Science.gov

Sample records for above-water radiometric measurements

  1. Polarization impacts on the water-leaving radiance retrieval from above-water radiometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Tristan; Gilerson, Alexander; Tonizzo, Alberto; Chowdhary, Jacek; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-12-10

    Above-water measurements of water-leaving radiance are widely used for water-quality monitoring and ocean-color satellite data validation. Reflected skylight in above-water radiometry needs to be accurately estimated prior to derivation of water-leaving radiance. Up-to-date methods to estimate reflection of diffuse skylight on rough sea surfaces are based on radiative transfer simulations and sky radiance measurements. But these methods neglect the polarization state of the incident skylight, which is generally highly polarized. In this paper, the effects of polarization on the sea surface reflectance and the subsequent water-leaving radiance estimation are investigated. We show that knowledge of the polarization field of the diffuse skylight significantly improves above-water radiometry estimates, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum where the reflected skylight is dominant. A newly developed algorithm based on radiative transfer simulations including polarization is described. Its application to the standard Aerosol Robotic Network-Ocean Color and hyperspectral radiometric measurements of the 1.5-year dataset acquired at the Long Island Sound site demonstrates the noticeable importance of considering polarization for water-leaving radiance estimation. In particular it is shown, based on time series of collocated data acquired in coastal waters, that the azimuth range of measurements leading to good-quality data is significantly increased, and that these estimates are improved by more than 12% at 413 nm. Full consideration of polarization effects is expected to significantly improve the quality of the field data utilized for satellite data validation or potential vicarious calibration purposes.

  2. Tower-Perturbation Measurements in Above-Water Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; DAlimonte, Davide; vanderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities which took place during June 2001 and June 2002 on the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea. The primary objective of these field campaigns was to quantify the effect of platform perturbations (principally reflections of sunlight onto the sea surface) on above-water measurements of water-leaving radiances. The deployment goals documented in this report were to: a) collect an extensive and simultaneous set of above- and in-water optical measurements under predominantly clear-sky conditions; b) establish the vertical properties of the water column using a variety of ancillary measurements, many of which were taken coincidently with the optical measurements; and c) determine the bulk properties of the environment using a diversity of atmospheric, biogeochemical, and meteorological techniques. A preliminary assessment of the data collected during the two field campaigns shows the perturbation in above-water radiometry caused by a large offshore structure is very similar to that caused by a large research vessel.

  3. PV Solar Radiometric Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Cannon, T.W.

    1997-02-01

    Radiometric measurements performed by the PV Solar Radiometric Measurements Task support NREL{close_quote}s centers for Measurements and Characterization, Performance Engineering and Reliability, and Renewable Energy Resources. The task provides characterization, measurements, testing, designs, and analysis of radiometric instrumentation and data for the performance of PV cells, modules, and systems. We describe recent characterization of the radiometric performance of pyranometers deployed for PV system testing at the NREL Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) and improvements undertaken in NREL broadband radiometer characterization. Typical measurement and calibration issues with diode array spectroradiometers used for absolute spectral measurements applied to PV performance and characterization are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Measurement of oceanic chlorophyll by LIDAR, MODIS, fluorometry and above-water radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampel, Milton; Lorenzzetti, João A.; Bentz, Cristina M.; Nunes, Raul A.; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Rudorff, Frederico M.; Politano, Alexandre T.

    2007-09-01

    Comparisons between in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll concentration (CHL) and ocean color remote sensing estimates were conducted during an oceanographic cruise in the Brazilian Southeastern continental shelf and slope in November 2004. In situ estimates were based on fluorometry, above-water radiometry and lidar fluorosensor. Three empirical algorithms were used to estimate chlorophyll a concentration from radiometric measurements: Ocean Chlorophyll 3 bands (OC3M), Ocean Chlorophyll 4 bands (OC4v4), and Ocean Chlorophyll 2 bands (OC2v4). The satellite estimates of chlorophyll a were derived from data collected by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a nominal 1.1 km resolution at nadir. Three algorithms were used to estimate chlorophyll concentrations from MODIS data: one empirical - OC3M, and two semi-analytical - Garver, Siegel, Maritorena version 01 (GSM01), and Carder. In this paper, LIDAR, MODIS and in situ above-water radiometry and fluorometry are briefly described and the estimated values of chlorophyll retrieved by these techniques are compared. Chlorophyll concentrations were fairly well estimated by all the methods. In general, the empirical algorithms applied to the satellite and in situ radiometric data showed a tendency for overestimating CHL. The semi-analytical GSM01 algorithm applied to MODIS data performed better than the Carder and the empirical OC3M algorithms.

  5. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Photovoltaic solar radiometric measurements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Cannon, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    We describe current activities in radiometric measurements by the Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) PV Module and System Performance and Engineering Project. Scientific and engineering understanding of incident solar irradiance is provided through radiometric instrumentation and/or measurement methods. Recently, deployed reference broadband radiometric and meteorological instrumentation and spectral instrumentation provide the project with best-practice routine and specialized radiometric data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Tower-Perturbation Measurements in Above-Water Radiometry. Volume 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; D'Alimonte, Davide; vanderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities which took place during June 2001 and June 2002 on the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea. The primary objective of these field campaigns was to quantify the effect of platform perturbations (principally reflections of sunlight onto the sea surface) on above-water measurements of water-leaving radiances. The deployment goals documented in this report were to: a) collect an extensive and simultaneous set of above- and in-water optical measurements under predominantly clear-sky conditions; b) establish the vertical properties of the water column using a variety of ancillary measurements, many of which were taken coincidently with the optical measurements; and c) determine the bulk properties of the environment using a diversity of atmospheric, biogeochemical, and meteorological techniques. A preliminary assessment of the data collected during the two field campaigns shows the perturbation in above-water radiometry caused by a large offshore structure is very similar to that caused by a large research vessel.

  8. Determination of biogeochemical properties of marine particles using above water measurements of the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David

    2007-07-01

    Retrieval of biogeochemical parameters from remotely sensed data in optically complex waters such as those found in coastal zones is a challenging task due to the effects of various water constituents (biogenic, nonalgal and inorganic particles, dissolved matter) on the radiation exiting the ocean. Since scattering by molecules, aerosols, hydrosols and reflection at the sea surface introduce and modify the polarization state of light, the polarized upward radiation contains embedded information about the intrinsic nature of aerosols and suspended matter in the ocean. In this study, shipborne above water angularly resolved visible/near infrared multiband measurements of the degree of polarization are analysed against their corresponding in-situ biogeochemically characterized water samples for the first time. Water samples and radiometric data were collected in the English Channel along an inshore-offshore transect. Angular variations in the degree of polarization P are found to be consistent with theory. Maximum values of P are observed near the Brewster viewing angle in the specular direction. Variations in the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle (PB) with water content revealed that the suspended particulate matter, which is mainly composed of inorganic particles during the experiment, contributes to depolarise the skylight reflection, thus reducing PB. An empirical polarization-based approach is proposed to determine biogeochemical properties of the particles. The concentration of inorganic particles can be estimated using PB to within ±13% based on the dataset used. Larger sets of polarized measurements are recommended to corroborate the tendency observed in this study.

  9. Reduction of skylight reflection effects in the above-water measurement of diffuse marine reflectance: comment.

    PubMed

    Krotkov, N A; Vasilkov, A P

    2000-03-20

    Use of a vertical polarizer has been suggested to reduce the effects of surface reflection in the above-water measurements of marine reflectance. We suggest using a similar technique for airborne or spaceborne sensors when atmospheric scattering adds its own polarization signature to the upwelling radiance. Our own theoretical sensitivity study supports the recommendation of Fougnie et al. [Appl. Opt. 38, 3844 (1999)] (40-50 degrees vertical angle and azimuth angle near 135 degrees, polarizer parallel to the viewing plane) for above-water measurements. However, the optimal viewing directions (and the optimal orientation of the polarizer) change with altitude above the sea surface, solar angle, and atmospheric vertical optical structure. A polarization efficiency function is introduced, which shows the maximal possible polarization discrimination of the background radiation for an arbitrary altitude above the sea surface, viewing direction, and solar angle. Our comment is meant to encourage broader application of airborne and spaceborne polarization sensors in remote sensing of water and sea surface properties. PMID:18338021

  10. Determination of biogeochemical properties of marine particles using above water measurements of the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David

    2007-07-23

    Retrieval of biogeochemical parameters from remotely sensed data in optically complex waters such as those found in coastal zones is a challenging task due to the effects of various water constituents (biogenic, nonalgal and inorganic particles, dissolved matter) on the radiation exiting the ocean. Since scattering by molecules, aerosols, hydrosols and reflection at the sea surface introduce and modify the polarization state of light, the polarized upward radiation contains embedded information about the intrinsic nature of aerosols and suspended matter in the ocean. In this study, shipborne above water angularly resolved visible/near infrared multiband measurements of the degree of polarization are analysed against their corresponding in-situ biogeochemically characterized water samples for the first time. Water samples and radiometric data were collected in the English Channel along an inshore-offshore transect. Angular variations in the degree of polarization P are found to be consistent with theory. Maximum values of P are observed near the Brewster viewing angle in the specular direction. Variations in the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle (P(B)) with water content revealed that the suspended particulate matter, which is mainly composed of inorganic particles during the experiment, contributes to depolarise the skylight reflection, thus reducing P(B). An empirical polarization-based approach is proposed to determine biogeochemical properties of the particles. The concentration of inorganic particles can be estimated using P(B) to within +/-13% based on the dataset used. Larger sets of polarized measurements are recommended to corroborate the tendency observed in this study.

  11. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  12. Radiometric Measurements and Data for Evaluating Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A.; Rymes, M.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Treadwell, J.

    2000-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltiac Radiometric Measurements Task ddresses the impact of solar and optical radiation on photovoltaic (PV) devices. The task maintains spectral and broadband calibration capability directly traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  13. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    PubMed

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation.

  14. Simultaneous Measurements of Chlorophyll Concentration by Lidar, Fluorometry, above-Water Radiometry, and Ocean Color MODIS Images in the Southwestern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Kampel, Milton; Lorenzzetti, João A; Bentz, Cristina M; Nunes, Raul A; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Rudorff, Frederico M; Politano, Alexandre T

    2009-01-01

    Comparisons between in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll-a concentration (CHL) and ocean color remote sensing estimates were conducted during an oceanographic cruise on the Brazilian Southeastern continental shelf and slope, Southwestern South Atlantic. In situ values were based on fluorometry, above-water radiometry and lidar fluorosensor. Three empirical algorithms were used to estimate CHL from radiometric measurements: Ocean Chlorophyll 3 bands (OC3M(RAD)), Ocean Chlorophyll 4 bands (OC4v4(RAD)), and Ocean Chlorophyll 2 bands (OC2v4(RAD)). The satellite estimates of CHL were derived from data collected by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a nominal 1.1 km resolution at nadir. Three algorithms were used to estimate chlorophyll concentrations from MODIS data: one empirical - OC3M(SAT), and two semi-analytical - Garver, Siegel, Maritorena version 01 (GSM01(SAT)), and Carder(SAT). In the present work, MODIS, lidar and in situ above-water radiometry and fluorometry are briefly described and the estimated values of chlorophyll retrieved by these techniques are compared. The chlorophyll concentration in the study area was in the range 0.01 to 0.2 mg/m(3). In general, the empirical algorithms applied to the in situ radiometric and satellite data showed a tendency to overestimate CHL with a mean difference between estimated and measured values of as much as 0.17 mg/m(3) (OC2v4(RAD)). The semi-analytical GSM01 algorithm applied to MODIS data performed better (rmse 0.28, rmse-L 0.08, mean diff. -0.01 mg/m(3)) than the Carder and the empirical OC3M algorithms (rmse 1.14 and 0.36, rmse-L 0.34 and 0.11, mean diff. 0.17 and 0.02 mg/m(3), respectively). We find that rmsd values between MODIS relative to the in situ radiometric measurements are < 26%, i.e., there is a trend towards overestimation of R(RS) by MODIS for the stations considered in this work. Other authors have already reported over and under estimation of MODIS remotely sensed

  15. Simultaneous Measurements of Chlorophyll Concentration by Lidar, Fluorometry, above-Water Radiometry, and Ocean Color MODIS Images in the Southwestern Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Kampel, Milton; Lorenzzetti, João A.; Bentz, Cristina M.; Nunes, Raul A.; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Rudorff, Frederico M.; Politano, Alexandre T.

    2009-01-01

    Comparisons between in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll-a concentration (CHL) and ocean color remote sensing estimates were conducted during an oceanographic cruise on the Brazilian Southeastern continental shelf and slope, Southwestern South Atlantic. In situ values were based on fluorometry, above-water radiometry and lidar fluorosensor. Three empirical algorithms were used to estimate CHL from radiometric measurements: Ocean Chlorophyll 3 bands (OC3MRAD), Ocean Chlorophyll 4 bands (OC4v4RAD), and Ocean Chlorophyll 2 bands (OC2v4RAD). The satellite estimates of CHL were derived from data collected by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a nominal 1.1 km resolution at nadir. Three algorithms were used to estimate chlorophyll concentrations from MODIS data: one empirical - OC3MSAT, and two semi-analytical - Garver, Siegel, Maritorena version 01 (GSM01SAT), and CarderSAT. In the present work, MODIS, lidar and in situ above-water radiometry and fluorometry are briefly described and the estimated values of chlorophyll retrieved by these techniques are compared. The chlorophyll concentration in the study area was in the range 0.01 to 0.2 mg/m3. In general, the empirical algorithms applied to the in situ radiometric and satellite data showed a tendency to overestimate CHL with a mean difference between estimated and measured values of as much as 0.17 mg/m3 (OC2v4RAD). The semi-analytical GSM01 algorithm applied to MODIS data performed better (rmse 0.28, rmse-L 0.08, mean diff. -0.01 mg/m3) than the Carder and the empirical OC3M algorithms (rmse 1.14 and 0.36, rmse-L 0.34 and 0.11, mean diff. 0.17 and 0.02 mg/m3, respectively). We find that rmsd values between MODIS relative to the in situ radiometric measurements are < 26%, i.e., there is a trend towards overestimation of RRS by MODIS for the stations considered in this work. Other authors have already reported over and under estimation of MODIS remotely sensed reflectance due to

  16. Azimuthal radiometric temperature measurements of wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of azimuthal view angle on the radiometric temperature of wheat canopies at various stages of development are investigated. Measurements of plant height, total leaf area index, green leaf area index and Feeks growth stage together with infrared radiometric temperature measurements at 12 azimuth intervals with respect to solar azimuth and at different solar zenith angles were obtained for four wheat canopies at various heights. Results reveal a difference on the order of 2 C between the temperatures measured at azimuths of 0 and 180 deg under calm wind conditions, which is attributed to the time-dependent transfer of heat between canopy component surfaces. The azimuthal dependence must thus be taken into account in the determination of radiometric temperatures.

  17. The Candela and Photometric and Radiometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Albert C.

    2001-01-01

    The national measurement system for photometric and radiometric quantities is presently based upon techniques that make these quantities traceable to a high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer. The redefinition of the candela in 1979 provided the opportunity for national measurement laboratories to base their photometric measurements on optical detector technology rather than on the emission from high-temperature blackbody optical sources. The ensuing technical developments of the past 20 years, including the significant improvements in cryogenic radiometer performance, have provided the opportunity to place the fundamental maintenance of photometric quantities upon absolute detector based technology as was allowed by the 1979 redefinition. Additionally, the development of improved photodetectors has had a significant impact on the methodology in most of the radiometric measurement areas. This paper will review the status of the NIST implementation of the technical changes mandated by the 1979 redefinition of the candela and its effect upon the maintenance and dissemination of optical radiation measurements. PMID:27500020

  18. Comparison of remote sensing reflectance from above-water and in-water measurements west of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait, and west of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-07-01

    The need to obtain ocean color essential climate variables (OC-ECVs) using hyperspectral technology has gained increased interest in recent years. Assessing ocean color on a large scale in high latitude environments using satellite remote sensing is constrained by polar environmental conditions. Nevertheless, on a small scale we can assess ocean color using above-water and in-water remote sensing. Unfortunately, above-water remote sensing can only determine apparent optical properties leaving the sea surface and is susceptible to near surface environmental conditions for example sky and sunglint. Consequently, we have to rely on accurate in-water remote sensing as it can provide both synoptic inherent and apparent optical properties of seawater. We use normalized water leaving radiance LWN or the equivalent remote sensing reflectance RRS from 27 stations to compare the differences in above-water and in-water OC-ECVs. Analysis of above-water and in-water RRS spectra provided very good match-ups (R2 > 0.97, MSE < 1.8*10(-7)) for all stations. The unbiased percent differences (UPD) between above-water and in-water approaches were determined at common OC-ECVs spectral bands (410, 440, 490, 510 and 555) nm and the classic band ratio (490/555) nm. The spectral average UPD ranged (5 - 110) % and band ratio UPD ranged (0 - 12) %, the latter showing that the 5% uncertainty threshold for ocean color radiometric products is attainable. UPD analysis of these stations West of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait and West of Iceland also suggests that the differences observed are likely a result of environmental and instrumental perturbations.

  19. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  20. The Joint African Radiometric Propagation Measurement Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbesser-Rastburg, B.; Zaks, C.; Rogers, D. V.; McCarthy, D. K.; Allnutt, J. E.

    1990-06-01

    This paper summarizes the principal aspects of a major cooperative radiowave propagation experiment that was designed to collect data for improving rain attenuation prediction models for tropical Africa. A pressing need for such data had previously been identified by Resolution 79 of the CCIR. In a unique joint arrangement with three African governments, Intelsat, Comsat, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the U.S. Telecommunications Training Institute (USTTI) collaborated in setting up a Ku-band radiometric measurement campaign in Cameroon, Kenya and Nigeria. A brief historical overview is given, together with the major technical parameters of the sites and the equipment installed there. The anticipated characteristics of the three locations are outlined with regard to meteorological and propagation conditions, and some preliminary indications of the results are presented based on an inspection of the early event data.

  1. Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: a) To determine the magnitude of radiometric tarp BRDF; b) To determine whether an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer can be used to perform the experiment. Radiometric tarps with nominal reflectance values of 52%, 35%, and 3.5%, deployed for IKONOS. QuickBird, and OrbView-3 overpasses Ground-based spectroradiometric measurements of tarp and Spectralon@ panel taken during overpass using ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer, and tarp reflectance calculated. Reflectance data used in atmospheric radiative transfer model (MODTRAN) to predict satellite at-sensor radiance for radiometric calibration. Reflectance data also used to validate atmospheric correction of high-spatial-resolution multispectral image products

  2. Development of a Model to Correct Multi-View Angle above Water Measurements for the Analysis of the Bidirectional Reflectance of Coral and Other Reef Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I.; Forster, B. C.; Laffan, S. W.

    2012-07-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of substrates in a coral reef environment are often measured in the field by viewing a substrate at nadir. However, viewing a substrate from multiple angles would likely result in different spectral characteristics for most coral reef substrates and provide valuable information on structural properties. To understand the relationship between the morphology of a substrate and its spectral response it is necessary to correct the observed above-water radiance for the effects of atmosphere and water attenuation, at a number of view and azimuth angles. In this way the actual surface reflectance can be determined. This research examines the air-water surface interaction for two hypothetical atmospheric conditions (clear Rayleigh scattering and totally cloudcovered) and the global irradiance reaching the benthic surface. It accounts for both water scattering and absorption, with simplifications for shallow water conditions, as well as the additive effect of background reflectance being reflected at the water-air surface at angles greater than the critical refraction angle (~48°). A model was developed to correct measured above-water radiance along the refracted view angle for its decrease due to path attenuation and the "n squared law of radiance" and the additive surface reflectance. This allows bidirectional benthic surface reflectance and nadir-normalised reflectance to be determined. These theoretical models were adapted to incorporate above-water measures relative to a standard, diffuse, white reference panel. The derived spectral signatures of a number of coral and non-coral benthic surfaces compared well with other published results, and the signatures and nadir normalised reflectance of the corals and other benthic surface classes indicate good class separation.

  3. Radiometric correction of scatterometric wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Use of a spaceborne scatterometer to determine the ocean-surface wind vector requires accurate measurement of radar backscatter from ocean. Such measurements are hindered by the effect of attenuation in the precipitating regions over sea. The attenuation can be estimated reasonably well with the knowledge of brightness temperatures observed by a microwave radiometer. The NASA SeaWinds scatterometer is to be flown on the Japanese ADEOS2. The AMSR multi-frequency radiometer on ADEOS2 will be used to correct errors due to attenuation in the SeaWinds scatterometer measurements. Here we investigate the errors in the attenuation corrections. Errors would be quite small if the radiometer and scatterometer footprints were identical and filled with uniform rain. However, the footprints are not identical, and because of their size one cannot expect uniform rain across each cell. Simulations were performed with the SeaWinds scatterometer (13.4 GHz) and AMSR (18.7 GHz) footprints with gradients of attenuation. The study shows that the resulting wind speed errors after correction (using the radiometer) are small for most cases. However, variations in the degree of overlap between the radiometer and scatterometer footprints affect the accuracy of the wind speed measurements.

  4. High speed radiometric measurements of IED detonation fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spidell, Matthew T.; Gordon, J. Motos; Pitz, Jeremey; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-04-01

    Continuum emission is predominant in fireball spectral phenomena and in some demonstrated cases, fine detail in the temporal evolution of infrared spectral emissions can be used to estimate size and chemical composition of the device. Recent work indicates that a few narrow radiometric bands may reveal forensic information needed for the explosive discrimination and classification problem, representing an essential step in moving from "laboratory" measurements to a rugged, fieldable system. To explore phenomena not observable in previous experiments, a high speed (10μs resolution) radiometer with four channels spanning the infrared spectrum observed the detonation of nine home made explosive (HME) devices in the < 100lb class. Radiometric measurements indicate that the detonation fireball is well approximated as a single temperature blackbody at early time (0 < t <~ 3ms). The effective radius obtained from absolute intensity indicates fireball growth at supersonic velocity during this time. Peak fireball temperatures during this initial detonation range between 3000.3500K. The initial temperature decay with time (t <~ 10ms) can be described by a simple phenomenological model based on radiative cooling. After this rapid decay, temperature exhibits a small, steady increase with time (10 <~ t <~ 50ms) and peaking somewhere between 1000.1500K-likely the result of post-detonation combustion-before subsequent cooling back to ambient conditions . Radius derived from radiometric measurements can be described well (R2 > 0.98) using blast model functional forms, suggesting that energy release could be estimated from single-pixel radiometric detectors. Comparison of radiometer-derived fireball size with FLIR infrared imagery indicate the Planckian intensity size estimates are about a factor of two smaller than the physical extent of the fireball.

  5. Measured and modeled radiometric quantities in coastal waters: toward a closure.

    PubMed

    Bulgarelli, Barbara; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-François

    2003-09-20

    Accurate radiative transfer modeling in the coupled atmosphere-sea system is increasing in importance for the development of advanced remote-sensing applications. Aiming to quantify the uncertainties in the modeling of coastal water radiometric quantities, we performed a closure experiment to intercompare theoretical and experimental data as a function of wavelength lambda and water depth z. Specifically, the study focused on above-water downward irradiance E(d)(lambda, 0+) and in-water spectral profiles of upward nadir radiance L(u)(lambda, z), upward irradiance E(u)(lambda, z), downward irradiance E(d)(lambda, z), the E(u)(lambda, z)/L(u)(lambda, z) ratio (the nadir Q factor), and the E(u)(lambda, z)/E(d)(lambda, z) ratio (the irradiance reflectance). The theoretical data were produced with the finite-element method radiative transfer code ingesting in situ atmospheric and marine inherent optical properties. The experimental data were taken from a comprehensive coastal shallow-water data set collected in the northern Adriatic Sea. Under various measurement conditions, differences between theoretical and experimental data for the above-water E(d)(lambda, 0+) and subsurface E(d)(lambda, 0-) as well as for the in-water profiles of the nadir Q factor were generally less than 15%. In contrast, the in-water profiles of L(u)(lambda, z), E(d)(lambda, z), E(u)(lambda, z) and of the irradiance reflectance exhibited larger differences [to approximately 60% for L(u)(lambda, z) and E(u)(lambda, z), 30% for E(d)(lambda, z), and 50% for the irradiance reflectance]. These differences showed a high sensitivity to experimental uncertainties in a few input quantities used for the simulations: the seawater absorption coefficient; the hydrosol phase function backscattering probability; and, mainly for clear water, the bottom reflectance. PMID:14526823

  6. IRCM spectral signature measurements instrumentation featuring enhanced radiometric accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantagne, Stéphane; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Roy, Claude; Willers, Cornelius J.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) signature measurements are performed in military applications including aircraft- and -naval vessel stealth characterization, detection/lock-on ranges, and flares efficiency characterization. Numerous military applications require high precision measurement of infrared signature characterization. For instance, Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems and Infrared Counter-Countermeasure (IRCCM) system are continuously evolving. Infrared flares defeated IR guided seekers, IR flares became defeated by intelligent IR guided seekers and Jammers defeated the intelligent IR guided seekers [7]. A precise knowledge of the target infrared signature phenomenology is crucial for the development and improvement of countermeasure and counter-countermeasure systems and so precise quantification of the infrared energy emitted from the targets requires accurate spectral signature measurements. Errors in infrared characterization measurements can lead to weakness in the safety of the countermeasure system and errors in the determination of detection/lock-on range of an aircraft. The infrared signatures are analyzed, modeled, and simulated to provide a good understanding of the signature phenomenology to improve the IRCM and IRCCM technologies efficiency [7,8,9]. There is a growing need for infrared spectral signature measurement technology in order to further improve and validate infrared-based models and simulations. The addition of imagery to Spectroradiometers is improving the measurement capability of complex targets and scenes because all elements in the scene can now be measured simultaneously. However, the limited dynamic range of the Focal Plane Array (FPA) sensors used in these instruments confines the ranges of measurable radiance intensities. This ultimately affects the radiometric accuracy of these complex signatures. We will describe and demonstrate how the ABB hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer features enhanced the radiometric accuracy

  7. Radiometric measurement of differential metabolism of fatty acid by mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, E.E.; Kertcher, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Tepper, B.S.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    An assay system has been developed based on automated radiometric quantification of /sup 14/CO2 produced through oxidation of (1-/sup 14/C) fatty acids by mycobacteria. Two stains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv and Erdman) and one of M. bovis (BCG) in 7H9 medium (ADC) with 1.0 microCi of one of the fatty acids (butyric, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic) were studied. Results previously published on M. lepraemurium (Hawaiian) were also included for comparison. Both strains of M. tuberculosis had maximum /sup 14/CO2 production from hexanoic acid. Oxidation of butyric and avid oxidation of lauric acids were also found with the H37Rv strain but not with Erdman. In contrast, /sup 14/CO2 production by M. bovis was greatest from lauric and somewhat less from decanoic acid. M. lepraemurium showed increasing oxidation rates from myristic, decanoic and lauric acids. Assimilation studies of M. tuberculosis H37Rv confirmed that most of the oxidized substrates were converted into by-products with no change in those from which no oxidation was found. These data suggest that the radiometric measurement of differential fatty acid metabolism may provide a basis of strain identification of the genus Mycobacterium.

  8. Radiometric Calibrations, Measurements, and Standards Development at NREL: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Gotseff, P.; Kay, B.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Radiometric calibrations, measurements, and standards development at NREL. We describe proposed revisions to current reference standard spectral distributions used to evaluate photovoltaic device performance and durability of materials. Improvements in broadband outdoor radiometer calibrations reduce uncertainties in broadband radiometer calibrations. We report a method to quantify the rate of change of broadband radiometer responsivities as a function of integrated exposure to irradiance and thermal energy. The results of applying a vector of calibration factors or responsivities to field data to remove zenith-angle dependent errors in global solar radiation measurements are shown. We report on the relative sensitivity of radiometers to daily versus biweekly cleaning.

  9. Formulation of radiometric feasibility measures for feature selection and planning in visual servoing.

    PubMed

    Janabi-Sharifi, Farrokh; Ficocelli, M

    2004-04-01

    Feature selection and planning are integral parts of visual servoing systems. Because many irrelevant and nonreliable image features usually exist, higher accuracy and robustness can be expected by selecting and planning good features. Assumption of perfect radiometric conditions is common in visual servoing. The following paper discusses the issue of radiometric constraints for feature selection in the context of visual servoing. Here, radiometric constraints are presented and measures are formulated to select the optimal features (in a radiometric sense) from a set of candidate features. Simulation and experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed measures.

  10. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  11. Phoretic and Radiometric Force Measurements on Microparticles in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. James

    1996-01-01

    Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and radiometric forces on microparticles are being measured over a wide range of gas phase and particle conditions using electrodynamic levitation of single particles to simulate microgravity conditions. The thermophoretic force, which arises when a particle exists in a gas having a temperature gradient, is measured by levitating an electrically charged particle between heated and cooled plates mounted in a vacuum chamber. The diffusiophoretic force arising from a concentration gradient in the gas phase is measured in a similar manner except that the heat exchangers are coated with liquids to establish a vapor concentration gradient. These phoretic forces and the radiation pressure force acting on a particle are measured directly in terms of the change in the dc field required to levitate the particle with and without the force applied. The apparatus developed for the research and the experimental techniques are discussed, and results obtained by thermophoresis experiments are presented. The determination of the momentum and energy accommodation coefficients associated with molecular collisions between gases molecules and particles and the measurement of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and small particles are of particular interest.

  12. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  13. The OLI Radiometric Scale Realization Round Robin Measurement Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutlip, Hansford; Cole,Jerold; Johnson, B. Carol; Maxwell, Stephen; Markham, Brian; Ong, Lawrence; Hom, Milton; Biggar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A round robin radiometric scale realization was performed at the Ball Aerospace Radiometric Calibration Laboratory in January/February 2011 in support of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Program. Participants included Ball Aerospace, NIST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and the University of Arizona. The eight day campaign included multiple observations of three integrating sphere sources by nine radiometers. The objective of the campaign was to validate the radiance calibration uncertainty ascribed to the integrating sphere used to calibrate the OLI instrument. The instrument level calibration source uncertainty was validated by quatnifying: (1) the long term stability of the NIST calibrated radiance artifact, (2) the responsivity scale of the Ball Aerospace transfer radiometer and (3) the operational characteristics of the large integrating sphere.

  14. Investigation of Pre- and Post-Flight Radiometric Calibration Uncertainties from Surface Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.F.; Wei, Z.Y.; Ahman, Z.

    1997-06-01

    A new technique has been developed for inferring column ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths from zenith sky observations. A new radiometric calibration technique for large aperture remote sensing instruments observing the earth through space has been validated which subsequently increased the accuracy of remote sensing measurements of ozone and vertical profiles using measurements of back-scattered ultraviolet solar radiation.

  15. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  16. Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.; Andreas, A.; Konings, J.

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays that form large solar deployments relies on accurate measurements of the available solar resource. Therefore, determining the accuracy of these solar radiation measurements provides a better understanding of investment risks. This paper provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements by radiometers using methods that follow the International Bureau of Weights and Measures Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM). Standardized analysis based on these procedures ensures that the uncertainty quoted is well documented.

  17. New Concepts for Radiometric Measurements of Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2013-05-01

    There is a long history of using radioisotopes to study a variety of environmental processes. The recent release of radioisotopes from the nuclear power facilities in Fukushima, Japan, prompted a review at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of the current measurement practices applied to the measurement of actinides and radioactive fission products in the environment. The objective of this review is to identify gaps in measurement capability that might be addressed through research and development. The scope is limited to man-made radioisotopes in the environment related to nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The focus rests on actinides and fission products. This report presents the preliminary findings of the review.

  18. Alfalfa canopy resistance from lysimetric and radiometric measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widely used Penman-Monteith (PM) equation to find the value of evapotranspiration (ET) contains a value for the canopy resistance (rc, s m-1) that, unlike the other equation parameters, cannot be measured directly. Different values for rc have been suggested but none have been directly nor exper...

  19. Water Vapor Profiling From CoSSIR Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chang, L. A.; Monosmith, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Previous millimeter-wave radiometry for water vapor profiling, by either airborne or satellite sensors, has been limited to frequencies less than or equal to 183 GHz. The retrievals are generally limited to an altitude range of 0-10 km. The additional measurements at the frequencies of 380.2 plus or minus 0.8, 380.2 plus or minus 1.8, 380.2 plus or minus 3.3, and 380.2 plus or minus 6.2 GHz provided by the new airborne Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) can extend this profiling capability up to an altitude of about 15 km. Furthermore, the retrievals can be performed over both land and water surfaces in the tropics without much difficulty. These properties are demonstrated by recent CoSSIR measurements on board the NASA WB-57 aircraft during CR-AVE in January 2006. Retrievals of water vapor mixing ratio were performed at eight altitude levels of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 km from CoSSIR data sets acquired at observational angles of 0 and 53.4 degrees, and the results were compared with other available measurements from the same aircraft and near-concurrent satellites. A comparison of the variations of mixing ratios retrieved from CoSSIR and those derived from the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) in the aircraft vicinity, along the path of the transit flight on January 14, 2006, appears to show some connection, although the measurements were referring to different altitudes. A very good agreement was found between the collocated values of total precipitable water derived from the CoSSIR-retrieved water vapor profiles and those estimated from TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager)

  20. Geometric, Kinematic and Radiometric Aspects of Image-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses theoretical foundations of quantitative image-based measurements for extracting and reconstructing geometric, kinematic and dynamic properties of observed objects. New results are obtained by using a combination of methods in perspective geometry, differential geometry. radiometry, kinematics and dynamics. Specific topics include perspective projection transformation. perspective developable conical surface, perspective projection under surface constraint, perspective invariants, the point correspondence problem. motion fields of curves and surfaces. and motion equations of image intensity. The methods given in this paper arc useful for determining morphology and motion fields of deformable bodies such as elastic bodies. viscoelastic mediums and fluids.

  1. Stray light effects in above-water remote-sensing reflectance from hyperspectral radiometers.

    PubMed

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Ansko, Ilmar; Banks, Andrew Clive; Kuusk, Joel

    2016-05-20

    Stray light perturbations are unwanted distortions of the measured spectrum due to the nonideal performance of optical radiometers. Because of this, stray light characterization and correction is essential when accurate radiometric measurements are a necessity. In agreement with such a need, this study focused on stray light correction of hyperspectral radiometers widely applied for above-water measurements to determine the remote-sensing reflectance (RRS). Stray light of sample radiometers was experimentally characterized and a correction algorithm was developed and applied to field measurements performed in the Mediterranean Sea. Results indicate that mean stray light corrections are appreciable, with values generally varying from -1% to +1% in the 400-700 nm spectral region for downward irradiance and sky radiance, and from -1% to +4% for total radiance from the sea. Mean corrections for data products such as RRS exhibit values that depend on water type varying between -0.5% and +1% in the blue-green spectral region, with peaks up to 9% in the red in eutrophic waters. The possibility of using one common stray light correction matrix for the analyzed class of radiometers was also investigated. Results centered on RRS support such a feasibility at the expense of an increment of the uncertainty typically well below 0.5% in the blue-green and up to 1% in the red, assuming sensors are based on spectrographs from the same production batch.

  2. Stray light effects in above-water remote-sensing reflectance from hyperspectral radiometers.

    PubMed

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Ansko, Ilmar; Banks, Andrew Clive; Kuusk, Joel

    2016-05-20

    Stray light perturbations are unwanted distortions of the measured spectrum due to the nonideal performance of optical radiometers. Because of this, stray light characterization and correction is essential when accurate radiometric measurements are a necessity. In agreement with such a need, this study focused on stray light correction of hyperspectral radiometers widely applied for above-water measurements to determine the remote-sensing reflectance (RRS). Stray light of sample radiometers was experimentally characterized and a correction algorithm was developed and applied to field measurements performed in the Mediterranean Sea. Results indicate that mean stray light corrections are appreciable, with values generally varying from -1% to +1% in the 400-700 nm spectral region for downward irradiance and sky radiance, and from -1% to +4% for total radiance from the sea. Mean corrections for data products such as RRS exhibit values that depend on water type varying between -0.5% and +1% in the blue-green spectral region, with peaks up to 9% in the red in eutrophic waters. The possibility of using one common stray light correction matrix for the analyzed class of radiometers was also investigated. Results centered on RRS support such a feasibility at the expense of an increment of the uncertainty typically well below 0.5% in the blue-green and up to 1% in the red, assuming sensors are based on spectrographs from the same production batch. PMID:27411122

  3. Retrieval of atmospheric properties with radiometric measurements using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Rohit; Maitra, Animesh

    2016-11-01

    Microwave radiometer is an effective instrument to monitor the atmosphere continuously in different weather conditions. It measures brightness temperatures at different frequency bands which are subjected to standard retrieval methods to obtain real time profiles of various atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity. But the retrieval techniques used by radiometer have to be adaptive to changing weather condition and location. In the present study, three retrieval techniques have been used to obtain the temperature and relative humidity profiles from brightness temperatures, namely; piecewise linear regression, feed forward neural network and neural back propagation network. The simulated results are compared with radiosonde observations using correlation analysis and error distribution. The analysis reveals that neural network with back propagation is the most accurate technique amongst the three retrieval methods utilized in this study.

  4. Microwave radiometric measurements of soil moisture in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Pampaloni, P.; Santi, E.; Tedesco, M.

    Within the framework of the MAP and RAPHAEL projects, airborne experimental campaigns were carried out by the IFAC group in 1999 and 2000, using a multifrequency microwave radiometer at L, C and X bands (1.4, 6.8 and 10 GHz). The aim of the experiments was to collect soil moisture and vegetation biomass information on agricultural areas to give reliable inputs to the hydrological models. It is well known that microwave emission from soil, mainly at L-band (1.4 GHz), is very well correlated to its moisture content. Two experimental areas in Italy were selected for this project: one was the Toce Valley, Domodossola, in 1999, and the other, the agricultural area of Cerbaia, close to Florence, where flights were performed in 2000. Measurements were carried out on bare soils, corn and wheat fields in different growth stages and on meadows. Ground data of soil moisture (SMC) were collected by other research teams involved in the experiments. From the analysis of the data sets, it has been confirmed that L-band is well related to the SMC of a rather deep soil layer, whereas C-band is sensitive to the surface SMC and is more affected by the presence of surface roughness and vegetation, especially at high incidence angles. An algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, based on the sensitivity to moisture of the brightness temperature at C-band, has been tested using the collected data set. The results of the algorithm, which is able to correct for the effect of vegetation by means of the polarisation index at X-band, have been compared with soil moisture data measured on the ground. Finally, the sensitivity of emission at different frequencies to the soil moisture profile was investigated. Experimental data sets were interpreted by using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) and the outputs of the model were used to train an artificial neural network to reproduce the soil moisture content at different depths.

  5. Fundamentals of gamma-ray measurements and radiometric analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hochel, R.C.

    1990-12-31

    There are four primary modes of radioactive decay. All can be measured using various types of detectors and are the basis of many analytical techniques and much of what we know about the nucleus and its structure. Alpha particle emission occurs mostly in heavy nuclei of atomic number, Z, greater than 82 like Po, Ra, Th, and U, etc. Beta particles are simply electrons. They are emitted from the nucleus with a distribution of energies ranging from 0--3 MeV. Gamma-rays are photons with energies ranging from a few keV to 10 MeV or more. They usually follow alpha or beta decay, and depending on their energy, can have considerable range in matter. Neutrons are emitted in fission processes and also from a few of the highly excited fission product nuclei. Fission neutrons typically have energies of 1--2 MeV. Like gamma-rays, they have long ranges. The energies involved in nuclear decay processes are much higher than anything encountered in, say, chemical reactions. They are at the very top of the electromagnetic spectrum -- about a million times more energetic than visible light. As a result, these particles always produce ionization, either directly or indirectly, as they pass through matter. It is this ionization which is the basis of all radiation detectors.

  6. Fundamentals of gamma-ray measurements and radiometric analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hochel, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    There are four primary modes of radioactive decay. All can be measured using various types of detectors and are the basis of many analytical techniques and much of what we know about the nucleus and its structure. Alpha particle emission occurs mostly in heavy nuclei of atomic number, Z, greater than 82 like Po, Ra, Th, and U, etc. Beta particles are simply electrons. They are emitted from the nucleus with a distribution of energies ranging from 0--3 MeV. Gamma-rays are photons with energies ranging from a few keV to 10 MeV or more. They usually follow alpha or beta decay, and depending on their energy, can have considerable range in matter. Neutrons are emitted in fission processes and also from a few of the highly excited fission product nuclei. Fission neutrons typically have energies of 1--2 MeV. Like gamma-rays, they have long ranges. The energies involved in nuclear decay processes are much higher than anything encountered in, say, chemical reactions. They are at the very top of the electromagnetic spectrum -- about a million times more energetic than visible light. As a result, these particles always produce ionization, either directly or indirectly, as they pass through matter. It is this ionization which is the basis of all radiation detectors.

  7. A Kalman Approach to Lunar Surface Navigation using Radiometric and Inertial Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Welch, Bryan W.; Sands, O. Scott; Nguyen, Binh V.

    2009-01-01

    Future lunar missions supporting the NASA Vision for Space Exploration will rely on a surface navigation system to determine astronaut position, guide exploration, and return safely to the lunar habitat. In this report, we investigate one potential architecture for surface navigation, using an extended Kalman filter to integrate radiometric and inertial measurements. We present a possible infrastructure to support this technique, and we examine an approach to simulating navigational accuracy based on several different system configurations. The results show that position error can be reduced to 1 m after 5 min of processing, given two satellites, one surface communication terminal, and knowledge of the starting position to within 100 m.

  8. NASA Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the characterization of radiometric data by NASA. The objective was to perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of imagery and compare with vendor-provided calibration coefficients. The approach was to use multiple, well-characterized sites. These sites are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and space borne sensors. Using the data from these sites, the investigators performed independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  9. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center site was used for an experiment in which soil moisture remote sensing over bare, grass, and alfalfa fields was conducted over a three-month period using 0.6 GHz, 1.4 GHz, and 10.6 GHz Dicke-type microwave radiometers mounted on mobile towers. Ground truth soil moisture content and ambient air and sil temperatures were obtained concurrently with the radiometric measurements. Biomass of the vegetation cover was sampled about once a week. Soil density for each of the three fields was measured several times during the course of the experiment. Results of the radiometric masurements confirm the frequency dependence of moisture sensing sensitivity reduction reported earlier. Observations over the bare, wet field show that the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest of 0.6 GHz frequency, a result contrary to expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil water mixtures and current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  10. Preliminary results of radiometric measurements of clear air and cloud brightness (antenna) temperatures at 37GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, A. K.; Hambaryan, A. K.; Arakelyan, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the results of polarization measurements of clear air and clouds brightness temperatures at 37GHz are presented. The results were obtained during the measurements carried out in Armenia from the measuring complex built under the framework of ISTC Projects A-872 and A-1524. The measurements were carried out at vertical and horizontal polarizations, under various angles of sensing by Ka-band combined scatterometric-radiometric system (ArtAr-37) developed and built by ECOSERV Remote Observation Centre Co.Ltd. under the framework of the above Projects. In the paper structural and operational features of the utilized system and the whole measuring complex will be considered and discussed as well.

  11. Comparison of the luminescent ADP-Glo assay to a standard radiometric assay for measurement of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Li, Rick; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Many assay technologies have been developed and utilized to efficiently assay and screen against protein kinase targets. The radiometric assay format for assaying the protein kinase targets has been considered the "Gold Standard" format since it allows the direct readout of kinase functional activity and is a universal assay that is highly sensitive. However, the hazardous nature of the radiometric assay together with the regulatory hurdles has led to the development of alternative assay formats for assessing protein kinase activity measurements. The luminescent ADP-Glo assay has been developed as an alternative to radiometric format for assaying protein kinase targets. This assay allows the measurement of the ADP product formed during the kinase reaction. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is similar to the radiometric format in that it measures the direct product of the protein kinase reaction. Furthermore, since the ADP product is generated by all protein kinase reactions, this is a universal format that can be used for assaying any given protein kinase target. Analysis of data generated with multiple protein kinase targets and the luminescent ADP-Glo technology shows comparable results to the radiometric assay format. Therefore, the luminescent ADP-Glo assay is a robust new technology for evaluating catalytic function of protein kinases as well as other ATPases.

  12. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  13. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Frisbee, Troy; Zanoni, Vicki; Blonski, Slawek; Daehler, Erik; Grant, Brennan; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Smith, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program: Perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of IKQNOS imagery and compare with Space Imaging calibration coefficients The approach taken: utilize multiple well-characterized sites which are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and spaceborne sensors; and to Perform independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  14. Retrievals of Column Water Vapor Using Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.; Triesky, M. E.; Manning, W.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric constituents that has a critical impact on cloud formation (ice or liquid). It is also a source that needs to be accounted for in remote measurements of surface parameters. In the high-latitude regions, e.g., Antarctica, monitoring of the state of water vapor and its transport into and out of these regions is important towards our understanding the state of balance of ice sheets and its effect on the global sea level. The technique of retrieving low amount of column water vapor using the millimeter-wave radiometric measurements, as presented in this paper, will be very useful for these regions, especially during winter times when the atmosphere is relatively dry.

  15. Uncertainty Analysis for Broadband Solar Radiometric Instrumentation Calibrations and Measurements: An Update; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Reda, I. M.; Wilcox, S. M.; Stoffel, T. L.

    2004-04-01

    The measurement of broadband solar radiation has grown in importance since the advent of solar renewable energy technologies in the 1970's, and the concern about the Earth's radiation balance related to climate change in the 1990's. In parallel, standardized methods of uncertainty analysis and reporting have been developed. Historical and updated uncertainties are based on the current international standardized uncertainty analysis method. Despite the fact that new and sometimes overlooked sources of uncertainty have been identified over the period 1988 to 2004, uncertainty in broadband solar radiometric instrumentation remains at 3% to 5% for pyranometers, and 2% to 3% for pyrheliometers. Improvements in characterizing correction functions for radiometer data may reduce total uncertainty. We analyze the theoretical standardized uncertainty sensitivity coefficients for the instrumentation calibration measurement equation and highlight the single parameter (thermal offset voltages), which contributes the most to the observed calibration responsivities.

  16. Infrared radiometric measurements of lunar disk temperatures during lunar eclipse on 15th June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    Radiometric measurements of the total lunar eclipse on 15th June 2011 were carried out at the KACST observatory (lat. 21.25 N; long. 49.30 E), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, using a locally designed, constructed and calibrated infrared detector. The basic detector is a Heimann TPS 534 thermopile with a 3° field of view and operating at wavelengths between 8 μm and 14 μm. The total phase of this eclipse lasted about 100 min, making it one of the darkest eclipses this century. The lunar temperature curve of this eclipse was obtained and showed comparable behavior with previously established infrared observations. We found that the lunar surface temperature decreased by about 147 K and 220 K during the partial and total eclipse phases, respectively, in comparison with the lunar temperature before the eclipse.

  17. Radiometric Measurement Comparisons Using Transfer Radiometers in Support of the Calibration of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Johnson, B. Carol; Brown, Steven W.; Yoon, Howard W.; Barnes, Robert A.; Markham, Brian L.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Spyak, Paul R.; Cooper, John W.; Sakuma, Fumihiro

    1999-01-01

    EOS satellite instruments operating in the visible through the shortwave infrared wavelength regions (from 0.4 micrometers to 2.5 micrometers) are calibrated prior to flight for radiance response using integrating spheres at a number of instrument builder facilities. The traceability of the radiance produced by these spheres with respect to international standards is the responsibility of the instrument builder, and different calibration techniques are employed by those builders. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Observing System (EOS) Project Science Office, realizing the importance of preflight calibration and cross-calibration, has sponsored a number of radiometric measurement comparisons, the main purpose of which is to validate the radiometric scale assigned to the integrating spheres by the instrument builders. This paper describes the radiometric measurement comparisons, the use of stable transfer radiometers to perform the measurements, and the measurement approaches and protocols used to validate integrating sphere radiances. Stable transfer radiometers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center Remote Sensing Group, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan, have participated in these comparisons. The approaches used in the comparisons include the measurement of multiple integrating sphere lamp levels, repeat measurements of select lamp levels, the use of the stable radiometers as external sphere monitors, and the rapid reporting of measurement results. Results from several comparisons are presented. The absolute radiometric calibration standard uncertainties required by the EOS satellite instruments are typically in the +/- 3% to +/- 5% range. Preliminary results reported during eleven radiometric measurement comparisons held between February 1995 and May 1998 have shown the radiance of integrating spheres

  18. Assessment of GOCI radiometric products using MERIS, MODIS and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamquin, Nicolas; Mazeran, Constant; Doxaran, David; Ryu, Joo-Hyung; Park, Young-Je

    2012-09-01

    The first Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) launched by South Korea in June 2010 constitutes a major breakthrough in marine optics remote-sensing for its capabilities to observe the diurnal cycles of the ocean. The light signal recorded at eight wavelengths by the sensor allows, after correction for Solar illumination and atmospheric effects, the retrieval of coloured biogeochemical products such as the chlorophyll, suspended sediment and coloured dissolved organic matter concentrations every hour between 9:00 am and 4:00 pm local time around the Korean peninsula. However operational exploitation of the mission needs beforehand a sound validation of first the radiometric calibration, i.e. inspection of the top-of-atmosphere reflectance, and second atmospheric corrections for retrieval of the water-leaving reflectance at sea surface. This study constitutes a contribution to the quality assessment of the GOCI radiometric products generated by the Korea Ocean Satellite Center (KOSC) through comparison with concurrent data from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, NASA) and MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS, ESA) sensors as well as in situ measurements. These comparisons are made with spatially and temporally collocated data. We focus on Rayleigh-corrected reflectance ( ρ RC ) and normalized remote-sensing marine reflectance (nRrs). Although GOCI compares reasonably well with MERIS and MODIS, what demonstrates the success of Ocean Colour in geostationary orbit, we show that the current GOCI atmospheric correction systematically masks out data over very turbid waters and needs further examination and correction for future release of the GOCI products.

  19. Radiometric measurement comparison using the Ocean Color Temperature Scanner (OCTS) visible and near infrared integrating sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.C.; Sakuma, F.; Butler, J.J.; Biggar, S.F.; Cooper, J.W.; Ishida, J.; Suzuki, K.

    1997-11-01

    As part of the pre-flight calibration and validation activities for the Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color satellite instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in February 1995 at the NEC Corporation in Yokohama, Japan. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC), the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA), and the National Research Laboratory of Metrology (NRLM) in Tsukuba, Japan used their portable radiometers to measure the spectral radiance of the OCTS visible and near-infrared integrating sphere at four radiance levels. These four levels corresponded to the configuration of the OCTS integrating sphere when the calibration coefficients for five of the eight spectral channels, or bands, of the OCTS instrument were determined. The measurements of the four radiometers differed by {minus}2.7% to 3.9% when compared to the NEC calibration of the sphere and the overall agreement was within the combined measurement uncertainties. A comparison of the measurements from the participating radiometers also resulted in agreement within the combined measurement uncertainties. These results are encouraging and demonstrate the utility of comparisons using laboratory calibration integrating sphere sources. Other comparisons will focus on instruments that are scheduled for spacecraft in the NASA study of climate change, the Earth Observing System (EOS).

  20. Dynamic tool to estimate the measurement error in radiometric IR cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Bernd

    2001-03-01

    In various applications of Infrared (IR) Thermography there is need for measuring true surface temperatures. Modern radiometric IR cameras are equipped with sophisticated tools like internal temperature sensors or internal temperature references to provide stabilized temperature read-outs and can guarantee a specified accuracy. But these manufacturer's accuracy specifications are only valid for known objects and under controlled laboratory conditions. In field use there are external effects such as unknown object emissivity, reflections or absorption that can be compensated by means of mathematical models. These factors usually have a significant influence on the results thus making it difficult for the user to estimate the real accuracy of the measurement. This paper introduces a computer tool where the thermographic measurement situation has been implemented in an MS Excel spreadsheet file. The user can vary the measurement parameters in the spreadsheet very easily using graphic controls called sliders. In a mixed numeric and graphical presentation the user can get a feel for the influence of a certain parameter in a specific situation and the model provides a good estimate of the measurement accuracy under realistic conditions.

  1. LAI estimation in a Mediterranean grassland by in situ radiometric measurements and MODIS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzarolo, M.; Arriga, N.; Papale, D.

    2009-04-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is one of a key variables in studying and understanding biogeochemical cycle mechanisms and ecosystem functionalities and, then, one of a main inputs for ecological modeling. Leaf area surface is related to the main interactions between leaves and the atmosphere as water interception, radiation extinction, energy, mass and gas exchange. Therefore LAI reduction, consequently the loss of productivity, is expression of any physiological and biochemical change of plant status due for example to summer water stress in Mediterranean areas. A good knowledge of seasonal trend and spatial variability of LAI can helps not only modelers but also local farmer to manage grasslands in a sustainable way (grazing, harvesting). In situ LAI measurements are often limited to relatively small areas whit a small number of samplings that can be sporadic, destructive and time-consuming. Nowadays an interesting alternative to estimate LAI is provided by a large variety of radiometric sensors (ground, airborne and satellite based) whit several spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions. However, few studies shown the effect of different radiometers set-up on VIs-LAI relationships that are also differently sensible to different ranges of LAI, management and to which method is used for LAI measurements. In this work, we analyzed the relations between several spectral vegetation indexes (VIs) and LAI for the Mediterranean grassland of Amplero, in the Abruzzo Region, Italy. In situ measurements were carried out in 2005 and 2006. Contemporaneously to destructive LAI measurements, radiometric measurements over the grass herbage were made by two different radiometric sensors: by hyperspectral Hand Held ASD spettroradiometer (HYS) field samplings and by broad band measurements (BNR) of incoming and outgoing global (shortwave) solar radiation components and of incident and reflected photosintetically active radiation (PAR). In addition we included in this analysis VIs

  2. Aerosol, cloud, and radiometric measurements with small autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Roberts, G.; Corrigan, C.; Ramana, M.; Nguyen, H.

    2005-12-01

    The AUAV (autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle) project is a part of the Atmospheric Brown Clouds project. It has been designed to allow for routine vertical profile measurements of aerosols and clouds using AUAVs above ground-based observatories in the Indo-Pacific Ocean region. The current scientific payloads consist of optical particle counters, condensation particle counters, cloud droplet probes, aethelometers, upward and downward facing pyranometers, and temperature-relative humidity sensors. Aerosol, cloud and radiometric instruments have been miniaturized with a total payload weight and power less than 5 kg and 50 W, respectively. Demonstration flights at the Yuma Proving Grounds, AZ show the potential for small AUAVs in atmospheric studies. The flights were performed on two aircraft, which flew autonomously up to 3000 m above sea level (asl) along programmed flight tracks. The aircraft flew in stacked formation for part of the flights. Once the aircraft were stacked (550 and 2100 m asl), the projected distances were less than 50 m - which translates to less than a 1.5 sec latency between the aircraft. Vertical profiles show a constant 8 K km-1 lapse rate and increasing relative humidity with altitude. At 2000 m asl (1600 m above ground level), an aerosol layer is evident in the total aerosol concentration profile (NCN = 2000 cm-3); relative humidity also increased by 10% in this layer. No such increase in 0.3 μm aerosol (NOPC) is visible at 2000 m asl, suggesting transport from an urban center. Back trajectories indicate air masses originated from south and west across central Baja California, Mexico. Aerosol concentrations are fairly constant at 1000 cm-3 throughout the profile indicating a well-mixed boundary layer. Spikes in aerosol concentrations are a result of sampling the aircrafts' exhaust. The vertical profiles show that spikes occurred at levels where the aircraft maintained level, repeating holding patterns. The cloud droplet probe was flown

  3. Estimation of the cloud transmittance from radiometric measurements at the ground level

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Dario; Mares, Oana

    2014-11-24

    The extinction of solar radiation due to the clouds is more significant than due to any other atmospheric constituent, but it is always difficult to be modeled because of the random distribution of clouds on the sky. Moreover, the transmittance of a layer of clouds is in a very complex relation with their type and depth. A method for estimating cloud transmittance was proposed in Paulescu et al. (Energ. Convers. Manage, 75 690–697, 2014). The approach is based on the hypothesis that the structure of the cloud covering the sun at a time moment does not change significantly in a short time interval (several minutes). Thus, the cloud transmittance can be calculated as the estimated coefficient of a simple linear regression for the computed versus measured solar irradiance in a time interval Δt. The aim of this paper is to optimize the length of the time interval Δt. Radiometric data measured on the Solar Platform of the West University of Timisoara during 2010 at a frequency of 1/15 seconds are used in this study.

  4. Radiometric measurements of dielectric material properties at MMW frequencies for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Suess, Helmut

    2006-05-01

    Microwaves can be used to detect hidden objects behind optically opaque materials. Hence, the penetration capability through such materials is of fundamental importance. In order to characterise a material of interest in the microwave region, its permittivity should be known besides its physical structure. In many cases the permittivity is unknown, inaccurately known, or known for only specific frequencies. Also very often the range of values given in the literature can have a large variability for a specific situation. In this paper we describe a procedure to determine the permittivity from radiometric free-space measurements of nearly arbitrary materials. The advantage of this method is that large material samples like brick or wooden plates, and materials like textiles, which are hard to mount in a defined way in a waveguide, can be investigated. Some representative results for MMW measurements are shown, and an estimation of the presently achieved precision is given. The first attempts showed a satisfying performance, although not for all materials and frequencies a unique solution could be found.

  5. Changes in the Radiometric sensitivity of SeaWiFS determined from lunar and solar-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R A; Eplee, R E; Patt, F S; McClain, C R

    1999-07-20

    We report on the lunar and solar measurements used to determine the changes in the radiometric sensitivity of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Radiometric sensitivity is defined as the output from the instrument (or from one of the instrument bands) per unit spectral radiance at the instrument's input aperture. Knowledge of the long-term repeatability of the SeaWiFS measurements is crucial to maintaining the quality of the ocean scenes derived from measurements by the instrument. For SeaWiFS bands 1-6 (412-670 nm), the change in radiometric sensitivity is less than 0.2% for the period from November 1997 through November 1998. For band 7 (765 nm), the change is approximately 1.5% and for band 8 (865 nm) approximately 5%. The rates of change of bands 7 and 8, which were linear with time for the first eight months of lunar measurements, are now slowing. The scatter in the data points about the trend lines in this analysis is less than 0.3% for all eight SeaWiFS bands. These results are based on monthly measurements of the moon. Daily solar measurements using an onboard diffuser show that the radiometric sensitivities of the SeaWiFS bands have changed smoothly during the time intervals between lunar measurements. Because SeaWiFS measurements have continued past November 1998, the results presented here are considered as a snapshot of the instrument performance as of that date.

  6. 225-GHz atmospheric opacity of the South Pole sky derived from continual radiometric measurements of the sky-brightness temperature.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, R A; Bally, J

    1994-02-20

    We report measurements of the atmospheric opacity of the South Pole at 225 GHz for the period from day 3 to day 180 in 1992. These opacity data were derived from continual radiometric measurements of the sky-brightness temperature as a function of the zenith angle. These radiometric measurements were performed with a 225-GHz heterodyne atmospheric radiometer on loan from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. This radiometer was previously used to characterize other candidate millimeter and submillimeter radio-telescope sites. We found that the atmospheric opacity was below 0.098 air mass(-1) 75% of the time from day 3 to day 70 in 1992, and below 0.055 air mass(-1) 75% of the time from day 70 to day 180 in 1992. Thus, our data demonstrate that the South Pole is an excellent site for performing millimeter-and submillimeter-wavelength radio astronomy.

  7. Ten years of measured UV Index from the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network.

    PubMed

    Utrillas, M P; Marín, M J; Esteve, A R; Estellés, V; Gandía, S; Núnez, J A; Martínez-Lozano, J A

    2013-08-01

    An analysis is made of the UV Index (UVI) obtained from the ultraviolet erythemal solar radiation (UVER) data measured by the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network between the years 2000 and 2009. Previously, the daily UVI has been evaluated using two different criteria: (a) the value corresponding to solar noon; and (b) the daily maximum value. The mean percentage of agreement is 92% if we consider the cases for which the difference is zero or one UVI unit. These results are similar to those obtained in a previous work where only 2 years were analyzed. In all the stations the UVI reaches very high values (8-10) in spring-summer, and the very high and extreme (≥ 11) UVI values are more dependent on the continental effect than on the latitude effect. From the UVI values it is possible to classify the stations into four groups: Coastal stations, Continental stations (more than 200 km from the coast), Southern stations (Coastal stations but with similar values of UVI as the Continental ones due to their low latitude) and Canary Islands stations (1400 km southwest from the Iberian Peninsula thus lower latitude). The monthly mean maximum of UVI is reached in July due to the annual evolution of the total ozone column. This value corresponds, for a skin phototype II, to three times the minimal erythemal dose (MED) in an hour in a Coastal station, 3.5 MEDs in an hour measured in a Continental or Southern station and up five MEDs in an hour in the Izaña station (Canary Islands). The cumulative dose on a horizontal plane over an average year has been calculated for each station. More than 40% of the annual dose is received in summer, about 35% in spring, more than 11% in autumn and less than 10% in winter except for the stations in the Canary Islands where the difference between seasons is less significant. PMID:23685479

  8. Ten years of measured UV Index from the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network.

    PubMed

    Utrillas, M P; Marín, M J; Esteve, A R; Estellés, V; Gandía, S; Núnez, J A; Martínez-Lozano, J A

    2013-08-01

    An analysis is made of the UV Index (UVI) obtained from the ultraviolet erythemal solar radiation (UVER) data measured by the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network between the years 2000 and 2009. Previously, the daily UVI has been evaluated using two different criteria: (a) the value corresponding to solar noon; and (b) the daily maximum value. The mean percentage of agreement is 92% if we consider the cases for which the difference is zero or one UVI unit. These results are similar to those obtained in a previous work where only 2 years were analyzed. In all the stations the UVI reaches very high values (8-10) in spring-summer, and the very high and extreme (≥ 11) UVI values are more dependent on the continental effect than on the latitude effect. From the UVI values it is possible to classify the stations into four groups: Coastal stations, Continental stations (more than 200 km from the coast), Southern stations (Coastal stations but with similar values of UVI as the Continental ones due to their low latitude) and Canary Islands stations (1400 km southwest from the Iberian Peninsula thus lower latitude). The monthly mean maximum of UVI is reached in July due to the annual evolution of the total ozone column. This value corresponds, for a skin phototype II, to three times the minimal erythemal dose (MED) in an hour in a Coastal station, 3.5 MEDs in an hour measured in a Continental or Southern station and up five MEDs in an hour in the Izaña station (Canary Islands). The cumulative dose on a horizontal plane over an average year has been calculated for each station. More than 40% of the annual dose is received in summer, about 35% in spring, more than 11% in autumn and less than 10% in winter except for the stations in the Canary Islands where the difference between seasons is less significant.

  9. Evaluation of the Radiometric Quality of the TM Data Using Clustering, Linear Transformations and Multispectral Distance Measures. [Illinois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Dean, M. E.; Anuta, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    The radiometric quality of LANDSAT 4 TM data for the classification and identification of Earth surface features was evaluated. Techniques employed in the evaluation included clustering, data compression (linear transformations), multispectral distance measures, and hierarchical classification methods. TM and MSS data for the Chicago, Illinois test site were studied. In order to determine the radiometric quality of the TM thermal data for temperature mapping of surface water, a test site was selected within the area covered by the TM scene (Scene ID: 40101-16025) gathered over Illinois. This site was chosen because it includes a surface water body with a large range of temperatures, i.e., a cooling pond for the Dresden nuclear power plant and the junction of two rivers.

  10. A Method to Estimate Uncertainty in Radiometric Measurement Using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) Method; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Radiometric data with known and traceable uncertainty is essential for climate change studies to better understand cloud radiation interactions and the earth radiation budget. Further, adopting a known and traceable method of estimating uncertainty with respect to SI ensures that the uncertainty quoted for radiometric measurements can be compared based on documented methods of derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM).

  11. Fourth World Radiometric Reference to SI radiometric scale comparison and implications for on-orbit measurements of the total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.; Schmutz, W.; Winkler, R.; Finsterle, W.; Fox, N.

    2012-04-01

    We report the fourth World Radiometric Reference (WRR)-to-SI comparison. At the National Physical Laboratory we compared three transfer pyrheliometer instruments in power mode with the SI radiometric scale. Compared with the three previous comparisons, we improved the experiment by operating the transfer instruments in vacuum. At the Total solar irradiance Radiometer Facility (TRF) located at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) in Boulder, we repeated the power comparison of one of the transfer instruments. The TRF also allowed the comparison and characterization of this instrument in irradiance mode. Using the WRR comparisons performed in Davos, we find that the WRR is 0.34% higher than the SI scale. Comparing irradiance mode calibrations with power mode calibrations reveals that previous estimates of stray light of PMO6-type radiometers were very low. The instrument calibrated at TRF was integrated in the space experiment PREMOS on the French satellite PICARD and carries the first vacuum irradiance calibration to space.

  12. Patch Antenna for Measuring the Internal Temperature of Biological Objects Using the Near-Field Microwave Radiometric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaichin, A.; Bespalko, A.; Filatov, A.; Alexeev, E.; Zhuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The near-field microwave antenna with central frequency of 2.23 GHz has been designed and manufactured to be used as a part of the medical microwave radiometric system. Experimental studies of the reflection coefficient in different parts of the human body were conducted using the developed antenna. The experimental studies were carried out in a group of volunteers with normal somatic growth. The results of the experiments were used to perform the analysis of the potential errors in the measurements obtained via the developed antenna.

  13. Apparatus description and data analysis of a radiometric technique for measurements of spectral and total normal emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S. F.; Kantsios, A. G.; Voros, J. P.; Stewart, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a radiometric technique for determining the spectral and total normal emittance of materials heated to temperatures of 800, 1100, and 1300 K by direct comparison with National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reference specimens is discussed. Emittances are measured over the spectral range of 1 to 15 microns and are statistically compared with NBS reference specimens. Results are included for NBS reference specimens, Rene 41, alundum, zirconia, AISI type 321 stainless steel, nickel 201, and a space-shuttle reusable surface insulation.

  14. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  15. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  16. Earth Return Navigation Analysis for Manned Spacecraft Using Optical and Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Ely, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    Future manned space missions will travel beyond low Earth orbit with more stringent navigation requirements and fewer navigation resources than used for the Apollo Program of the 1960s. A study has been performed to assess radiometric and optical tracking capabilities necessary to meet nominal and contingency Earth entry flight path angle requirements. Results indicate that 3 tracking stations will be insufficient for meeting nominal entry requirements, while the performance of a 6 station architecture is dependent on the entry geometry. Optical tracking results indicate that a narrow-angle camera is required for satisfying contingency Earth return requirements.

  17. Laser photothermal radiometric instrumentation for fast in-line industrial steel hardness inspection and case depth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xinxin; Sivagurunathan, Konesh; Garcia, Jose; Mandelis, Andreas; Giunta, Salvatore; Milletari, Salvatore

    2009-03-01

    A contact-free, nondestructive laser photothermal radiometric instrumentation technique was developed to meet industrial demand for on-line steel hardness inspection and quality control. A series of industrial steel samples, flat or curvilinear, with different effective hardness case depths ranging between 0.21 and 1.78 mm were measured. The results demonstrated that three measurement parameters (metrics) extracted from fast swept-sine photothermal excitation and measurements, namely, the phase minimum frequency fmin, the peak or trough frequency width W, and the area S, are complementary for evaluating widely different ranges of hardness case depth: fmin is most suitable for large case depths, and W and S for small case depths. It was also found that laser beam angular inclination with respect to the surface plane of the sample strongly affects hardness measurement resolution and that the phase frequency maximum is more reliable than the amplitude maximum for laser beam focusing on the sample surface.

  18. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  19. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  20. Radiometric Measurement Comparison on the Integrating Sphere Source Used to Calibrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+).

    PubMed

    Butler, James J; Brown, Steven W; Saunders, Robert D; Johnson, B Carol; Biggar, Stuart F; Zalewski, Edward F; Markham, Brian L; Gracey, Paul N; Young, James B; Barnes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to validate the radiometric scales assigned to integrating sphere sources used in the calibration of Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in May 1998 at Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS). This comparison was conducted in support of the calibration of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instruments. The radiometric scale assigned to the Spherical Integrating Source (SIS100) by SBRS was validated through a comparison with radiometric measurements made by a number of stable, well-characterized transfer radiometers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA's GSFC), and the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA). The measured radiances from the radiometers differed by ±3 % in the visible to near infrared when compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements. In general, the transfer radiometers gave higher values than the SBRS calibration in the near infrared and lower values in the blue. The measurements of the radiometers differed by ±4 % from 800 nm to 1800 nm compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements for wavelengths less than 2200 nm. The results of the radiometric measurement comparison presented here supplement the results of previous measurement comparisons on the integrating sphere sources used to calibrate the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) at NEC Corporation, Yokohama, Japan. PMID:27413606

  1. Radiometric Measurement Comparison on the Integrating Sphere Source Used to Calibrate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+).

    PubMed

    Butler, James J; Brown, Steven W; Saunders, Robert D; Johnson, B Carol; Biggar, Stuart F; Zalewski, Edward F; Markham, Brian L; Gracey, Paul N; Young, James B; Barnes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to validate the radiometric scales assigned to integrating sphere sources used in the calibration of Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in May 1998 at Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS). This comparison was conducted in support of the calibration of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instruments. The radiometric scale assigned to the Spherical Integrating Source (SIS100) by SBRS was validated through a comparison with radiometric measurements made by a number of stable, well-characterized transfer radiometers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA's GSFC), and the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA). The measured radiances from the radiometers differed by ±3 % in the visible to near infrared when compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements. In general, the transfer radiometers gave higher values than the SBRS calibration in the near infrared and lower values in the blue. The measurements of the radiometers differed by ±4 % from 800 nm to 1800 nm compared to the SBRS calibration of the sphere, and the overall agreement was within the combined uncertainties of the individual measurements for wavelengths less than 2200 nm. The results of the radiometric measurement comparison presented here supplement the results of previous measurement comparisons on the integrating sphere sources used to calibrate the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) at NEC Corporation, Yokohama, Japan.

  2. High temperature millimeter wave radiometric and interferometric measurements of slag-refractory interaction for application to coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-09-17

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments) such as in slagging coal gasifiers, where sensors have been identified as a key enabling technology need for process optimization. We present a state-of-the-art dual-channel MMW heterodyne radiometer with active interferometric capability that allows simultaneous radiometric measurements of sample temperature, emissivity, and flow dynamics to over 1873 K. Interferometric capability is supplied via a probe signal originating from the 137 GHz radiometer local oscillator (LO). The interferometric 'video' channels allow measurement of additional parameters simultaneously, such as volume expansion, thickness change, and slag viscosity along with temperature or emissivity. This capability has been used to demonstrate measurement of temperature and simulated coal slag infiltration into a chromia refractory brick sample as well as slag flow down a vertically placed refractory brick. Observed phenomena include slag melting and slumping, slag reboil and foam with oxygen evolution, and eventual failure of the alumina crucible through corrosion by the molten slag. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters from operating slagging coal gasifiers, providing valuable information for process efficiency, control, and increased productivity.

  3. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  4. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  5. Solar Tower Experiments for Radiometric Calibration and Validation of Infrared Imaging Assets and Analysis Tools for Entry Aero-Heating Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Horvath, Thomas J.; Mercer, David C.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ross, Martin N.; Tietjen, Alan; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements assessment team has a task to perform radiometric calibration and validation of land-based and airborne infrared imaging assets and tools for remote thermographic imaging. The IR assets and tools will be used for thermographic imaging of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry aero-heating to provide flight boundary layer transition thermography data that could be utilized for calibration and validation of empirical and theoretical aero-heating tools. A series of tests at the Sandia National Laboratories National Solar Thermal Test Facility were designed for this task where reflected solar radiation from a field of heliostats was used to heat a 4 foot by 4 foot test panel consisting of LI 900 ceramic tiles located on top of the 200 foot tall Solar Tower. The test panel provided an Orbiter-like entry temperature for the purposes of radiometric calibration and validation. The Solar Tower provided an ideal test bed for this series of radiometric calibration and validation tests because it had the potential to rapidly heat the large test panel to spatially uniform and non-uniform elevated temperatures. Also, the unsheltered-open-air environment of the Solar Tower was conducive to obtaining unobstructed radiometric data by land-based and airborne IR imaging assets. Various thermocouples installed on the test panel and an infrared imager located in close proximity to the test panel were used to obtain surface temperature measurements for evaluation and calibration of the radiometric data from the infrared imaging assets. The overall test environment, test article, test approach, and typical test results are discussed.

  6. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  7. The large volume radiometric calorimeter system: A transportable device to measure scrap category plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An innovative design concept has been used to design a large volume calorimeter system. The new design permits two measuring cells to fit in a compact, nonevaporative environmental bath. The system is mounted on a cart for transportability. Samples in the power range of 0.50 to 12.0 W can be measured. The calorimeters will receive samples as large as 22.0 cm in diameter by 43.2 cm high, and smaller samples can be measured without lengthening measurement time or increasing measurement error by using specially designed sleeve adapters. This paper describes the design considerations, construction, theory, applications, and performance of the large volume calorimeter system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Radiometric sounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Vertical profiles of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes are key research needs for global climate change research. These fluxes are expected to change as radiatively active trace gases are emitted to the earth`s atmosphere as a consequence of energy production and industrial and other human activities. Models suggest that changes in the concentration of such gases will lead to radiative flux divergences that will produce global warming of the earth`s atmosphere. Direct measurements of the vertical variation of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes that lead to these flux divergences have been largely unavailable because of the expense of making such measurements from airplanes. These measurements are needed to improve existing atmospheric radiative transfer models, especially under the cloudy conditions where the models have not been adequately tested. A tethered-balloon-borne Radiometric Sounding System has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide an inexpensive means of making routine vertical soundings of radiative fluxes in the earth`s atmospheric boundary layer to altitudes up to 1500 m above ground level. Such vertical soundings would supplement measurements being made from aircraft and towers. The key technical challenge in the design of the Radiometric Sounding System is to develop a means of keeping the radiometers horizontal while the balloon ascends and descends in a turbulent atmospheric environment. This problem has been addressed by stabilizing a triangular radiometer-carrying platform that is carried on the tetherline of a balloon sounding system. The platform, carried 30 m or more below the balloon to reduce the balloon`s effect on the radiometric measurements, is leveled by two automatic control loops that activate motors, gears and pulleys when the platform is off-level. The sensitivity of the automatic control loops to oscillatory motions of various frequencies and amplitudes can be adjusted using filters.

  9. Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

  10. Comparison of OLYMPUS beacon and radiometric attenuation measurements at Blacksburg, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, J. B.; Jacobson, M. D.; Beeler, R. H.; Hazen, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of attenuation of the 20 and 30 GHz beacons onboard the OLYMPUS satellite are compared to simultaneous observations of atmospheric attenuation by a multichannel microwave radiometer along the same path. Departures from high correlation between the two measurements are believed to be related to differences in antenna beamwidths. Mean equivalent zenith attenuations derived from the slant path data are compared to zenith observations made at previous locations.

  11. TES radiometric assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, H.; Sarkissian, E.; Bowman, K.; Fisher, B.; Rider, D.; Aumann, H. H.; Apolinski, M.; Debaca, R. C.; Gluck, S.; Madatyan, M.; McDuffie, J.; Tremblay, D.; Shephard, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.

    2005-01-01

    TES is an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the EOS-Aura spacecraft launched July 15, 2004. Improvements to the radiometric calibration and consequent assessment of radiometric accuracy have been on-going since launch.

  12. Three-dimensional vector modeling and restoration of flat finite wave tank radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, W. M.; Balanis, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector interaction between a microwave radiometer and a wave tank was modeled. Computer programs for predicting the response of the radiometer to the brightness temperature characteristics of the surroundings were developed along with a computer program that can invert (restore) the radiometer measurements. It is shown that the computer programs can be used to simulate the viewing of large bodies of water, and is applicable to radiometer measurements received from satellites monitoring the ocean. The water temperature, salinity, and wind speed can be determined.

  13. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  14. Retrievals of Profiles of Fine And Coarse Aerosols Using Lidar And Radiometric Space Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Tanre, Didier; Leon, Jean-Francois; Pelon, Jacques; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In couple of years we expect the launch of the CALIPSO lidar spaceborne mission designed to observe aerosols and clouds. CALIPSO will collect profiles of the lidar attenuated backscattering coefficients in two spectral wavelengths (0.53 and 1.06 microns). Observations are provided along the track of the satellite around the globe from pole to pole. The attenuated backscattering coefficients are sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol particles, their shape and size. However the information is insufficient to be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties and vertical distribution. Infinite number of physical solutions can reconstruct the same two wavelength backscattered profile measured from space. CALIPSO will fly in formation with the Aqua satellite and the MODIS spectro-radiometer on board. Spectral radiances measured by MODIS in six channels between 0.55 and 2.13 microns simultaneously with the CALIPSO observations can constrain the solutions and resolve this ambiguity, albeit under some assumptions. In this paper we describe the inversion method and apply it to aircraft lidar and MODIS data collected over a dust storm off the coast of West Africa during the SHADE experiment. It is shown that the product of the single scattering albedo, omega, and the phase function, P, for backscattering can be retrieved from the synergism between measurements avoiding a priori hypotheses required for inverting lidar measurements alone. The resultant value of (omega)P(180 deg.) = 0.016/sr are significantly different from what is expected using Mie theory, but are in good agreement with recent results obtained from lidar observations of dust episodes. The inversion is robust in the presence of noise of 10% and 20% in the lidar signal in the 0.53 and 1.06 pm channels respectively. Calibration errors of the lidar of 5 to 10% can cause an error in optical thickness of 20 to 40% respectively in the tested cases. The lidar calibration errors cause degradation in the

  15. The Effect of Clouds on Water Vapor Profiling from the Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Racette, P.; Chang, L. A.; Hart, W.

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements with the millimeter-wave imaging radiometer (MIR), cloud lidar system (CLS), and the MODIS airborne simulator (MAS) were made aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft over the western Pacific Ocean on 17-18 January 1993. These measurements were used to study the effects of clouds on water vapor profile retrievals based on millimeter-wave radiometer measurements. The CLS backscatter measurements (at 0.532 and 1.064 am) provided information on the heights and a detailed structure of cloud layers; the types of clouds could be positively identified. All 12 MAS channels (0.6-13 Am) essentially respond to all types of clouds, while the six MIR channels (89-220 GHz) show little sensitivity to cirrus clouds. The radiances from the 12-/Am and 0.875-gm channels of the MAS and the 89-GHz channel of the MIR were used to gauge the performance of the retrieval of water vapor profiles from the MIR observations under cloudy conditions. It was found that, for cirrus and absorptive (liquid) clouds, better than 80% of the retrieval was convergent when one of the three criteria was satisfied; that is, the radiance at 0.875 Am is less than 100 W/cm.sr, or the brightness at 12 Am is greater than 260 K, or brightness at 89 GHz is less than 270 K (equivalent to cloud liquid water of less than 0.04 g/cm). The range of these radiances for convergent retrieval increases markedly when the condition for convergent retrieval was somewhat relaxed. The algorithm of water vapor profiling from the MIR measurements could not perform adequately over the areas of storm-related clouds that scatter radiation at millimeter wavelengths.

  16. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  17. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  18. Radiometric gains of satellite sensors of reflected solar radiation - Results from NASA ER-2 aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Peter; Galimore, Reginald; Cooper, John

    1992-01-01

    A method for using congruent aircraft-satellite observations to calibrate a satellite sensor is presented. A calibrated spectroradiometer at an altitude of 19 km above White Sands, NM, is oriented to view White Sands at the satellite overpass time along the same view vector as the satellite sensor. Collected data are transformed into corresponding estimates of sensor band radiance at the satellite (derived from the aircraft measurements), and average count (from the sensor measurements). These are both averaged across the footprint of the spectroradiometer. Results are presented for the evolution of NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) (Bands 1 and 2) gain between November 1988 and October 1990, and for GOES-6 and GOES-7 VISSR/VAS visible bands during the same period. Estimates of uncertainty in the results are presented, as well as ideas for their reduction in future flights.

  19. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on soil moisture remote sensing was conducted during July to September 1981 on bare, grass, and alfalfa fields at frequencies of 0.6, 1.4, 5.0, and 10.6 GHz with radiometers mounted on mobile towers. The results confirm the frequency dependence of sensitivity reduction due to the presence of vegetation cover. For the type of vegetated fields reported here, the vegetation effect is appreciable even at 0.6 GHz. Measurements over bare soil show that when the soil is wet, the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest at 0.6 GHz, a result contrary to the expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil-water mixtures and the current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  20. Macrophysical and microphysical properties of monsoon clouds over a rain shadow region in India from ground-based radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikishan, G.; Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Pandithurai, G.; Min, Q. L.

    2014-04-01

    The important radiative properties of clouds such as cloud optical depth (COD) and droplet effective radii (Re) are retrieved from the simultaneous measurements by ground-based multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and microwave radiometric profiler (MWRP), colocated at Mahabubnagar, a rain shadow region in southern Indian peninsula. Min and Harisson's (1996) retrieval algorithm is used for the first time to derive monsoon cloud properties in India. COD and liquid water path (LWP) retrieved from two independent instruments of MFRSR and MWRP showed reasonably good correlation. During monsoon (July to September) and postmonsoon (October) months, the maximum probability of occurrence of COD for overcast sky is 20. The maximum probability of occurrence of LWP is 100 gm-2 for water clouds during monsoon months, while October showed maximum occurrence at a lower value of 50 gm-2, where most of the times the cloud bases are above freezing level indicating mixed phase clouds. Maximum Re varied from 14-16 µm (10-12%) to 12 µm (9%) during monsoon to postmonsoon transition with very less probability of occurrence indicating the characteristic feature of this region. A case study showed that the mean Re from ground-based and aircraft measurements are 12.0 ± 3.7 µm and 8.14 ± 1.4 µm, respectively, indicating a fairly good agreement within the experimental constraints. Intercomparison of ground-based and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Terra and MODIS-Aqua-derived COD, LWP and Re over the observational site for overcast and warm clouds indicates that on an average, MODIS-retrieved mean COD and LWP are underestimated, while mean Re is overestimated as compared to ground retrievals.

  1. Effect of atmospheric radiance errors in radiometric sea-surface skin temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Donlon, C J; Nightingale, T J

    2000-05-20

    Errors in measurements of sea-surface skin temperature (SSST) caused by inappropriate measurements of sky radiance are discussed; both model simulations and in situ data obtained in the Atlantic Ocean are used. These errors are typically caused by incorrect radiometer view geometry (pointing), temporal mismatches between the sea surface and atmospheric views, and the effect of wind on the sea surface. For clear-sky, overcast, or high-humidity atmospheric conditions, SSST is relatively insensitive (<0.1 K) to sky-pointing errors of ?10 degrees and to temporal mismatches between the sea and sky views. In mixed-cloud conditions, SSST errors greater than ?0.25 K are possible as a result either of poor radiometer pointing or of a temporal mismatch between the sea and sky views. Sea-surface emissivity also changes with sea view pointing angle. Sea view pointing errors should remain below 5 degrees for SSST errors of <0.1 K. We conclude that the clear-sky requirement of satellite infrared SSST observations means that sky-pointing errors are small when one is obtaining in situ SSST validation data at zenith angles of <40 degrees . At zenith angles greater than this, large errors are possible in high-wind-speed conditions. We recommend that high-resolution inclinometer measurements always be used, together with regular alternating sea and sky views, and that the temporal mismatch between sea and sky views be as small as possible. These results have important implications for the development of operational autonomous instruments for determining SSST for the long-term validation of satellite SSST.

  2. Orbit Determination Analysis Utilizing Radiometric and Laser Ranging Measurements for GPS Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current issues involve lowering the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. In this document, the results of an orbit determination covariance assessment are provided. The analysis is intended to be the baseline orbit determination study comparing the benefits of adding laser ranging measurements from various numbers of ground stations. Results are shown for two starting longitude assumptions of the satellite location and for nine initial covariance cases for the GPS satellite state vector.

  3. 30 CFR 75.501-3 - New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New openings; mines above water table and never... Equipment-General § 75.501-3 New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy. (a) Where a new... existing mine shall be considered of primary importance. (2) Whether the operator had a right to mine...

  4. 30 CFR 75.501-3 - New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New openings; mines above water table and never... Equipment-General § 75.501-3 New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy. (a) Where a new... existing mine shall be considered of primary importance. (2) Whether the operator had a right to mine...

  5. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  6. VIIRS emissive band radiometric performance trending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric; Ranshaw, Courtney

    2012-09-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite launched on October 28, 2011 into a polar orbit of 824 km nominal altitude. VIIRS collects radiometric and imagery data of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and land surfaces in 22 spectral bands spanning the visible and infrared spectrum from 0.4 to 12.5 μm. This paper summarizes the radiometric performance measured in the 7 VIIRS thermal emissive bands (3.7 to 12.5 μm), covering both pre-launch thermal-vacuum testing and early on-orbit characterizations. Radiometric characteristics trended include radiometric response and radiometric sensitivity (SNR/NEdT).

  7. Spectrally Tunable Sources for Advanced Radiometric Applications.

    PubMed

    Brown, S W; Rice, J P; Neira, J E; Johnson, B C; Jackson, J D

    2006-01-01

    A common radiometric platform for the development of application-specific metrics to quantify the performance of sensors and systems is described. Using this platform, sensor and system performance may be quantified in terms of the accuracy of measurements of standardized sets of source distributions. The prototype platform consists of spectrally programmable light sources that can generate complex spectral distributions in the ultraviolet, visible and short-wave infrared regions for radiometric, photometric and colorimetric applications. In essence, the programmable spectral source is a radiometric platform for advanced instrument characterization and calibration that can also serve as a basis for algorithm testing and instrument comparison.

  8. Radiometric correction procedure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, C.; Sands, R.; Murphrey, S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of MSS radiometric processing techniques identified as a preferred radiometric processing technique a procedure which equalizes the mean and standard deviation of detector-specific histograms of uncalibrated scene data. Evaluation of MSS calibration data demonstrated that the relationship between detector responses is essentially linear over the range of intensities typically observed in MSS data, and that the calibration wedge data possess a high degree of temporal stability. An analysis of the preferred radiometric processing technique showed that it could be incorporated into the MDP-MSS system without a major redesign of the system, and with minimal impact on system throughput.

  9. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Daehler, Erik; Zanoni, Vicki; Schiller, Stephen; Thome, Kurtis

    2002-01-01

    NASA acquired imagery from the IKONOS satellite as part of its Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) program, which purchases scientific data sets from commercial sources. This viewgraph presentation describes the IKONOS satellite and its sensors, and then gives an overview of characterization efforts undertaken by NASA in cooperation with other government agencies. The characterization included relative radiometric correction, absolute radiometric characterization of data from Lunar Lake Playa, Nevada, and calibration of data from Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.

  10. Current status and future plans for NBS radiometric source standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostkowski, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    The accuracy and long-term stability of currently available NBS radiometric source standards are described. Current research efforts and expected results in this area are outlined. There are over ten NBS radiometric source standards currently available or under development that are of interest for solar measurements or for remote sensing of the earth. The standards and sources are classified and described in terms of the radiometric quantities they represent -- spectral radiance, spectral irradiance and irradiance.

  11. 30 CFR 75.501-3 - New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New openings; mines above water table and never classed gassy. 75.501-3 Section 75.501-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501-3 New...

  12. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  13. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  14. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  15. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  16. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation. PMID:24401459

  17. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation.

  18. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  19. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air.

  20. THEMATIC MAPPER: DETAILED RADIOMETRIC AND GEOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh

    1983-01-01

    The paper is in abstract form. It discusses those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration or spectral data. Subscenes of radiometrically raw data (B-data) were examined on an individual detector basis; areas of uniform radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by about a factor of two by irregular width of the digital levels. Several detectors have a change of gain with a period of several scans, the largest effect is about 4%. The geometric fidelity of the GSFC filmwriter used for Thematic Mapper (TM) images was assessed by measurement with accuracy better than three micrometers of a test grid.

  1. Assessment of a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Correction of Above-Water and Satellite Water-Leaving Radiance in Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Harmal, Tristan; Tonizzo, Alberto; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances, retrieved from in situ or satellite measurements, need to be corrected for the bidirectional properties of the measured light in order to standardize the data and make them comparable with each other. The current operational algorithm for the correction of bidirectional effects from the satellite ocean color data is optimized for typical oceanic waters. However, versions of bidirectional reflectance correction algorithms specifically tuned for typical coastal waters and other case 2 conditions are particularly needed to improve the overall quality of those data. In order to analyze the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of case 2 waters, a dataset of typical remote sensing reflectances was generated through radiative transfer simulations for a large range of viewing and illumination geometries. Based on this simulated dataset, a case 2 water focused remote sensing reflectance model is proposed to correct above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance data for bidirectional effects. The proposed model is first validated with a one year time series of in situ above-water measurements acquired by collocated multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers, which have different viewing geometries installed at the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO). Match-ups and intercomparisons performed on these concurrent measurements show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the algorithm currently in use at all wavelengths, with average improvement of 2.4% over the spectral range. LISCO's time series data have also been used to evaluate improvements in match-up comparisons of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data when the proposed BRDF correction is used in lieu of the current algorithm. It is shown that the discrepancies between coincident in-situ sea-based and satellite data decreased by 3.15% with the use of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Radiometric Modeling and Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)Ground Based Measurement Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere s thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  3. High Temperature Millimeter Wave Radiometric and Interferometric Measurements of Slag-Refractory Interaction for Application to Coal Gasifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Slaugh, Ryan; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-11-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments such as in slagging coal gasifiers, where sensors have been identified as a key enabling technology need for process optimization. We present a dual-channel MMW heterodyne radiometer with active interferometric capability that allows simultaneous measurements of sample temperature, emissivity, and flow dynamics. Interferometric capability at 137 GHz is supplied via a probe signal originating from a local oscillator allowing monitoring of sample dynamics such as volume expansion and thickness change. This capability has been used to monitor characteristic behavior between refractories and slag such as slag infiltration, slag melting, viscous flow, foaming, and crucible corrosion by the molten slag. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting process parameters from operating slagging coal gasifiers, providing valuable information for process efficiency, control, and increased productivity.

  4. An alternative method for the estimation of sedimentation rates using radiometric measurements in an intertidal region (sw of spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligero, Rufino; Casas-Ruiz, Melquiades; Barrera, Manuel; Barbero, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The techniques for the direct measurement of the sedimentation rate are reliable but slow and imprecise, given that the time intervals of measurement cannot be very long. Consequently it is an extremely laborious task to obtain a representative map of the sedimentation rates and such maps are available for very few zones. However, for most environmental studies, it is very important to know the sedimentation rates. The high degree of accuracy of the gamma spectrometric techniques together with the application of the model describes in this work, has allowed the determination of the sedimentation rates in a wide spatial area such of the Bay of Cadiz to be obtained with precision and consuming considerably less time in comparison to the traditional techniques. Even so, the experimental conditions required for the sample cores are fairly restrictive, and although the radiological method provides a quantitative advance in measurement, the experimental difficulty in the execution of the study is not greatly diminished. For this reason, a second model has been derived based on the measurement of the inventory, which offers economies in time and financial cost, and which allows the sedimentation rate in a region to be determined with satisfactory accuracy. Furthermore, it has been shown that the application of this model requires a precise determination of 137Cs inventories. The sedimentation rates estimated by the 137Cs inventory method ranged from 0.26 cm/year to 1.72 cm/year. The average value of the sedimentation rate obtained is 0.59 cm/year, and this rate has been compared with those resulting from the application of the 210Pb dating technique. A good agreement between the two procedures has been found. From the study carried out, it has been possible for the first time, to draw a map of sedimentation rates for this zone where numerous physical-chemical, oceanographic and ecological studies converge, since it is situated in a region of great environmental interest

  5. Mid-infrared measurements of the atmospheric emission over the South Pole using a radiometrically calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Van Allen, R; Murcray, F J; Liu, X

    1996-03-20

    We conducted year-round measurements of the downwelling atmospheric infrared emission over the South Pole in 1992. The instrument covered the 550-1600-wave-number region with 1-wave-number resolution. We calculated the water vapor content for clear-sky cases and found a good correlation with the surface temperature, with values ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 mm. Ozone-sonde profiles were compared with total column abundances of O(3) retrieved from the spectra. The experiment is explained in detail, including the instrumentation, calibration, and retrieval methods used. The calibrated spectra contain information about several trace gases, water, clouds, temperature profiles, and aerosols.

  6. Mid-infrared measurements of the atmospheric emission over the South Pole using a radiometrically calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Van Allen, R; Murcray, F J; Liu, X

    1996-03-20

    We conducted year-round measurements of the downwelling atmospheric infrared emission over the South Pole in 1992. The instrument covered the 550-1600-wave-number region with 1-wave-number resolution. We calculated the water vapor content for clear-sky cases and found a good correlation with the surface temperature, with values ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 mm. Ozone-sonde profiles were compared with total column abundances of O(3) retrieved from the spectra. The experiment is explained in detail, including the instrumentation, calibration, and retrieval methods used. The calibrated spectra contain information about several trace gases, water, clouds, temperature profiles, and aerosols. PMID:21085269

  7. MOBY, A Radiometric Buoy for Performance Monitoring and Vicarious Calibration of Satellite Ocean Color Sensors: Measurement and Data Analysis Protocols. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Dennis K.; Yarbrough, Mark A.; Feinholz, Mike; Flora, Stephanie; Broenkow, William; Kim, Yong Sung; Johnson, B. Carol; Brown, Steven W.; Yuen, Marilyn; Mueller, James L.

    2003-01-01

    The Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) is the centerpiece of the primary ocean measurement site for calibration of satellite ocean color sensors based on independent in situ measurements. Since late 1996, the time series of normalized water-leaving radiances L(sub WN)(lambda) determined from the array of radiometric sensors attached to MOBY are the primary basis for the on-orbit calibrations of the USA Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Japanese Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS), the French Polarization Detection Environmental Radiometer (POLDER), the German Modular Optoelectronic Scanner on the Indian Research Satellite (IRS1-MOS), and the USA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). The MOBY vicarious calibration L(sub WN)(lambda) reference is an essential element in the international effort to develop a global, multi-year time series of consistently calibrated ocean color products using data from a wide variety of independent satellite sensors. A longstanding goal of the SeaWiFS and MODIS (Ocean) Science Teams is to determine satellite-derived L(sub WN)(labda) with a relative combined standard uncertainty of 5 %. Other satellite ocean color projects and the Sensor Intercomparison for Marine Biology and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project have also adopted this goal, at least implicitly. Because water-leaving radiance contributes at most 10 % of the total radiance measured by a satellite sensor above the atmosphere, a 5 % uncertainty in L(sub WN)(lambda) implies a 0.5 % uncertainty in the above-atmosphere radiance measurements. This level of uncertainty can only be approached using vicarious-calibration approaches as described below. In practice, this means that the satellite radiance responsivity is adjusted to achieve the best agreement, in a least-squares sense, for the L(sub WN)(lambda) results determined using the satellite and the independent optical sensors (e.g. MOBY). The end result of this approach is to

  8. Radiometric Characterization of IKONOS Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A radiometric characterization of Space Imaging's IKONOS 4-m multispectral imagery has been performed by a NASA funded team from the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (UARSG), and South Dakota State University (SDSU). Both intrinsic radiometry and the effects of Space Imaging processing on radiometry were investigated. Relative radiometry was examined with uniform Antarctic and Saharan sites. Absolute radiometric calibration was performed using reflectance-based vicarious calibration methods on several uniform sites imaged by IKONOS, coincident with ground-based surface and atmospheric measurements. Ground-based data and the IKONOS spectral response function served as input to radiative transfer codes to generate a Top-of-Atmosphere radiance estimate. Calibration coefficients derived from each vicarious calibration were combined to generate an IKONOS radiometric gain coefficient for each multispectral band assuming a linear response over the full dynamic range of the instrument. These calibration coefficients were made available to Space Imaging, which subsequently adopted them by updating its initial set of calibration coefficients. IKONOS imagery procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program is processed with or without a Modulation Transfer Function Compensation kernel. The radiometric effects of this kernel on various scene types was also investigated. All imagery characterized was procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program.

  9. Innovative flooded mask for a well-corrected vision both under water and above water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercatelli, L.; Sani, E.; Sansoni, P.; Francini, F.; Jafrancesco, D.; Fontani, D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative scuba mask, which can be flooded by water and is able to provide a correct sight both underwater and in air, thus overcoming the drawbacks of traditional diving masks. The working principle of this new flooded device corresponds to the underwater telescope. Optical design analyses have demonstrated that it is able to provide a well corrected vision in both underwater and above-water conditions. The development of the optical configuration for the mask is illustrated presenting various stages of the optical project. The device has been optically and mechanically designed and then realized. Beyond the optical requirements, the optical design takes into account compactness, low fragility, diver comfort and other practical aspects in view of a possible mass production.

  10. Assessment of a bidirectional reflectance distribution correction of above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Harmel, Tristan; Tonizzo, Alberto; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Samir

    2012-01-10

    Water-leaving radiances, retrieved from in situ or satellite measurements, need to be corrected for the bidirectional properties of the measured light in order to standardize the data and make them comparable with each other. The current operational algorithm for the correction of bidirectional effects from the satellite ocean color data is optimized for typical oceanic waters. However, versions of bidirectional reflectance correction algorithms specifically tuned for typical coastal waters and other case 2 conditions are particularly needed to improve the overall quality of those data. In order to analyze the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of case 2 waters, a dataset of typical remote sensing reflectances was generated through radiative transfer simulations for a large range of viewing and illumination geometries. Based on this simulated dataset, a case 2 water focused remote sensing reflectance model is proposed to correct above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance data for bidirectional effects. The proposed model is first validated with a one year time series of in situ above-water measurements acquired by collocated multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers, which have different viewing geometries installed at the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO). Match-ups and intercomparisons performed on these concurrent measurements show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the algorithm currently in use at all wavelengths, with average improvement of 2.4% over the spectral range. LISCO's time series data have also been used to evaluate improvements in match-up comparisons of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data when the proposed BRDF correction is used in lieu of the current algorithm. It is shown that the discrepancies between coincident in-situ sea-based and satellite data decreased by 3.15% with the use of the proposed algorithm. This confirms the advantages of the proposed model over the current

  11. Radiometric calibration by rank minimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Young; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Shi, Boxin; Kweon, In So; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    We present a robust radiometric calibration framework that capitalizes on the transform invariant low-rank structure in the various types of observations, such as sensor irradiances recorded from a static scene with different exposure times, or linear structure of irradiance color mixtures around edges. We show that various radiometric calibration problems can be treated in a principled framework that uses a rank minimization approach. This framework provides a principled way of solving radiometric calibration problems in various settings. The proposed approach is evaluated using both simulation and real-world datasets and shows superior performance to previous approaches.

  12. Discontinuities in hygroscopic growth below and above water saturation for laboratory surrogates of oligomers in organic atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Natasha; Zuend, Andreas; Schilling, Katherine; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Discontinuities in apparent hygroscopicity below and above water saturation have been observed for organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles in both laboratory studies and in the ambient atmosphere. However, uncertainty remains regarding the factors that contribute to observations of low hygroscopic growth below water saturation but enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a given aerosol population. Utilizing laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosols, we explore the extent to which such discontinuities are influenced by organic component molecular mass and viscosity, non-ideal thermodynamic interactions between aerosol components, and the combination of these factors. Measurements of hygroscopic growth under subsaturated conditions and the CCN activity of aerosols comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with average molecular masses ranging from 200 to 10 000 g mol-1 and mixtures of PEG with ammonium sulfate (AS) were conducted. Experimental results are compared to calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium conducted with the Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model, and the potential influence of kinetic limitations on observed water uptake was further explored through estimations of water diffusivity in the PEG oligomers. Particle-phase behavior, including the prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), was also modeled with AIOMFAC. Under subsaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions, we observed little variability in hygroscopic growth across PEG systems with different molecular masses; however, an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular mass was observed. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures, and, in fact, an enhancement in CCN activity was observed for the PEG10000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 15 % reduction in critical activation diameter at a supersaturation of 0.8 %. We also

  13. A radiometric Bode's Law: Predictions for Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheres of three planets, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are known to be sources of intense, nonthermal radio bursts. The emissions from these sources undergo pronounced long term intensity fluctuations that are caused by the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of each planet. Determinations by spacecraft of the low frequency radio spectra and radiation beam geometry now permit a reliable assessment of the overall efficiency of the solar wind in stimulating these emissions. Earlier estimates of how magnetospheric radio output scales with the solar wind energy input must be revised greatly, with the result that, while the efficiency is much lower than previously thought, it is remarkably uniform from planet to planet. The formulation of a radiometric Bode's Law from which a planet's magnetic moment is estimated from its radio emission output is presented. Applying the radiometric scaling law to Uranus, the low-frequency radio power is likely to be measured by the Voyager 2 spacecraft as it approaches this planet.

  14. Hemispherical Field-of-View Above-Water Surface Imager for Submarines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Farr, William H.; Dannecker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses solutions to the problem of submarines having to rise above water to detect airplanes in the general vicinity. Two solutions are provided, in which a sensor is located just under the water surface, and at a few to tens of meter depth under the water surface. The first option is a Fish Eye Lens (FEL) digital-camera combination, situated just under the water surface that will have near-full- hemisphere (360 azimuth and 90 elevation) field of view for detecting objects on the water surface. This sensor can provide a three-dimensional picture of the airspace both in the marine and in the land environment. The FEL is coupled to a camera and can continuously look at the entire sky above it. The camera can have an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) focal plane array that allows logic circuitry to be built directly in the sensor. The logic circuitry allows data processing to occur on the sensor head without the need for any other external electronics. In the second option, a single-photon sensitive (photon counting) detector-array is used at depth, without the need for any optics in front of it, since at this location, optical signals are scattered and arrive at a wide (tens of degrees) range of angles. Beam scattering through clouds and seawater effectively negates optical imaging at depths below a few meters under cloudy or turbulent conditions. Under those conditions, maximum collection efficiency can be achieved by using a non-imaging photon-counting detector behind narrowband filters. In either case, signals from these sensors may be fused and correlated or decorrelated with other sensor data to get an accurate picture of the object(s) above the submarine. These devices can complement traditional submarine periscopes that have a limited field of view in the elevation direction. Also, these techniques circumvent the need for exposing the entire submarine or its periscopes to the outside environment.

  15. Methods for LWIR Radiometric Calibration and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Harrington, Gary; Howell, Dane; Pagnutti, Mary; Zanoni, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    The utility of a remote sensing system increases with its ability to retrieve surface temperature or radiance accurately. Research applications, such as sea temperature and power plant discharge, require a 0.2 C resolution or better for absolute temperature retrievals. Other applications, including agriculture water stress detection, require at least a 1 C resolution. To achieve these levels of accuracy routinely, scientists must perform laboratory and onboard calibration, as well as in-flight vicarious radiometric characterization. A common approach used for in-flight radiometric characterization incorporates a well-calibrated infrared radiometer that is mounted on a bouy and placed on a uniform water body. The radiometer monitors radiant temperature along with pressure, humidity, and temperature measurements of an associated column of atmosphere. On very still waters, however, a buoy can significantly distrub these measurements. Researchers at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) have developed a novel approach of using an uncooled infrared camera mounted on a boom to quantify buoy effects. Another critical aspect of using buoy-mounted infrared radiometers is the need for extensive laboratory characterization of the instruments' radiometric sensitivity, field of view, and spectral response. Proper surface temperature retrieval also requires detailed knowledge of both the upward emission and the reflected sky emission. Recent work at SSC has demonstrated that the use of a polarization-based radiometer operating at the Brewster angle can greatly simplify temperature retrieval as well as improve overall accuracy.

  16. Lessons Learned from the AIRS Pre-Flight Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Weiler, Margie

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flies on the NASA Aqua satellite and measures the upwelling hyperspectral earth radiance in the spectral range of 3.7-15.4 micron with a nominal ground resolution at nadir of 13.5 km. The AIRS spectra are achieved using a temperature controlled grating spectrometer and HgCdTe infrared linear arrays providing 2378 channels with a nominal spectral resolution of approximately 1200. The AIRS pre-flight tests that impact the radiometric calibration include a full system radiometric response (linearity), polarization response, and response vs scan angle (RVS). We re-derive the AIRS instrument radiometric calibration coefficients from the pre-flight polarization measurements, the response vs scan (RVS) angle tests as well as the linearity tests, and a recent lunar roll test that allowed the AIRS to view the moon. The data and method for deriving the coefficients is discussed in detail and the resulting values compared amongst the different tests. Finally, we examine the residual errors in the reconstruction of the external calibrator blackbody radiances and the efficacy of a new radiometric uncertainty model. Results show the radiometric calibration of AIRS to be excellent and the radiometric uncertainty model does a reasonable job of characterizing the errors.

  17. Radiometric ages of Tennessee rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Corgan, J.X.; Bradley, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report compiles and summarizes all known radiometric age determinations based on bedrock samples from Tennessee. Data are available for 89 sites. Specimens record both igneous and metamorphic events ranging in age from 1.3 billion to 220 million years before present. Tennessee rocks have been dated by techniques that measure the results of four different kinds of radioactive decay: thorium-lead, uranium-lead, potassium-argon, and rubidium-strontium. Most determinations meet normal scientific standards for reliability. This study focuses on clarifying published data by bringing together geochemical, geological, and geographical information for each site. In addition to data on the age of bedrock samples, this study presents basic information on the ages of meteorites from Tennessee and on the ages of sediments and organic remains from Ice Age fossil sites and more recent archeological sites. While bedrock ages are the thrust of the report, other kinds of absolute age determinations are briefly discussed. 98 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Radiometric validation of NASA's Ames Research Center's Sensor Calibration Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven W; Johnson, B Carol; Biggar, Stuart F; Zalewski, Edward F; Cooper, John; Hajek, Pavel; Hildum, Edward; Grant, Patrick; Barnes, Robert A; Butler, James J

    2005-10-20

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Ames Research Center's Airborne Sensor Facility (ASF) is responsible for the calibration of several airborne Earth-viewing sensor systems in support of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) investigations. The primary artifact used to calibrate these sensors in the reflective solar region from 400 to 2500 nm is a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source. In September 1999, a measurement comparison was made at the Ames ASF Sensor Calibration Facility to validate the radiometric scale, establish the uncertainties assigned to the radiance of this source, and examine its day-to-day repeatability. The comparison was one of a series of validation activities overseen by the EOS Calibration Program to ensure the radiometric calibration accuracy of sensors used in long-term, global, remote-sensing studies. Results of the comparison, including an evaluation of the Ames Sensor Calibration Laboratory (SCL) measurement procedures and assigned radiometric uncertainties, provide a validation of their radiometric scale at the time of the comparison. Additionally, the maintenance of the radiance scale was evaluated by use of independent, long-term, multiyear radiance validation measurements of the Ames sphere source. This series of measurements provided an independent assessment of the radiance values assigned to integrating sphere sources by the Ames SCF. Together, the measurements validate the SCF radiometric scale and assigned uncertainties over the time period from September 1999 through July 2003.

  19. Radiometric validation of NASA's Ames Research Center's Sensor Calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Biggar, Stuart F.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Cooper, John; Hajek, Pavel; Hildum, Edward; Grant, Patrick; Barnes, Robert A.; Butler, James J

    2005-10-20

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Ames Research Center's Airborne Sensor Facility (ASF) is responsible for the calibration of several airborne Earth-viewing sensor systems in support of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) investigations. The primary artifact used to calibrate these sensors in the reflective solar region from 400 to 2500 nm is a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source. In September 1999, a measurement comparison was made at the Ames ASF Sensor Calibration Facility to validate the radiometric scale, establish the uncertainties assigned to the radiance of this source, and examine its day-to-day repeatability. The comparison was one of a series of validation activities overseen by the EOS Calibration Program to ensure the radiometric calibration accuracy of sensors used in long-term, global, remote-sensing studies. Results of the comparison, including an evaluation of the Ames Sensor Calibration Laboratory (SCL) measurement procedures and assigned radiometric uncertainties, provide a validation of their radiometric scale at the time of the comparison. Additionally, the maintenance of the radiance scale was evaluated by use of independent, long-term, multiyear radiance validation measurements of the Ames sphere source. This series of measurements provided an independent assessment of the radiance values assigned to integrating sphere sources by the Ames SCF. Together, the measurements validate the SCF radiometric scale and assigned uncertainties over the time period from September 1999 through July 2003.

  20. An extended area blackbody for radiometric calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVeigne, Joe; Franks, Greg; Singer, Jake; Arenas, D. J.; McHugh, Steve

    2013-06-01

    SBIR is developing an enhanced blackbody for improved radiometric testing. The main feature of the blackbody is an improved coating with higher emissivity than the standard coating used. Comparative measurements of the standard and improved coatings are reported, including reflectance. The coatings were also tested with infrared imagers and a broadband emissivity estimate derived from the imagery data. In addition, a control algorithm for constant slew rate has been implemented, primarily for use in minimum resolvable temperature measurements. The system was tested over a range of slew rates from 0.05 K/min to 10 K/min and its performance reported.

  1. Radiometric characterization of the NASA GSFC radiometric calibration facility primary transfer radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John W.; Brown, Steven W.; Abel, Peter; Marketon, John E.; Butler, James J.

    2004-11-01

    As part of an effort to reduce uncertainties in the radiometric calibrations of integrating sphere sources and standard lamp irradiance sources, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Radiometric Calibration Facility (RCF) primary radiometer was characterized at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). Specifically, the radiometer's slit spectral function was measured and the magnitude of out-of-band stray light was determined. The characterization also revealed significant contributions of spectral stray light due to fluorescence of the radiometer's input sphere. The RCF examined the effects of stray light and sphere fluorescence in the radiometer on source radiance calibrations along with approaches to reduce those sources of measurement error.

  2. In-flight Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, D.; Savage, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral scanner system was placed into Earth orbit on July 16, 1982, as part of NASA's LANDSAT 4 payload. To determine temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire system in flight, spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere are made simultaneously with TM image acquisitions over the White Sands, New Mexico area. By entering the measured values into an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels at the entrance pupil of the TM in four of the TM spectral bands are determined. These levels are compared to the output digital counts from the detectors that sampled the radiometrically measured ground area, thus providing an absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system utilizing those detectors. By reference to an adjacent, larger uniform area, the calibration is extended to all 16 detectors in each of the three bands.

  3. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system in flight spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM image collections over the White Sands, New Mexico area. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined, band 1:0.45 to 0.52 micrometers, band 2:0.53 to 0.61 micrometers band 3:0.62 to 0.70 micrometers and 4:0.78 to 0.91 micrometers. These levels were compared to the output digital counts from the detectors that sampled the radiometrically measured ground area, thus providing an absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system utilizing those detectors.

  4. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system in flight spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM image collections over the White Sands, NM area. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined, band 1: 0.45 to 0.52 micrometers, band 2: 0.53 to 0.61 micrometers, band 3: 0.62 to 0.70 micrometers, and 4: 0.78 to 0.91 micrometers. These levels were compared to the output digital counts from the detectors that sampled the radiometrically measured ground area, thus providing an absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system utilizing those detectors. Previously announced in STAR as N84-15633

  5. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  6. Assessment of VIIRS radiometric performance using vicarious calibration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Sirish; Cao, Changyong; Blonski, Slawomir; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-09-01

    Radiometric performance of satellite instruments needs to be regularly monitored to determine if there is any drift in the instrument response over time despite the calibration with the best effort. If a drift occurs, it needs to be characterized in order to keep the radiometric accuracy and stability well within the specification. Instrument gain change over time can be validated independently using many techniques such as using stable earth targets (desert, ocean, snow sites etc), inter-comparison with other well calibrated radiometers (using SNO, SNO-x), deep convective clouds (DCC), lunar observations or other methods. This study focus on using vicarious calibration sites for the assessment of radiometric performance of Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) reflective solar bands. The calibration stability is primarily analyzed by developing the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance time series over these sites. In addition, the radiometric bias relative to AQUA MODIS is estimated over these calibration sites and analyzed. The radiometric bias is quantified in terms of observed and spectral bias. The spectral characterization and bias analysis will be performed using hyperspectral measurements and radiative transfer models such as MODTRAN.

  7. Radiometric acid-base titrations.

    PubMed

    Erdey, L; Gimesi, O; Szabadváry, F

    1969-03-01

    Acid-base titrations can be performed with radiometric end-point detection by use of labelled metal salts (e.g., ZnCl(2), HgCl(2)). Owing to the formation or dissolution of the corresponding hydroxide after the equivalence point, the activity of the titrated solution linearly increases or decreases as excess of standard solution is added. The end-point of the titration is determined graphically.

  8. Sentinel-3 OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performance Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, L.; Blanot, L.; Lamquin, N.; Bruniquel, V.; Meskini, N.; Nieke, J.; Bouvet, M.; Fougnie, B.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the activities to be undertaken by ACRI-ST under ESA/ESTEC coordination for the assessment of OLCI Radiometric and Spectral Performances during the SENTINEL-3 Commissioning Phase. As an introduction, it briefly describes the instrument concept and available on-board calibration hardware, the context and main objective of the work. Insisting on the fact that radiometric calibration of OLCI is based on in-flight measurements, as was for MERIS, it then describes the methodology and tools to be used during Commissioning. Finally, as in-flight based radiometry implies the need for independent validation, it describes the corresponding methods and tools.

  9. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  10. A multichannel wide FOV infrared radiometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S.; Lissak, Z.; Yoav, Y.; Komet, Y.; Davidson, R.

    1989-07-01

    A radiometric system which consists of five IR radiometers with a mutual data acquisition system is described. The system was designed, developed and built at IAI to conduct simultaneous IR signature measurements of a high intensity source at different aspect angles. The requirement to provide a wide FOV radiometric capability led to a technical solution based on the combination of refractive and reflective optics. Each radiometer is equipped with a ZnSe lens, elliptical mirror, mechanical chopper and a thermoelectrically cooled PbSe detector. The chopper is positioned before the entrance aperture and its blades serve as an ambient temperature reference Black Body. The reference temperature is monitored by a temperature transducer. The optical layout of the radiometers and relevant ray tracing examples are demonstrated. The radiometer sensitivity and field of view response data are presented. The data acquisition as well as software capabilities are described. The system is remotely operated. Data on source intensity, at different aspect angles, may be obtained immediately after the test.

  11. GIFTS SM EDU Radiometric and Spectral Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, J.; Reisse, R. a.; Johnson, D. G.; Gazarik, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Sensor Module (SM) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is a high resolution spectral imager designed to measure infrared (IR) radiance using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The GIFTS instrument gathers measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. This paper describes the processing algorithms involved in the calibration. The calibration procedures can be subdivided into three categories: the pre-calibration stage, the calibration stage, and finally, the post-calibration stage. Detailed derivations for each stage are presented in this paper.

  12. Absolute radiometric calibration of the Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Calibration data for the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 TM obtained from five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations from July 1984-November 1985 at White Sands, New Mexico are presented and analyzed. Ground reflectance and atmospheric data were utilized to predict the spectral radiance at the entrance pupil of the TM and the average number of digital counts in each TM band. The calibration of each of the TM solar reflective bands was calculated in terms of average digital counts/unit spectral radiance for each band. It is observed that for the 12 reflectance-based measurements the rms variation from the means as a percentage of the mean is + or - 1.9 percent; for the 11 measurements in the IR bands, it is + or - 3.4 percent; and the rms variation for all 23 measurements is + or - 2.8 percent.

  13. Overview of the radiometric calibration of MOBY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Dennis K.; Feinholz, Michael; Yarbrough, Mark; Johnson, B. Carol; Brown, Steven W.; Kim, Yong S.; Barnes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    a negative difference for the post- deployment values. This trend is to be expected after a deployment of 3 months. To date, only the pre-deployment calibration measurements have been used to adjust the system responses for the MOBY time series. Based on these results, the estimated radiometric uncertainty for MOBY in-water ocean color measurements is estimated to be about 4% to 8% (kequals1). As part of a collaboration with NIST, annual radiometric comparisons are made at the MOBY calibration facility. NIST personnel use transfer radiometers and integrating spheres to validate (verify) the accuracy of the MOBY calibration sources. Recently, we began a study of the stray light contribution to the radiometric uncertainty in the MOBY systems. A complete reprocessing of the MOBY data set, including the changes within each MOBY deployment, will commence upon the completion of the stray light characterization, which is scheduled for the fall of 2001. It is anticipated that this reprocessing will reduce the overall radiometric uncertainty to less than 5% (kequals1).

  14. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Forward Modeling Results from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, E.R.; Cimini, D.; Klein, M.; Leuski, V.; Mattioli, V.; Gasiewski, A.J.; Dowlatshahi, S.; Liljegren, J.S.; Lesht, B.M.; Shaw, J.A.

    2005-03-18

    The 2004 Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program field site near Barrow, Alaska from March 9 to April 9, 2004. The goals of the experiment were: to study the microwave and millimeter wave radiometric response to water vapor and clouds during cold and dry conditions; to obtain data for forward model studies at frequencies ranging from 22.235 to 400 GHz, to demonstrate new Environmental Technology Laboratory's (ETL) radiometric receiver and calibration technology and to compare both radiometric and in situ measurements of water vapor.

  15. Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of radiometric tarps

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J

    2008-06-20

    Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of radiometric tarp samples used in the vicarious calibration of Earth remote sensing satellite instruments are presented in this paper. The results illustrate the BRDF dependence on the orientation of the tarps' weft and warp threads. The study was performed using the GSFC scatterometer at incident zenith angles of 0 deg., 10 deg., and 30 deg.; scatter zenith angles from 0 deg. to 60 deg.; and scatter azimuth angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg.. The wavelengths were 485 nm, 550 nm, 633 nm, and 800 nm. The tarp's weft and warp dependence on BRDF is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. The BRDF difference can be as high as 8% at 0 deg. incident angle and 12% at 30 deg. incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps are reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well-pronounced forward scatter. The provided BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps is an excellent reference for anyone interested in using tarps for radiometric calibrations. The results are NIST traceable.

  16. Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of radiometric tarps.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Georgi T; Butler, James J

    2008-06-20

    Laboratory-based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of radiometric tarp samples used in the vicarious calibration of Earth remote sensing satellite instruments are presented in this paper. The results illustrate the BRDF dependence on the orientation of the tarps' weft and warp threads. The study was performed using the GSFC scatterometer at incident zenith angles of 0 degrees, 10 degrees, and 30 degrees; scatter zenith angles from 0 degrees to 60 degrees; and scatter azimuth angles of 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, 135 degrees, and 180 degrees. The wavelengths were 485 nm, 550 nm, 633 nm, and 800 nm. The tarp's weft and warp dependence on BRDF is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. The BRDF difference can be as high as 8% at 0 degrees incident angle and 12% at 30 degrees incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps are reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well-pronounced forward scatter. The provided BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps is an excellent reference for anyone interested in using tarps for radiometric calibrations. The results are NIST traceable.

  17. Determination of in-flight AVIRIS spectral, radiometric, spatial and signal-to-noise characteristics using atmospheric and surface measurements from the vicinity of the rare-earth-bearing carbonatite at Mountain Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Vane, Gregg; Conel, James E.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) performance was made for a flight over Mountain Pass, California, July 30, 1987. The flight data were reduced to reflectance using an empirical algorithm which compensates for solar, atmospheric and instrument factors. AVIRIS data in conjunction with surface and atmospheric measurements acquired concurrently were used to develop an improved spectral calibration. An accurate in-flight radiometric calibration was also performed using the LOWTRAN 7 radiative transfer code together with measured surface reflectance and atmospheric optical depths. A direct comparison with coincident Thematic Mapper imagery of Mountain Pass was used to demonstrate the high spatial resolution and good geometric performance of AVIRIS. The in-flight instrument noise was independently determined with two methods which showed good agreement. A signal-to-noise ratio was calculated using data from a uniform playa. This ratio was scaled to the AVIRIS reference radiance model, which provided a basis for comparison with laboratory and other in-flight signal-to-noise determinations.

  18. Thematic mapper: detailed radiometric and geometric characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh

    1983-01-01

    Those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data have been examined. Subscenes of radiometric all raw data (B-data) were examined on an individual detector basis: areas of uniform radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. A variety of anomalies have been discovered with magnitude of a few digital levels or less: the only problem not addressable by ground processing is irregular width of the digital levels. Essentially all of this non-ideal performance is incorporated in the fully processed (P-type) images, but disguised by the geometric resampling procedure. The overall performance of the Thematic Mapper is a great improvement over previous Landsat scanners. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by about a factor of two by irregular width of the digital levels. Several detectors have a change of gain with a period of several scans, the largest effect is about 4%. These detectors appear to switch between two response levels during scan direction reversal; there is no apparent periodicity to these changes. This can cause small apparent difference between forward and reverse scans for portions of an image. The high-frequency noise level of each detector was characterized by the standard deviation of the first derivative in the sample direction across a flat field. Coherent sinusoidal noise patterns were determined using one-dimensional Fourier transforms. A "stitching" pattern in Band 1 has a period of 13.8 samples with a peak-to-peak amplitude ranging from 1 to 5 DN. Noise with a period of 3.24 samples is pronounced for most detectors in band 1, to a lesser extent in bands 2, 3, and 4, and below background noise levels in bands 5, 6, and 7. The geometric fidelity of the GSFC film writer used for Thematic Mapper (TM) images was assessed by measurement with accuracy bette than three micrometers of a test grid. A set of 55

  19. Radiometric studies of Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    PubMed

    Camargo, E E; Larson, S M; Tepper, B S; Wagner, H N

    1976-01-01

    The radiometric method has been applied for studying the metabolism of M. lepraemurium and the conditions which might force or inhibit its metabolic activity in vitro. These organisms assimilate and oxidize (U-14C) glycerol, and (U-14C) acetate, but are unable to oxidize (U-14C) glucose, (U-14C) pyruvate, (U-14C) glycine and 14C-formate. When incubated at 30 degrees C M. lepraemurium oxidizes (U-14C) acetate to 14CO2 faster than 37 degrees C. The smae effect was observed with increasing concentrations of polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), or the 14C-substrate. No change in metabolic rate was observed when the organisms were kept at -20 degrees C for 12 days. Although tried several times, it was not possible to demonstrate any "inhibitors" of bacterial metabolism in the reaction system. The radiometric method seems to be an important tool for studying metabolic pathways and the influence of physical and biochemical factors on the metabolism of M. lepraemurium in vitro.

  20. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  1. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  2. A Non-Radiative Transfer Approach to Radiometric Vicarious Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance from high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery systems is important for a wide variety of research and applications. Many research initiatives require data with absolute radiometric accuracy better than a few percent. The conversion of satellite digital numbers to radiance depends on accurate radiometric calibration. A common method for determining and validating radiometric calibrations is to rely upon vicarious calibration approaches. Historically, vicarious calibration methods use radiative transfer codes with ground-based atmosphere and surface reflectance or radiance inputs for estimating TOA radiance values. These TOA radiance values are compared against the satellite digital numbers to determine the radiometric calibration. However, the radiative transfer codes used depend on many assumptions about the aerosol properties and the atmospheric point spread function. A measurement-based atmospheric radiance estimation approach for high-spatial-resolution, multispectral, visible/near-infrared sensors is presented that eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and many of the underlying assumptions. A comparison between the radiative transfer and non-radiative transfer approaches is made.

  3. Analysis and modeling of radiometric error caused by imaging blur in optical remote sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xufen; Zhang, Yuncui; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Imaging blur changes the digital output values of imaging systems. It leads to radiometric errors when the system is used for measurement. In this paper, we focus on the radiometric error due to imaging blur in remote sensing imaging systems. First, in accordance with the radiometric response calibration of imaging systems, we provide a theoretical analysis on the evaluation standard of radiometric errors caused by imaging blur. Then, we build a radiometric error model for imaging blur based on the natural stochastic fractal characteristics of remote sensing images. Finally, we verify the model by simulations and physical defocus experiments. The simulation results show that the modeling estimation result approaches to the simulation computation. The maximum difference of relative MSE (Mean Squared Error) between simulation computation and modeling estimation can achieve 1.6%. The physical experimental results show that the maximum difference of relative MSE between experimental results and modeling estimation is only 1.29% under experimental conditions. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed model is correct, which can be used to estimate the radiometric error caused by imaging blur in remote sensing images. This research is of great importance for radiometric measurement system evaluation and application.

  4. Radiometric measurements over bare and vegetated fields at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. [Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Engman, E. T.; Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Microwave emission from bare and vegetated fields was measured with dual polarized radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields are shown to compare favorably with those calculated from radiative transfer theory with two constant parameters characterizing surface roughness effect. The presence of vegetation cover is found to reduce the sensitivity to soil moisture variation. This sensitivity reduction is generally pronounced the denser, the vegetation cover and the higher the frequency of observation. The effect of vegetation cover is also examined with respect to the measured polarization factor at both frequencies. With the exception of dry corn fields, the measured polarization factor over vegetated fields is found appreciably reduced compared to that over bare fields. A much larger reduction in this factor is found at 5GHz than at 1.4GHz frequency.

  5. Changes in the Radiometric Sensitivity of SeaWiFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Patt, Frederick S.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the lunar and solar measurements used to determine the changes in the radiometric sensitivity of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Radiometric sensitivity is defined as the output from the instrument (or from one of the instrument bands) per unit spectral radiance at the instrument's input aperture. Knowledge of the long-term repeatability of the SeaWiFS measurements is crucial to maintaining the quality of the ocean scenes derived from measurements by the instrument. For SeaWiFS bands 1 through 6 (412 nm through 670 rim), the change in radiometric sensitivity is less than 0.2% for the period from November 1997 through November 1998. For band 7 (765 nm), the change is about 1.5%, and for band 8 (865 nm) about 5%. The rates of change of bands 7 and 8, which were linear with time for the first eight months of lunar measurements, are now slowing. The scatter in the data points about the trend lines in this analysis is less than 0.3% for all eight SeaWiFS bands. These results are based on monthly measurements of the moon. Daily solar measurements using an onboard diffuser show that the radiometric sensitivities of the SeaWiFS bands have changed smoothly during the time intervals between lunar measurements. Since SeaWiFS measurements have continued past November 1998, the results presented here are considered as a snapshot of the instrument performance as of that date.

  6. Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors Using the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Anderson, N. J.; Thome, K. J.; Biggar, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) of the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona uses the reflectance-based approach to perform the absolute radiometric calibration of such sensors as Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, Terra and Aqua MODIS, ASTER, RapidEye, and others. The reflectance-based approach requires that personnel be present at a test site during the sensor overpass, so the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) was developed in order to capture data during every possible overpass, which assists in the temporal trending of the radiometric calibration of earth-observing sensors. The number of earth-observing sensors is rapidly increasing in recent years, and RadCaTS provides the ability to radiometrically calibrate them without the requirement of frequent field campaigns. The 2013 launch of Landsat 8 provides a unique opportunity for RadCaTS in that it is being used to supplement the in situ measurements by RSG ground personnel, and it will be used throughout the lifetime of the Landsat 8 mission. This allows more data to be collected throughout the year, and it also allows the accuracy and uncertainty of RadCaTS to be analyzed. The current top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectral radiance uncertainty of the reflectance-based approach is ~2.6% in the mid-visible region of the spectrum, and current work indicates that the uncertainty of RadCaTS in TOA spectral radiance is ~3-4%. This work presents the radiometric calibration results of RadCaTS for a variety of sensors such as Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, Terra and Aqua MODIS, MISR, ASTER, and Suomi NPP VIIRS.

  7. Experimental Research on Passive Millimeter Wave Radiometric Stealth Technology of Metal Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangfeng; Lou, Guowei; Li, Xingguo

    2012-12-01

    Working all day and all weather, a passive millimeter wave radiometer (PMMW) can be widely used in civil and military affairs. It can get some specific information about the material characteristics different from radar and infrared detectors. On basis of the radiometric operating range equation, the radiation cross section and stealth effect of metal objects are presented for the PMMW near-sensing application. The measurement experiments of metal solid models adopts 3 mm band Dicke radiometer with the outdoor calibration system. The sky temperature and other different surface metal objects are also measured as the contrastive experiments. The results show the radiometric temperature contrasts of solid models have remarkable difference in the bare and coated conditions, and the radiometric operating range can decrease to 60.8 %. In addition, the PMMW stealth methods through different surface treatment respectively reduce the radiometric antenna temperature contrast in some degree.

  8. Radiometric Meteorology: radon progeny as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Mark; Iwata, Atsushi; Ito, Nahoko; Kubo, Kenya; Komura, Kazu; Ishizaki, Miho

    2008-10-01

    In-situ measurement of atmospheric γ radiation from radon progeny determine rain and snow rates to better accuracy than standard rain gauges and gives a handle on how droplets are formed. The measured γ ray rates (GRR) have been shown to be proportional to a power of radiometric precipitation rates (RPR)^α, α giving a handle on the extent to which radon progeny are surface adsorbed or volume absorbed.ootnotetextM. B. Greenfield et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93, (2003) pp 5733-5741. More recently time dependent ratios of GRR from ^214Pb and ^214Bi, concentrated from collected rainwater, have been used to determine the elapsed time since activity from RPR, adhered to rain droplets, was removed from secular equilibrium. Ion exchange resins precipitate out the ^214Pb and ^214Bi ions, which are then filtered from 10s of liters of rainwater or snowmelt. A portable Ge detector is used to integrate the resulting activity over 5-10 min intervals. The measured evolution of these two activities from secular equilibrium to transient equilibrium has meteorological applications enabling both the determination of average elapsed times between the formation of raindrops and the time they reach the ground, as well as an estimate of the initial activity at the source of droplet formation.

  9. Susceptibility testing of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B by a rapid radiometric method

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, W.G.; Fay, D.; Thumar, B.; Dixon, D.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid, radiometric method was developed to determine the susceptibility of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B. The rapid, radiometric method depended on measurement of the inhibition of /sup 24/CO/sub 2/ production in the presence of amphotericin B. Thirty isolates of filamentous fungi were tested by the rapid, radiometric method and a reference agar dilution method. There was 93% agreement between the two methods when an 80% or greater decrease in CO/sub 2/ production was used to calculate the minimal inhibitory concentration with the rapid, radiometric method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, based on 80% decrease of CO/sub 2/ production, were achieved within 24 h of incubation with all of the fungi tested.

  10. Radiometric-microbiologic assay fo vitamin B-6: analysis of plasma samples

    SciTech Connect

    Guilarte, T.R.; McIntyre, P.A.

    1981-11-01

    A radiometric microbiologic assay for the analysis of vitamin B-6 in plasma was developed. The method is based on the measurement of 14CO2 generated from the metabolism of DL-l-14C-valine (L-l-14C-valine) by Kloeckera brevis. The assay is specific for the biologically active forms of the vitamin, that is, pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxamine, and their respective phosphorylated forms. The biologically inert vitamin B-6 metabolite (4-pyridoxic acid) did not generate a response at concentrations tested. The radiometric technique was shown to be sensitive to the 1 nanogram level. Reproducibility and recovery studies gave good results. Fifteen plasma samples were assayed using the radiometric and turbidimetric techniques. The correlation coefficient was r . 0.98. Turbid material or precipitated debris did not interfere with the radiometric microbiologic assay, thus allowing for simplification of assay procedure.

  11. Issues in Absolute Spectral Radiometric Calibration: Intercomparison of Eight Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Kindel, Bruce; Pilewskie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The application of atmospheric models to AVIRIS and other spectral imaging data to derive surface reflectance requires that the sensor output be calibrated to absolute radiance. Uncertainties in absolute calibration are to be expected, and claims of 92% accuracy have been published. Measurements of accurate surface albedos and cloud absorption to be used in radiative balance calculations depend critically on knowing the absolute spectral-radiometric response of the sensor. The Earth Observing System project is implementing a rigorous program of absolute radiometric calibration for all optical sensors. Since a number of imaging instruments that provide output in terms of absolute radiance are calibrated at different sites, it is important to determine the errors that can be expected among calibration sites. Another question exists about the errors in the absolute knowledge of the exoatmospheric spectral solar irradiance.

  12. Radiometric calibration procedures for a wideband infrared scene projector (WISP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, David S.; Marlow, Steven A.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Kircher, James R.

    1999-07-01

    The Wideband Infrared Scene Projector (WISP) has been undergoing development for the Kinetic-Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. In order to perform realistic tests of an infrared seeker, the radiometric output of the WISP system must produce the same response in the seeker as the real scene. In order to ensure this radiometric realism, calibration procedures must be established and followed. This paper describes calibration procedures that have been used in recent tests. The procedures require knowledge of the camera spectral response in the seeker under test. The camera is set up to operate over the desired range of observable radiances. The camera is then nonuniformity corrected (NUCed) and calibrated with an extended blackbody. The camera drift rates are characterized, and as necessary, the camera is reNUCed and recalibrated. The camera is then set up to observe the WISP system, and calibration measurements are made of the camera/WISP system.

  13. SLC-off Landsat-7 ETM+ reflective band radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Thome, K.J.; Barker, J.L.; Scaramuzza, P.L.; Helder, D.L.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Since May 31, 2003, when the scan line corrector (SLC) on the Landsat-7 ETM+ failed, the primary foci of Landsat-7 ETM+ analyses have been on understanding and attempting to fix the problem and later on developing composited products to mitigate the problem. In the meantime, the Image Assessment System personnel and vicarious calibration teams have continued to monitor the radiometric performance of the ETM+ reflective bands. The SLC failure produced no measurable change in the radiometric calibration of the ETM+ bands. No trends in the calibration are definitively present over the mission lifetime, and, if present, are less than 0.5% per year. Detector 12 in Band 7 dropped about 0.5% in response relative to the rest of the detectors in the band in May 2004 and recovered back to within 0.1% of its initial relative gain in October 2004.

  14. Laboratory-Based BRDF Calibration of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the remote sensing community with important high accuracy laboratory-based BRDF calibration of radiometric tarps. The results illustrate the dependence of tarps' weft and warp threads orientation on BRDF. The study was done at incident angles of 0deg, 10deg, and 30deg; scatter zenith angles from 0deg to 60deg, and scatter azimuth angles of 0deg, 45deg, 90deg, 135deg, and 180deg. The wavelengths were 485nm, 550nm, 633nm and 800nm. The dependence is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. It can be as high as 8% at 0deg incident angle and 2% at 30deg incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps is reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well pronounced forward scatter. The BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps can be successfully extended to other structured surface fabric samples. The results are NIST traceable.

  15. Selection of chemotherapy for patient treatment utilizing a radiometric versus a cloning system

    SciTech Connect

    Von Hoff, D.D.; Forseth, B.J.; Turner, J.N.; Clark, G.M.; Warfel, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    From the 1950s to the 1970s, a number of in vitro systems that measured inhibition of glucose metabolism were used to predict the responsiveness of patients' tumors to chemotherapy. In vitro-in vivo correlations were excellent, with true positive predictions ranging from 68% to 96% and true negative predictions of 95% to 100%. The radiometric system is a new in vitro technique that measures the conversion of 14C-glucose to 14CO2. The system already has been utilized to screen prospective new antineoplastic agents for cytotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to determine if the radiometric system might be used to predict correctly the responsiveness of an individual patient's tumor to single-agent or combination-agent chemotherapy. Fifty-six tumor specimens were divided and tested for drug sensitivity in the radiometric system and a conventional human tumor clonning system. Overall, there was a significant correlation between in vitro and in vivo results for the conventional cloning system (P = 0.03). However, there was no significant relationship between in vitro and in vivo results for the radiometric system. The radiometric system consistently failed to predict the tumor's clinical sensitivity to single agents. A radiometric system is not useful in predicting the responsiveness of a patient's tumor to single agent chemotherapy and is not a replacement for the more biologically attractive human tumor cloning system.

  16. BOREAS TE-18, 60-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 2 1 Jun-1995. The 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18-Sep-1994 in the SSA and 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (1991). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, the full-resolution (30-m) images may not be publicly distributed. However, this spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images may be openly distributed and is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. After the radiometric rectification processing, the original data were degraded to a 60-m pixel size from the original 30-m pixel size by averaging the data over a 2- by 2-pixel window. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Radiometric cross-calibration of KOMPSAT-3 with Landsat-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongyoon; Jin, Cheonggil; Ahn, Hoyong; Choi, Chuluong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a radiometric cross calibration of KOMPSAT-3 AEISS based on Landsat-8 OLI. Cross calibration between the two sensors using simultaneous image pairs, acquired during an underfly event over the Libya 4 pseudo invariant calibration site (PICS) site. The spectral profile of the target comes from the near-simultaneous EO-1 Hyperion data over these sites for apply Spectral Band Adjustment Factor (SBAF). The results indicate that the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance measurements for KOMPSAT-3 agree with Landsat-8 to within 5% after the application of SBAF. To validate radiometric coefficient, comparison TOA reflectance executed in north Virginia, USA. The difference in TOA reflectance was calculated to within a maximum ±1.55%. There was a huge improvement when the standard deviation altered from 0.1 to 0.01, when applying the SBAF. The result of radiometric coefficient presented here appear to be a good standard for maintaining the optical quality of the KOMPSAT-3, for which prelaunch, onboard, and vicarious calibration data are lacking.

  18. Results of magnetic HGI and radiometric surveys in W. Canada

    SciTech Connect

    LeSchack, L.A.

    1997-05-19

    This article presents four case histories in which ground-based magnetic horizontal gradient intensity (HGI) and radiometric surveys were used in Western Canada for cost-effective geochemical exploration for hydrocarbons. The authors has developed these two surface exploration techniques from published studies and adapted them for use on the prairies the past 7 years. These surveys are used in conjunction with the usual geologic and seismic studies for: (1) evaluating prospects and land; (2) verifying seismic anomalies and inexpensively locating areas for conducting expensive 3D seismic surveys. Occasionally, as in two of the case histories discussed, these surveys were used successfully as stand-alone exploration methods where seismic exploration is not effective. The HGI and radiometric surveys measure, by geophysical methods, those effects associated with geochemical alterations due to vertical microseepage of hydrocarbons. The total cost, including permitting, data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation of the combination HGI and radiometric surveys is about 15% the total cost of a 3D seismic survey. Because of this, the author finds them an attractive and rapid survey adjunct to traditional exploration. They substantially reduce finding costs and significantly raise the probability of financial success.

  19. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  20. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The TM multispectral scanner system was calibrated in an absolute manner before launch. To determine the temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire system, spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM collections over White Sands, New Mexico. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels of the in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined. Tables show values for the reflectance of snow at White Sands measured by a modular 8 channel radiometer, and values for exoatmospheric irradiance within the TM passbands, calculated for the Earth-Sun distance using a solar radiometer.

  1. A multi-channel radiometric profiler of temperature, humidity and cloud liquid.

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Carpenter, R.; Guldner, J.; Liljegren, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Solheim, F.; Vandenberghe, F.; Environmental Research; Radiometrics Corp.; Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research; Weather Decision Technologies Inc.; Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc.; National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2003-07-31

    A microwave radiometer is described that provides continuous thermodynamic (temperature, water vapor, and moisture) soundings during clear and cloudy conditions. The radiometric profiler observes radiation intensity at 12 microwave frequencies, along with zenith infrared and surface meteorological measurements. Historical radiosonde and neural network or regression methods are used for profile retrieval. We compare radiometric, radiosonde, and forecast soundings and evaluate the accuracy of radiometric temperature and water vapor soundings on the basis of statistical comparison with radiosonde soundings. We find that radiometric soundings are equivalent in accuracy to radiosonde soundings when used in numerical weather forecasting. A case study is described that demonstrates improved fog forecasting on the basis of variational assimilation of radiometric soundings. The accuracy of radiometric cloud liquid soundings is evaluated by comparison with cloud liquid sensors carried by radiosondes. Accurate high-resolution three-dimensional water vapor and wind analysis is described on the basis of assimilation of simulated thermodynamic and wind soundings along with GPS slant delays. Examples of mobile thermodynamic and wind profilers are shown. Thermodynamic profiling, particularly when combined with wind profiling and slant GPS, provides continuous atmospheric soundings for improved weather and dispersion forecasting.

  2. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper

    SciTech Connect

    Wukelic, G.E.; Gibbons, D.E.; Martucci, L.M.; Foote, H.P.

    1988-08-01

    Absolute calibration of satellite-acquired data is essential for quantification of scientific studies and a variety of image- processing applications. This paper describes a multiyear, on-orbit radiometric calibration of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). Primary emphasis was placed on TM band 6 (thermal) calibration, but selected reflectance-band calibration measurements were also made. Twenty-five Landsat TM coverages were acquired, and included day, night, and seasonal scenes at several geographical locations. Concurrent with Landsat overpasses, thermal and reflectance field and local meteorological (surface and radiosonde) measurements were collected. At-satellite (uncorrected) radiances and temperatures for water and non-water land cover were compared to ground truth (GT) measurements after making adjustments for atmospheric (using LOWTRAN), mixed-pixel, and emissivity effects. Results indicate that for well-characterized water features, TM band 6 average corrected temperature determinations using local radiosonde data for atmospheric adjustments are within less than or equal to0.6/degree/C of GT temperature determinations. For non-water features, TM band 6 derived temperatures are within 1/degree/C of GT temperature determinations, if appropriate emissivity adjustments are made. Corrections using non-local radiosonde data resulted in errors as large as 12/degree/C. Corrections using the US Standard atmosphere gave temperature values within 1 to 2/degree/C of GT. The average uncertainty for field instruments was +-0.2/degree/C; average uncertainty for Landsat TM corrected temperature determinations was +-0.4/degree/C. A cross-calibration of TM band 6 and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for a Landsat overpass gave similar temperature results. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. AIRS radiometric calibration validation for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave; Broberg, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Climate research using data from satellite based radiometers makes extreme demands on the traceability and stability of the radiometric calibration. The selection of a cooled grating array spectrometer for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS, is key, but does not ensured that AIRS data will be of climate quality. Additional design features, plus additional pre-launch testing, and extensive on-orbit calibration subsystem monitoring beyond what would suffice for application of the data to weather forecasting were required to ensure the radiometric data quality required for climate research. Validation that climate data quality are being generated makes use of the sea surface skin temperatures (SST and (obs-calc).

  4. Kernel MAD Algorithm for Relative Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Tang, Ping; Hu, Changmiao

    2016-06-01

    The multivariate alteration detection (MAD) algorithm is commonly used in relative radiometric normalization. This algorithm is based on linear canonical correlation analysis (CCA) which can analyze only linear relationships among bands. Therefore, we first introduce a new version of MAD in this study based on the established method known as kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA). The proposed method effectively extracts the non-linear and complex relationships among variables. We then conduct relative radiometric normalization experiments on both the linear CCA and KCCA version of the MAD algorithm with the use of Landsat-8 data of Beijing, China, and Gaofen-1(GF-1) data derived from South China. Finally, we analyze the difference between the two methods. Results show that the KCCA-based MAD can be satisfactorily applied to relative radiometric normalization, this algorithm can well describe the nonlinear relationship between multi-temporal images. This work is the first attempt to apply a KCCA-based MAD algorithm to relative radiometric normalization.

  5. Absolute Radiometric Calibration Of The Thematic Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.; Moran, M. S.; Palmer, J. M.; Yuan, B.

    1986-11-01

    The results are presented of five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations, made in the period July 1984 to November 1985, at White Sands, New Mexico, of the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) . The 23 bandcalibrations made on the five dates show a ± 2.8% RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean.

  6. Radiometric surface temperature components for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature is a boundary condition often used in assessing soil moisture status and energy exchange from the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface. For row crops having incomplete canopy cover, the radiometric surface temperature is a composite of sunlit and shaded vegetation and substr...

  7. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Alireza G; Olsen, Michael J; Parrish, Christopher E; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-11-06

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record "intensity", loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of "normalization", "correction", or "calibration" techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration.

  8. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Alireza G; Olsen, Michael J; Parrish, Christopher E; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record "intensity", loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of "normalization", "correction", or "calibration" techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration. PMID:26561813

  9. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Alireza G.; Olsen, Michael J.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record “intensity”, loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of “normalization”, “correction”, or “calibration” techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration. PMID:26561813

  10. Radiometric terrain correction of SPOT5 image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiuli; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Ke

    2007-06-01

    Remote sensing SPOT5 images have been widely applied to the surveying of agriculture and forest resources and to the monitoring of ecology environment of mountain areas. However, the accuracy of land-cover classification of mountain areas is often influenced by the topographical shadow effect. Radiometric terrain correction is important for this kind of application. In this study, a radiometric terrain correction model which based on the rationale of moment matching was made in ERDAS IMAGINE by using the Spatial Modeler Language. Lanxi city in China as the study area, a SPOT5 multispectral image with the spatial resolution of 10 m of that mountain area was corrected by the model. Furthermore, in order to present the advantage of this new model in radiometric terrain correction of remote sensing SPOT5 image, the traditional C correction approach was also applied to the same area to see its difference with the result of the radiometric terrain correction model. The results show that the C correction approach keeps the overall statistical characteristics of spectral bands. The mean and the standard deviation value of the corrected image are the same as original ones. However, the standard deviation value became smaller by using the radiometric terrain correction model and the mean value changed accordingly. The reason of these changes is that before the correction, the histogram of the original image is represented as the 'plus-skewness distribution' due to the relief-caused shade effect, after the correction of the model, the histogram of the image is represented as the normal distribution and the shade effect of the relief has been removed. But as for the result of the traditional C approach, the skewness of the histogram remains the same after the correction. Besides, some portions of the mountain area have been over-corrected. So in my study area, the C correction approach can't remove the shade effect of the relief ideally. The results show that the radiometric

  11. Evaluation of S190A radiometric exposure test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Goodding, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The S190A preflight radiometric exposure test data generated as part of preflight and system test of KM-002 Sequence 29 on flight camera S/N 002 was analyzed. The analysis was to determine camera system transmission using available data which included: (1) films exposed to a calibrated light source subject; (2) filter transmission data; (3) calibrated light source data; (4) density vs. log10 exposure curves for the films; and (5) spectral sensitometric data for the films. The procedure used is outlined, and includes the data and a transmission matrix as a function of field position for nine measured points on each station-film-filter-aperture-shutter speed combination.

  12. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper multispectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    A main problem encountered in radiometric calibration of satellite image data is correcting for atmospheric effects. Without this correction, an image digital number (DN) cannot be converted to a surface reflectance value. In this paper the accuracy of a calibration procedure, which includes a correction for atmospheric scattering, is tested. Two simple methods, a stand-alone and an in situ sky radiance measurement technique, were used to derive the HAZE DN values for each of the six reflectance Thematic Mapper (TM) bands. The DNs of two Landsat TM images of Phoenix, Arizona were converted to surface reflectances. -from Author

  13. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Radiometric Response Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.; Lencioni, D. E.; Evans, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is one of three instruments to be flown on the first Earth Observing mission (EO-1) under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). ALI contains a number of innovative features, including a wide field of view optical design, compact multispectral focal plane arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe detectors for the short wave infrared bands, and silicon carbide optics. This document outlines the techniques adopted during ground calibration of the radiometric response of the Advanced Land Imager. Results from system level measurements of the instrument response, signal-to-noise ratio, saturation radiance, and dynamic range for all detectors of every spectral band are also presented.

  14. A review of some radiometric calibration problems and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The in-flight radiometric calibration instrumentation and procedures of the Landsat Thematic Mapper and the high-resolution visible-range instruments of SPOT are illustrated with drawings and diagrams, characterized, and compared. Problems encountered in the laboratory calibration process, minimizing the temporal instability of the systems, identifying anomalies in the electronics in flight, and rechecking the calibration are examined, and it is pointed out that the stability of the calibration systems is less than that of the instruments themselves. The use of carefully measured ground-site data and atmospheric parameters in combination with radiative-transfer models for periodic calibration is recommended.

  15. The Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Space - Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Ronald Gene

    1987-09-01

    The need for absolute radiometric calibration of space-based sensors will continue to increase as new generations of space sensors are developed. A reflectance -based in-flight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of the sensor. This procedure uses ground-based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of five calibrations of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). For the 12 measurements made in TM bands 1-3, the RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean is (+OR-) 1.9%, and for measurements in the IR, TM bands 4,5, and 7, the value is (+OR-) 3.4%. The RMS variation for all 23 measurements is (+OR-) 2.8%. The absolute calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of three calibration of the SPOT-1 High Resolution Visible, (HRV), sensors. The ratio, HRV-2/HRV-1, of absolute calibration coefficients compared very well with ratios of histogrammed data obtained when the cameras simultaneously imaged the same ground site. Bands PA, B1 and B3 agreed to within 3%, while band B2 showed a 7% difference. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft -based radiometer data. This procedure was applied on four dates with two different surface conditions per date. A strong correlation, R('2) = .996, was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low-flying aircraft

  16. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager using the reflectance-based approach and the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Anderson, Nikolaus; Thome, Kurtis; Biggar, Stuart

    2014-10-01

    Landsat 8 was launched on 11 February 2013 as the newest platform in the Landsat program. It contains two Earthobserving instruments, one of which is the Operational Land Imager (OLI). OLI includes an onboard radiometric calibration system that is used to monitor changes in its responsivity throughout the mission lifetime, and it consists of Spectralon solar diffuser panels as well as tungsten lamp assemblies. External techniques are used to monitor both OLI and its calibration system, and they include lunar views, side slither maneuvers of the satellite, and ground-based vicarious calibration. This work presents the absolute radiometric calibration results for Landsat 8 OLI that were obtained using two ground-based measurement techniques. The first is the reflectance-based approach, where measurements of atmospheric and surface properties are made during a Landsat 8 overpass, and it requires personnel to be on site during the time of measurement. The second uses the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS), which was developed by the Remote Sensing Group in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona so that radiometric calibration data can be collected without the requirement of on-site personnel. It allows more data to be collected annually, which increases the temporal sampling of trending results.

  17. Site characterization for calibration of radiometric sensors using vicarious method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Shailesh; Rathore, L. S.; Mohapatra, M.; Sharma, A. K.; Mitra, A. K.; Bhatla, R.; Singh, R. S.; Desai, Yogdeep; Srivastava, Shailendra S.

    2016-05-01

    Radiometric performances of earth observation satellite/sensors vary from ground pre-launch calibration campaign to post launch period extended to lifetime of the satellite due to launching vibrations. Therefore calibration is carried out worldwide through various methods throughout satellite lifetime. In India Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) calibrates the sensor of Resourcesat-2 satellite by vicarious method. One of these vicarious calibration methods is the reflectance-based approach that is applied in this study for radiometric calibration of sensors on-board Resouresat-2 satellite. The results of ground-based measurement of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance are made at Bap, Rajasthan Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) site. Cal/Val observations at site were carried out with hyper-spectral Spectroradiometer covering spectral range of 350nm- 2500nm for radiometric characterization of the site. The Sunphotometer/Ozonometer for measuring the atmospheric parameters has also been used. The calibrated radiance is converted to absolute at-sensor spectral reflectance and Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) radiance. TOA radiance was computed using radiative transfer model `Second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum' (6S), which can accurately simulate the problems introduced by the presence of the atmosphere along the path from Sun to target (surface) to Sensor. The methodology for band averaged reflectance retrieval and spectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6S code to predict TOA radiance which compare with Resourcesat-2 radiance. Spectral signature and its reflectance ratio indicate the uniformity of the site. Thus the study proves that the selected site is suitable for vicarious calibration of sensor of Resourcesat-2. Further the study demonstrates the procedure for similar exercise for site selection for Cal/Val analysis of other satellite over India

  18. In-flight radiometric calibration of AVIRIS in 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Helmlinger, Mark; Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Hajek, Pavel

    1995-01-01

    The AVIRIS sensor must be calibrated at the time it measures spectra from the ER-2 airborne platform in order to achieve research and application objectives that are both quantitative and physically based. However, the operational environment inside the Q-bay of the ER-2 at 20 km altitude differs from that in the AVIRIS laboratory with respect to temperature, pressure, vibration, and high-frequency electromagnetic fields. Experiments at surface calibration targets are used in each flight season to confirm the accuracy of AVIRIS in-flight radiometric calibrations. For these experiments, the MODTRAN radiative transfer code is constrained by using in situ measurements to independently predict the upwelling spectral radiance arriving at AVIRIS for a specific calibration target. AVIRIS calibration is validated in flight by comparing the MODTRAN-predicted radiance to the laboratory-calibrated radiance measured by the AVIRIS sensor for the same time over the calibration target. We present radiometric calibration results for the AVIRIS in-flight calibration experiment held at the beginning of the 1994 flight season.

  19. Radiometric calibration and noise estimation of acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2013-05-20

    The accuracy of the radiometric response of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) hyperspectral imaging systems is crucial for obtaining reliable measurements. It is therefore important to know the radiometric response and noise characteristics of the hyperspectral imaging system used. A radiometric model of an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system composed of an imaging sensor radiometric model (CCD, CMOS, and sCMOS) and an AOTF light transmission model is proposed. Using the radiometric model, a method for obtaining the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of the imaging system by displacing and imaging an illuminated reference target is developed. Methods for estimating the temporal noise of the imaging system, using the photon transfer method, and for correcting FPN are also presented. Noise estimation and image restoration methods were tested on an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system. The results indicate that the developed methods can accurately calculate temporal and FPN, and can effectively correct the acquired images. After correction, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images was shown to increase by 26%. PMID:23736239

  20. Radiometric calibration and noise estimation of acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2013-05-20

    The accuracy of the radiometric response of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) hyperspectral imaging systems is crucial for obtaining reliable measurements. It is therefore important to know the radiometric response and noise characteristics of the hyperspectral imaging system used. A radiometric model of an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system composed of an imaging sensor radiometric model (CCD, CMOS, and sCMOS) and an AOTF light transmission model is proposed. Using the radiometric model, a method for obtaining the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of the imaging system by displacing and imaging an illuminated reference target is developed. Methods for estimating the temporal noise of the imaging system, using the photon transfer method, and for correcting FPN are also presented. Noise estimation and image restoration methods were tested on an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system. The results indicate that the developed methods can accurately calculate temporal and FPN, and can effectively correct the acquired images. After correction, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images was shown to increase by 26%.

  1. Radiometric Characterization Results for the IKONOS, Quickbird, and OrbView-3 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities better understand commercial imaging satellite properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, the NASA Applied Sciences Directorate (ASD) at Stennis Space Center established a commercial satellite imaging radiometric calibration team consisting of three independent groups: NASA ASD, the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, and South Dakota State University. Each group independently determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of available high-spatial-resolution commercial 4-band multispectral products, in the visible though near-infrared spectrum, from GeoEye(tradeMark) (formerly SpaceImaging(Registered TradeMark)) IKONOS, DigitalGlobe(Regitered TradeMark) QuickBird, and GeoEye (formerly ORBIMAGE(Registered TradeMark) OrbView. Each team member employed some variant of reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. Several study sites throughout the United States that covered a significant portion of the sensor's dynamic range were employed. Satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to evaluate the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these sensors' absolute calibration values.

  2. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 21-Jun-1995. the 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18 Sep-1994 in the SSA and from 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (199 1). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. The data are stored in binary image-format files. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, these full-resolution images may not be publicly distributed. However, a spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. See Sections 15 and 16 for information about how to possibly acquire the full resolution data. Information about the full-resolution images is provided in an inventory listing on the CD-ROMs. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Climate Change and Sounder Radiometric Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instrument radiometric stability is critical for climate studies. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances are of sufficient stability and accuracy to serve as a climate data record as evidenced by comparisons with the global network of buoys. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of derived geophysical products to potential instrument radiometric stability issues due to diurnal, orbital and seasonal variations. Our method is to perturb the AIRS radiances and examine the impact to retrieved parameters. Results show that instability in retrieved temperature products will be on the same order of the brightness temperature error in the radiances and follow the same time dependences. AIRS excellent stability makes it ideal for examining impacts of instabilities of future systems on geophysical parameter performance.

  4. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper Thermal Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wukelic, G. E.; Gibbons, D. E.; Martucci, L. M.; Foote, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of satellite-acquired data is essential for quantitative scientific studies, as well as for a variety of image-processing applications. This paper describes a multiyear, on-orbit radiometric calibration of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Band 6 conducted at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Numerous Landsat TM scenes acquired and analyzed included day and night coverages at several geographical locations over several seasons. Concurrent with Landsat overpasses, thermal field and local meteorological (surface and radiosonde) measurements were collected. At-satellite (uncorrected) radiances and temperatures for water and nonwater land cover were compared to ground truth (GT) measurements after making adjustments for atmospheric (using LOWTRAN), mixed-pixel, and emissivity effects. Results indicate that, for both water and nonwater features, TM Band 6 average corrected temperature determinations using local radiosonde data to adjust for atmospheric effects, and using appropriate emissivities, are within 1.0 C of GT temperature values. Temperatures of water pixels derived from uncorrected TM Band 6 data varied roughly between 1 and 3 C of ground truth values for water temperatures ranging between 4 and 24 C. Moreover, corrections using nonlocal and noncoincident radiosonde data resulted in errors as large as 12 C. Corrections using the U.S. Standard Atmosphere gave temperature values within 1 to 2 C of GT. The average uncertainty for field instruments was + or - 0.2 C; average uncertainty for Landsat TM corrected temperature determinations was + or - 0.4 C.

  5. Geometric and Radiometric Evaluation of Rasat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Ali; Topan, Hüseyin; Oruç, Murat; Özendi, Mustafa; Bayık, Çağlar

    2016-06-01

    RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space) Technologies Research Institute (Ankara). RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD) and RGB (15 m GSD) bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R) of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM) reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  6. Robust radiometric calibration and vignetting correction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Joo; Pollefeys, Marc

    2008-04-01

    In many computer vision systems, it is assumed that the image brightness of a point directly reflects the scene radiance of the point. However, the assumption does not hold in most cases due to nonlinear camera response function, exposure changes, and vignetting. The effects of these factors are most visible in image mosaics and textures of 3D models where colors look inconsistent and notable boundaries exist. In this paper, we propose a full radiometric calibration algorithm that includes robust estimation of the radiometric response function, exposures, and vignetting. By decoupling the effect of vignetting from the response function estimation, we approach each process in a manner that is robust to noise and outliers. We verify our algorithm with both synthetic and real data which shows significant improvement compared to existing methods. We apply our estimation results to radiometrically align images for seamless mosaics and 3D model textures. We also use our method to create high dynamic range (HDR) mosaics which are more representative of the scene than normal mosaics.

  7. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  8. Radiometric Characterization of Hyperspectral Imagers using Multispectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Kurt, Thome; Leisso, Nathan; Anderson, Nikolaus; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona has a long history of using ground-based test sites for the calibration of airborne and satellite based sensors. Often, ground-truth measurements at these test sites are not always successful due to weather and funding availability. Therefore, RSG has also automated ground instrument approaches and cross-calibration methods to verify the radiometric calibration of a sensor. The goal in the cross-calibration method is to transfer the calibration of a well-known sensor to that of a different sensor, This work studies the feasibility of determining the radiometric calibration of a hyperspectral imager using multispectral a imagery. The work relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (M0DIS) as a reference for the hyperspectral sensor Hyperion. Test sites used for comparisons are Railroad Valley in Nevada and a portion of the Libyan Desert in North Africa. Hyperion bands are compared to MODIS by band averaging Hyperion's high spectral resolution data with the relative spectral response of M0DlS. The results compare cross-calibration scenarios that differ in image acquisition coincidence, test site used for the calibration, and reference sensor. Cross-calibration results are presented that show agreement between the use of coincident and non-coincident image pairs within 2% in most brands as well as similar agreement between results that employ the different MODIS sensors as a reference.

  9. Principal Component Noise Filtering for NAST-I Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed- Interferometer (NAST-I) instrument is a high-resolution scanning interferometer that measures emitted thermal radiation between 3.3 and 18 microns. The NAST-I radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient and hot temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes a principal component (PC) noise filter to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, further improve the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy. To test the procedure and estimate the PC filter noise performance, we form dependent and independent test samples using odd and even sets of blackbody spectra. To determine the optimal number of eigenvectors, the PC filter algorithm is applied to both dependent and independent blackbody spectra with a varying number of eigenvectors. The optimal number of PCs is selected so that the total root-mean-square (RMS) error is minimized. To estimate the filter noise performance, we examine four different scenarios: apply PC filtering to both dependent and independent datasets, apply PC filtering to dependent calibration data only, apply PC filtering to independent data only, and no PC filters. The independent blackbody radiances are predicted for each case and comparisons are made. The results show significant reduction in noise in the final calibrated radiances with the implementation of the PC filtering algorithm.

  10. Overview of atmospheric correction and radiometric calibration efforts during FIFE

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, R.N. ); Markham, B.L. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on the work of the atmospheric corrections and radiometric calibration subgroup of FIFE. The responsibility of this group included calibration of remote sensing instrumentation used on surface platforms and aircraft, establishing recommendations for calibrating satellite observations, measurement of relevant atmospheric properties, development of algorithms which will perform the atmospheric corrections for the remotely sensed data, and finally evaluation of surface properties, including reflectances and temperatures. Good progress was made for cloudless and low-haze atmospheric conditions, but no effort was directed toward more complicated conditions, since little FIFE data was collected in these conditions. Studies of aircraft mounted instrumentation revealed that some of this instrumentation was not adequately designed for radiometric calibration, and thus the errors are very large for some of this data.

  11. Radiometric and Geometric Accuracy Analysis of Rasat Pan Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaman, S.; Yalcin, I.; Guler, M.

    2016-06-01

    RASAT is the second Turkish Earth Observation satellite which was launched in 2011. It operates with pushbroom principle and acquires panchromatic and MS images with 7.5 m and 15 m resolutions, respectively. The swath width of the sensor is 30 km. The main aim of this study is to analyse the radiometric and geometric quality of RASAT images. A systematic validation approach for the RASAT imagery and its products is being applied. RASAT image pair acquired over Kesan city in Edirne province of Turkey are used for the investigations. The raw RASAT data (L0) are processed by Turkish Space Agency (TUBITAK-UZAY) to produce higher level image products. The image products include radiometrically processed (L1), georeferenced (L2) and orthorectified (L3) data, as well as pansharpened images. The image quality assessments include visual inspections, noise, MTF and histogram analyses. The geometric accuracy assessment results are only preliminary and the assessment is performed using the raw images. The geometric accuracy potential is investigated using 3D ground control points extracted from road intersections, which were measured manually in stereo from aerial images with 20 cm resolution and accuracy. The initial results of the study, which were performed using one RASAT panchromatic image pair, are presented in this paper.

  12. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  13. Spectral and radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Gregg; Chrien, Thomas G.; Miller, Edward A.; Reimer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory spectral and radiometric calibration of the AVIRIS science data collected since 1987 is described. The instrumentation and procedures used in the calibration are discussed and the accuracy achieved in the laboratory as determined by measurement and calculation is compared with the requirements. Instrument performance factors affecting radiometry are described. The paper concludes with a discussion of future plans.

  14. NASA IKONOS Multispectral Radiometric Calibration and 3-Year Temporal Stability Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Carver, David; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen; Aaran, David

    2003-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can place confidence in the imagery they use and can fully understand its properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other system. In addition, the user community has little or no insight into the design and operation of commercial sensors or into the methods involved in generating commercial products. To address this calibration need, the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) Earth Science Applications (ESA) Directorate established a commercial satellite imaging radiometric calibration team consisting of three independent groups: NASA, SSC,ESA, the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, and South Dacota State University. Each group determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of the Space Imaging IKONOS 4-band, 4 m multispectral product covering the visible through near-infrared spectral region. For a three year period beginning in 2000, each team employed some variant of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with IKONOS image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. Several study sites throughout the United States were employed that covered nearly the entire dynamic range of the IKONOS sensor. IKONOS at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent group to determine the IKONOS sensor's radiometric accuracy and stability. Over 10 individual vicariously determined at-sensor radiance estimates were used each year. When combined, these estimates provided a high-precision radiometric gain calibration coefficient. No significant calibration offset was observed. The results of this evaluation provide the scientific community with an independent assessment of the IKONOS sensor's absolute calibration and temporal stability over the 3

  15. INTRABAND RADIOMETRIC PERFORMANCE OF THE LANDSAT 4 THEMATIC MAPPER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Eliason, Eric M.; Chavez, Pat S.; ,

    1985-01-01

    This preliminary report examines those radiometric characteristics of the Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data. Analysis is based largely on radiometrically raw (B type) data of three daytime and two nighttime scenes; in most scenes, a set of 512 lines were examined on an individual-detector basis. Subscenes selected for uniform-radiance were used to characterize subtle radiometric differences and noise problems.

  16. Relative radiometric calibration of LANDSAT TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Raw thematic mapper (TM) calibration data from pre-launch tests and in-orbit acquisitions from LANDSAT 4 and 5 satellites are analyzed to assess the radiometric characteristics of the TM sensor. A software program called TM radiometric and algorithmic performance program (TRAPP) was used for the majority of analyses. Radiometric uncertainty in the final TM image originates from: (1) scene variability (solar irradiance and atmospheric scattering); (2) optical and electrical variability of the sensor; and (3) variability introduced during image processing.

  17. Dynamic noise corrected hyperspectral radiometric calibration in the SWIR range using a supercontinuum laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Janos C.; Aernouts, Ben; Koshel, R. J.; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-09-01

    As line scanning short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a growing field in the food industry, it is important to select efficient illumination designs to image contaminants with high contrast and low noise. Illumination systems can efficiently be compared and optimized through the use of ray tracing simulations. However, these simulations provide illumination patterns in absolute radiometric units while HSI systems typically provide relative measurements. To bridge this gap, a supercontinuum laser and monochromator setup was used in this study to calibrate a SWIR HSI imager in spectral radiometric units. For the radiometric calibration, an integrating sphere (IS) was illuminated with the monochromatic laser light, while both a high sensitivity photodiode and the hyperspectral camera were positioned at different ports of the IS to measure the diffuse light synchronously. For each spectral band, the radiance observed by the imager corresponding to a line was detected using image analysis, while the remainder of the image was used to sample the noise of the sensor. Laser power fluctuations were monitored using a power meter coupled with a thermal sensor, allowing for their correction. As these measurements were time consuming, while InGaAs based sensors are very sensitive to thermal drift, the dark current was sampled frequently to avoid noise time drifts. This approach allowed correcting for 6% of temporal noise fluctuations. A per-pixel linear radiometric model was fitted with an R2 of 0:94+/-0:3 and used to transfer the measured light distribution of a halogen spot with and without a diffuser into absolute radiometric units. This allowed comparing measurements with the results of ray tracing.

  18. New Sentinel-2 radiometric validation approaches (SEOM program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruniquel, Véronique; Lamquin, Nicolas; Ferron, Stéphane; Govaerts, Yves; Woolliams, Emma; Dilo, Arta; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    SEOM is an ESA program element whose one of the objectives aims at launching state-of-the-art studies for the scientific exploitation of operational missions. In the frame of this program, ESA awarded ACRI-ST and its partners Rayference and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) early 2016 for a R&D study on the development and intercomparison of algorithms for validating the Sentinel-2 radiometric L1 data products beyond the baseline algorithms used operationally in the frame of the S2 Mission Performance Centre. In this context, several algorithms have been proposed and are currently in development: The first one is based on the exploitation of Deep Convective Cloud (DCC) observations over ocean. This method allows an inter-band radiometry validation from the blue to the NIR (typically from B1 to B8a) from a reference band already validated for example with the well-known Rayleigh method. Due to their physical properties, DCCs appear from the remote sensing point of view to have bright and cold tops and they can be used as invariant targets to monitor the radiometric response degradation of reflective solar bands. The DCC approach is statistical i.e. the method shall be applied on a large number of measurements to derive reliable statistics and decrease the impact of the perturbing contributors. The second radiometric validation method is based on the exploitation of matchups combining both concomitant in-situ measurements and Sentinel-2 observations. The in-situ measurements which are used here correspond to measurements acquired in the frame of the RadCalNet networks. The validation is performed for the Sentinel-2 bands similar to the bands of the instruments equipping the validation site. The measurements from the Cimel CE 318 12-filters BRDF Sun Photometer installed recently in the Gobabeb site near the Namib desert are used for this method. A comprehensive verification of the calibration requires an analysis of MSI radiances over the full dynamic range

  19. Airborne Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Observations of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the first radiometric measurements of cirrus clouds in the frequency range of 89-325 GHz from a high-altitude aircraft flight. The measurements are conducted with a Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft over a region in northern Oklahoma. Aboard the same aircraft are a cloud lidar system and a multichannel radiometer operating at the visible and infrared wavelengths. The instrument ensemble is well suited for identifying cirrus clouds. It is shown that the depressions in brightness temperatures associated with a few intense cirrus clouds occur at all frequency channels of the MIR. Estimates of total ice water path of the cirrus clouds are derived from comparisons of radiative transfer calculations and observed brightness depressions.

  20. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  1. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  2. Errors in radiometric remote sensing of sea-surface temperature and salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote measurement of sea-surface physical temperature and salinity using radiometric measurements from aircraft or satellite are reviewed. Studies have been conducted to determine the sensitivity of the errors in surface temperature and salinity to errors in the measured brightness temperatures using combinations of UHF, L, S, and C-band measurements. These investigations were made using values of conductivity, static dielectric constant, and relaxation time derived from the regression equations of Klein and Swift (1977). Results of the error sensitivity study are presented in the form of error contour plots which permit the calculation of errors in the estimation of the physical parameters for given errors in the raw radiometric measurements.

  3. Effects of point-spread function on calibration and radiometric accuracy of CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Voss, Kenneth J

    2004-01-20

    The point-spread function (PSF) of a camera can seriously affect the accuracy of radiometric calibration and measurement. We found that the PSF can produce a 3.7% difference between the apparent measured radiance of two plaques of different sizes with the same illumination. This difference can be removed by deconvolution with the measured PSF. To determine the PSF, many images of a collimated beam from a He-Ne laser are averaged. Since our optical system is focused at infinity, it should focus this source to a single pixel. Although the measured PSF is very sharp, dropping 4 and 6 orders of magnitude and 8 and 100 pixels away from the point source, respectively, we show that the effect of the PSF as far as 100 pixels away cannot be ignored without introducing an appreciable error to the calibration. We believe that the PSF should be taken into account in all optical systems to obtain accurate radiometric measurements.

  4. Bandwidth and spectral stray light effects in the NASA GSFC Radiometric Calibration Facility primary transfer radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Cooper, John W.; Marketon, John E.; Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Butler, James J.

    2006-08-01

    As part of an effort to reduce uncertainties in the radiometric calibrations of integrating sphere sources and standard lamp irradiance sources, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Radiometric Calibration Facility's (RCF) primary radiometer was characterized at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). Based on those measurements, a nominal slit scattering function was developed for the radiometer. This allowed calculations of band averaged spectral radiances and irradiances for the radiometer's measurements of sphere and standard lamp sources, respectively. From these calculations the effects of bandwidth and spectral stray light were isolated for measurements in the blue spectral region. These effects, which depend on the spectral distribution of the source being measured, can be as large as 8% for measurements at 400 nm. The characterization results and a correction algorithm for these effects are presented here.

  5. New approach for the radiometric calibration of spectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Kohler, David; Bissett, W; Steward, Robert; Davis, Curtiss

    2004-05-31

    The calibration of multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems is typically done in the laboratory using an integrating sphere, which usually produces a signal that is red rich. Using such a source to calibrate environmental monitoring systems presents some difficulties. Not only is much of the calibration data outside the range and spectral quality of data values that are expected to be captured in the field, using these measurements alone may exaggerate the optical flaws found within the system. Left unaccounted for, these flaws will become embedded in to the calibration, and thus, they will be passed on to the field data when the calibration is applied. To address these issues, we used a series of well-characterized spectral filters within our calibration. It provided us with a set us stable spectral standards to test and account for inadequacies in the spectral and radiometric integrity of the optical imager.

  6. Validation of Landsat 7 ETM+ band 6 radiometric performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, Frank; Hook, Simon; Abtahi, Ali; Alley, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Since shortly after launch the radiometric performance of band 6 of the ETM+ instrument on Landsat 7 has been evaluated using vicarious calbiration techniques for both land and water targets. This evaluation indicates the radiometric performance of band 6 has been both highly stable and accurate.

  7. Relative radiometric calibration of LANDSAT TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A common scientific methodology and terminology is outlined for characterizing the radiometry of both TM sensors. The magnitude of the most significant sources of radiometric variability are discussed and methods are recommended for achieving the exceptional potential inherent in the radiometric precision and accuracy of the TM sensors.

  8. Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

  9. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Efremova, Boryana; Ji, Qiang; Lee, Shihyan; Schwarting, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on-board the first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) completed its sensor level testing on December 2014. The JPSS-1 (J1) mission is scheduled to launch in December 2016, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. VIIRS instrument was designed to provide measurements of the globe twice daily. It is a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer with spatial resolutions of 370 and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. It covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands [0.412 μm to 12.01 μm]. VIIRS observations are used to generate 22 environmental data products (EDRs). This paper will briefly describe J1 VIIRS characterization and calibration performance and methodologies executed during the pre-launch testing phases by the independent government team, to generate the at-launch baseline radiometric performance, and the metrics needed to populate the sensor data record (SDR) Look-Up-Tables (LUTs). This paper will also provide an assessment of the sensor pre-launch radiometric performance, such as the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field and stray light responses. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  10. Optical Diffraction Corrections in Radiometric Thermodynamic Temperature Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briaudeau, S.; Rougié, B.; Sadli, M.; Richard, A.; Coutin, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    One of the main components of uncertainty in high-temperature thermometry arises because of the size-of-source effect (SSE). This effect makes the temperature measurement sensitive to the geometry of the radiating environment. It is caused by optical diffraction and especially by light scattering off/from, and inter-reflections between, optical components inside the pyrometer. The LNE-INM/CNAM is involved in extending the thermometry temperature scale to very high temperatures ( T > 2000 °C) and has developed eutectic-based fixed points (Sadli et al. (in: Zvizdic (ed.) Proceedings of TEMPMEKO 2004, 9th International Symposium on Temperature and Thermal Measurements in Industry and Science, 2004)) and a thermodynamic temperature measurement capability based on absolute radiometric methods (Briaudeau et al. (in: D. Zvizdic (ed.) Proceedings of TEMPMEKO 2004, 9th International Symposium on Temperature and Thermal Measurements in Industry and Science 2004)). A new measurement technique that uses an optical fiber has been developed and tested, allowing the determination of the SSE at any defocusing plane, with high resolution. A model based on optical diffraction has been developed to simulate the SSE in a real situation, considering the contribution to the pyrometer signal of the whole “3D” optical scene inside the blackbody furnace. Using the same approach, it has been demonstrated that optical scattering in a simple radiance meter can be estimated from accurate optical diffraction measurement.

  11. Radiometric responsivity determination for Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE) flown on space shuttle mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.; Davis, R. E.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Bullock, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure was developed to obtain the radiometric (radiance) responsivity of the Feature Identification and Local Experiment (FILE) instrument in preparation for its flight on Space Shuttle Mission 41-G (November 1984). This instrument was designed to obtain Earth feature radiance data in spectral bands centered at 0.65 and 0.85 microns, along with corroborative color and color-infrared photographs, and to collect data to evaluate a technique for in-orbit autonomous classification of the Earth's primary features. The calibration process incorporated both solar radiance measurements and radiative transfer model predictions in estimating expected radiance inputs to the FILE on the Shuttle. The measured data are compared with the model predictions, and the differences observed are discussed. Application of the calibration procedure to the FILE over an 18-month period indicated a constant responsivity characteristic. This report documents the calibration procedure and the associated radiometric measurements and predictions that were part of the instrument preparation for flight.

  12. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds. PMID:19498585

  13. Intraband radiometric performance of the Landsat Thematic Mappers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Cook, D.A.; Eliason, E.M.; Eliason, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    Radiometric characteristics have been examined of the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 Thematic Mappers (TMs) that can be established without absolute calibration of spectral data. This analysis is based on radiometrically and geometrically raw (B-type) data of both uniform (flat-field) and high-contrast scenes. Subscenes selected for uniform radiance were used to characterized subtle radiometric differences and noise problems. Although the general performance of the Thematic Mappers is excellent, various anomalies that have a magnitude of a few digital levels (DN) or less are quantified. -from Authors

  14. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds.

  15. Relative Radiometric Calibration of LANDSAT TM Reflective Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results and recommendations pertaining to the characterization of the relative radiometric calibration of the protoflight thematic mapper (TM/PF) on the LANDSAT-4 satellite are presented. Some preliminary pre-launch and in-orbit results are also included from the flight model (TM/F) on LANDSAT-5. A common scientific methodology and terminology is outlined for characterizing the radiometry of both TM sensors. The magnitude of the most significant sources of radiometric variability are discussed and methods are recommended for achieving the exceptional potential inherent in the radiometric precision and accuracy of the sensors.

  16. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS): Inflight radiometric calibration and the determination of surface reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Vane, G.; Green, R. O.; Alley, R. E.; Carere, V.; Gabell, A.; Bruegge, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The inflight radiometric performance of AVIRIS is presented together with a comparison of methods of recovering surface spectral reflectance from the data. Performance is evaluated by comparing radiance predicted from AVIRIS with radiance generated from the LOWIRAN 6 atmospheric model and measured surface reflectance. Comparisons show apparent agreement to within a few percent between 1800 and 2450 nm. Between 600 and 1800 nm the response of AVIRIS is systematically low by as much as 70 percent, and between 400 and 600 nm it is higher than expected. These problems are traced to thermal distortions of the instrument, and to detachment during flight of optical fibers connecting foreoptics to two of four spectrometers in the instrument. Of three methods studied, an empirical one involving calibration curves constructed from field reflectance measurements returns accurate predictions of the surface reflectance independent of the actual radiometric significance of the flight data.

  17. The effects of vegetation cover on the radar and radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Brunfeldt, D. R.; Razani, M.

    1982-01-01

    The measured effects of vegetation canopies on radar and radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture are compared to emission and scattering models. The models are found to predict accurately the measured emission and backscattering for various crop canopies at frequencies between 1.4 and 5.0 GHz, especially at theta equal to or less than 30 deg. Vegetation loss factors, L(theta), increase with frequency and are found to be dependent upon canopy type and water content. In addition, the radiometric power absorption coefficient of a mature corn canopy is 1.75 times that calculated for the radar. Comparison of an L-band radiometer with a C-band radar shows the two systems to be complementary in terms of accurate soil moisture sensing over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil moisture conditions.

  18. Results of a thermoluminescence radiometric survey in Takala area of China's Tarim basin

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, F.R. ); Vaz, J.E. ); Su, J. )

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports on a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) radiometric study of the near-surface radiation flux which was done as an adjunct to oil exploration research in the Takala area, Tarim basin, western China. About 80 sq km of the basin were evaluated using lithium fluoride (LiF) TLDs buried at about 0.5 m; Rn and [Delta]C (anomalous carbonate) measurements were made in this region as well. Small target areas were defined in the region by low value TL radiometric signals. Comparative measurements of Rn and [Delta]C were not as effective as TL in defining small areas for follow-up seismic work or in revealing the structural trends. The structural nature of the area was mimicked by the near-surface radiometries distribution pattern determined by TLDs and suggested the possibility of fault-influenced traps in the subsurface.

  19. Method to remove the effect of ambient temperature on radiometric calibration.

    PubMed

    Songtao, Chang; Yaoyu, Zhang; Zhiyuan, Sun; Min, Li

    2014-09-20

    High precision radiometric calibration is essential for infrared imaging systems, especially in scientific applications where an accurate quantitative analysis is required. Nevertheless, calibration and radiometry are usually not simultaneously performed. Hence the discrepancy of ambient temperature between calibration and actual measurement can generate significant measurement errors unless the calibration results have been properly corrected. To overcome the restriction, we studied the effect of ambient temperature on radiometric calibration, then derived the relationship between calibration results and ambient temperature considering the integration time. A novel method compensating for the impact of ambient temperature on the calibration of a cooled infrared system is proposed. Several experiments are performed, and the results indicate that the proposed method can not only ensure the accuracy of calibration but achieve calibration results under any ambient temperature and arbitrary integration time.

  20. Report of Optical Radiometric Instruments and Calibration Panel. [spaceborne instrumentation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Measurement and accuracy needs for remote sensing are analyzed. Topics discussed include: (1) in orbit performance degradation due to contamination; (2) increased radiometric accuracy required for detecting small changes over long periods of time in environmental parameters; (3) references for verifying calibration in orbit; (4) high attenuation neutral density filters; (5) the sun as a radiation source for testing; (6) rejection of stray light; (7) development of spectrally flat detectors for flight sensors; and (8) long term stability of sensor components.

  1. Radiometric performance results of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Slater, David C.; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Persson, Kristian B.; Winters, Gregory S.; Persyn, Steven C.; Eterno, John S.

    2011-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and ground calibration results of the Juno mission's Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS) flight model. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Its primary job will be to characterize Jupiter's UV auroral emissions and relate them to in situ particle measurements.

  2. Support technologies involved in the development and implementation of radiometric systems for sensor calibration, characterization, and HWIL testing at AEDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H. S.; Breeden, M. F.; Crider, D. H.; Steely, S. L.; Nicholson, R. A.; Labello, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    The characterization, calibration, and mission simulation testing of space-based, interceptor, and air-borne sensors require a continual involvement in the development and evaluation of radiometric projection technologies. Activities at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) include Hardware in the Loop (HWIL) testing with high-fidelity complex scene-projection technologies as well as improvements in the radiometric source-calibration systems. These technologies are integrated into a low cryo-vacuum (~20 K) environment. The latest scene simulation and HWIL projection technologies are being investigated that can produce desired target temperatures and target-to-sensor ranges such that sensor mission performance can be evaluated. These technologies include multiple-band source subsystems and special spectral-tailoring methods, as well as comprehensive analysis and optical properties measurements of the components involved. Emphasis areas include the development of methodologies to test wide field of view (WFOV), polarimetric, and multi/hyperspectral radiometric imaging systems.

  3. History of Solar Radiometry and the World Radiometric Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, C.

    1991-01-01

    The history of solar radiometry since the first pyrheliometer of Pouillet is presented. After the invention of the Ångström and the Smithsonian pyrheliometers around the turn of this century two different "scales" were in use. Comparisons with absolute cavity radiometers developed in America and Europe have been performed since about 1910 which show remarkably accurate measurements in terms of the SI units. However, these results have never been accepted and several rules have been established to reference radiation measurements in the meteorological community and to remedy the unsatisfactory fact of having different "scales". Unfortunately none of these rules led to a reference close to the SI units of irradiance, confusing the issue even more. With the advent of modern absolute radiometers in the late 1960s the situation improved and led to the definition of the World Radiometric Reference in use by the meteorological community since 1981. This reference has an estimated accuracy of 0,3% and guarantees the worldwide homogeneity of radiation measurements within 0,1% precision.

  4. Radiometric Calibration Tracking of the Vacuum-Ultraviolet Spectrometer SUMER During the First Year of the SOHO Mission.

    PubMed

    Schühle, U; Brekke, P; Curdt, W; Hollandt, J; Lemaire, P; Wilhelm, K

    1998-05-01

    Detailed radiometric calibration tracking of the vacuum-ultravioletspectrometer SUMER (from solar ultraviolet measurements of emittedradiation) was performed during the first year of the Solar andHeliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission and will continue. Inview of the flight history of many previous solar UV instruments, thestability of calibration of the extreme-ultraviolet instruments on SOHOhas been a major concern. Results obtained during the first year ofoperation show that excellent radiometric stability has been achievedwith SUMER. These results were accomplished by stringentcleanliness and contamination-control procedures during all phases ofthe project. We describe the strategy and results of the in-flightcalibration tracking program performed with SUMER.

  5. Radiometric dating of the Siloam Tunnel, Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Amos; Shimron, Aryeh; Rosenbaum, Jeff

    2003-09-11

    The historical credibility of texts from the Bible is often debated when compared with Iron Age archaeological finds (refs. 1, 2 and references therein). Modern scientific methods may, in principle, be used to independently date structures that seem to be mentioned in the biblical text, to evaluate its historical authenticity. In reality, however, this approach is extremely difficult because of poor archaeological preservation, uncertainty in identification, scarcity of datable materials, and restricted scientific access into well-identified worship sites. Because of these problems, no well-identified Biblical structure has been radiometrically dated until now. Here we report radiocarbon and U-Th dating of the Siloam Tunnel, proving its Iron Age II date; we conclude that the Biblical text presents an accurate historic record of the Siloam Tunnel's construction. Being one of the longest ancient water tunnels lacking intermediate shafts, dating the Siloam Tunnel is a key to determining where and when this technological breakthrough took place. Siloam Tunnel dating also refutes a claim that the tunnel was constructed in the second century bc.

  6. Calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, J. K.; Schildkraut, Elliot Robert; Bauldree, Russell S.; Goodrich, Shawn M.

    1996-06-01

    The calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer (CIGARS) is a new high performance, multi-purpose, multi- platform Fourier transform spectrometer (FPS) sensor. It covers the waveband from 0.2 to 12 micrometer, has spectral resolution as fine as 0.3 cm-1, and records over 100 spectra per second. Two CIGARS units are being used for observations of target signatures in the air or on the ground from fixed or moving platforms, including high performance jet aircraft. In this paper we describe the characteristics and capabilities of the CIGARS sensor, which uses four interchangeable detector modules (Si, InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe) and two optics modules, with internal calibration. The data recording electronics support observations of transient events, even without precise information on the timing of the event. We present test and calibration data on the sensitivity, spectral resolution, stability, and spectral rate of CIGARS, and examples of in- flight observations of real targets. We also discuss plans for adapting CIGARS for imaging spectroscopy observations, with simultaneous spectral and spatial data, by replacing the existing detectors with a focal plane array (FPA).

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  8. Modeling Radiometric Uncertainty for Vision with Tone-Mapped Color Images.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ayan; Xiong, Ying; Sun, Baochen; Darrell, Trevor; Scharstein, Daniel; Zickler, Todd; Saenko, Kate

    2014-11-01

    To produce images that are suitable for display, tone-mapping is widely used in digital cameras to map linear color measurements into narrow gamuts with limited dynamic range. This introduces non-linear distortion that must be undone, through a radiometric calibration process, before computer vision systems can analyze such photographs radiometrically. This paper considers the inherent uncertainty of undoing the effects of tone-mapping. We observe that this uncertainty varies substantially across color space, making some pixels more reliable than others. We introduce a model for this uncertainty and a method for fitting it to a given camera or imaging pipeline. Once fit, the model provides for each pixel in a tone-mapped digital photograph a probability distribution over linear scene colors that could have induced it. We demonstrate how these distributions can be useful for visual inference by incorporating them into estimation algorithms for a representative set of vision tasks.

  9. Radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction of satellite and aircraft data for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Markham, Brian L.; Newcomer, Jeffery A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite and aircraft radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction work carried out as part of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) are summarized. A large volume (120 Gbytes) of radiometric data were acquired and derived from a number of different instruments on a variety of platforms. The same basic procedure was applied to each instrument: derive the most recent calibration coefficients for converting sensor counts to reflective spectral radiances; correct the radiances for earth-sun distance variations and incident solar spectral irradiance within the bandpass of each respective instrument channel at the top of the atmosphere; characterize the atmosphere for aerosols and absorbing gases; and derive apparent surface reflectance by correcting the exoatmospheric values for atmospheric attenuation. The same basic approach was used for surface temperature derivation. The results of this processing were verified by surface measurements, and corroborated by sensor intercomparisons.

  10. Radiometric, SEM and XRD investigation of the Chituc black sands, southern Danube Delta, Romania.

    PubMed

    Margineanu, R M; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Celarel, Aurelia; Gomoiu, Claudia-Mariana; Costea, C; Dumitras, Delia; Ion, Adriana; Duliu, O G

    2014-12-01

    The black sand of the Chituc marine sand bank, northern of the city of Navodari (Romania), presents anomalous high radioactivity. Field measurements recorded in some places dose rate up to 200 nSv/h, significantly overpassing the average value of 44 ± 20 nSv/h along the entire Southern sector of Romanian Black Sea shore. Gamma ray spectrometry performed on both Slanic-Prahova Underground Low Background Laboratory and Geological Institute of Romania Radiometric Facilities showed with clarity the dominance of (228)Ac radioisotope in the 50 microns fraction together with the (226)Ra and traces of (40)K. No significant amount of anthropogenic (137)Cs was identified. Based on radiometric as well as on SEM-EDAX and XRD determinations we come to the conclusion that the evidenced radioactivity could be attributed to both uranium and thorium series in the zircon and monazite fractions and to a lesser extent to potassium in the feldspars.

  11. Designing an in-flight airborne calibration site using experience from vicarious radiometric satellite calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livens, Stefan; Debruyn, Walter; Sterckx, Sindy; Reusen, Ils

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory calibration of electro-optical sensors is preferably complemented by regular in-flight verification. This checks whether the lab calibration parameters remain valid or recalibration is necessary. In-flight verification can be achieved by vicarious calibration using in-flight measurements of calibration targets. We intend to identify and design a set of suitable radiometric calibration targets. For this, we borrow from expertise gained with the PROBA-V satellite calibration system, which uses multiple vicarious methods relying on diverse natural on-ground targets. Besides reflectance based calibration using ground measurements, the PROBA-V calibration methods are unproven for use in airborne calibration. The selected targets should be suitable for the calibration of both multispectral and hyperspectral imagers. We start from general requirements for radiometric targets and investigate their applicability to airborne calibration. From this we identify two possible sets of natural calibration sites in Belgium. One set, located in the Campine region, contains small water bodies and sandy lakesides. Another set is located in the Westhoek region near the Belgian coast. It offers better suitable water bodies, as well as sandy areas, grass fields and dark targets. Airborne calibration lends itself to the use of smaller artifical targets. We propose to complement the natural targets with a portable target consisting of agricultural nets with different densities. The definition of sets of calibration targets, both natural and artificial can facilitate the investigation of the usability of vicarious targets and method for inflight radiometric verification.

  12. Radiometric Characteristics of Cassini RADAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, B. W.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G. A.; Johnson, W. T.; Shimada, J. G.; West, R. D.

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR instrument on-board the Cassini Orbiter is currently being employed to obtain SAR imagery of the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. The viewing geometry of Cassini RADAR is different from most imaging radars because the Cassini Orbiter flies by Titan rather than entering into orbit about it. This unusual viewing geometry leads to variable noise characteristics throughout the SAR swath. Due to large changes in range to target and number of looks, noise characteristics and effective resolution vary widely throughout the swath. A good understanding of these parameters is important in order to draw scientific conclusions from the SAR images. Changes in noise bias could be misinterpreted as changes in reflectivity from the surface. Changes in resolution or noise variance could be misinterpreted as changes in the heterogeneity of the surface. The purpose of this paper is to quantify noise variance, bias, and effective radiometric resolution throughout the SAR swath in order to aid scientists in interpreting the data. Of the three parameters, the easiest to model is noise bias which increases with the range to the target. Noise variance is more complicated. The thermal noise (SNR) contribution to the overall variance increases with range, but the fading (speckle) noise contribution varies inversely with number of looks and thus with range. Effective resolution becomes coarser as range increases, but cross track and along track resolution vary differently. Along track resolution varies continuously, but cross track resolution has a discontinuity at 1600 km altitude, due to a change in commanded bandwidth. This paper presents the equations governing the noise characteristics and effective resolution as well as providing pseudo-color images of each quantity in SAR image coordinates for the October 2004 Cassini RADAR observation of Titan. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with

  13. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager: Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Dabney, Philip; Pedelty, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) is one of two instruments to fly on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is scheduled to launch in December 2012 to become the 8th in the series of Landsat satellites. The OLI images in the solar reflective part of the spectrum, with bands similar to bands 1-5, 7 and the panchromatic band on the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument. In addition, it has a 20 nm bandpass spectral band at 443 nm for coastal and aerosol studies and a 30 nm band at 1375 nm to aid in cirrus cloud detection. Like ETM+, spatial resolution is 30 m in the all but the panchromatic band, which is 15 meters. OLI is a pushbroom radiometer with approximately 6000 detectors per 30 meter band as opposed to the 16 detectors per band on the whiskbroom ETM+. Data are quantized to 12 bits on OLI as opposed to 8 bits on ETM+ to take advantage of the improved signal to noise ratio provided by the pushbroom design. The saturation radiances are higher on OLI than ETM+ to effectively eliminate saturation issues over bright Earth targets. OLI includes dual solar diffusers for on-orbit absolute and relative (detector to detector) radiometric calibration. Additionally, OLI has 3 sets of on-board lamps that illuminate the OLI focal plane through the full optical system, providing additional checks on the OLI's response[l]. OLI has been designed and built by Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. (BATC) and is currently undergoing testing and calibration in preparation for delivery in Spring 2011. Final pre-launch performance results should be available in time for presentation at the conference. Preliminary results will be presented below. These results are based on the performance of the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) that was radiometrically tested at the integrated instrument level in 2010 and assembly level measurements made on the flight unit. Signal-to-Noise (SNR) performance: One of the advantages of a pushbroom system is the increased dwell time of the detectors

  14. Radiometric calibration of DMSP-OLS sensor using VIIRS day/night band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Cao, Changyong; Zhang, Bin; Qiu, Shi; Elvidge, Christopher; Von Hendy, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been collecting global night light imaging data for more than 40 years. With the launch of Suomi-NPP satellite in 2011, the Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities because it surpasses DMSP-OLS in having broader radiometric measurement range, more accurate radiometric calibration, finer spatial resolution, and better geometric quality. DMSP-OLS sensor does not have on-board calibration and data is recorded as digital number (DN). Therefore, VIIRS-DNB provides opportunities to perform quantitative radiometric calibration of DMSP-OLS sensor. In this paper, vicarious radiometric calibration of DMSP-OLS at night under lunar illumination is performed. Events were selected when satellite flies above Dome C in Antarctic at night and the moon illuminates the site with lunar phase being more than quarter moon. Additional event selection criteria to limit solar and lunar zenith angle range have been applied to ensure no influence of stray light effects and adequate lunar illumination. The data from DMSP-OLS and VIIRS-DNB were analyzed to derive the characteristic radiance or DN for the region of interest. The scaling coefficient for converting DMSP-OLS DN values into radiance is determined to optimally merge the observation of DMSP-OLS into VIIRS-DNB radiance data as a function of lunar phases. Calibrating the nighttime light data collected by the DMSP-OLS sensors into radiance unit can enable applications of using both sensor data and advance the applications of night time imagery data.

  15. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  16. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130–115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA 81Kr analysis requires a 40–80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, 81Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  17. Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS Using Vicarious Calibration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara

    2007-01-01

    A radiometric calibration assessment of the AWiFS (Advanced Wide Field Sensor) on the Indian Remote Sensing Resourcesat-1 satellite was performed by the NASA Applied Research & Technology Project Office (formerly the Applied Sciences Directorate) at the John C. Stennis Space Center. A reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with satellite acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations, was used to estimate at-sensor radiance. The AWiFS is a 4-band, multispectral, moderate-resolution (60 m) imaging sensor that operates in the visible through short-wave infrared spectrum and is currently being considered as a Landsat-like alternative. Several study sites near the Stennis Space Center that attempted to span the dynamic range of the sensor were employed. Satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of the radiometric accuracy of AWiFS image products, which are commercially available through GeoEye. These results are an extension of an independent assessment made by the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, the South Dakota State University Satellite Calibration Group & Image Processing Lab, and the NASA Applied Sciences Directorate at the John C. Stennis Space Center the previous year.

  18. Radiometric calibration of Advanced Land Imager using reflectance-based results between 2001 and 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Thome, K.; Biggar, S.; Kuester, M.

    2006-08-01

    The Landsat series of sensors have supplied the remote sensing community with a continuous data set dating to the early 1970s. An important aspect of retaining the continuity of these data is that a Landsat follow-on as well as current Landsat instruments must be understood radiometrically throughout their mission. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI), for example, was developed as a prototype for the next generation of Landsat Instruments, and as such there was a significant effort to understand its radiometric characteristics as well as how it compares with previous Landsat sensors. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been part of this effort since the late 2000 launch of ALI through the use of the reflectance-based method of vicarious calibration. The reflectance-based approach consists of ground-based measurements of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance at the time of satellite overpass to predict the at-sensor radiance seen by the sensor under study. The work compares results from the reflectance-based approach obtained from well-characterized test sites such as Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada and Ivanpah Playa in California as applied to ALI, Landsat-5 TM, and Landsat-7 EMT+. The results from the comparison use a total of 14 ALI dates spanning in time from 2001 to late 2005 and show that ALI agrees with the current radiometric results from TM and ETM+ to within 5%.

  19. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility.

  20. Radiometric STFT Analysis of PDV recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozier, Olivier; Prudhomme, Gabriel; Mercier, Patrick; Berthe, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: by example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach ``PDV Radiometric analysis'' resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derivate an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit. It may be compared to back-scattering and collected power from a particle, which is increasing with its size. At least, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it may show the improvement of sensitivity.

  1. Combined Geometric/radiometric Point Cloud Matching for Shear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the recent past, dense image matching methods such as Semi-Global Matching (SGM) became popular for many applications. The SGM approach has been adapted to and implemented for Leica ADS line-scanner data by North West Geomatics (North West) in co-operation with Leica Geosystems; it is used in North West's production workflow. One of the advantages of ADS imagery is the calibrated color information (RGB and near infrared), extending SGM-derived point clouds to dense "image point clouds" or, more general, information clouds (info clouds). With the goal of automating the quality control of ADS data, info clouds are utilized for Shear Analysis: Three-dimensional offsets of adjacent ADS image strips are determined from a pattern of info cloud pairs in strip overlaps by point cloud matching. The presented approach integrates geometry (height) and radiometry (intensity) information; matching is based on local point-to-plane distances for all points in a given cloud. The offset is derived in a least squares adjustment by applying it to each individual distance computation equation. Using intensities in addition to heights greatly benefits the offset computation, because intensity gradients tend to occur more frequently than height gradients. They can provide or complement the required information for the derivation of planimetric offset components. The paper details the combined geometric/radiometric point cloud matching approach and verifies the results against manual measurements.

  2. Investigation of Aerodynamic and Aerodynamic and Radiometric Land Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crago, Richard D.; Friedl, Mark; Kustas, William; Wang, Ye-Qiao

    2003-01-01

    The overall goal of the project was to reconcile the difference between T(sub s,r) and T(sub aero), while maintaining consistency within models and with theory and data. The project involved collaboration between researchers at Bucknell University, Boston University, University of mode Island, and the USDNARS Hydrology Laboratory. This report focuses on the work done at Bucknell, which used an analytical continuous-source flux model developed by Crago (1998), based on work by Brutsaert and Sugita (1996) to generate fluxes at all levels of the canopy. Named ALARM [Analytical Land- Atmosphere-Radiometer Model] by Suleiman and Crago (2002), the model assumes the foliage has an exponential vertical temperature profile. The same profile is felt by the within-canopy turbulence and 'seen" by a radiometer viewing the surface from any zenith view angle. ALARM converts radiometric surface temperatures taken from any view angle into a clearly-defined version of Taero called the equivalent isothermal surface temperature T(sub s,j), and then calculates the sensible heat flux H using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. This allows remotely sensed Ts,r measurements to be used to produce high quality sensible and latent heat flux estimates, or to validate or update the surface temperature produced by SVATs in climate or mesoscale models.

  3. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  4. Radiometric Study of Soil Profiles in the Infrared Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, T. V.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of radiometric survey of soil profiles in the infrared range for the analysis of soil physical properties was studied. Radiometric data were obtained for different dates of the growing season for a number of soil profiles. The specificity of temperature profiles of texture-differentiated soils (Luvisols and Retisols) as related to weather conditions of the growing season was examined. The correlation analysis showed a close relationship between the air and surface soil temperatures and between the radiometric and thermodynamic soil temperatures in the upper 10 cm. In the studied profiles, the gradient of radiometric temperatures reached 0.5-0.8°C/cm in the humus horizons and sharply decreased at the depth of more than 15-20 cm. The gradient analysis of radiometric images made it possible to outline the boundaries of soil horizons. For the texture-differentiated soils, the most distinct boundaries were established between the gray-humus AY horizon and the underlying eluvial EL horizon in podzolic soils and between the AY horizon and the underlying humus-eluvial AEL horizon in gray soils.

  5. Radiometric rectification - Toward a common radiometric response among multidate, multisensor images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Strebel, D. E.; Nickeson, J. E.; Goetz, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for relating scene digital counts among several images of the same scene by identifying radiometric control sets with mean reflectances that are basically constant. The average digital-count values of the control sets are utilized to compute linear transforms that relate digital count values between images. Two Landsat TM images are studied by means of the technique using simulations of a wide range of atmospheric conditions. In the visible and near-IR bands the algorithm effectively adjusts the surface reflectance for the effects of relative atmospheric differences to within 1 percent. The proposed method is found to be an effective relative correction procedure that can be used when atmospheric optical-depth data and calibration coefficients are not available.

  6. Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus: radiometric calibration and prelaunch performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Kaita, Ed; Gorin, Inna

    1997-12-01

    Landsat-7 will carry the enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) as its payload. This instrument is a derivative of the thematic mapper (TM) instruments flown on the Landsat 4 and 5 spacecraft. Key changes to the instrument include a new 15 meter panchromatic band, an increased spatial resolution 60 meter thermal band and two new solar calibrators to improve the radiometric calibration of the reflective bands. The ETM+ is currently going through a series of radiometric performance tests to evaluate spectral responsivity, noise performance, linearity, radiometric stability, and absolute radiometric calibration in ambient and vacuum. To date, spectral responsivity, dynamic range, noise performance and absolute calibration tests have been conducted in ambient conditions for the reflective channels. System spectral responsivity, based on component level measurements, is similar to previous TM instruments. One notable difference is in band 5, where the ETM+ response cuts off near the nominal value of 1.75 micrometer versus the 1.78 micrometer of Landsat 4 and 5 TM's, providing a bandpass freer of atmospheric absorption. The gain setting on the reflective channels provided within-specification values of dynamic range and variations of less than 2% between detectors in a band for bands 1 - 5, and less than 4% for bands 7 and 8. Generally within-specification noise performance is observed on the instrument, with signal-to-noise ratios in the range of 150 - 300 at the upper end of the dynamic range. The current notable exception is the panchromatic band which shows significant coherent noise. In orbit, the ETM+ has three on board devices available for performing radiometric calibration: the internal calibrator (IC), the partial aperture solar calibrator (PASC) and the full aperture solar calibrator (FASC). The IC, which is similar to the internal calibrator on the thematic mappers, consists of two lamps, a blackbody and a shutter flag which transmits the light from the lamps

  7. Radiometric Calibration Techniques for Signal-of-Opportunity Reflectometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Shah, Rashmi; Deshpande, Manohar; Johnson, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Bi-static reflection measurements utilizing global navigation satellite service (GNSS) or other signals of opportunity (SoOp) can be used to sense ocean and terrestrial surface properties. End-to-end calibration of GNSS-R has been performed using well-characterized reflection surface (e.g., water), direct path antenna, and receiver gain characterization. We propose an augmented approach using on-board receiver electronics for radiometric calibration of SoOp reflectometers utilizing direct and reflected signal receiving antennas. The method calibrates receiver and correlator gains and offsets utilizing a reference switch and common noise source. On-board electronic calibration sources, such as reference switches, noise diodes and loop-back circuits, have shown great utility in stabilizing total power and correlation microwave radiometer and scatterometer receiver electronics in L-band spaceborne instruments. Application to SoOp instruments is likely to bring several benefits. For example, application to provide short and long time scale calibration stability of the direct path channel, especially in low signal-to-noise ratio configurations, is directly analogous to the microwave radiometer problem. The direct path channel is analogous to the loopback path in a scatterometer to provide a reference of the transmitted power, although the receiver is independent from the reflected path channel. Thus, a common noise source can be used to measure the gain ratio of the two paths. Using these techniques long-term (days to weeks) calibration stability of spaceborne L-band scatterometer and radiometer has been achieved better than 0.1. Similar long-term stability would likely be needed for a spaceborne reflectometer mission to measure terrestrial properties such as soil moisture.

  8. Landsat-5 TM reflective-band absolute radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Dewald, J.D.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Micijevic, E.; Ruggles, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provides the longest running continuous dataset of moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery, dating back to its launch in March 1984. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset of each detector. Due to observed degradations in the IC, a new procedure was implemented for U.S.-processed data in May 2003. This new calibration procedure is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration model for the instrument's reflective bands (1-5 and 7) and is derived, in part, from the IC response without the related degradation effects and is tied to the cross calibration with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. Reflective-band absolute radiometric accuracy of the instrument tends to be on the order of 7% to 10%, based on a variety of calibration methods.

  9. Variations in in-flight absolute radiometric calibration. [satellite remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Philip N.

    1986-01-01

    Variations in the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner and the Thematic Mapper (TM) are reviewed. At short wavelengths, the sensors show a gradual reduction in response, while in the mid-IR the TM shows oscillatory variations. One set of measurements made at White Sands, New Mexico shows anomalous results in TM bands 2 and 4. The results of a reflectance-based and a radiance-based calibration method at White Sands are described. An analysis of the radiance-based method shows the value of such measurements from helicopter altitudes for calibration.

  10. Ellipsoidal geometry in asteroid thermal models - The standard radiometric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The major consequences of ellipsoidal geometry in an othewise standard radiometric model for asteroids are explored. It is shown that for small deviations from spherical shape a spherical model of the same projected area gives a reasonable aproximation to the thermal flux from an ellipsoidal body. It is suggested that large departures from spherical shape require that some correction be made for geometry. Systematic differences in the radii of asteroids derived radiometrically at 10 and 20 microns may result partly from nonspherical geometry. It is also suggested that extrapolations of the rotational variation of thermal flux from a nonspherical body based solely on the change in cross-sectional area are in error.

  11. Prelaunch absolute radiometric calibration of LANDSAT-4 protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.; Walker, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are summarized and analyzed from several prelaunch tests with a 122 cm integrating sphere used as part of the absolute radiometric calibration experiments for the protoflight TM sensor carried on the LANDSAT-4 satellite. The calibration procedure is presented and the radiometric sensitivity of the TM is assessed. The internal calibrator and dynamic range after calibration are considered. Tables show dynamic range after ground processing, spectral radiance to digital number and digital number to spectral radiance values for TM bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and for channel 4 of band 6.

  12. Radiometric comparison of the Landsat-5 TM and MSS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Alain; Charbonneau, Lise; Brochu, Richard; Murphy, Jennifer M.; Teillet, Philippe M.

    1987-04-01

    The radiometric accuracy of Landsat-5 TM data and MSS data is evaluated. The TM and MSS images employed in the study were recorded simultaneously over Montreal on August 4, 1984. The radiometric and geometric correction procedures of the Canada Center for Remote Sensing are described. TM and MSS normalized and corrected apparent reflectances computed for 11 different cover types (four water areas, three urban areas having different densities, and four vegetative surfaces) are compared. It is observed that the normalized and corrected apparent reflectances from TM and MSS correlate well; and the usefulness of the processing procedure is validated.

  13. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Boegh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Kustas, William P.; Prueger, John H.; Niyogi, Dev; Das, Narendra; Drewry, Darren T.; Hoffmann, Lucien; Jarvis, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combines TR data with standard energy balance closure models for deriving a hybrid scheme that does not require parameterization of the surface (or stomatal) and aerodynamic conductances (gS and gB). STIC is formed by the simultaneous solution of four state equations and it uses TR as an additional data source for retrieving the "near surface" moisture availability (M) and the Priestley-Taylor coefficient (α). The performance of STIC is tested using high-temporal resolution TR observations collected from different international surface energy flux experiments in conjunction with corresponding net radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (TA), and relative humidity (RH) measurements. A comparison of the STIC outputs with the eddy covariance measurements of λE and H revealed RMSDs of 7-16% and 40-74% in half-hourly λE and H estimates. These statistics were 5-13% and 10-44% in daily λE and H. The errors and uncertainties in both surface fluxes are comparable to the models that typically use land surface parameterizations for determining the unobserved components (gS and gB) of the surface energy balance models. However, the scheme is simpler, has the capabilities for generating spatially explicit surface energy fluxes and independent of submodels for boundary layer developments. This article was corrected on 27 AUG 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  14. Radiometric calibration of a polarization-sensitive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.P.; Markham, B.L. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1992-11-01

    The radiometric accuracy of a sensor is adversely affected by scene polarization if its optical system is sensitive to polarization. Tests performed on the reflective bands of the NS001 Thematic Mapper simulator, an aircraft multispectral scanner, show that it is very sensitive to the polarization state of the incoming radiations. For 100 percent linearly polarized light, errors in the measured intensity vary from -40 to +40 percent, depending on the scan angle and spectral band. To estimate polarization-induced errors in the intensity measured at aircraft level, the intensity and polarization of the atmospheric radiances were simulated using a realistic earth-atmosphere radiative transfer model. For the polarization of atmospheric radiances in the solar meridian plane over a vegetated target, intensity errors may range from -10 to + 10 percent. The polarization-induced errors are highest in the shortest NS001 spectral band (0.450-0.525 microns) because of large atmospheric polarizations contributed by Rayleigh particles and small diluting effects caused by the small contributions of weakly polarized radiations coming from aerosols and the surface. Depending on the illumination and view angles, the errors in derived surface reflectance due to the radiance errors can be very large. In particular, for large off-nadir view angles in the forward scattered direction when the sun is low, the relative errors in the derived surface reflectance can be as large as 4 to 5 times the relative error in the radiances. Polarization sensitivity errors cannot be neglected for the shorter wavelengths when the surface reflectance contribution to atmospheric radiances is very small. 40 refs.

  15. Geometric Calibration and Radiometric Correction of LiDAR Data and Their Impact on the Quality of Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman F.; Kersting, Ana P.; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data. PMID:22164121

  16. Geometric calibration and radiometric correction of LiDAR data and their impact on the quality of derived products.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ayman F; Kersting, Ana P; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data.

  17. Mise en pratique for the definition of the candela and associated derived units for photometric and radiometric quantities in the International System of Units (SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Sperling, Armin; Goodman, Teresa; Campos Acosta, Joaquin; Ohno, Yoshi; Rastello, Maria Luisa; Stock, Michael; Woolliams, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this mise en pratique, prepared by the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) and formally adopted by the CIPM, is to provide guidance on how the candela and related units used in photometry and radiometry can be realized in practice. The scope of the mise en pratique recognizes the fact that the two fields of photometry and radiometry and their units are closely related through the current definition of the SI base unit for the photometric quantity, luminous intensity: the candela. The previous version of the mise en pratique was applied only to the candela whereas this updated version covers the realization of the candela and other related units used for photometric and radiometric quantities. Recent advances in the generation and manipulation of individual photons show great promise of producing radiant fluxes with a well-established number of photons. Thus, this mise en pratique also includes information on the practical realization of units for photometric and radiometric quantities using photon-number-based techniques. In the following, for units used for photometric and radiometric quantities, the shorter term, photometric and radiometric units, is generally used. Section 1 describes the definition of the candela which introduces a close relationship between photometric and radiometric units. Sections 2 and 3 describe the practical realization of radiometric and photon-number-based units, respectively. Section 4.1 explains how, in general, photometric units are derived from radiometric units. Sections 4.2-4.5 deal with the particular geometric conditions for the specific photometric units. Section 5 deals very briefly with the topic of determination of measurement uncertainties in photometry.

  18. Mise en pratique for the definition of the candela and associated derived units for photometric and radiometric quantities in the International System of Units (SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Sperling, Armin; Goodman, Teresa; Campos Acosta, Joaquin; Ohno, Yoshi; Rastello, Maria Luisa; Stock, Michael; Woolliams, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this mise en pratique, prepared by the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) and formally adopted by the CIPM, is to provide guidance on how the candela and related units used in photometry and radiometry can be realized in practice. The scope of the mise en pratique recognizes the fact that the two fields of photometry and radiometry and their units are closely related through the current definition of the SI base unit for the photometric quantity, luminous intensity: the candela. The previous version of the mise en pratique was applied only to the candela whereas this updated version covers the realization of the candela and other related units used for photometric and radiometric quantities. Recent advances in the generation and manipulation of individual photons show great promise of producing radiant fluxes with a well-established number of photons. Thus, this mise en pratique also includes information on the practical realization of units for photometric and radiometric quantities using photon-number-based techniques. In the following, for units used for photometric and radiometric quantities, the shorter term, photometric and radiometric units, is generally used. Section 1 describes the definition of the candela which introduces a close relationship between photometric and radiometric units. Sections 2 and 3 describe the practical realization of radiometric and photon-number-based units, respectively. Section 4.1 explains how, in general, photometric units are derived from radiometric units. Sections 4.2–4.5 deal with the particular geometric conditions for the specific photometric units. Section 5 deals very briefly with the topic of determination of measurement uncertainties in photometry.

  19. Radiometric sources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.; Bender, S.; Byrd, D.; Michaud, F.D.; Moore, S.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    Los Alamos is developing a laboratory that will support state of the art calibration of moderate-aperture instrumentation (< 40 cm diameter) having high spatial and thermal resolution. Highly accurate calibration in the reflected solar and thermal infrared spectral regions are required for newly developed instrumentation. Radiometric calibration of the instrumentation requires well-characterized, extensive sources of radiation from 0.45 to 12 {mu}m. For wavelengths above 2.5 {mu}m, blackbodies having temperature control and radiometric uniformity to within 100 mK are being designed and will be radiometrically characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For the spectral range 0.45--2.5 {mu}m, a ``whitebody`` integrating sphere equipped with tungsten-halogen lamps and enclosed inside a vacuum shroud will be used; this vacuum-compatible extensive standard diffuse source utilizes well-known technology and will be characterized at NIST`s existing facilities. Characterization of instrumental contrast performance for wavelengths, {lambda}, beyond 2.5 {mu}m will utilize a recently designed absolute variable-contrast IR radiometric calibrator, and preliminary data indicate that this calibrator will perform satisfactorily. Conceptual design and status of these extensive broad-band sources and of a monochromatic source to be used for spectral calibrations will be presented.

  20. Thematic Mapper, band 6, radiometric calibration and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, John R.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for absolute radiometric calibration of longwave infrared satellite systems. The technique involves a combination underflight technique and radiometric models to estimate the radiance field reaching a satellite sensor. The radiance field can then be compared to the radiance observed at the satellite to evaluate the sensor's post launch calibration. The technique was applied to the Thematic Mapper band 6 sensor on board Landsat 5. Results are presented for three underflight dates. These results indicate that the TM band 6 sensor can be calibrated to yield an expected error (1 standard deviation) in surface temperature of 0.9K. The radiometric propagation models used to achieve these results are presented along with estimates of potential sensor calibration errors. The final radiometric propagation models developed can be applied independent of underflight requirements and represent a general approach to computation of kinetic surface temperatures. The parameters included in the analysis encompass internal calibration, sensor spectral response, atmospheric transmission, upwelled radiance, downwelled radiance, and sample emissivity.

  1. A new method for in-flight radiometric noise assessment: application to SPOT5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, V. éronique; Chaffaut, Francois-Xavier; Kubik, Philippe; Lebegue, Laurent; Valorge, Christophe; Jung, Mathieu

    2004-11-01

    Since SPOT1 launch in February 1986 and until SPOT5 launch in May 2002, the methods and means to insure the best quality of the images delivered to SPOT IMAGE customers have been continuously improved and updated. The quality of the corrected images is quantified through several figures of merit, including, for radiometric quality, the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). Radiometric noise is due to two separate phenomena: -column-wise noise: it represents on-board image chain performances. -line-wise noise: normalization defects (radiometric model deviations) may lead to visible "columns" on a uniform landscape. For each image, these two noises are combined in an "image noise" that quantifies the variations of the digital numbers on a uniform landscape. Different techniques can be used to assess these different noises in-flight. For SPOT1 to SPOT4, the on-board lamp is used for both normalization and SNR assessment. For SPOT5, without lamp unit, we use images acquired over the quasi-uniform landscapes of Antarctic and Greenland for normalization. However, uniformity of these landscapes is not sufficient to accurately measure the SNR. So, a new method experimented during SPOT3 in-flight commissioning phase and operational for SPOT5 is applied. It consists in using two images of the same landscape acquired simultaneously to eliminate the landscape contribution. This paper focuses on the presentation of this new method and compares its accuracy to the other methods. Finally, a comparison between flight measurements and ground measurements before launch is given.

  2. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, R.; Loyola, D.; Gimeno García, S.; Romahn, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud fraction estimation) using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) on-board the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA) is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude) and to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud top height (CTH), cloud top pressure (CTP), cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud optical thickness (COT) with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN) algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than six years of GOME-2A data (February 2007-June 2013), reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing angle dependent and latitude dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with co-located AVHRR geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of -0.15±0.20. From operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its extremely fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA by using the polarization measurement devices (PMDs).

  3. Radiometric Calibration of the Earth Observing System's Imaging Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Philip N. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The work on the grant was mainly directed towards developing new, accurate, redundant methods for the in-flight, absolute radiometric calibration of satellite multispectral imaging systems and refining the accuracy of methods already in use. Initially the work was in preparation for the calibration of MODIS and HIRIS (before the development of that sensor was canceled), with the realization it would be applicable to most imaging multi- or hyper-spectral sensors provided their spatial or spectral resolutions were not too coarse. The work on the grant involved three different ground-based, in-flight calibration methods reflectance-based radiance-based and diffuse-to-global irradiance ratio used with the reflectance-based method. This continuing research had the dual advantage of: (1) developing several independent methods to create the redundancy that is essential for the identification and hopefully the elimination of systematic errors; and (2) refining the measurement techniques and algorithms that can be used not only for improving calibration accuracy but also for the reverse process of retrieving ground reflectances from calibrated remote-sensing data. The grant also provided the support necessary for us to embark on other projects such as the ratioing radiometer approach to on-board calibration (this has been further developed by SBRS as the 'solar diffuser stability monitor' and is incorporated into the most important on-board calibration system for MODIS)- another example of the work, which was a spin-off from the grant funding, was a study of solar diffuser materials. Journal citations, titles and abstracts of publications authored by faculty, staff, and students are also attached.

  4. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Progress during the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan-ERIM's and 5 image data quality assessment program for the thematic mapper is described. Analyses of LANDSAT 5 TM radiometric characteristics were performed. Effects which had earlier been found in LANDSAT 4 TM data were found to be present in LANDSAT 5 data as well, including: (1) scan direction related signal droop; (2) scan correlated level shifts; and (3) low frequency coherent noise. Coincident LANDSAT 4 and 5 raw TM data were analyzed, and band by band relationships between the two sensors were derived. Earlier efforts which developed an information theoretic measure of multispectral information content were continued, comparing TM and MSS information content.

  5. The Future Spaceborne Hyperspectral Imager Enmap: its In-Flight Radiometric and Geometric Calibration Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Müller, R.; Krawzcyk, H.; Bachmann, M.; Storch, T.; Mogulsky, V.; Hofer, S.

    2012-07-01

    The German Aerospace Center DLR - namely the Earth Observation Center EOC and the German Space Operations Center GSOC - is responsible for the establishment of the ground segment of the future German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program). The Earth Observation Center has long lasting experiences with air- and spaceborne acquisition, processing, and analysis of hyperspectral image data. In the first part of this paper, an overview of the radiometric in-flight calibration concept including dark value measurements, deep space measurements, internal lamps measurements and sun measurements is presented. Complemented by pre-launch calibration and characterization these analyses will deliver a detailed and quantitative assessment of possible changes of spectral and radiometric characteristics of the hyperspectral instrument, e.g. due to degradation of single elements. A geometric accuracy of 100 m, which will be improved to 30 m with respect to a used reference image, if it exists, will be achieved by ground processing. Therfore, and for the required co-registration accuracy between SWIR and VNIR channels, additional to the radiometric calibration, also a geometric calibration is necessary. In the second part of this paper, the concept of the geometric calibration is presented in detail. The geometric processing of EnMAP scenes will be based on laboratory calibration results. During repeated passes over selected calibration areas images will be acquired. The update of geometric camera model parameters will be done by an adjustment using ground control points, which will be extracted by automatic image matching. In the adjustment, the improvements of the attitude angles (boresight angles), the improvements of the interior orientation (view vector) and the improvements of the position data are estimated. In this paper, the improvement of the boresight angles is presented in detail as an example. The other values and combinations

  6. Titan Density Reconstruction Using Radiometric and Cassini Attitude Control Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrade, Luis G., Jr.; Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods of Titan atmospheric density reconstruction for the Titan 87 Cassini flyby. T87 was a unique flyby that provided independent Doppler radiometric measurements on the ground throughout the flyby including at Titan closest approach. At the same time, the onboard accelerometer provided an independent estimate of atmospheric drag force and density during the flyby. These results are compared with the normal method of reconstructing atmospheric density using thruster on-time and angular momentum accumulation. Differences between the estimates are analyzed and a possible explanation for the differences is evaluated.

  7. "Once is Enough" in Radiometric Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Gerald T; Gibson, Charles E; Yoon, Howard W; Parr, Albert C

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of an Optical Technology Division quality system for optical radiation measurement services has provided the opportunity to reconsider the existing calibration procedures to improve quality and reduce costs. We have instituted procedures in our calibration programs to eliminate uninformative repetitive measurements by concentrating our efforts on controlling and understanding the measurement process. The first program in our calibration services to undergo these revisions is described in this paper.

  8. Orbit Determination and Gravity Field Estimation of the Dawn spacecraft at Vesta Using Radiometric and Image Constraints with GEODYN Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centinello, F. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Mazarico, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Dawn spacecraft orbited the protoplanet Vesta from May 3, 2011 to July 25, 2012. Precise orbit determination was critical for the geophysical investigation, as well as the definition of the Vesta-fixed reference frame and the subsequent registration of datasets to the surface. GEODYN, the orbit determination and geodetic parameter estimation software of NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, was used to compute the orbit of the Dawn spacecraft and estimate the gravity field of Vesta. GEODYN utilizes radiometric Doppler and range measurements, and was modified to process image data from Dawn's cameras. X-band radiometric measurements were acquired by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The addition of the capability to process image constraints decreases position uncertainty in the along- and cross-orbit track directions because of their geometric strengths compared with radiometric measurements. This capability becomes critical for planetary missions such as Dawn due to the weak gravity environment, where non-conservative forces affect the orbit more than typical of orbits at larger planetary bodies. Radiometric measurements were fit to less than 0.1 mm/s and 5 m for Doppler and range during the Survey orbit phase (compared with measurement noise RMS of about 0.05 mm/s and 2 m for Doppler and range). Image constraint RMS was fit to less than 100 m (resolution is 5 - 150 m/pixel, depending on the spacecraft altitude). Orbits computed using GEODYN were used to estimate a 20th degree and order gravity field of Vesta. The quality of the orbit determination and estimated gravity field with and without image constraints was assessed through comparison with the spacecraft trajectory and gravity model provided by the Dawn Science Team.

  9. The First SIMBIOS Radiometric Intercomparison (SIMRIC-1), April-September 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Abel, Peter; McClain, Charles; Barnes, Robert; Fargion, Giulietta; Cooper, John; Davis, Curtiss; Korwan, Daniel; Godin, Mike; Maffione, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the first SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) Radiometric Intercomparison (SIMRIC-1). The purpose of the SIMRIC-1 is to ensure a common radiometric scale of the calibration facilities that are engaged in calibrating in situ radiometers used for ocean color related research and to document the calibration procedures and protocols. SIMBIOS staff visited the seven participating laboratories for at least two days each. The SeaWiFS Transfer Radiometer SXR-II measured the calibration radiances produced in the laboratories. The measured radiances were compared with the radiances expected by the laboratories. Typically, the measured radiances were higher than the expected radiances by 0 to 2%. This level of agreement is satisfactory. Several issues were identified, where the calibration protocols need to be improved, especially the reflectance calibration of the reference plaques and the distance correction when using the irradiance standards at distances greater than the 50 cm. The responsivity of the SXR-II changed between 0.3% (channel 6) and 1.6% (channel 2) from December 2000 to December 2001. Monitoring the SXR-II with a portable light source showed a linear drift of the calibration, except for channel 1, where a 2% drop occurred in summer.

  10. Radiometric calibration method for large aperture infrared system with broad dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Chang, Songtao; Zhu, Wei

    2015-05-20

    Infrared radiometric measurements can acquire important data for missile defense systems. When observation is carried out by ground-based infrared systems, a missile is characterized by long distance, small size, and large variation of radiance. Therefore, the infrared systems should be manufactured with a larger aperture to enhance detection ability and calibrated at a broader dynamic range to extend measurable radiance. Nevertheless, the frequently used calibration methods demand an extended-area blackbody with broad dynamic range or a huge collimator for filling the system's field stop, which would greatly increase manufacturing costs and difficulties. To overcome this restriction, a calibration method based on amendment of inner and outer calibration is proposed. First, the principles and procedures of this method are introduced. Then, a shifting strategy of infrared systems for measuring targets with large fluctuations of infrared radiance is put forward. Finally, several experiments are performed on a shortwave infrared system with Φ400  mm aperture. The results indicate that the proposed method cannot only ensure accuracy of calibration but have the advantage of low cost, low power, and high motility. Hence, it is an effective radiometric calibration method in the outfield.

  11. Radiometric uncertainty per pixel for the Sentinel-2 L1C products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorroño, Javier; Gascon, Ferran; Fox, Nigel P.

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the European Union Copernicus programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the Sentinel-2 (S2) Earth Observation (EO) mission which provides optical high spatial resolution imagery. Here is presented a tool, S2-RUT, (Sentinel-2 Radiometric Uncertainty Tool) allowing estimation of the radiometric uncertainties associated to each pixel using as input the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance images provided by ESA. The Sentinel-2 radiometric analysis focuses on the review of the pre- and post-launch characterisations in order to specify the uncertainty contributors at a pixel level and allow changes to be proposed in the uncertainty contributors where necessary. The identified uncertainty contributors are combined using a metrological Guide to Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement' (GUM) model that is validated by comparing the results to a multivariate Monte Carlo Method (MCM). Specific contributors of the TOA reflectance are initially characterised and its future integration in the tool is discussed. The software implementation of the S2-RUT tool relies on the flexibility of the JPEG2000 standard using partial decoding. Auxiliary information for the uncertainty calculation is extracted from the metadata and quality masks integrated in the L1C product. In addition, using the detector footprint mask it is possible to account for parameters dependent on the neighbouring pixels and/or detector module. The L1C uncertainty is coded using 1 byte with an extra optional byte for complementary information. The resulting images and the metadata are directly appended to the original L1C product.

  12. Three Years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Radiometric Calibration Validation using Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometric calibration of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) by analyzing the difference between the brightness temperatures measured at 2616 cm(exp -1) and those calculated at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), using the Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature (RTGSST) for cloud-free night tropical oceans between +/- 30 degrees latitude. The TOA correction is based on radiative transfer. The analysis of the first 3 years of AIRS radiances verifies the absolute calibration at 2616 cm(exp -1) to better than 200 mK, with better than 16 mK/yr stability. The AIRS radiometric calibration uses an internal full aperture wedge blackbody with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable prelaunch calibration coefficients. The calibration coefficients have been unchanged since launch. The analysis uses very tight cloud filtering, which selects about 7000 cloud-free tropical ocean spectra per day, about 0.5% of the data. The absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometry demonstrated at 2616 cm(sup -1) are direct consequences of the implementation of AIRS as a thermally controlled, cooled grating-array spectrometer and meticulous attention to details. Comparable radiometric performance is inferred from the AIRS design for all 2378 channels. AIRS performance sets the benchmark for what can be achieved with a state-of-the-art hyperspectral radiometer from polar orbit and what is expected from future hyperspectral sounders. AIRS was launched into a 705 km altitude polar orbit on NASA's Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua spacecraft on 4 May 2002. AIRS covers the 3.7-15.4 micron region of the thermal infrared spectrum with a spectral resolution of nu/Delta nu = 1200 and has returned 3.7 million spectra of the upwelling radiance each day since the start of routine data gathering in September 2002.

  13. Pre-flight radiometric and spectral calibration of Resourcesat-2A-LISS3* payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Harish; Detroja, M. P.; Padmanabhan, Deepa; Raj, Vedant; Kumar, Anil; Sarkar, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Resourcesat-2A is a follow-on mission of Resourcesat-2, belongs to Indian Remote Sensing Program. It is expected to be launched in 2016 and is dedicated mainly to agricultural applications. One of the payloads, LISS3* is a medium resolution (23.5 m) sensor having four multispectral bands from 450 to 1650 nm. These spectral bands are named as B2 (550 nm), B3 (650 nm), B4 (815 nm) and B5 (1625 nm) respectively covering Visible, Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) regions. In order to provide quality data to the user community for long term scientific applications pre-flight ground calibration is carried out. This paper describes pre-flight spectral and radiometric calibration of LISS3* payload and its performance evaluation. Since it is a continuity mission to Resourcesat-2, which was launched in April 2011 so for generating long-term data record and correlation with previous observations, its parameters are compared with Resourcesat-2 LISS3* payload. The main spectral parameters like central wavelength, and pass band is determined using system level spectral response and compared for both the mission and differences are outlined. The next important exercise is pre-flight radiometric calibration, which was carried out in laboratory using a standard integrating sphere traceable to NIST standards. This paper highlights the technique adopted during pre-flight calibration of the radiometric response and performance assessment of all 4 bands of LISS3* in terms of major electro-optical parameters like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Saturation Radiance (SR) etc. The observed SR shows that the sensor can measure spectral radiance from Earth up to 100% albedo.

  14. Methods for LWIR Radiometric Calibration and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Zanoni, Vicki; Harrington, Gary; Howell, Dane; Stewart, Randy

    2002-01-01

    The utility of a thermal remote sensing system increases with it's ability to retrieve surface temperature or radiance accurately. The radiometer measures the water surface radiant temperature. Combining these measurements with atmospheric pressure, temperature, and water vapor profiles, a top-of-the-atmosphere tradiance estimate can be caluclated with a radiativer transfer code to compare to trhe sensor's output. A novel approach has been developed using an uncooled infrared camera mounted on a boom, to quantify buoy effects.

  15. Radiometric and Spatial Characterization of High-Spatial Resolution Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Zanoni, Vicki (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development and improvement of commercial hyperspatial sensors in recent years has increased the breadth of information that can be retrieved from spaceborne and airborne imagery. NASA, through it's Scientific Data Purchases, has successfully provided such data sets to its user community. A key element to the usefulness of these data are an understanding of the radiometric and spatial response quality of the imagery. This proposal seeks funding to examine the absolute radiometric calibration of the Ikonos sensor operated by Space Imaging and the recently-launched Quickbird sensor from DigitalGlobe. In addition, we propose to evaluate the spatial response of the two sensors. The proposed methods rely on well-understood, ground-based targets that have been used by the University of Arizona for more than a decade.

  16. Thematic Mapper radiometric correction research and development results and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper has the objective to discuss three modifications made to the Thematic Mapper Image Processing System (TIPS) radiometric correction process during the R&D period, before turnover of the Landsat Ground Segment to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The R&D period was to enhance the correction performance of the ground processing of Thematic Mapper (TM) data, taking into account the correction of sensor anomalies. In the context of a brief review of the major steps in TM radiometric correction, a description is provided of the approaches employed to overcome the effects of the Landsat-5 light leak and the saturated calibration lamp states. Attention is also given to scene content correction limitations, and a performance bench mark.

  17. Thematic Mapper radiometric correction research and development results and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.

    1985-09-01

    The present paper has the objective to discuss three modifications made to the Thematic Mapper Image Processing System (TIPS) radiometric correction process during the R&D period, before turnover of the Landsat Ground Segment to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The R&D period was to enhance the correction performance of the ground processing of Thematic Mapper (TM) data, taking into account the correction of sensor anomalies. In the context of a brief review of the major steps in TM radiometric correction, a description is provided of the approaches employed to overcome the effects of the Landsat-5 light leak and the saturated calibration lamp states. Attention is also given to scene content correction limitations, and a performance bench mark.

  18. Validation of Landsat 7 ETM+ band 6 radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palluconi, Frank; Hook, Simon; Abtahi, Ali; Alley, Ron

    2005-08-01

    Since shortly after launch the radiometric performance of band 6 of the ETM+ instrument on Landsat 7 has been evaluated using vicarious calibration techniques for both land and water targets. This evaluation indicates the radiometric performance of band 6 has been both highly stable and accurate. Over a range corresponding to a factor of two in radiance (5 to 55 C in kinetic temperature terms) the difference between the in-situ derived radiance and the image derived radiance is on average 0.5% or less. Water targets are the easiest to use but are limited to the temperature range from 0 to about 32 C. Land targets can reach 55 C or more but are far less spatially homogeneous than water targets with respect to both local surface temperature and spectral emissivity. The techniques used and the results are described.

  19. Characterization of radiometric calibration of LANDSAT-4 TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch internal calibrator, image, and background data is to characterize the radiometric performance of the LANDSAT-4 TM and to recommend improved procedures for radiometric calibration. All but two channels (band 2, channel 4; band 5, channel 3) behave normally. Gain changes relative to a postlaunch reference for channels within a band vary within 0.5 percent as a group. Instrument gain for channels in the cold focal plane oscillates. Noise in background and image data ranges from 0.5 to 1.7 counts. Average differences in forward and reverse image data indicate a need for separate calibration processing of forward and reverse scans. Precision is improved by increasing the pulse integration width from 31 to 41 minor frames, depending on the band.

  20. The 90 GHz radiometric imaging. [for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. E.; White, J. D.; Wilson, W. J.; Mori, T. T.; Hollinger, J. P.; Troy, B. E.; Kenney, J. E.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-GHz (3 mm wavelength) radiometer with a noise output fluctuation of 0.22 K (RMS), with a scanning antenna beam mirror, and the data processing system are described. Real-time radiometric imaging of terrain and man-made objects are shown. Flying at an altitude of 1500 ft a radiometer antenna with a 2 degrees halfpower beamwidth can distinguish landforms, waterways, roads, runways, bridges, ships at sea and their wakes, aircraft on runways, and athletic fields. A flight taken at an altitude of 3000 ft with approximately 2000 ft of clouds below the radiometer demonstrates the ability to distinguish bridges, rivers, marshland and other landforms even though the clouds are optically opaque. The radiometric images of a few representative scenes along with photographs of the corresponding scenes are presented to demonstrate the resolution of the imager system.

  1. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  2. Radiometric calibration of the telescope and ultraviolet spectrometer SUMER on SOHO.

    PubMed

    Hollandt, J; Schühle, U; Paustian, W; Curdt, W; Kühne, M; Wende, B; Wilhelm, K

    1996-09-01

    The prelaunch spectral-sensitivity calibration of the solar spectrometer SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) is described. SUMER is part of the payload of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), which begins its scientific mission in 1996. The instrument consists of a telescope and a spectrometer capable of taking spatially and spectrally highly resolved images of the Sun in a spectral range from 50 to 161 nm. The pointing capabilities, the dynamic range, and the sensitivity of the instrument allow measurements both on the solar disk and above the limb as great as two solar radii. To determine plasma temperatures and densities in the solar atmosphere, the instrument needs an absolute spectral-sensitivity calibration. Here we describe the prelaunch calibration of the full instrument, which utilizes a radiometric transfer-standard source. The transfer standard was based on a high-current hollow-cathode discharge source. It had been calibrated in the laboratory for vacuum UV radiometry of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by use of the calculable spectral photon flux of the Berlin electron storage ring for synchrotron radiation (BESSY)-a primary radiometric source standard.

  3. Radiometric Spacecraft Tracking for Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.; Border, James S.; Shin, Dong K.

    2008-01-01

    Interplanetary spacecraft navigation relies on three types of terrestrial tracking observables.1) Ranging measures the distance between the observing site and the probe. 2) The line-of-sight velocity of the probe is inferred from Doppler-shift by measuring the frequency shift of the received signal with respect to the unshifted frequency. 3) Differential angular coordinates of the probe with respect to natural radio sources are nominally obtained via a differential delay technique of (Delta) DOR (Delta Differential One-way Ranging). The accuracy of spacecraft coordinate determination depends on the measurement uncertainties associated with each of these three techniques. We evaluate the corresponding sources of error and present a detailed error budget.

  4. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Baggenstos, D.; Jiang, W.; Purtschert, R.; Petrenko, V. V.; Lu, Z.; Müller, P.; Kuhl, T.; Lee, J.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Brook, E.

    2013-12-01

    Ice cores from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets provide highly resolved, well-dated climate records of past polar temperatures, atmospheric composition and aerosol loading up to 800 ka before present. In addition to deep ice cores, old ice can also be found at ice margin sites and blue ice areas (BIAs) where it is exposed due to local ice dynamics and ablation. BIAs have great potential for paleoclimate studies, as large quantities of old ice are available at the surface where it can be sampled with relative ease. Determining the age of the ablating ice is the main difficulty in using BIAs for climate reconstructions. There is significant scientific interest in obtaining glacial ice dating beyond 800ka, as such an archive would extend the ice core record further back in time; such old ice can potentially be found in Antarctic BIAs such as the Allan Hills site, providing a strong impetus to developing reliable (absolute) dating tools for glacial ice. 81Kr is naturally produced in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions with the stable isotopes of Kr. The long half-life (229 ka) of 81Kr allows for radiometric dating in the 50 ka - 1.5 Ma age range, well past the reach of radiocarbon dating. Recent technological advances in Atom Trace Trap Analysis (ATTA) have reduced sample requirements to 40-80 kg of ice, which can realistically be obtained from BIAs and ice margins. We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using ATTA. The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a root mean square offset of 6.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination, and 2) air content measurements that show the ice did

  5. LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner (MSS) subsystem radiometric characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, W. (Editor); Barker, J. (Editor); Clark, B. P.; Dasgupta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The multispectral band scanner (mass) and its spectral characteristics are described and methods are given for relating video digital levels on computer compatible tapes to radiance into the sensor. Topics covered include prelaunch calibration procedures and postlaunch radiometric processng. Examples of current data resident on the MSS image processing system are included. The MSS on LANDSAT 4 is compared with the scanners on earlier LANDSAT satellites.

  6. Radiometrically accurate thermal imaging in the Landsat program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansing, Jack C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of calibrating Landsat TM thermal IR data have been developed so that the residual error is reduced to 0.9 K (1 standard deviation). Methods for verifying the radiometric performance of TM on orbit and ground calibration methods are discussed. The preliminary design of the enhanced TM for Landsat-6 is considered. A technique for accurately reducing raw data from the Landsat-5 thermal band is described in detail.

  7. Observations of the moon by the global ozone monitoring experiment: radiometric calibration and lunar albedo.

    PubMed

    Dobber, M R; Goede, A P; Burrows, J P

    1998-11-20

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new instrument, which was launched aboard the second European Remoting Sensing satellite ESA-ERS2 in 1995. For its long-term radiometric and spectral calibration the GOME observes the sun and less frequently the moon on a regular basis. These measurements of the lunar radiance and solar irradiance have been used in a study to determine, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, the geometric lunar albedo from 240 to 800 nm at high spectral resolution from space. For a waning moon there is good agreement with ground-based measurements in the visible region and with recent space-based measurements in the ultraviolet region. In addition, the use of these measurements for the characterization of in-orbit degradation of instruments operating in this spectral region has been adequately demonstrated.

  8. In-progress absolute radiometric inflight calibration of the LANDSAT-4 sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. J.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Savage, R.; Slater, P. N.

    1983-01-01

    An approach is described for providing periodic inflight absolute radiometric calibrations of the LANDSAT-4 sensors by reference to selected, instrumented ground areas. Results of some early ground measurements and computer simulations are presented. Selection of a suitable ground reference site, accurate measurement of the spectral reflectance of the selected area, determination of atmospheric characteristics during the morning of the sensor overpass, reduction of the measured data and their use in an appropriate atmospheric radiative transfer program, and comparison of the radiance level data with the digital counts of for the images of the selected areas are discussed. Preliminary measurements of gypsum are being made as an aid in defining the characteristics of field equipment to be constructed and calibrated for use over the White Sands Missile Range.

  9. Landsat radiometric continuity using airborne imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Angal, A.; Thome, K.; Cook, B.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Goddard's Lidar, Hyperspectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) includes a scanning lidar, an imaging spectrometer and a thermal camera. The Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) Imaging Spectrometer acquires high resolution spectral measurements (1.5 nm resolution) from 0.4 to 1.0 µm. The SIRCUS-based calibration facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was used to measure the absolute spectral response (ASR) of the G-LiHT's imaging spectrometer. Continuously tunable lasers coupled to an integrating sphere facilitated a radiance-based calibration for the detectors in the reflective solar bands. The transfer of the SIRCUS-based laboratory calibration of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer to the Landsat sensors (Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI) is demonstrated using simultaneous overpasses over the Red Lake Playa and McClaw's Playa sites during the commissioning phase of Landsat 8 in March 2013. Solar Lunar Absolute Imaging Spectrometer (SOLARIS) is the calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument of CLARREO. A portable version of SOLARIS, known as Suitcase SOLARIS, also calibrated using a SIRCUS-based setup, was deployed for ground measurements as a part of both the field campaigns. Simultaneous measurements of SOLARIS allow cross-comparison with G-LiHT and Landsat sensors. The transfer of the lab-based calibration of G-LiHT to Landsat sensors show that the sensors agree within 5% with a 1-3% calibration uncertainty of G-LiHT's Imaging Spectrometer.

  10. User's guide to the Radiometric Age Data Bank (RADB)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, Robert Eugene; Cole, James C.; Marvin, Richard F.

    1976-01-01

    The Radiometric Age Data Bank (RADB) has been established by the U.S. Geological Survey, as a means for collecting and organizing the estimated 100,000 radiometric ages presently published for the United States. RADB has been constructed such that a complete sample description (location, rock type, etc.), literature citation, and extensive analytical data are linked to form an independent record for each sample reported in a published work. Analytical data pertinent to the potassium-argon, rubidium-strontium, uranium-thorium-lead, lead-alpha, and fission-track methods can be accommodated, singly or in combinations, for each record. Data processing is achieved using the GIPSY program (University of Oklahoma) which maintains the data file and builds, updates, searches, and prints the records using simple yet versatile command statements. Searching and selecting records is accomplished by specifying the presence, absence, or (numeric or alphabetic) value of any element of information in the data bank, and these specifications can be logically linked to develop sophisticated searching strategies. Output is available in the form of complete data records, abbreviated tests, or columnar tabulations. Samples of data-reporting forms, GIPSY command statements, output formats, and data records are presented to illustrate the comprehensive nature and versatility of the Radiometric Age Data Bank.

  11. Preliminary radiometric calibration assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouvet, M.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Saunier, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities carried out in the frame of the data quality activities of the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) sensor onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). Assessment of the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 multi-spectral imager is achieved via three intercomparisons to currently flying sensors over the Libyan desert, during the first year of operation. AU three methodologies indicate a slight underestimation of AVNIR-2 in band 1 by 4 to 7% with respect to other sensors radiometric scale. Band 2 does not show any obvious bias. Results for band 3 are affected by saturation due to inappropriate gain setting. Two methodologies indicate no significant bias in band 4. Preliminary results indicate possible degradations of the AVNIR-2 channels, which, when modeled as an exponentially decreasing functions, have time constants of respectively 13.2 %.year-1, 8.8%.year-1 and 0.1%.year-1 in band 1, 2 and 4 (with respect to the radiometric scale of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, MERIS). Longer time series of AVNIR-2 data are needed to draw final conclusions. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  12. [Spectral radiometric calibration research of Quick Bird digital image].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Kun; Chen, Chun; Xing, Fu; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Yun-Sheng

    2008-03-01

    The present article uses the basic operation of the digital remote image radiometric calibration of the Quickbird with high distinguishing rate, including the physical attribute and the mathematical basement of digital images, the annotation as well as the format of image data. The study makes use of information of spectral radiance from the ground-atmosphere system, which is recorded by the digital remote image of Quick Bird in Honghe area. This dissertation offered the calculation means of radiometric calibration, and changed the pixel digital number into band-integrated radiance. Then, the spectral radiance was calculated. After the radiometric calibration, the Quick Bird image showed the quantitative information of spectral feature from various ground items. Only through the calibration can the Quick Bird image be quantitatively compared and analyzed with other remote sensor images. Thus, the inversion image has the value of application. The significance consists in offering important basic condition for the image amalgamation and better disposal of the special inforation pick-up. This effort also offered spectral information of the ground items for the inversion of the remote image. Therefore, the authors can combine the research of the spectral character of ground items with the establishment of the remote application model in order to quantitatively analyze the ground items.

  13. [Radiometric calibration of LCTF-based multispectral area CCD camera].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Li; Yi, Wei-Ning; Zhang, Dong-Ying; Huang, Hong-Lian; Qiao, Yan-Li; Zhang, Xie

    2011-01-01

    Multispectral area CCD camera based on liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) is a new spectral imaging system, which could record image of one wavelength on the area CCD by utilizing electrically controlled birefringence of liquid-crystal and interference principle of polarized light. Because of the special working principle of LCTF and frame transfer area CCD, the existing radiometric calibration method can not meet the precision need of remote sensing application if it is used for LCTF-camera. An improved radiometric calibration method is proposed, in which the camera performance test and calibration experiment are carried out relying on the devices of integrating sphere and standard detector, and the absolute calibration coefficient is calculated via correcting frame transfer smear and improving data process algorithm. Then the validity of the laboratory calibration coefficient is checked by a field validation experiment. Experimental result indicates that the calibration coefficient is valid, and the radiation information on the ground could be accurately inverted from the calibrated image data. With the resolution of radiometric calibration of LCTF-camera and the improvement of calibration precision, the application field of the image data acquired by the camera would be extended effectively.

  14. A Preliminary Analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Fusco, L.; Mehl, W.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA raw (BT) product, the radiometrically corrected (AT) product, and the radiometrically and geometrically corrected (PT) product of a TM scene were analyzed examine the frequency distribution of the digital data; the statistical correlation between the bands; and the variability between the detectors within a band. The analyses were performed on a series of image subsets from the full scence. Results are presented from one 1024 c 1024 pixel subset of Realfoot Lake, Tennessee which displayed a representative range of ground conditions and cover types occurring within the full frame image. From this cursory examination of one of the first seven channel TM data sets, it would appear that the radiometric performance of the system is most satisfactory and largely meets pre-launch specifications. Problems were noted with Band 5 Detector 3 and Band 2 Detector 4. Differences were observed between forward and reverse scan detector responses both for the BT and AT products. No systematic variations were observed between odd and even detectors.

  15. A Traceable Ground to On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration System for the Solar Reflective Wavelength Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Donald F.; Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the combination of a Mie scattering spectral BSDF and BTDF albedo standard whose calibration is traceable to the NIST SIRCUS Facility or the NIST STARR II Facility. The Space-based Calibration Transfer Spectroradiometer (SCATS) sensor uses a simple, invariant optical configuration and dedicated narrow band spectral channel modules to provide very accurate, polarization-insensitive, stable measurements of earth albedo and lunar disk albedo. Optical degradation effects on calibration stability are eliminated through use of a common optical system for observations of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. The measurements from space would be traceable to SI units through preflight calibrations of radiance and irradiance at NIST's SIRCUS facility and the invariant optical system used in the sensor. Simultaneous measurements are made in multiple spectral channels covering the solar reflective wavelength range of 300 nm to 2.4 microns. The large dynamic range of signals is handled by use of single-element, highly-linear detectors, stable discrete electronic components, and a non imaging optical configuration. Up to 19 spectral modules can be mounted on a single-axis drive to give direct pointing at the Earth and at least once per orbit view of the Sun and Moon. By observing the Sun on every orbit, the most stringent stability requirements of the system are limited to short time periods. The invariant optical system for both radiance and irradiance measurements also give excellent transfer to-orbit SI traceability. Emerging instrumental requirements for remotely sensing tropospheric trace species have led to a rethinking by some of the paradigm for Systeme International d'Unites (SI) traceability of the spectral irradiance and radiance radiometric calibrations to spectral albedo (sr(exp -1)) which is not a SI unit. In the solar reflective wavelength region the spectral albedo calibrations are tied often to either the spectral albedo of a solar diffuser or the Moon

  16. High accuracy in situ radiometric mapping.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew N

    2004-01-01

    In situ and airborne gamma ray spectrometry have been shown to provide rapid and spatially representative estimates of environmental radioactivity across a range of landscapes. However, one of the principal limitations of this technique has been the influence of changes in the vertical distribution of the source (e.g. 137Cs) on the observed photon fluence resulting in a significant reduction in the accuracy of the in situ activity measurement. A flexible approach for single gamma photon emitting radionuclides is presented, which relies on the quantification of forward scattering (or valley region between the full energy peak and Compton edge) within the gamma ray spectrum to compensate for changes in the 137Cs vertical activity distribution. This novel in situ method lends itself to the mapping of activity concentrations in environments that exhibit systematic changes in the vertical activity distribution. The robustness of this approach has been demonstrated in a salt marsh environment on the Solway coast, SW Scotland, with both a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) detector and a 35% n-type HPGe detector. Application to ploughed field environments has also been demonstrated using HPGe detector, including its application to the estimation of field moist bulk density and soil erosion measurement. Ongoing research work is also outlined.

  17. The moon as a radiometric reference source for on-orbit sensor stability calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    The wealth of data generated by the world's Earth-observing satellites, now spanning decades, allows the construction of long-term climate records. A key consideration for detecting climate trends is precise quantification of temporal changes in sensor calibration on-orbit. For radiometer instruments in the solar reflectance wavelength range (near-UV to shortwave-IR), the Moon can be viewed as a solar diffuser with exceptional stability properties. A model for the lunar spectral irradiance that predicts the geometric variations in the Moon's brightness with ???1% precision has been developed at the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, AZ. Lunar model results corresponding to a series of Moon observations taken by an instrument can be used to stabilize sensor calibration with sub-percent per year precision, as demonstrated by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The inherent stability of the Moon and the operational model to utilize the lunar irradiance quantity provide the Moon as a reference source for monitoring radiometric calibration in orbit. This represents an important capability for detecting terrestrial climate change from space-based radiometric measurements.

  18. Sensitivity and information content of aerosol retrievals from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer: radiometric factors.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Alexander

    2002-02-20

    The sensitivity of aerosol optical depths tau1 and tau2 derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 1 and 2, centered at lambda1 = 0.63 and lambda2 = 0.83 microm, respectively, and of an effective Angstrom exponent alpha, derived therefrom as alpha = -ln(tau1/tau2)/ln(lambda1/lambda2), to calibration uncertainties, radiometric noise, and digitization is estimated. Analyses are made both empirically (by introduction of perturbations into the measured radiances and estimation of the respective partial derivatives) and theoretically (by use of a decoupled form of the single-scattering approximation of the radiative transfer equation). The two results are in close agreement. The errors, deltataui and deltaalphai, are parameterized empirically as functions of taui, radiometric errors, and Sun and view geometry. In particular, the alpha errors change in approximately inverse proportion to tau and are comparable with, or even exceed, typical alpha signals over oceans when tau < 0.25. Their detrimental effect on the information content of the AVHRR-derived size parameter gradually weakens as tau increases.

  19. Radiometric calibration of ocean color satellite sensors using AERONET-OC data.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Foster, Robert; Wang, Menghua; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2014-09-22

    Radiometric vicarious calibration of ocean color (OC) satellite sensors is carried out through the full sunlight path radiative transfer (RT) simulations of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system based on the aerosol and water-leaving radiance data from AERONET-OC sites for the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands. Quantitative evaluation of the potential of such approach for achieving the radiometric accuracies of OC satellite sensors is made by means of direct comparisons between simulated and satellite measured top of atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Very high correlations (R ≥ 0.96 for all visible channels) are achieved for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor when this approach is applied with the data from the LISCO and WaveCIS AERONET-OC sites. Vicarious calibration gain factors derived with this approach are highly consistent, with comparisons between the two sites exhibiting around 0.5% discrepancy in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, while their average temporal variability is also within 0.28% - 1.23% permitting the approach to be used, at this stage, for verification of sensor calibration performance.

  20. Initial On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Fulbright, Jon; Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Chiang, Vincent; Xiong, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The on-orbit radiometric response calibration of the VISible/Near InfraRed (VISNIR) and the Short-Wave InfraRed (SWIR) bands of the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite is carried out through a Solar Diffuser (SD). The transmittance of the SD screen and the SD's Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) are measured before launch and tabulated, allowing the VIIRS sensor aperture spectral radiance to be accurately determined. The radiometric response of a detector is described by a quadratic polynomial of the detector?s digital number (dn). The coefficients were determined before launch. Once on orbit, the coefficients are assumed to change by a common factor: the F-factor. The radiance scattered from the SD allows the determination of the F-factor. In this Proceeding, we describe the methodology and the associated algorithms in the determination of the F-factors and discuss the results.

  1. Simulations of three-dimensional radiometric imaging of extended sources in a security screening portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Neil A.; Bowring, Nick

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates by simulation the use of the three-dimensional aperture synthesis imaging technique to image three-dimensional extended sources. Software was written to access the three-dimensional information from computer graphics models in the formats of *.dxf and *.3ds and use these to generate synthetic cross-correlations, as if they would have been generated by an aperture synthesis antenna/receiver array measuring the radiometric emission from the three-dimensional object. A three-dimensional (near-field) aperture synthesis imaging algorithm generates [1] a voxel image of the three-dimensional object. Images created from a sphere indicate faithful reproduction about a single phase centre when the radius of the sphere is less than the Fresnel scale. However, for larger spheres, definition in the threedimensional imagery suffers and a phenomenon, referred to in this paper as Fresnel noise, appears in the image. Images of objects larger than the Fresnel scale can be created by having multiple smaller images, each having a size approximately of the Fresnel scale and centred on separate phase centres. Using the software to generate threedimensional imagery of a person, to demonstrate capabilities for portal security screening, indicates the technique works to first order. Improvements are needed in the software to improve the spatial sampling of the radiometric fields from the three-dimensional objects and implement a volumetric image mosaicking technique to remove the Fresnel noise.

  2. Airborne lidar and radiometric observations of PBL- and low clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Valentin, R.; Pelon, J.

    1992-01-01

    lidar and narrowbeam IR radiometer is conducted to study the scale integration problem. A good agreement within less than 100 m relies on spatial uniformity and an optically thick layer. In the presence of holes, a discrepancy is observed. This is illustrated in figure 2, displaying as a function of time (1) the lidar signals; (2) the target temperature (either clouds or sea surface) retreived from a narrowbeam IR radiometer, 17 C is the sea surface temperature on that day; and (3) the visible flux, linked to cloud albedo, measured by a pyranometer. In preparation of ASTEX, down- and up-looking measurements where conducted on stratocumulus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean near Quimper in Brittany. Depending on the flight pattern orientation with respect to the wind, the top and bottom cloud morphologies are different. Preliminary results are given on cloud morphology, cloud top PDFs, optical porosity, fractional cloudiness, and comparison of lidar and radiometric measurements.

  3. MODIS Radiometric Calibration Program, Methods and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Guenther, Bruce; Angal, Amit; Barnes, William; Salomonson, Vincent; Sun, Junqiang; Wenny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    As a key instrument for NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has made significant contributions to the remote sensing community with its unprecedented amount of data products continuously generated from its observations and freely distributed to users worldwide. MODIS observations, covering spectral regions from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared (LWIR), have enabled a broad range of research activities and applications for studies of the earth s interactive system of land, oceans, and atmosphere. In addition to extensive pre-launch measurements, developed to characterize sensor performance, MODIS carries a set of on-board calibrators (OBC) that can be used to track on-orbit changes of various sensor characteristics. Most importantly, dedicated and continuous calibration efforts have been made to maintain sensor data quality. This paper provides an overview of the MODIS calibration program, on-orbit calibration activities, methods, and performance. Key calibration results and lessons learned from the MODIS calibration effort are also presented in this paper.

  4. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  5. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  6. Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS Sensor and a Cross-calibration Enhanced Vicarious Calibration Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, David

    2007-01-01

    Using vicarious calibration validation of moderate resolution sensors such as AWiFS is complicated by requiring more land area to ensure proper registration and sufficient pixel numbers. A trial AWiFS calibration was performed on a grass site that consisted of two dramatically different grass heights. Ground truth data was collected over relatively small areas representing only a few pixels. The radiometric gain results for each of these areas will be reported. To enhance this analysis, since a near coincidence high resolution image was collected, the high resolution data was effectively resized to produce pixels comparable to AWiFS and the atmospheric model was used to produce a top of canopy radiance map. Multiple uniform vegetated areas of several radiances were then identified and subsequently propagated to the top of atmosphere viewpoint of the moderate resolution (AWiFS) satellite. The radiometric gain was then calculated based on the vendor high resolution satellite gains (for the 3 bands with comparable wavelengths). Band-to-band conversion was performed assuming a hyperspectral reflectance based on the standard vegetated site. The initial comparison produces AWiFS radiometric gain values that agree to better than 10% of the values measured using the standard vicarious gain technique.

  7. Radiometric surveying for the assessment of radiation dose and radon specific exhalation in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, M.; Verdoya, M.; Chiozzi, P.; Pasquale, V.

    2012-08-01

    We performed a radiometric survey for evaluating the natural radioactivity and the related potential hazard level both outdoor and indoor a mine tunnel. The mine is located in a zone of uranium enrichment in the Western Alps (Italy). At first, a γ-ray spectrometry survey of the area surrounding the mine was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, spectrometric measurements were performed in the tunnel and rock samples were collected for laboratory analyses. The results point to significant heterogeneity in uranium concentration and consequently in the absorbed dose rate spatial distribution. Spectrometric results in situ and in the laboratory, together with radon air concentration measurements, were used to infer the radon specific exhalation and flow from the mine rocks. The specific exhalation is positively related to the activity concentration of uranium.

  8. Radiometric calibration of the Landsat MSS sensor series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, Dennis L.; Karki, Sadhana; Bhatt, Rajendra; Micijevik, Esad; Aaron, David; Jasinski, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing of the Earth using Landsat sensors was ushered on July 23, 1972, with the launch of Landsat-1. Following that success, four more Landsat satellites were launched, and each of these carried the Multispectral Scanner System (MSS). These five sensors provided the only consistent multispectral space-based imagery of the Earth's surface from 1972 to 1982. This work focuses on developing both a consistent and absolute radiometric calibration of this sensor system. Cross-calibration of the MSS was performed through the use of pseudoinvariant calibration sites (PICSs). Since these sites have been shown to be stable for long periods of time, changes in MSS observations of these sites were attributed to changes in the sensors themselves. In addition, simultaneous data collections were available for some MSS sensor pairs, and these were also used for cross-calibration. Results indicated substantial differences existed between instruments, up to 16%, and these were reduced to 5% or less across all MSS sensors and bands. Lastly, this paper takes the calibration through the final step and places the MSS sensors on an absolute radiometric scale. The methodology used to achieve this was based on simultaneous data collections by the Landsat-5 MSS and Thematic Mapper (TM) instruments. Through analysis of image data from a PICS location and through compensating for the spectral differences between the two instruments, the Landsat-5 MSS sensor was placed on an absolute radiometric scale based on the Landsat-5 TM sensor. Uncertainties associated with this calibration are considered to be less than 5%.

  9. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Ronny; Loyola, Diego; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Romahn, Fabian

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud-fraction estimation) using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) onboard the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA) is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude) to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud-top height (CTH), cloud-top pressure (CTP), cloud-top albedo (CTA) and cloud optical thickness (COT) with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN) algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than five years of GOME-2A data (April 2008 to June 2013), reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing-angle-dependent and latitude-dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with colocated AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of -0.15 ± 0.20. From an operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its very fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud-fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA using polarization measurement devices (PMDs).

  10. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  11. Calibration method for radiometric and wavelength calibration of a spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Edward M.

    1998-12-01

    A new calibration target or Certified Reference Material (CRM) has been designed that uses violet, orange, green and cyan dyes ont cotton paper. This paper type was chosen because it has a relatively flat spectral response from 400 nm to 700 nm and good keeping properties. These specific dyes were chosen because the difference signal between the orange, cyan, green and purple dyes have certain characteristics that then a low the calibration of an instrument. The ratio between the difference readings is a direct function of the center wavelength of a given spectral band. Therefore, the radiometric and spectral calibration can be determined simultaneously from the physical properties of the reference materials.

  12. Radiometric correction and equalization of satellite digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algazi, V. R.; Ford, G. E.; Kazakoff, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Satellite digital data from Landsat and NOAA satellites is often marred by striping or streaking errors due to variations in the response of the radiometric sensors. In this paper, we discuss the equalization of the digital data as a preprocessing step, prior to image enhancement or automatic classification. The methods described make use of statistics of the data itself to generate nonlinear or linear memory-less equalization algorithms. These algorithms, by contrast to multidimensional filtering, do not result in a loss of spatial resolution. Examples of applications to Landsat and NOAA-3 thermal infrared data are given and illustrated.

  13. A radiometric interpretive legend for Landsat digital thematic maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    A legend is suggested for use with computer-generated thematic maps made from Landsat digital data that designates some of the radiometric characteristics of each thematic map unit as well as the described terrain attributes of each map unit. The relationship between spectral band and radiance for each map unit is shown by a two-dimensional polygon with the four Landsat multispectral scanner bands plotted on the ordinate and radiance levels on the abscissa. The resulting shape is colored to correspond with the map unit color, thus facilitating the recognition and understanding of the computer-generated map units.

  14. Exploring a Black Body Source as an Absolute Radiometric Calibration Standard and Comparison with a NIST Traced Lamp Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas; Sarture, Chuck

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is required for the scientific research and application objectives pursued with the spectroscopic measurements. Specifically calibration is required for: inter-comparison of AVIRIS data measured at different locations and at different times; analysis of AVIRIS data with data measured by other instruments; and analysis of AVIRIS data in conjunction with computer models. The primary effect of radiometric calibration is conversion of AVIRIS instrument response values (digitized numbers, or DN) to units of absolute radiance. For example, a figure shows the instrument response spectrum measured by AVIRIS over a portion of Rogers Dry Lake, California, and another figure shows the same spectrum calibrated to radiance. Only the calibrated spectrum may be quantitatively analyzed for science research and application objectives. Since the initial development of the AVIRIS instrument-radiometric calibration has been based upon a 1000-W irradiance lamp with a calibration traced to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are several advantages to this irradiance-lamp calibration approach. First, the considerable effort of NIST backs up the calibration. Second, by changing the distance to the lamp, the output can closely span the radiance levels measured by AVIRIS. Third, this type of standard is widely used. Fourth, these calibrated lamps are comparatively inexpensive. Conversely, there are several disadvantages to this approach as well. First, the lamp is not a primary standard. Second, the lamp output characteristics may change in an unknown manner through time. Third, it is difficult to assess, constrain, or improve the calibration uncertainty delivered with the lamp. In an attempt to explore the effect and potentially address some of these disadvantages a set of analyses and measurements comparing an irradiance lamp with a black-body source have been completed

  15. a Comparison of LIDAR Reflectance and Radiometrically Calibrated Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncat, A.; Briese, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    In order to retrieve results comparable under different flight parameters and among different flight campaigns, passive remote sensing data such as hyperspectral imagery need to undergo a radiometric calibration. While this calibration, aiming at the derivation of physically meaningful surface attributes such as a reflectance value, is quite cumbersome for passively sensed data and relies on a number of external parameters, the situation is by far less complicated for active remote sensing techniques such as lidar. This fact motivates the investigation of the suitability of full-waveform lidar as a "single-wavelength reflectometer" to support radiometric calibration of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, this suitability was investigated by means of an airborne hyperspectral imagery campaign and an airborne lidar campaign recorded over the same area. Criteria are given to assess diffuse reflectance behaviour; the distribution of reflectance derived by the two techniques were found comparable in four test areas where these criteria were met. This is a promising result especially in the context of current developments of multi-spectral lidar systems.

  16. Automated gamma spectrometry and data analysis on radiometric neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, W.Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated gamma-ray spectrometry system was designed and implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to analyze radiometric neutron dosimeters. Unattended, automatic, 24 hour/day, 7 day/week operation with online data analysis and mainframe-computer compatible magnetic tape output are system features. The system was used to analyze most of the 4000-plus radiometric monitors (RM's) from extensive reactor characterization tests during startup and initial operation of th Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF, operated by HEDL for the Department of Energy, incorporates a 400 MW(th) sodium-cooled fast reactor. Aumomated system hardware consists of a high purity germanium detector, a computerized multichannel analyzer data acquisition system (Nuclear Data, Inc. Model 6620) with two dual 2.5 Mbyte magnetic disk drives plus two 10.5 inch reel magnetic tape units for mass storage of programs/data and an automated Sample Changer-Positioner (ASC-P) run with a programmable controller. The ASC-P has a 200 sample capacity and 12 calibrated counting (analysis) positions ranging from 6 inches (15 cm) to more than 20 feet (6.1 m) from the detector. The system software was programmed in Fortran at HEDL, except for the Nuclear Data, Inc. Peak Search and Analysis Program and Disk Operating System (MIDAS+).

  17. Reduction of radiometric miscalibration--applications to pushbroom sensors.

    PubMed

    Rogass, Christian; Spengler, Daniel; Bochow, Mathias; Segl, Karl; Lausch, Angela; Doktor, Daniel; Roessner, Sigrid; Behling, Robert; Wetzel, Hans-Ulrich; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework-Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME)-considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared) and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data. PMID:22163960

  18. Reduction of radiometric miscalibration--applications to pushbroom sensors.

    PubMed

    Rogass, Christian; Spengler, Daniel; Bochow, Mathias; Segl, Karl; Lausch, Angela; Doktor, Daniel; Roessner, Sigrid; Behling, Robert; Wetzel, Hans-Ulrich; Kaufmann, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of hyperspectral images is an important task in Remote Sensing. Foregoing radiometric calibration results in the assignment of incident electromagnetic radiation to digital numbers and reduces the striping caused by slightly different responses of the pixel detectors. However, due to uncertainties in the calibration some striping remains. This publication presents a new reduction framework that efficiently reduces linear and nonlinear miscalibrations by an image-driven, radiometric recalibration and rescaling. The proposed framework-Reduction Of Miscalibration Effects (ROME)-considering spectral and spatial probability distributions, is constrained by specific minimisation and maximisation principles and incorporates image processing techniques such as Minkowski metrics and convolution. To objectively evaluate the performance of the new approach, the technique was applied to a variety of commonly used image examples and to one simulated and miscalibrated EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) scene. Other examples consist of miscalibrated AISA/Eagle VNIR (Visible and Near Infrared) and Hawk SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) scenes of rural areas of the region Fichtwald in Germany and Hyperion scenes of the Jalal-Abad district in Southern Kyrgyzstan. Recovery rates of approximately 97% for linear and approximately 94% for nonlinear miscalibrated data were achieved, clearly demonstrating the benefits of the new approach and its potential for broad applicability to miscalibrated pushbroom sensor data.

  19. Branching Ratios for The Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Bhatia, A. K.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket instrument is a two-channel imaging spectrograph that observes the solar corona and transition region with high spectral resolution and a rapid cadence made possible by unprecedented sensitivity. The upcoming flight will incorporate a new wavelength channel covering the range 524-630 Angstroms, the previously-flown 300-370 Angstroms channel, and the first flight demonstration of cooled active pixel sensor (APS) arrays. The new 524-630 Angstrom channel incorporates a Toroidal Varied Line Space (TVLS) grating coated with B4C/Ir, providing broad spectral coverage and a wide temperature range of 0.025 to 10 MK. Absolute radiometric calibration of the two channels is being performed using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and NIST-calibrated AXUV-100G photodiode. Laboratory observations of He I 584 Angstroms and He II 304 Angstroms provide absolute radiometric calibrations of the two channels at those two respective wavelengths by using the AXUV photodiode as a transfer standard. The spectral responsivity is being determined by observing line pairs with a common upper state in the spectra of Ne I-III and Ar II-III. Calculations of A-values for the observed branching ratios are in progress.

  20. Investigation of radiometric properties of the LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Rice, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric data quality of the LANDSAT 4 multispectral scanner (MSS) was examined using several LANDSAT 4 frames. It was found that LANDSAT 4 MSS produces high-quality data of the caliber experienced with previous LANDSATS. For example, the detector equalization procedure worked well, leaving a residual banding effect of about 0.3 digital counts RMS, close to the theoretical minimum value of quantization error. Nevertheless, artifacts of the data were found, two of which were not experienced in previous MSS data. A low-level coherent noise effect was observed in all bands, with a magnitude of about 0.5 digital counts and a frequency of approximately 28 KHz (representing a wavelength of about 3.6 pixels); a substantial increase in processing complexity would be required to reduce this artifact in the data. Also, a substantial scan-length variation (of up to six pixels) was noted in MSS data when the TM sensor was operating; the LANDSAT 4 correction algorithms being applied routinely by the EROS Data Center to produce a p-type data should remove most of this variation. Between-satellite calibrations were examined in paired LANDSAT 3 and LANDSAT 4 MSS data sets, which were closely matched in acquisition time and place. Radiometric comparisons showed that all bands were highly linear in digital counts, and a well-determined linear transformation between the MSS's was established.

  1. A Preliminary Analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Radiometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Fusco, L.; Mehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis was performed to characterize the radiometry of three Thematic Mapper (TM) digital products of a scene of Arkansas. The three digital products examined were the NASA raw (BT) product, the radiometrically corrected (AT) product and the radiometrically and geometrically corrected (PT) product. The frequency distribution of the digital data; the statistical correlation between the bands; and the variability between the detectors within a band were examined on a series of image subsets from the full scene. The results are presented from one 1024 x 1024 pixel subset of Realfoot Lake, Tennessee which displayed a representative range of ground conditions and cover types occurring within the full frame image. Bands 1, 2 and 5 of the sample area are presented. The subsets were extracted from the three digital data products to cover the same geographic area. This analysis provides the first step towards a full appraisal of the TM radiometry being performed as part of the ESA/CEC contribution to the NASA/LIDQA program.

  2. Blood culture cross contamination associated with a radiometric analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.R.; Miller, A.D.; Davis, A.C.

    1982-04-01

    During a 9-day period in August 1980 in a New Jersey hospital, three pairs of consecutively numbered blood cultures from different patients were identified as positive for the same organism, for each pair, both cultures were positive in the same atmosphere, both organisms had the same sensitivities, and the second of each pair grew at least 2 days after the first and was the only positive blood culture obtained from the patient. When the hospital laboratory discontinued use of its radiometric culture analyzer for 15 days, no more consecutive pairs of positive cultures occurred. Subsequent use of the machine for 9 days with a new power unit but the original circuit boards resulted in one more similar consecutive pair (Staphylococcus epidermidis). After replacement of the entire power unit, there were no further such pairs. Examination of the machine by the manufacturer revealed a defective circuit board which resulted in inadequate needle sterilization. Laboratories which utilize radiometric analyzers should be aware of the potential for cross contamination. Recognition of such events requires alert microbiologists and infection control practitioners and a record system in the bacteriology laboratory designed to identify such clusters.

  3. Radiometric infrared focal plane array imaging system for thermographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, B. J.; Mccafferty, N.; Brown, R.; Tower, J. R.; Kosonocky, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes research performed under the Radiometric Infrared Focal Plane Array Imaging System for Thermographic Applications contract. This research investigated the feasibility of using platinum silicide (PtSi) Schottky-barrier infrared focal plane arrays (IR FPAs) for NASA Langley's specific radiometric thermal imaging requirements. The initial goal of this design was to develop a high spatial resolution radiometer with an NETD of 1 percent of the temperature reading over the range of 0 to 250 C. The proposed camera design developed during this study and described in this report provides: (1) high spatial resolution (full-TV resolution); (2) high thermal dynamic range (0 to 250 C); (3) the ability to image rapid, large thermal transients utilizing electronic exposure control (commandable dynamic range of 2,500,000:1 with exposure control latency of 33 ms); (4) high uniformity (0.5 percent nonuniformity after correction); and (5) high thermal resolution (0.1 C at 25 C background and 0.5 C at 250 C background).

  4. Empirical radiometric correction of optical remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palubinskas, Gintautas; Mueller, Rupert M.; Reinartz, Peter H.

    2002-08-01

    We propose an empirical radiometric correction method for the effects, such as atmospheric effects and anisotropic reflection of the surface, in optical remote sensing data. These distortions are sensor viewing (scanning) angle dependent, thus they can be significant for data received from airborne sensors due to their wide field of view. The procedure is based solely on the digital image data and consists of several steps. First, the initial image region near nadir (minimal distortions) is clustered by an extended k-means algorithm, which automatically detects the clusters (surface types) in an image. Then, for each cluster an average line profile is calculated. These profiles (initially defined in a middle part of an image line) are extrapolated to the whole line of an image by a polynomial approximation. Finally, from these polynomial functions the linear regression over all clusters is build using the radiative transfer equation, which allows the radiometric correction for each viewing angle in an image relative to the reference angle, usually nadir. The procedure is iterative, that is the correction is first performed for a narrow part around the initial region. Then the procedure is initialized with this newly corrected image region and repeated until the whole image is corrected. The experiments for data acquired by airborne multispectral scanner DAEDALUS AADS 1268 ATM show the effectiveness of the proposed method especially for the mosaicking and classification applications.

  5. The Moon Mineralogy (M3) Imaging Spectrometer: Early Assessment of the Spectral, Radiometric, Spatial and Uniformity Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pieters, C. M.; Boardman, J.; Barr, D.; Bruce, C.; Bousman, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eastwood, M.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Glavich, T.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Hyman, S.; Hovland, L.; Koch, T.; Lee, K.; Lundeen, S.; Motts, E.; Mouroulis, P.; Paulson, S.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Robinson, D.; Rodriquez, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper's (M3) is a high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio NASA imaging spectrometer that is a guest instrument on the Indian Chandrayaan-1 Mission to the Moon. The laboratory measured spectral, radiometric, spatial, and uniformity characteristics of the M3 instrument are given. The M3 imaging spectrometer takes advantage of a suite of critical enabling capabilities to achieve its measurement requirement with a mass of 8 kg, power usage of 15 W, and volume of 25X18X12 cm. The M3 detector and spectrometer are cooled by a multi-stage passive cooler. This paper presents early M3 performance assessment results.

  6. Investigation of LANDSAT follow-on thematic mapper spatial, radiometric and spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Morgenstern, J. P.; Kent, E. R.; Erickson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Fine resolution M7 multispectral scanner data collected during the Corn Blight Watch Experiment in 1971 served as the basis for this study. Different locations and times of year were studied. Definite improvement using 30-40 meter spatial resolution over present LANDSAT 1 resolution and over 50-60 meter resolution was observed, using crop area mensuration as the measure. Simulation studies carried out to extrapolate the empirical results to a range of field size distributions confirmed this effect, showing the improvement to be most pronounced for field sizes of 1-4 hectares. Radiometric sensitivity study showed significant degradation of crop classification accuracy immediately upon relaxation from the nominally specified values of 0.5% noise equivalent reflectance. This was especially the case for data which were spectrally similar such as that collected early in the growing season and also when attempting to accomplish crop stress detection.

  7. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  8. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  9. Radiometric Calibration of an Airborne CO2 Pulsed Doppler Lidar Using a Natural Earth Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, Dean R.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Tratt, David M.; Srivastava, Vandana; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished using surface retro-reflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, USA. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.26 and 9.26 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne continuous-wave Doppler lidar using a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth-surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of pulsed airborne, and, in principal, spaceborne lidars.

  10. Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar with a natural earth surface.

    PubMed

    Cutten, Dean R; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A; Hardesty, R Michael; Howell, James N; Tratt, David M; Srivastava, Vandana

    2002-06-20

    Radiometric calibration of an airborne CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar has been accomplished with surface retroreflection signals from the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. Two circular passes were made at altitudes of 6.3 and 9.3 km. The computed calibration factors for both altitudes are in excellent agreement with the value derived from standard ground-based measurements involving a fixed sandpaper target of known reflectance. This finding corroborates a previous study that successfully calibrated an airborne cw Doppler lidar with a variety of natural Earth surfaces. The present results indicate that relatively uniform Earth surface targets can be used for in-flight calibration of CO2 pulsed airborne and, in principal, other infrared lidars.

  11. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top-of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  12. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top- of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  13. A simple and effective radiometric correction method to improve landscape change detection across sensors and across time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Vierling, Lee; Deering, D.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite data offer unrivaled utility in monitoring and quantifying large scale land cover change over time. Radiometric consistency among collocated multi-temporal imagery is difficult to maintain, however, due to variations in sensor characteristics, atmospheric conditions, solar angle, and sensor view angle that can obscure surface change detection. To detect accurate landscape change using multi-temporal images, we developed a variation of the pseudoinvariant feature (PIF) normalization scheme: the temporally invariant cluster (TIC) method. Image data were acquired on June 9, 1990 (Landsat 4), June 20, 2000 (Landsat 7), and August 26, 2001 (Landsat 7) to analyze boreal forests near the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), and reduced simple ratio (RSR). The temporally invariant cluster (TIC) centers were identified via a point density map of collocated pixel VIs from the base image and the target image, and a normalization regression line was created to intersect all TIC centers. Target image VI values were then recalculated using the regression function so that these two images could be compared using the resulting common radiometric scale. We found that EVI was very indicative of vegetation structure because of its sensitivity to shadowing effects and could thus be used to separate conifer forests from deciduous forests and grass/crop lands. Conversely, because NDVI reduced the radiometric influence of shadow, it did not allow for distinctions among these vegetation types. After normalization, correlations of NDVI and EVI with forest leaf area index (LAI) field measurements combined for 2000 and 2001 were significantly improved; the r 2 values in these regressions rose from 0.49 to 0.69 and from 0.46 to 0.61, respectively. An EVI "cancellation effect" where EVI was positively related to understory greenness but negatively related to forest canopy coverage was evident across a

  14. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  15. Galileo SSI/Gaspra Radiometrically Calibrated Images V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    This data set includes Galileo Orbiter SSI radiometrically calibrated images of the asteroid 951 Gaspra, created using ISIS software and assuming nadir pointing. This is an original delivery of radiometrically calibrated files, not an update to existing files. All images archived include the the asteroid within the image frame. Calibration was performed in 2013-2014.

  16. Comparison of radiometric scaling laws and detailed wave-optics simulations for designing ground-based laser satellite-illumination and receiver systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Keith A.

    2002-12-01

    Ground-based optical transmitter and receiver systems designed for active imaging, active tracking and laser ranging of satellites in Earth orbit are very sensitive to physical conditions limiting the radiometric returns for achieving these measurements. The initial design of these systems is often based on simple radiometric scaling laws that provide estimates of average radiometric returns and are derived from experimental data or from more complex theoretical calculations. While these laws are quite useful, it is often easy to lose sight of the initial assumptions made in their formulation, and hence, the limits of their accuracy for designing certain systems. The objective of this paper is to review some of the commonly used radiometric scaling laws for active systems and to establish guidelines for their use based on comparisons of their predictions with results from detailed wave-optics simulations for different system design requirements and physical conditions. The combined effects of laser and transmitter beam parameters, wave-front aberrations, atmospheric turbulence, and satellite optical cross-section are considered.

  17. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in

  18. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager (OLI) Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.; Knight, Edward J.; Kvaran, Geir; Barsi, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) has a comprehensive radiometric characterization and calibration program beginning with the instrument design, and extending through integration and test, on-orbit operations and science data processing. Key instrument design features for radiometric calibration include dual solar diffusers and multi-lamped on-board calibrators. The radiometric calibration transfer procedure from NIST standards has multiple checks on the radiometric scale throughout the process and uses a heliostat as part of the transfer to orbit of the radiometric calibration. On-orbit lunar imaging will be used to track the instruments stability and side slither maneuvers will be used in addition to the solar diffuser to flat field across the thousands of detectors per band. A Calibration Validation Team is continuously involved in the process from design to operations. This team uses an Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the ground system to characterize and calibrate the on-orbit data.

  19. Ground-based vicarious radiometric calibration of Landsat 7 ETM+ and Terra MODIS using an automated test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Leisso, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has operated the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley, Nevada, since 2004. It is an approach to ground-based vicarious calibration that does not require on-site personnel to make surface and atmospheric measurements during a satellite overpass. It was originally developed in 2002 in an attempt to increase the amount of data collected throughout the year while maintaining the accuracy of in-situ measurements. RadCaTS currently consists of four ground-viewing radiometers to measure surface reflectance, a Cimel sun photometer to make atmospheric measurements, and a weather station to measure ambient conditions. The data from these instruments are used in MODTRAN 5 to determine the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectral radiance for a given overpass time, and the results are compared to the sensor under test. The work presented here describes the RadCaTS instrumentation suite and automated processing scheme used to determine the surface reflectance and TOA spectral radiance. The instruments used to measure surface and atmospheric properties are presented, followed by a discussion of their spatial layout and their radiometric calibration. The RadCaTS ground-based results are compared to those from Aqua and Terra MODIS overpasses in 2008, and Landsat 7 ETM+ overpasses in 2009.

  20. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  1. Radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2 and PRISM sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saunier, S.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Bouvet, M.; Collet, B.; Mambimba, A.; Kocaman, Aksakal S.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24, 2006, by a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-IIA launcher. It carries three remote-sensing sensors: 1) the Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2); 2) the Panchromatic Remote-Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM); and 3) the Phased-Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR). Within the framework of ALOS Data European Node, as part of the European Space Agency (ESA), the European Space Research Institute worked alongside JAXA to provide contributions to the ALOS commissioning phase plan. This paper summarizes the strategy that was adopted by ESA to define and implement a data verification plan for missions operated by external agencies; these missions are classified by the ESA as third-party missions. The ESA was supported in the design and execution of this plan by GAEL Consultant. The verification of ALOS optical data from PRISM and AVNIR-2 sensors was initiated 4 months after satellite launch, and a team of principal investigators assembled to provide technical expertise. This paper includes a description of the verification plan and summarizes the methodologies that were used for radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment. The successful completion of the commissioning phase has led to the sensors being declared fit for operations. The consolidated measurements indicate that the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 sensor is stable and agrees with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and the Envisat MEdium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer calibration. The geometrical accuracy of PRISM and AVNIR-2 products improved significantly and remains under control. The PRISM modulation transfer function is monitored for improved characterization. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  2. Mixing geometric and radiometric features for change classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Alexandre; Descombes, Xavier; Zerubia, Josiane

    2008-02-01

    Most basic change detection algorithms use a pixel-based approach. Whereas such approach is quite well defined for monitoring important area changes (such as urban growth monitoring) in low resolution images, an object based approach seems more relevant when the change detection is specifically aimed toward targets (such as small buildings and vehicles). In this paper, we present an approach that mixes radiometric and geometric features to qualify the changed zones. The goal is to establish bounds (appearance, disappearance, substitution ...) between the detected changes and the underlying objects. We proceed by first clustering the change map (containing each pixel bitemporal radiosity) in different classes using the entropy-kmeans algorithm. Assuming that most man-made objects have a polygonal shape, a polygonal approximation algorithm is then used in order to characterize the resulting zone shapes. Hence allowing us to refine the primary rough classification, by integrating the polygon orientations in the state space. Tests are currently conducted on Quickbird data.

  3. Radiometric performance of the Viking Mars lander cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Taylor, E. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking lander cameras feature an array of 12 silicon photodiodes for electronic focus selection and multispectral imaging. Comparisons of absolute radiometric calibrations of the four cameras selected for the mission to Mars with performance predictions based on their design data revealed minor discrepancies. These discrepancies were caused primarily by the method used to calibrate the photosensor array and apparently also from light reflections internal to the array. The sensitivity and dynamic range of all camera channels are found to be sufficient for high quality pictures, providing that the commandable gains and offsets can be optimized for the scene radiance; otherwise, the quantization noise may be too high or the dynamic range too low for an adequate characterization of the scene.

  4. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  5. Radiometric calibration and SNR calculation of a SWIR imaging telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Turk, Fethi; Selimoglu, Ozgur

    2012-09-06

    Radiometric calibration of an imaging telescope is usually made using a uniform illumination sphere in a laboratory. In this study, we used the open-sky images taken during bright day conditions to calibrate our telescope. We found a dark signal offset value and a linear response coefficient value for each pixel by using three different algorithms. Then we applied these coefficients to the taken images, and considerably lowered the image non-uniformity. Calibration can be repeated during the operation of telescope with an object that has better uniformity than open-sky. Also SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of each pixel was calculated from the open-sky images using the temporal mean and standard deviations. It is found that SNR is greater than 80 for all pixels even at low light levels.

  6. Radiometric Ages of Martian Meteorites compared to Martian Surfaces Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1999-01-01

    The surprisingly young Rb-Sr age of the Shergotty meteorite contributed to early suggestions that it might be of martian origin. their redox state and oxygen isotopic compositions linked the shergottites to the clino-pyroxenite nakhlites and the dunite Chassigny, causing them to be grouped as SNC meteorites. These characteristics, but especially the similarity of the elemental and isotopic compositions of gases trapped in shergottites to those of the martian atmosphere, have caused the martian origin of the SNC and related meteorites to be widely accepted. Although the young ages were one of the early hints of a martian origin for the SNC meteorites, their interpretation has remained somewhat ambiguous. We will review the radiometric ages of the martian meteorites and attempt to place them into the context of martian surface ages.

  7. Radiometric Normalization of Large Airborne Image Data Sets Acquired by Different Sensor Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, S.; Beshah, B. T.

    2016-06-01

    Generating seamless mosaics of aerial images is a particularly challenging task when the mosaic comprises a large number of im-ages, collected over longer periods of time and with different sensors under varying imaging conditions. Such large mosaics typically consist of very heterogeneous image data, both spatially (different terrain types and atmosphere) and temporally (unstable atmo-spheric properties and even changes in land coverage). We present a new radiometric normalization or, respectively, radiometric aerial triangulation approach that takes advantage of our knowledge about each sensor's properties. The current implementation supports medium and large format airborne imaging sensors of the Leica Geosystems family, namely the ADS line-scanner as well as DMC and RCD frame sensors. A hierarchical modelling - with parameters for the overall mosaic, the sensor type, different flight sessions, strips and individual images - allows for adaptation to each sensor's geometric and radiometric properties. Additional parameters at different hierarchy levels can compensate radiome-tric differences of various origins to compensate for shortcomings of the preceding radiometric sensor calibration as well as BRDF and atmospheric corrections. The final, relative normalization is based on radiometric tie points in overlapping images, absolute radiometric control points and image statistics. It is computed in a global least squares adjustment for the entire mosaic by altering each image's histogram using a location-dependent mathematical model. This model involves contrast and brightness corrections at radiometric fix points with bilinear interpolation for corrections in-between. The distribution of the radiometry fixes is adaptive to each image and generally increases with image size, hence enabling optimal local adaptation even for very long image strips as typi-cally captured by a line-scanner sensor. The normalization approach is implemented in HxMap software. It has been

  8. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  9. Radiometric Characterization of the IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  10. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Neubert, T.; Ribalda, R.; Sha, M. K.; Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.

    2014-03-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable range of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The innovative optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  11. Level 0 to 1 processing of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Neubert, T.; Ribalda, R.; Sha, M. K.; Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kretschmer, E.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olschewski, F.; Preusse, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer that is capable of operating on various high-altitude research aircraft. It measures the atmospheric emission in the thermal infrared spectral region in limb and nadir geometry. GLORIA consists of a classical Michelson interferometer combined with an infrared camera. The infrared detector has a usable area of 128 × 128 pixels, measuring up to 16 384 interferograms simultaneously. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometers impose a number of challenges with respect to instrument calibration and algorithm development. The optical setup with extremely high optical throughput requires the development of new methods and algorithms for spectral and radiometric calibration. Due to the vast amount of data there is a high demand for scientifically intelligent optimisation of the data processing. This paper outlines the characterisation and processing steps required for the generation of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated spectra. Methods for performance optimisation of the processing algorithm are presented. The performance of the data processing and the quality of the calibrated spectra are demonstrated for measurements collected during the first deployments of GLORIA on aircraft.

  12. Vegetation canopy optical and structural variability based on radiometric and laser analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dim, Jules R.; Kajiwara, Koji; Honda, Yoshiaki

    2007-10-01

    For a comprehensive vegetation monitoring and/or management, a good understanding of the distribution of the solar radiation energy among components of this vegetation is needed. The energy received by the vegetation is measured by spectroradiometers either at satellite elevations or near the ground (in situ measurements). In this study, in situ, radiometric data and laser scanning techniques are combined, in order to evaluate the contribution of the vegetation structure to the variability of canopy reflectance. Advanced processing laser techniques are not only an efficient tool for the generation of physical models but also give information about the vertical structure of canopies (height, shape, density) and their horizontal extension. To conduct this study, airborne multispectral radiation data and, laser pulse returns are recorded from a low flying helicopter above the vegetation of a boreal forest. These measurements are used to derive canopy optical and structural variables. The impact of the canopy 2-dimensional structural variability on the distribution of the solar radiation reflected by plants of this area is discussed. The results obtained show that the laser technology can be used for the selection of the most appropriate configuration of radiation measurements, and optimization of canopy physical characteristics, in future airborne missions.

  13. Design and optimization of an ultra-wideband and compact microwave antenna for radiometric monitoring of brain temperature

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Snow, Brent W.; Reudink, Doug; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design and frequency selection to monitor brain temperature during prolonged surgery using non-invasive microwave radiometry. A tapered log-spiral antenna design is chosen for its wideband characteristics that allow higher power collection from deep brain. Parametric analysis with HFSS is used to optimize antenna performance for deep brain temperature sensing. Radiometric antenna efficiency (η) is evaluated in terms of the ratio of power collected from brain to total power received by the antenna. Anatomical information extracted from several adult computed tomography (CT) scans is used to establish design parameters for constructing an accurate layered 3D tissue phantom. This head phantom includes separate brain and scalp regions, with tissue equivalent liquids circulating at independent temperatures on either side of an intact skull. The optimized frequency band is 1.1–1.6 GHz producing an average antenna efficiency of 50.3% from a 2 turn log-spiral antenna. The entire sensor package is contained in a lightweight and low profile 2.8 cm diameter by 1.5 cm high assembly that can be held in place over the skin with an electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding adhesive patch. The calculated radiometric equivalent brain temperature tracks within 0.4°C of measured brain phantom temperature when the brain phantom is lowered 10°C and then returned to original temperature (37°C) over a 4.6-hour experiment. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the optimized 2.5 cm log-spiral antenna is well suited for the non-invasive radiometric sensing of deep brain temperature. PMID:24759979

  14. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  15. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Barsi, Julia A.; Kaita, Ed; Thome, Kurtis J.; Helder, Dennis L.; Palluconi, Frank D.; Schott, John R.; Scaramuzza, Pat

    2003-04-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than +/-1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than +/-5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than +/- 0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of +/- 0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  16. Flight Technology Improvement. [spaceborne optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Shortcomings in spaceborne instrumentation technology are analyzed and recommendations are given for corrections and technology development. The technologies discussed are optical radiometric instruments and calibration, attitude control and determination, and electromechanical and power subsystems.

  17. Level 1 In-Flight Radiometric Calibration and Characterization Algorithm Theoretical Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, C.; Chrien, N.; Diner, D.

    2000-01-01

    This Algorithm Theoretical Basis (ATB) document describes the algorithms which operate at the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Science Computing Facility (SCF) as part of the In-flight Radiometric Calibration and characterization (IFRCC) subsystem.

  18. Intra-annual NDVI validation of the Landsat 5 TM radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Groeneveld, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone of the extensive archive of moderate-resolution Earth imagery. Even after more than 24 years of service, the L5 TM is still operational. Given the longevity of the satellite, the detectors have aged and the sensor's radiometric characteristics have changed since launch. The calibration procedures and parameters in the National Land Archive Production System (NLAPS) have also changed with time. Revised radiometric calibrations in 2003 and 2007 have improved the radiometric accuracy of recently processed data. This letter uses the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a metric to evaluate the radiometric calibration. The calibration change has improved absolute calibration accuracy, consistency over time, and consistency with Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic radiometry and will provide the basis for continued long-term studies of the Earth's land surfaces.

  19. Advanced radiometric complex for detection of radioactive release from Siberian chemical combine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, Gennady A.; Penin, Sergei T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper states limited availability of the use of the automated radiation situation monitoring system and proposes radiometric complex as more reliable system in the case of an accidental release of the Siberian Chemical Enterprises.

  20. Characterization of the Sonoran desert as a radiometric calibration target for Earth observing sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Choi, Tae-young; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    To provide highly accurate quantitative measurements of the Earth's surface, a comprehensive calibration and validation of the satellite sensors is required. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Characterization Support Team, in collaboration with United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, has previously demonstrated the use of African desert sites to monitor the long-term calibration stability of Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). The current study focuses on evaluating the suitability of the Sonoran Desert test site for post-launch long-term radiometric calibration as well as cross-calibration purposes. Due to the lack of historical and on-going in situ ground measurements, the Sonoran Desert is not usually used for absolute calibration. An in-depth evaluation (spatial, temporal, and spectral stability) of this site using well calibrated L7 ETM+ measurements and local climatology data has been performed. The Sonoran Desert site produced spatial variability of about 3 to 5% in the reflective solar regions, and the temporal variations of the site after correction for view-geometry impacts were generally around 3%. The results demonstrate that, barring the impacts due to occasional precipitation, the Sonoran Desert site can be effectively used for cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring of satellite sensors, thus, providing a good test site in the western hemisphere.

  1. Improved detection of tides at Europa with radiometric and optical tracking during flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ryan S.; Bills, Bruce; Buffington, Brent B.; Folkner, William M.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; McElrath, Timothy P.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Watkins, Michael M.

    2015-07-01

    Due to its eccentric orbit about Jupiter, Europa experiences periodic tidal deformation, which causes changes in its gravitational field and induces both radial and transverse displacements of the surface. The amplitude and phase of these tidal changes are diagnostic of internal structure, and can be measured with sufficient radiometric and optical tracking of a spacecraft during a series of flyby encounters with Europa. This paper presents results of the simulated accuracy for recovery of the tides of Europa through measuring the second-degree tidal Love numbers k2, h2, and l2. A reference trajectory, which consists of a total of 45 close flybys, was considered and a detailed covariance analysis was performed. The study was based on Earth-based Doppler tracking during ± 2 h of each periapsis passage and surface imaging data taken below 500 km altitude. The result shows that the formal uncertainty of the second-degree tidal Love numbers can be estimated to be σk2 = 0.01 , σh2 = 0.02 , and σl2 = 0.01 , which is sufficient to constrain the global ice thickness to about 10 km under reasonable assumptions. Moreover, the forced librations of Europa can be measured to 0.3″ accuracy, which can further constrain Europa's interior structure.

  2. Study of Spectral/Radiometric Characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for Land Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Metzler, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    An investigation conducted in support of the LANDSAT 4/5 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) Program is discussed. Results of engineering analyses of radiometric, spatial, spectral, and geometric properties of the Thematic Mapper systems are summarized; major emphasis is placed on the radiometric analysis. Details of the analyses are presented in appendices, which contain three of the eight technical papers produced during this investigation; these three, together, describe the major activities and results of the investigation.

  3. Radiometric and signal-to-noise ratio properties of multiplex dispersive spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barducci, Alessandro; Guzzi, Donatella; Lastri, Cinzia; Nardino, Vanni; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan

    2010-10-01

    Recent theoretical investigations have shown important radiometric disadvantages of interferential multiplexing in Fourier transform spectrometry that apparently can be applied even to coded aperture spectrometers. We have reexamined the methods of noninterferential multiplexing in order to assess their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, relying on a theoretical modeling of the multiplexed signals. We are able to show that quite similar SNR and radiometric disadvantages affect multiplex dispersive spectrometry. The effect of noise on spectral estimations is discussed.

  4. Robust Multiscale Stereo Matching from Fundus Images with Radiometric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Alward, Wallace L.M.; Kwon, Young H.; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A robust multiscale stereo matching algorithm is proposed to find reliable correspondences between low contrast and weakly textured retinal image pairs with radiometric differences. Existing algorithms designed to deal with piecewise planar surfaces with distinct features and Lambertian reflectance do not apply in applications such as 3D reconstruction of medical images including stereo retinal images. In this paper, robust pixel feature vectors are formulated to extract discriminative features in the presence of noise in scale space, through which the response of low-frequency mechanisms alter and interact with the response of high-frequency mechanisms. The deep structures of the scene are represented with the evolution of disparity estimates in scale space, which distributes the matching ambiguity along the scale dimension to obtain globally coherent reconstructions. The performance is verified both qualitatively by face validity and quantitatively on our collection of stereo fundus image sets with ground truth, which have been made publicly available as an extension of standard test images for performance evaluation. PMID:21464502

  5. A hyperspectral imager for high radiometric accuracy Earth climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, Joey; Drake, Ginger; Heuerman, Karl; Kopp, Greg; Lieber, Alex; Smith, Paul; Vermeer, Bill

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate a visible and near-infrared prototype pushbroom hyperspectral imager for Earth climate studies that is capable of using direct solar viewing for on-orbit cross calibration and degradation tracking. Direct calibration to solar spectral irradiances allow the Earth-viewing instrument to achieve required climate-driven absolute radiometric accuracies of <0.2% (1σ). A solar calibration requires viewing scenes having radiances 105 higher than typical Earth scenes. To facilitate this calibration, the instrument features an attenuation system that uses an optimized combination of different precision aperture sizes, neutral density filters, and variable integration timing for Earth and solar viewing. The optical system consists of a three-mirror anastigmat telescope and an Offner spectrometer. The as-built system has a 12.2° cross track field of view with 3 arcmin spatial resolution and covers a 350-1050 nm spectral range with 10 nm resolution. A polarization compensated configuration using the Offner in an out of plane alignment is demonstrated as a viable approach to minimizing polarization sensitivity. The mechanical design takes advantage of relaxed tolerances in the optical design by using rigid, non-adjustable diamond-turned tabs for optical mount locating surfaces. We show that this approach achieves the required optical performance. A prototype spaceflight unit is also demonstrated to prove the applicability of these solar cross calibration methods to on-orbit environments. This unit is evaluated for optical performance prior to and after GEVS shake, thermal vacuum, and lifecycle tests.

  6. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  7. Optimized mapping of radiometric quantities into OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Maximo; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moulton, J. R., Jr.; Liu, Jesse

    1999-07-01

    Physically realistic synthesis of FLIR imagery requires intensive phenomenology calculations of the spectral band thermal emission and reflection from scene elements in the database. These calculations predict the heat conduction, convection, and radiation exchange between scene elements and the environment. Balancing this requirement is the need for imagery to be presented to a display in a timely fashion, often in real time. In order to support these conflicting requirements, some means of overcoming the gap between real time and high fidelity must be achieved. Over the past several years, the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been developing a real-time forward looking infrared sensor simulation known as Paint the Night (PTN). As part of this development, NVESD has explored schemes for optimizing signature models and for mapping model radiometric output into parameters compatible with OpenGL, real-time rendering architectures. Relevant signature and mapping optimization issues are discussed, and a current NVESD PTN real-time implementation scheme is presented.

  8. JPSS-1 VIIRS pre-launch radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrari, Hassan; McIntire, Jeff; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James; Ji, Qiang; Schwarting, Tom; Zeng, Jinan

    2016-05-01

    The first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1 or J1) mission is scheduled to launch in January 2017, and will be very similar to the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) mission. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the J1 spacecraft completed its sensor level performance testing in December 2014. VIIRS instrument is expected to provide valuable information about the Earth environment and properties on a daily basis, using a wide-swath (3,040 km) cross-track scanning radiometer. The design covers the wavelength spectrum from reflective to long-wave infrared through 22 spectral bands, from 0.412 μm to 12.01 μm, and has spatial resolutions of 370 m and 740 m at nadir for imaging and moderate bands, respectively. This paper will provide an overview of pre-launch J1 VIIRS performance testing and methodologies, describing the at-launch baseline radiometric performance as well as the metrics needed to calibrate the instrument once on orbit. Key sensor performance metrics include the sensor signal to noise ratios (SNRs), dynamic range, reflective and emissive bands calibration performance, polarization sensitivity, bands spectral performance, response-vs-scan (RVS), near field response, and stray light rejection. A set of performance metrics generated during the pre-launch testing program will be compared to the sensor requirements and to SNPP VIIRS pre-launch performance.

  9. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  10. Infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer radiometric noise assessment from spectral residuals.

    PubMed

    Serio, Carmine; Standfuss, Carsten; Masiello, Guido; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dufour, Emmanuel; Tournier, Bernard; Stuhlmann, Rolf; Tjemkes, Stephen; Antonelli, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    The problem of characterizing and estimating the radiometric noise of satellite high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers from Earth views is addressed in this paper. A methodology has been devised which is based on the common concept of spectral residuals (Observations-Calculations) obtained after spectral radiance inversion for atmospheric and surface parameters. An in-depth analytical assessment of the statistical covariance matrix of the spectral residuals has been performed which is based on the optimal estimation theory. It has been mathematically demonstrated that the use of spectral residuals to assess instrument noise leads to an effective estimator, which is largely independent of possible departures of the observational covariance matrix from the true covariances. Application to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer has been considered. It is shown that Earth-view-derived observation errors agree with blackbody in-flight calibration. The spectral residuals approach also proved to be effective in characterizing noise features due to mechanical microvibrations of the beam splitter of the IASI instrument.

  11. Radiometric sensitivity contrast metrics for hyperspectral remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silny, John F.; Zellinger, Lou

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses the calculation, interpretation, and implications of various radiometric sensitivity metrics for Earth-observing hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors. The most commonly used sensor performance metric is signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), from which additional noise equivalent quantities can be computed, including: noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR), noise equivalent delta reflectance (NEΔρ), noise equivalent delta emittance (NEΔƐ), and noise equivalent delta temperature (NEΔT). For hyperspectral sensors, these metrics are typically calculated from an at-aperture radiance (typically generated by MODTRAN) that includes both target radiance and non-target (atmosphere and background) radiance. Unfortunately, these calculations treat the entire at-aperture radiance as the desired signal, even when the target radiance is only a fraction of the total (such as when sensing through a long or optically dense atmospheric path). To overcome this limitation, an augmented set of metrics based on contrast signal-to-noise ratio (CNSR) is developed, including their noise equivalent counterparts (CNESR, CNEΔρ, CNEΔƐ, and CNEΔT). These contrast metrics better quantify sensor performance in an operational environment that includes remote sensing through the atmosphere.

  12. Effects on Spacecraft Radiometric Data at Superior Solar Conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Trevor; Budnik, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During 2006, three ESA interplanetary spacecraft, Rosetta, Mars Express (MEX) and Venus Express (VEX), passed through superior solar conjunction. For all three spacecraft, the noise in the post-fit range-rate residuals from the orbit determination was analysed. At small Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles the level was almost two orders of magnitude higher than normal. The main objective was to characterize the Doppler (rangerate) noise as a function of SEP angle. At least then the range-rate data can be appropriately weighted within the orbit determination so that the solution uncertainties are realistic. For VEX, some intervals of particularly noisy Doppler data could be correlated with unusual solar activity. For Rosetta, the biases in the range data residuals were analysed with the aim of improving the model used for calibrating the signal delay due to the solar plasma. The model, which originally had fixed coefficients, was adjusted to achieve better fits to the data. Even the relatively small Doppler biases were well represented. Using the improved model, the electron density at 20 solar radii was compared with earlier results obtained by radio science studies using Voyager 2 and Ulysses radiometric data. There is some evidence for a dependency of the density on the phase within the 11 years solar cycle.

  13. Evaluation of relative radiometric correction techniques on Landsat 8 OLI sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, Antonio; Caradonna, Grazia; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2016-08-01

    The quality of information derived from processed remotely sensed data may depend upon many factors, mostly related to the extent data acquisition is influenced by atmospheric conditions, topographic effects, sun angle and so on. The goal of radiometric corrections is to reduce such effects in order enhance the performance of change detection analysis. There are two approaches to radiometric correction: absolute and relative calibrations. Due to the large amount of free data products available, absolute radiometric calibration techniques may be time consuming and financially expensive because of the necessary inputs for absolute calibration models (often these data are not available and can be difficult to obtain). The relative approach to radiometric correction, known as relative radiometric normalization, is preferred with some research topics because no in situ ancillary data, at the time of satellite overpasses, are required. In this study we evaluated three well known relative radiometric correction techniques using two Landsat 8 - OLI scenes over a subset area of the Apulia Region (southern Italy): the IR-MAD (Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection), the HM (Histogram Matching) and the DOS (Dark Object Subtraction). IR-MAD results were statistically assessed within a territory with an extremely heterogeneous landscape and all computations performed in a Matlab environment. The panchromatic and thermal bands were excluded from the comparisons.

  14. Sensible heat flux - Radiometric surface temperature relationship for eight semiarid areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. B.; Kustas, W. P.; Humes, K. S.; Nichols, W. D.; Moran, M. S.; De Bruin, H. A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of sensible heat flux, radiometric surface temperature, air temperature, and wind speed made at eight semiarid rangeland sites were used to investigate the sensible heat flux-aerodynamic resistance relationship. The individual sites covered a wide range of vegetation (0.1-4 m tall) and cover (3%-95% bare soil) conditions. Mean values of k/B, a quantity related to the resistance of heat versus momentum transfer at the surface, for the individual sites varied between 3.5 and 12.5. A preliminary test of the utility of an excess resistance based on the mean value of k/B showed that the difference between the mean estimated and measured sensible heat fluxes varied +/- 60 W/sq m for the eight semiarid sites. For the eight sites the values of k/B were plotted against the roughness Reynolds number. The plot showed considerable scatter with values ranging between and beyond the theoretical curves for bluff rough and permeable rough surfaces.

  15. The potential for radiometric retrievals of halocarbon concentrations from the MIPAS-E instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. P.; Waterfall, A. M.; Remedios, J. J.

    Halocarbons, such as CFC-11, CFC-12 and HCFC-22, are important trace gases in the atmosphere through their role as greenhouse gases and their influence on stratospheric ozone chemistry. This paper focuses on an initial study using integration of spectral radiance measurements from a spaceborne limb sounding Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) to retrieve these compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The instrument employed in this study is the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) which obtains spectral data in the altitude range of 6 68 km at an unapodized spectral resolution of 0.025 cm-1. We have used optimal estimation techniques to retrieve vertical information for these compounds using a radiometric approach. It is shown that significant retrieval information is obtained at up to five measured levels in the UTLS for CFC-11, up to six for CFC-12 and up to two levels for HCFC-22. An initial error analysis indicates significant sensitivity of our retrievals to variability in operationally retrieved pressure and temperature data. For each halocarbon, gain, offset and spectroscopic uncertainties generally each contribute less than 10% to the total error. Finally, tracer correlations are used to compare the datasets to equivalent relationships derived here from version 2 ATMOS data with very good agreements for CFC-12 but with more variability in the CFC-11 comparisons.

  16. Radiometric analysis of the longwave infrared channel of the Thematic Mapper on LANDSAT 4 and 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, John R.; Volchok, William J.; Biegel, Joseph D.

    1986-01-01

    The first objective was to evaluate the postlaunch radiometric calibration of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) band 6 data. The second objective was to determine to what extent surface temperatures could be computed from the TM and 6 data using atmospheric propagation models. To accomplish this, ground truth data were compared to a single TM-4 band 6 data set. This comparison indicated satisfactory agreement over a narrow temperature range. The atmospheric propagation model (modified LOWTRAN 5A) was used to predict surface temperature values based on the radiance at the spacecraft. The aircraft data were calibrated using a multi-altitude profile calibration technique which had been extensively tested in previous studies. This aircraft calibration permitted measurement of surface temperatures based on the radiance reaching the aircraft. When these temperature values are evaluated, an error in the satellite's ability to predict surface temperatures can be estimated. This study indicated that by carefully accounting for various sensor calibration and atmospheric propagation effects, and expected error (1 standard deviation) in surface temperature would be 0.9 K. This assumes no error in surface emissivity and no sampling error due to target location. These results indicate that the satellite calibration is within nominal limits to within this study's ability to measure error.

  17. Correlations between altimetric sea surface height and radiometric sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew S.; Allen, Myles; Guymer, Trevor; Saunders, Mark

    1998-04-01

    In the last decade, satellite altimetric measurements of sea surface height (SSH) and infrared radiometric measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) have provided a wealth of information about ocean circulation and atmosphere-ocean interactions. SSH is a depth-integrated quantity dependent upon the temperature and salinity structure of the water column and on the depth independent barotropic contribution. SST from infrared radiometers is a surface parameter representing the temperature of the top few microns of the ocean surface. Hence any relationship between SST and SSH provides dynamical information about the coupling between the ocean surface and subsurface. It also offers a promise of new techniques such as interpolating SSH data using SST and of improved calculations of eddy kinetic energy. We use SST data from the along-track scanning radiometer on ERS-I and SSH data from the TOPEX/POSEIDON instrument to examine the relationship between SST and SSH anomalies within the South Atlantic region for 1993 and 1994. We find that positive (≈0.2-0.6) spatial cross correlations between SST and SSH anomalies at zero lag are present throughout the region at large scales (wavelengths >1000 km). Small-scale correlations, however, are high (≈0.7) only in areas associated with fronts and mesoscale variability. These small-scale correlations are seasonal, being strongest in winter and weakest in summer. We discuss the application of these correlations to various techniques requiring the synergistic use of SSH and SST data.

  18. Radiometric calibration of IR Fourier transform spectrometers - Solution to a problem with the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Buijs, H.; Howell, Hugh B.; Laporte, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    A calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer, known as the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), has been flown on the NASA U-2 research aircraft to measure the infrared emission spectrum of the earth. The primary use - atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding - requires high radiometric precision and accuracy (of the order of 0.1 and 1 C, respectively). To meet these requirements, the HIS instruments, the HIS instrument performs inflight radiometric calibration, using observations of hot and cold blackbody reference sources as the basis for two-point calibrations at each wavenumber. Initially, laboratory tests revealed a calibration problem with brightness temperature errors as large as 15 C between 600 and 900/cm. The symptom of the problem, which occurred in one of the three spectral bands of HIS, was a source-dependent phase response. Minor changes to the calibration equations completely eliminated the anomalous errors. The new analysis properly accounts for the situation in which the phase response for radiance from the instrument itself differs from that for radiance from an external source. The mechanism responsible for the dual phase response of the HIS instrument is identified as emission from the interferometer beam splitter.

  19. Landsat-7 EMT+ On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barker, J. L.; Kaita, E.; Seiferth, J.; Morfitt, Ron

    1999-01-01

    Landsat-7 was launched on April 15, 1999 and completed its on orbit initialization and verification period on June 28, 1999. The ETM+ payload is similar to the TM sensors on previous Landsat satellites and incorporates two new devices to improve its absolute radiometric calibration. The Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) is a deployable diffuser panel. This device has been deployed 9 times to date, with a normal deployment schedule of once per month. The initial analysis of the FASC data has given absolute calibration results within 5% of the prelaunch integrating sphere calibrations and a range of variation of 2% between dates. The Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC), is a set of auxiliary optics that allows the ETM+ to view the sun through a reduced aperture. Data have normally been acquired on a daily basis with the PASC. Initial results with the PASC were encouraging, despite some unexpected saturation in the shortest wavelength band. The response of the ETM+ short wavelength (silicon) bands to the PASC increased initially and has begun to decrease in some of these bands. The longer wavelength (InSb) bands have shown up to 30% oscillations that vary between detectors within the band. Studies are ongoing to better characterize the response to the PASC. The ETM+ also incorporates an internal calibrator (IC), a shutter that oscillates in front of the focal plane that directs light from the internal calibrator lamps to the focal plane. The responses to this device are also varying, though differently than the PASC results. Both the IC and PASC results are attributable to the calibration devices as opposed to the ETM+ itself.

  20. Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06 With Theoretical Predicted `Insensitive' Line Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Brosius, J. W.; Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) is a sounding-rocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of solar active and quiet-Sun regions, providing information about the corona and upper transition region. EUNIS incorporates two independent, co-pointing imaging spectrographs, one covering EUV lines between 300 and 370 Å\\ seen in first order (the longwave [LW] channel), and a second covering lines between 170 and 205 Å\\ seen in second order (the shortwave [SW] channel). Shortly after the payload's initial successful flight on 2006 April 12, a complete end-to-end radiometric calibration of its LW bandpass was carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England. Here we develop and apply a technique for deriving the absolute radiometric calibration of its SW bandpass from these direct LW results by means of density- and temperature-insensitive line intensity ratios. The first step is to use the EUNIS LW calibration to get absolute intensities for EUV lines recorded from solar positions along its LW slit during the 2006 flight. Then co-registered SOHO/CDS images taken within minutes of the flight are used to transfer these absolute values to solar locations observed by the EUNIS SW slit, spatially offset by about 1 arcmin. Finally, theoretical `insensitive' line ratios obtained from CHIANTI allow us to determine absolute intensities of emission lines within the EUNIS SW bandpass from those observed in its LW channel. A total of 29 ratios composed of 11 LW and 15 SW emission lines from Fe~X - Fe~XIII yield an instrumental response curve that matches very well to a relative calibration which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components. The second EUNIS flight, now scheduled for 2007 October 30, will make coordinated observations and provide similar calibration updates for Hinode/EIS. We will also present some preliminary results from the new observations. EUNIS is supported by the NASA Heliophysics

  1. Experimental methods of indoor millimeter-wave radiometric imaging for personnel concealed contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xiao, Zelong; Li, Hao; Lv, Rongchuan; Lu, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    The increasingly emerging terrorism attacks and violence crimes around the world have posed severe threats to public security, so carrying out relevant research on advanced experimental methods of personnel concealed contraband detection is crucial and meaningful. All of the advantages of imaging covertly, avoidance of interference with other systems, intrinsic property of being safe to persons under screening , and the superior ability of imaging through natural or manmade obscurants, have significantly combined to enable millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometric imaging to offer great potential in personnel concealed contraband detection. Based upon the current research status of MMW radiometric imaging and urgent demands of personnel security screening, this paper mainly focuses on the experimental methods of indoor MMW radiometric imaging. The reverse radiation noise resulting from super-heterodyne receivers seriously affects the image experiments carried out at short range, so both the generation mechanism and reducing methods of this noise are investigated. Then, the benefit of sky illumination no longer exists for the indoor radiometric imaging, and this leads to the decrease in radiometric temperature contrast between target and background. In order to enhance the radiometric temperature contrast for improving indoor imaging performance, the noise illumination technique is adopted in the indoor imaging scenario. In addition, the speed and accuracy of concealed contraband detection from acquired MMW radiometric images are usually restricted to the deficiencies in traditional artificial interpretation by security inspectors, thus an automatic recognition and location algorithm by integrating improved Fuzzy C-means clustering with moment invariants is put forward. A series of original results are also presented to demonstrate the significance and validity of these methods.

  2. English/Russian terminology on radiometric calibration of space-borne optoelectronic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalsky, V.; Zakharenkov, V.; Humpherys, T.; Sapritsky, V.; Datla, R.

    The efficient use of data acquired through exo-atmospheric observations of the Earth within the framework of existing and newly planned programs requires a unique understanding of respective terms and definitions. Yet, the last large-scale document on the subject - The International Electrotechnical Vocabulary - had been published 18 years ago. This lack of a proper document, which would reflect the changes that had occurred in the area since that time, is especially detrimental to the developing international efforts aimed at global observations of the Earth from space such as the Global Earth Observations Program proposed by the U.S.A. at the 2003 WMO Congress. To cover this gap at least partially, a bi-lingual explanatory dictionary of terms and definitions in the area of radiometric calibration of space-borne IR sensors is developed. The objectives are to produce a uniform terminology for the global space-borne observations of the Earth, establish a unique understanding of terms and definitions by the radiometric communities, including a correspondence between the Russian and American terms and definitions, and to develop a formal English/Russian reference dictionary for use by scientists and engineers involved in radiometric observations of the Earth from space. The dictionary includes close to 400 items covering basic concepts of geometric, wave and corpuscular optics, remote sensing technologies, and ground-based calibration as well as more detailed treatment of terms and definitions in the areas of radiometric quantities, symbols and units, optical phenomena and optical properties of objects and media, and radiometric systems and their properties. The dictionary contains six chapters: Basic Concepts, Quantities, Symbols, and Units, Optical phenomena, Optical characteristics of surfaces and media, Components of Radiometric Systems, Characteristics of radiometric system components, plus English/Russian and Russian/Inglish indices.

  3. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  4. In-Flight Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the Landsat Thematic Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Carol Jane

    The in-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the Thematic Mapper (TM) is being conducted using the results of field measurements at White Sands, New Mexico. These measurements are made to characterize the ground and atmosphere at the time the TM is acquiring an image of White Sands. The data are used as input to a radiative transfer code that computes the radiance at the entrance pupil of the TM. The calibration is obtained by comparing the digital counts associated with the TM image of the measured ground site with the radiative transfer code result. The calibrations discussed here are for the first four visible and near -infrared bands of the TM. In this dissertation the data reduction for the first calibration attempts on January 3, 1983, and July 8, 1984, is discussed. Included are a review of radiative transfer theory and a discussion of model atmospheric parameters as defined for the White Sands area. These model parameters are used to assess the errors associated with the calibration procedure. Each input parameter to the radiative transfer code is varied from its model value in proportion to the uncertainty with which it can be determined. The effects of these uncertainties on the predicted radiances are determined. It is thought that the optical depth components (tau)(,Ray), (tau)(,Mie), (tau)(,oz), and (tau)(,H(,2)O) can be measured to within 10%, 2%, 10%, and 30%, respectively. For the white gypsum sand, surface reflectance uniformity is on the order of 1.5%, and the overall uncertainty in measured reflectance is about 2%. This is due to an uncertainty in the reflectance factor of the calibration plates. The greatest uncertainty in calibration is attributed to our uncertainty in the aerosol parameters, in particular the imaginary component of refractive index. The cumulative effect of these uncertainties is thought to produce an uncertainty in computed radiance of about 5%.

  5. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Pedro; Mateus, António; Paiva, Isabel; Trindade, Romão; Santos, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in

  6. Study on radiometric consistency of LANDSAT-4 multispectral scanner. [borders between North and South Carolina and between the Imperial Valley of California and Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Two full frames of radiometrically corrected LANDSAT-4 MSS data were examined to determine a number of radiometric properties. It was found that LANDSAT-4 MSS produces data of good quality with dynamic ranges and target responses qualitatively similar to those of previous MSS sensors. Banding appears to be quite well corrected, with a residual rms error of about 0.3 digital counts being measured; the histogram equalization algorithm appears to be working as advertised. A low level coherent noise effect was found in all bands, appearing in uniform areas as a diagonal striping pattern. The principle component of this noise was found by Fourier analysis to be a highly consistent wavelength of 3.6 pixels along a scan line (28 KHz). The magnitude of this effect ranged from about 0.75 of one count in the worst band (Band 1) to only about 0.25 counts in the best band (Band 4). Preparations were made for establishing a relative radiometric calibration from MSS 4 data with respect to MSS 3.

  7. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-12-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures.

  8. Interlaboratory drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a radiometric procedure and two conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hawkins, J.E.; Laszlo, A.

    1985-12-01

    A total of 224 recent isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from 163 patients selected to have multidrug resistance were tested against streptomycin (SM), isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (EMB) by the rapid radiometric BACTEC method and two conventional proportion methods: the World Health Organization (WHO) method, using Lowenstein-Jensen medium; and the Veterans Administration reference laboratory for mycobacteria (VA) method, using Middlebrook 7H10 agar medium. The results were compared, focusing on the concentrations of the drugs in all three methods. Among the four drugs tested, most of the discrepancies in measured activity were observed with SM and EMB, generally because of differences in the drug concentrations used by the three methods. A 4-micrograms amount of SM in the BACTEC method was found to be slightly less active than 10 micrograms in the VA method and significantly more active than 4 micrograms of dihydrostreptomycin in the WHO method. With EMB, 2.5 micrograms in BACTEC was similar to 5 micrograms in the VA method and 2 micrograms in the WHO method, while 10 micrograms in the BACTEC method was found to be more active than 10 and 2 micrograms in the VA and WHO methods, respectively. To attain close agreement, drug concentrations used in the BACTEC method should be carefully selected when a comparison is to be made with any conventional method employed in a laboratory. Standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing is greatly needed to achieve uniformity among the test methods used to evaluate tuberculosis therapeutics.

  9. Wavelength-dependent radiometric modeling for an active geosynchronous satellite imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Keith A.; Barnard, Calvin C.

    2000-10-01

    Recent interest in imaging satellites in geo-synchronous earth orbit has led to the design of a ground-based active imaging system using a concept known as Fourier Telescopy. Fourier Telescopy systems use active laser illumination, aperture synthesis, and extensive computer processing to minimize atmospheric turbulence effects and form high-resolution images of distant stationary objects. Three laser transmitters of slightly different frequency illuminate the object with varying baseline separations to temporally encode object spatial frequency information in the energy backscattered from the object. Detection and demodulation of the temporal signals and processing using phase closure and wavefront reconstruction techniques yield measurements of the object's incoherent Fourier amplitude and phase distribution. We have developed a detailed wave optics simulation to analyze and optimize the performance of this system. Wavelength dependent renderings of 3-D satellite models and the statistical variations of object illumination determine the radiometric returns received for a given scenario and the effect on imaging system performance. This work uses the simulation to examine system performance for three different illumination laser wavelengths and for realistic system design limitations. System design trade-offs based on the wavelength dependence of satellite optical cross-section, atmospheric propagation, and diffraction are discussed. Our results indicate that a near infra-red (IR) wavelength may be most suitable for this system.

  10. A Maximum Likelihood Approach to Determine Sensor Radiometric Response Coefficients for NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Ning; Chiang, Kwo-Fu; Oudrari, Hassan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    Optical sensors aboard Earth orbiting satellites such as the next generation Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) assume that the sensors radiometric response in the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) is described by a quadratic polynomial, in relating the aperture spectral radiance to the sensor Digital Number (DN) readout. For VIIRS Flight Unit 1, the coefficients are to be determined before launch by an attenuation method, although the linear coefficient will be further determined on-orbit through observing the Solar Diffuser. In determining the quadratic polynomial coefficients by the attenuation method, a Maximum Likelihood approach is applied in carrying out the least-squares procedure. Crucial to the Maximum Likelihood least-squares procedure is the computation of the weight. The weight not only has a contribution from the noise of the sensor s digital count, with an important contribution from digitization error, but also is affected heavily by the mathematical expression used to predict the value of the dependent variable, because both the independent and the dependent variables contain random noise. In addition, model errors have a major impact on the uncertainties of the coefficients. The Maximum Likelihood approach demonstrates the inadequacy of the attenuation method model with a quadratic polynomial for the retrieved spectral radiance. We show that using the inadequate model dramatically increases the uncertainties of the coefficients. We compute the coefficient values and their uncertainties, considering both measurement and model errors.

  11. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  12. On-ground characterization of Rosetta/VIRTIS-M. II. Spatial and radiometric calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Ammannito, E.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Piccioni, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Dami, M.; Barbis, A.

    2006-10-15

    After having considered the spectral and geometrical performances of the Rosetta/VIRTIS-M experiment, we complete here the analysis by evaluating quantitatively the flat-field and radiometric responses. The purpose of this work is to retrieve the flat-field matrix necessary to homogenize the focal plane response. Moreover, the most important result is the determination of the instrument transfer function that allows to convert digital numbers in physical units of spectral radiance (W m{sup -2} {mu}m{sup -1} sterad{sup -1}). The strategy adopted to organize measurement sequence, a basic description of the on-ground experimental setups and the analysis of the collected data, is included in this article. An analysis of the instrumental stability has been performed as well by examining how the internal calibration data are affected by environmental conditions. These data allow to evaluate the cumulative effects of thermal and vibrational stresses on the instrumental performances: up to now we have verified that this effect is negligible. Finally the basic calibration pipeline used to calibrate in-flight data with on-ground parameters is fully described.

  13. Using AIRS and IASI Data to Evaluate Absolute Radiometric Accuracy and Stability for Climate Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    The creation of multi-decadal data sets for climate research requires better than 100 mK absolute calibration accuracy for the full range of spectral temperatures encountered under global conditions. Validation that this accuracy is achieved by the operational hyperspectral sounders from polar orbit is facilitated by comparing data from two instruments. Extreme radiometric calibration stability is critical to allow a long time series of noisy, but presumably long-term accurate truth measurements to be used for the validation of absolute accuracy at the 100 mK level. We use the RTGSST in the tropical oceans as ground truth. The difference between the AIRS derived sst2616 and the RTGSST based on six years of data shows a systematic cold bias of about 250 mK, but better than 4 mK/year stability. The double difference between AIRS and the RTGSST and IASI and the RTGSST with less than one year of data already allows statements at the 100 mK absolute level. It shows a 60 mK difference between the AIRS and the IASI calibration at 2616 cm-(sup 1) and 300 K, with a statistically insignificant 20 mK shift in six months.

  14. Revisiting the NEAR mission with radiometric, altimetric and image tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory; Rowlands, David; Barnouin, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    The NEAR mission to asteroid 433 Eros in 2000-2001 was the first extended survey of an asteroid. In orbit around Eros for about one year, NEAR acquired a wealth of global and high-resolution data about this Near-Earth Asteroid. The primary geodetic dataset is the radiometric tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network, which have been used to reconstruct the orbits of multiple planetary orbiter missions and determine the gravity field of their target body. However, given the small size of Eros compared to terrestrial bodies, the gravitational environment is relatively weak, and the constraints from Doppler data are not as strong. Altimetric data from the NLR instrument, in the form of altimetric crossovers, were used by the NLR team to support the radio data. Image-based constraints, such as landmark data, were used by the navigation team to provide out-of-plane orbital information. Here, we process the three types of measurements simultaneously. We use the altimetric data not as crossovers, but as direct shot-to-shot distance constraints. We implemented in our GEODYN software both the landmark data type and a constraint on the geometry of image pairs which does not rely on prior accurate knowledge of surface point locations. We present results from this analysis, in terms of spacecraft orbits, gravity field and orientation solution, and shape of 433 Eros.

  15. The Eurosdr Project "RADIOMETRIC Aspects of Digital Photogrammetric IMAGES" - Results of the Empirical Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkavaara, E.; Arbiol, R.; Markelin, L.; Martínez, L.; Bovet, S.; Bredif, M.; Chandelier, L.; Heikkinen, V.; Korpela, I.; Lelegard, L.; Pérez, F.; Schläpfer, D.; Tokola, T.

    2011-09-01

    This article presents the empirical research carried out in the context of the multi-site EuroSDR project "Radiometric aspects of digital photogrammetric images" and provides highlights of the results. The investigations have considered the vicarious radiometric and spatial resolution validation and calibration of the sensor system, radiometric processing of the image blocks either by performing relative radiometric block equalization or into absolutely reflectance calibrated products, and finally aspects of practical applications on NDVI layer generation and tree species classification. The data sets were provided by Leica Geosystems ADS40 and Intergraph DMC and the participants represented stakeholders in National Mapping Authorities, software development and research. The investigations proved the stability and quality of evaluated imaging systems with respect to radiometry and optical system. The first new-generation methods for reflectance calibration and equalization of photogrammetric image block data provided promising accuracy and were also functional from the productivity and usability points of view. The reflectance calibration methods provided up to 5% accuracy without any ground reference. Application oriented results indicated that automatic interpretation methods will benefit from the optimal use of radiometrically accurate multi-view photogrammetric imagery.

  16. GPU-based high-precision real-time radiometric rendering for IR scene generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi; Zhang, Jianqi; Zhang, Shaoze; Wu, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Aiming at the problem that traditional infrared scene real-time radiometric rendering method leads to greater calculation error for securing real-time purpose, this article studies the IR rendering comprehensive optimization method, which secures real-time performance as well as calculation accuracy. Firstly, based on the effective average value principle, the spectrum coupling thermal emission and reflected radiations in the spectral radiometric equation are decomposed into physical quantities, and the spectral radiometric equation is improved to become a simpler calculation between "primer" radiance terms and effective average factors. Secondly, the parameter processing method is proposed to cope with the situation when index parameters of effective average factors exceed the maximum dimensionalities of graphics processing unit (GPU) look-up-table (LUT); and pre-calculation method is applied to promote the real-time evaluation efficiency of the physical quantities in the radiometric equation. Finally, concurrent computation of radiometric equation is achieved with GPU IR scene generation software and the precise and real-time rendering of three-dimensional IR scene is realized.

  17. [On-orbit radiometric calibration accuracy of FY-3A MERSI thermal infrared channel].

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Hu, Xiu-qing; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Ju-yang; Sun, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Accurate satellite radiance measurements are significant for data assimilations and quantitative retrieval applications. In the present paper, radiometric calibration accuracy of FungYun-3A (FY-3A) Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) thermal infrared (TIR) channel was evaluated based on simultaneous nadir observation (SNO) intercalibration method. Hyperspectral and high-quality measurements of METOP-A/IASI were used as reference. Assessment uncertainty from intercalibration method was also investigated by examining the relation between BT bias against four main collocation factors, i. e. observation time difference, view geometric difference related to zenith angles and azimuth angles, and scene spatial homogeneity. It was indicated that the BT bias is evenly distributed across the collocation variables with no significant linear relationship in MERSI IR channel. Among the four collocation factors, the scene spatial homogeneity may be the most important factor with the uncertainty less than 2% of BT bias. Statistical analysis of monitoring biases during one and a half years indicates that the brightness temperature measured by MERSI is much warmer than that of IASI. The annual mean bias (MERSI-IASI) in 2012 is (3.18±0.34) K. Monthly averaged BT biases show a little seasonal variation character, and fluctuation range is less than 0.8 K. To further verify the reliability, our evaluation result was also compared with the synchronous experiment results at Dunhuang and Qinghai Lake sites, which showed excellent agreement. Preliminary analysis indicates that there are two reasons leading to the warm bias. One is the overestimation of blackbody emissivity, and the other is probably the incorrect spectral respond function which has shifted to window spectral. Considering the variation character of BT biases, SRF error seems to be the dominant factor. PMID:25881453

  18. [On-orbit radiometric calibration accuracy of FY-3A MERSI thermal infrared channel].

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Hu, Xiu-qing; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Ju-yang; Sun, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Accurate satellite radiance measurements are significant for data assimilations and quantitative retrieval applications. In the present paper, radiometric calibration accuracy of FungYun-3A (FY-3A) Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) thermal infrared (TIR) channel was evaluated based on simultaneous nadir observation (SNO) intercalibration method. Hyperspectral and high-quality measurements of METOP-A/IASI were used as reference. Assessment uncertainty from intercalibration method was also investigated by examining the relation between BT bias against four main collocation factors, i. e. observation time difference, view geometric difference related to zenith angles and azimuth angles, and scene spatial homogeneity. It was indicated that the BT bias is evenly distributed across the collocation variables with no significant linear relationship in MERSI IR channel. Among the four collocation factors, the scene spatial homogeneity may be the most important factor with the uncertainty less than 2% of BT bias. Statistical analysis of monitoring biases during one and a half years indicates that the brightness temperature measured by MERSI is much warmer than that of IASI. The annual mean bias (MERSI-IASI) in 2012 is (3.18±0.34) K. Monthly averaged BT biases show a little seasonal variation character, and fluctuation range is less than 0.8 K. To further verify the reliability, our evaluation result was also compared with the synchronous experiment results at Dunhuang and Qinghai Lake sites, which showed excellent agreement. Preliminary analysis indicates that there are two reasons leading to the warm bias. One is the overestimation of blackbody emissivity, and the other is probably the incorrect spectral respond function which has shifted to window spectral. Considering the variation character of BT biases, SRF error seems to be the dominant factor.

  19. Early radiometric performance assessment of the Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.

    2013-09-01

    Landsat-8, the latest in the Landsat series of satellites, was launched on February 11, 2013 and carries on board the Operational Land Imager (OLI) as one of its payloads. The satellite's mission is to continue the long history of moderate resolution imaging of the Landsat program. The OLI follows the highly successful Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 in continuing to populate a global archive of Earth images that dates back to 1972. The design of the Landsat-8 instruments is a significant departure from earlier Landsats. The OLI is a pushbroom instrument; all previous recent Landsat instruments were electromechanical (whiskbroom) instruments. OLI also has two new spectral bands and refined bandpasses; the thermal imaging capability on Landsat-8 is in a separate instrument. The pushbroom design provides significantly better signal to noise performance than historically available, but at the expense of circa 70,000 detectors versus the 100 or so on previous instruments. The large focal plane and large number of detectors makes detector to detector relative calibration more challenging, increasing the propensity for banding and striping in imagery. On-board radiometric calibration devices include a shutter to measure the dark levels, a full aperture solar panel for calibration against the sun, and multiple sets of lamps for short-term stability monitoring. Early results from the on-board calibration devices indicate that the OLI is outperforming the Landsat-7 instrument in signal-to-noise ratio by an order of magnitude, consistent with pre-launch measurements. Over the first five months, the instrument is stable to within 0.7%, as measured by the lamps and solar diffuser. A relative calibration (detector-to-detector) and a linearization parameter update have been performed that reduce visible striping; with this update, the residual striping has been reduced by half in all OLI bands.

  20. Preparation of a new autonomous instrumented radiometric calibration site: Gobabeb, Namib Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwell, Claire; Bialek, Agnieszka; Marks, Amelia; Woolliams, Emma; Berthelot, Béatrice; Meygret, Aimé; Marcq, Sébastien; Bouvet, Marc; Fox, Nigel

    2015-10-01

    A new permanently instrumented radiometric calibration site for high/medium resolution imaging satellite sensors is currently under development, focussing on the visible and near infra-red parts of the spectrum. The site will become a European contribution to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) initiative RadCalNet (Radiometric Calibration Network). The exact location of the permanent monitoring instrumentation will be defined following the initial site characterisation. The new ESA/CNES RadCalNet site will have a robust uncertainty budget and its data fully SI traceable through detailed characterisation and calibration by NPL of the instruments and artefacts to be used on the site. This includes a CIMEL sun photometer (the permanent instrumentation) an ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer, Gonio Radiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS), and reference reflectance standards.

  1. Radiometric calibration and processing procedure for reflective bands on LANDSAT-4 protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiometric subsystem of NASA's LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor is described. Special emphasis is placed on the internal calibrator (IC) pulse shapes and timing cycle. The procedures for the absolute radiometric calibration of the TM channels with a 122-centimeter integrating sphere and the transfer of radiometric calibration from the channels to the IC are reviewed. The use of the IC to calibrate TM data in the ground processing system consists of pulse integration, pulse averaging, IC state identification, linear regression analysis, and histogram equalization. An overview of the SCROUNGE-era (before August 1983) method is presented. Procedural differences between SCROUNGE and the TIPS-era (after July 1983) and the implications of these differences are discussed.

  2. Absolute radiometric calibration of Als intensity data: effects on accuracy and target classification.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data.

  3. Radiometric Calibration of Mars HiRISE High Resolution Imagery Based on Fpga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yifan; Geng, Xun; Xing, Shuai; Tang, Yonghe; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA) is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  4. Artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques employed in the Landsat 7 image assessment system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boncyk, Wayne C.; Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Helder, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the Landsat-7 Ground System, will calibrate and evaluate the radiometric and geometric performance of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) instrument. The IAS incorporates new instrument radiometric artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques which overcome some limitations to calibration accuracy inherent in historical calibration methods. Knowledge of ETM + instrument characteristics gleaned from analysis of archival Thematic Mapper in-flight data and from ETM + prelaunch tests allow the determination and quantification of the sources of instrument artifacts. This a priori knowledge will be utilized in IAS algorithms designed to minimize the effects of the noise sources before calibration, in both ETM + image and calibration data.

  5. Absolute radiometric calibration of Als intensity data: effects on accuracy and target classification.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  6. Characterization of Titan surface scenarios combining Cassini SAR images and radiometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, B.; Notarnicola, C.; Casarano, D.; Janssen, M.; Posa, F.; Cassini RADAR Science Team

    2009-04-01

    A great amount of data and images was provided by the radar on Cassini probe, thus opening and suggesting new scenarios about Titan's formation and evolution. An important result was the detection, among the peculiar and heterogeneous Titan's surface features, of lakes most likely constituted by liquid hydrocarbons, thus supporting the hypothesis of a methane cycle similar to water cycle on Earth.These areas, which resemble terrestrial lakes, seem to be sprinkled all over the high latitudes surrounding Titan's pole. The abundant methane in Titan's atmosphere combined with the low temperature, 94 K, lead scientists to interpret them as lakes of liquid methane or ethane. In this work, scattering models and a Bayesian inversion algorithm are applied in order to characterize lake and land surfaces. The possibility of combining the SAR data with radiometric ones on both lakes and neighboring land areas is also presented. Radar backscattering from lakes is described in terms of a double layer model, consisting of Bragg or facets scattering for the upper liquid layer and the Integral Equation Model (IEM) model for the lower solid surface. Furthermore, by means of a gravity-capillary wave model (Donelan-Pierson), the wave spectra of liquid hydrocarbons surfaces are introduced as a function of wind speed and direction. Theoretical radar backscattering coefficient values are compared with the experimental ones collected by the radar in order to estimate physical and morphological surface parameters, and to evaluate their compatibility with the expected constituents for Titan surfaces. This electromagnetic analysis is the starting point for a statistical inversion algorithm which allows determining limits on the parameters values, especially on the optical thickness and wind speed of the lakes. The physical surface parameters inferred by using the inversion algorithm are used as input for a forward radiative transfer model calculation to obtain simulated brightness

  7. Radiometric-microbiologic assay of niacin using Kloeckera brevis: analysis of human blood and food

    SciTech Connect

    Guilarte, T.R.; Pravlik, K.

    1983-12-01

    Kloeckera brevis, a yeast, was used as the test organism for the development of a radiometric-microbiologic (RMA) assay for niacin. The assay was determined to be sensitive to the 2 ng niacin per vial level and specific for the biologically active forms of this vitamin. The method was shown to be simple, accurate, and precise in the analysis of niacin in human blood and food. The application of the radiometric technique eliminates some of the problems encountered with conventional turbidimetric-microbiologic assay.

  8. Radiometric dating of the Earlier Stone Age sequence in excavation I at Wonderwerk Cave, South Africa: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Chazan, Michael; Ron, Hagai; Matmon, Ari; Porat, Naomi; Goldberg, Paul; Yates, Royden; Avery, Margaret; Sumner, Alexandra; Horwitz, Liora Kolska

    2008-07-01

    We present here the results of 44 paleomagnetic measurements, and single cosmogenic burial and optically stimulated luminescence ages for the Earlier Stone Age deposits from Wonderwerk Cave, Northern Cape, South Africa. The resulting paleomagnetic sequence: N>R>N>R>N constrains the Earlier Stone Age strata in this part of the site to between approximately 0.78-1.96 Ma. A single cosmogenic date of approximately 2.0 Ma from the base of the section offers some corroboration for the paleomagnetic sequence. Preliminary results indicate that the small lithic assemblage from the basal stratum may contain an Oldowan facies. This is overlain by several strata containing Acheulean industries. The preliminary radiometric dates reported here place the onset of the Acheulean at this site to approximately 1.6 Ma, which is roughly contemporaneous with that of East Africa.

  9. Tracking radiometric responsivity of optical sensors without on-board calibration systems-case of the Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Feng, Lian

    2015-01-26

    The radiometric stability of satellite sensors is crucial for generating highly consistent remote sensing measurements and products. We have presented a radiometric responsivity tracking method designed especially for optical sensors without on-board calibration systems. Using a temporally stable desert site with high reflectance, the sensor responsivity was simulated using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model (RTM) with information from validated MODIS atmospheric data. Next, radiometric responsivity drifting was identified using a linear regression of the time series bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) normalized coefficients. The proposed method was applied to Chinese HJ-1A/1B charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have been on-orbit operations for more than 5 years without continuous assessment of their radiometric performance. Results from the Dunhuang desert site between 2008 and 2013 indicated that the CCD sensors degraded at various rates, with the most significant degradation occurring in the blue bands, ranging from 2.8% to 4.2% yr-1. The red bands were more stable, with a degradation rate of 0.7-3.1% yr-1. A cross-sensor comparison revealed the least degradation for the HJ-1A CCD1 (blue: 2.8%; green: 2.8%; red: 0.7%; and NIR: 0.9% yr-1), whereas the degradation of HJ-1B CCD1 was most pronounced (blue: 3.5%; green: 4.1%; red: 2.3%; and NIR: 3.4% yr-1). The uncertainties of the method were evaluated theoretically based on the propagation of uncertainties from all possible sources of the RT simulations. In addition, a cross comparison with matchup ground-based absolute calibration results was conducted. The comparison demonstrated that the method was useful for continuously monitoring the radiometric performance of remote sensors, such as HJ-1A/1B CCD and GaoFen (GF) series (China's latest high-definition Earth observation

  10. Comparison of diverse methods for the correction of atmospheric effects on LANDSAT and SKYLAB images. [radiometric correction in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Camara, G.; Dias, L. A. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.; Desouza, R. C. M.; Pereira, A. E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere reduces a sensors ability in currently discriminating targets. Using radiometric correction to reduce the atmospheric effects may improve considerably the performance of an automatic image interpreter. Several methods for radiometric correction from the open literature are compared leading to the development of an atmospheric correction system.

  11. Landsat-7 ETM+: 12 years on-orbit reflective-band radiometric performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Haque, M.O.; Barsi, J.A.; Micijevic, E.; Helder, D.L.; Thome, K.J.; Aaron, D.; Czapla-Myers, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor has been operating on orbit for more than 12 years, and characterizations of its performance have been ongoing over this period. In general, the radiometric performance of the instrument has been remarkably stable: 1) noise performance has degraded by 2% or less overall, with a few detectors displaying step changes in noise of 2% or less; 2) coherent noise frequencies and magnitudes have generally been stable, though the within-scan amplitude variation of the 20 kHz noise in bands 1 and 8 disappeared with the failure of the scan line corrector and a new similar frequency noise (now about 18 kHz) has appeared in two detectors in band 5 and increased in magnitude with time; 3) bias stability has been better than 0.25 DN out of a normal value of 15 DN in high gain; 4) relative gains, the differences in response between the detectors in the band, have generally changed by 0.1% or less over the mission, with the exception of a few detectors with a step response change of 1% or less; and 5) gain stability averaged across all detectors in a band, which is related to the stability of the absolute calibration, has been more stable than the techniques used to measure it. Due to the inability to confirm changes in the gain (beyond a few detectors that have been corrected back to the band average), ETM+ reflective band data continues to be calibrated with the prelaunch measured gains. In the worst case, some bands may have changed as much as 2% in uncompensated absolute calibration over the 12 years.

  12. Radiometric calibration of SeaWiFS in the near infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Martiny, Nadege; Frouin, Robert; Santer, Richard

    2005-12-20

    The radiometric calibration of the Sea-Viewing Wide-Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) in the near infrared (band 8, centered on 865 nm) is evaluated by use of ground-based radiometer measurements of solar extinction and sky radiance in the Sun's principal plane at two sites, one located 13 km off Venice, Italy, and the other on the west coast of Lanai Island, Hawaii. The aerosol optical thickness determined from solar extinction is used in an iterative scheme to retrieve the pseudo aerosol phase function, i.e., the product of single-scattering albedo and phase function, in which sky radiance is corrected for multiple scattering effects. No assumption about the aerosol model is required. The aerosol parameters are the inputs into a radiation-transfer code used to compute the SeaWiFS radiance. The calibration method has a theoretical inaccuracy of plus or minus 2.0-3.6%, depending on the solar zenith angle and the SeaWiFS geometry. The major source of error is in the calibration of the ground-based radiometer operated in radiance mode, assumed to be accurate to {+-}2%. The establishment of strict criteria for atmospheric stability, angular geometry, and surface conditions resulted in selection of only 26 days for the analysis during 1999-2000 (Venice site) and 1998-2001 (Lanai site). For these days the measured level-1B radiance from the SeaWiFS Project Office was generally lower than the corresponding simulated radiance in band 8 by 7.0% on average, {+-}2.8%.

  13. Radiometric calibration of SeaWiFS in the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Nadège; Frouin, Robert; Santer, Richard

    2005-12-20

    The radiometric calibration of the Sea-Viewing Wide-Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) in the near infrared (band 8, centered on 865 nm) is evaluated by use of ground-based radiometer measurements of solar extinction and sky radiance in the Sun's principal plane at two sites, one located 13 km off Venice, Italy, and the other on the west coast of Lanai Island, Hawaii. The aerosol optical thickness determined from solar extinction is used in an iterative scheme to retrieve the pseudo aerosol phase function, i.e., the product of single-scattering albedo and phase function, in which sky radiance is corrected for multiple scattering effects. No assumption about the aerosol model is required. The aerosol parameters are the inputs into a radiation-transfer code used to compute the SeaWiFS radiance. The calibration method has a theoretical inaccuracy of plus or minus 2.0-3.6%, depending on the solar zenith angle and the SeaWiFS geometry. The major source of error is in the calibration of the ground-based radiometer operated in radiance mode, assumed to be accurate to +/- 2%. The establishment of strict criteria for atmospheric stability, angular geometry, and surface conditions resulted in selection of only 26 days for the analysis during 1999-2000 (Venice site) and 1998-2001 (Lanai site). For these days the measured level-1B radiance from the SeaWiFS Project Office was generally lower than the corresponding simulated radiance in band 8 by 7.0% on average, +/- 2.8%.

  14. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan W; Lorentz, Steven R; Stone, Thomas C; Datla, Raju V

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty(1) of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties.

  15. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan W.; Lorentz, Steven R.; Stone, Thomas C.; Datla, Raju V.

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty1 of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth’s atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties. PMID:26900523

  16. CSP parabolic trough and power tower performance analysis through the Southern African universities radiometric network (SAURAN) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidaparthi, A. S.; Dall, E. P.; Hoffmann, J. E.; Dinter, F.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyse the performance of parabolic trough and power tower technologies by selecting two radiometric stations in different geographic locations, with approximately equal annual direct normal irradiance (DNI) values, but with different monthly DNI distributions. The two stations chosen for this study are situated at the University of Free State, Bloemfontein, Free State Province and in Vanrhynsdorp, Western Cape Province. The annual measured DNI values for both these locations in South Africa are in the range of 2500-2700 kWh/m2. The comparison between the different monthly DNI distributions of these selected sites includes an assessment of annual hourly data in order to study the performance analysis of the most mature concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies, namely parabolic trough and power tower plants. The weather data has been obtained from the Southern African Universities Radiometric Network (SAURAN). A comparison between the different monthly DNI distributions of these selected sites includes the assessment of hourly data. Selection of these radiometric stations has also been done on the basis that they have been operational for at least one year. The first year that most SAURAN stations have been online for at least one year is 2014, thus data from this year has been considered. The annual performance analysis shows that parabolic trough plants have a higher energy yield in Vanrhynsdorp while power tower plants seem to be more suitable for Bloemfontein. Power tower plants in both the locations have a higher annual energy yield when compared with parabolic trough plants. A parabolic trough power plant in Vanrhynsdorp in the Western Cape Province has very low monthly electricity generation in the winter months of May, June, July and August. This is partly due to the higher cosine losses in the parabolic trough `one-axis' tracking systems and lower DNI values in the winter months. However, a power tower plant in

  17. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morfitt, Ron; Barsi, Julia A.; Levy, Raviv; Markham, Brian L.; Micijevic, Esad; Ong, Lawrence; Scaramuzza, Pat; Vanderwerff, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  18. Radiometric ages of brachyuran crabs from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.T.; Turekian, K.K.

    1984-09-01

    The ages of four crab carapaces from the Galapagos spreading-center hydrothermal ventfield were determined radiometrically using members of the U and Th decay chains. One animal had an age of 0.1 years and therefore had undergone molting just before collection; the other three had last molted 3-4 years before collection.

  19. Adjustments to the MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration and Polarization Sensitivity in the 2010 Reprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite Terra provides global coverage of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances that have been successfully used for terrestrial and atmospheric research. The MODIS Terra ocean color products, however, have been compromised by an inadequate radiometric calibration at the short wavelengths. The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) at NASA has derived radiometric corrections using ocean color products from the SeaWiFS sensor as truth fields. In the R2010.0 reprocessing, these corrections have been applied to the whole mission life span of 10 years. This paper presents the corrections to the radiometric gains and to the instrument polarization sensitivity, demonstrates the improvement to the Terra ocean color products, and discusses issues that need further investigation. Although the global averages of MODIS Terra ocean color products are now in excellent agreement with those of SeaWiFS and MODIS Aqua, and image quality has been significantly improved, the large corrections applied to the radiometric calibration and polarization sensitivity require additional caution when using the data.

  20. Initial Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS Using Vicarious Calibration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2007-01-01

    The NASA team of University of Arizona, South Dakota State University, and NASA SSC produce consistent results. The AWiFS calibration coefficients agree reasonably well with the NASA team estimate. The NASA team will continue to assess AWiFS radiometric accuracy.

  1. Radiometric performance assessment of Suomi NPP VIIRS SWIR Band (2.25 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Sirish; Cao, Changyong

    2015-09-01

    Suomi NPP VIIRS SWIR band M11 (2.25 μm) has larger radiometric uncertainty compared to the rest of the reflective solar bands. This is due to a number of reasons including prelaunch calibration uncertainties. One of the most commonly used technique to verify the radiometric stability and accuracy of VIIRS is by intercomparing it with other well calibrated radiometers such as MODIS. However one of the limitations of using MODIS is that VIIRS band M11 RSR doesn't overlap with MODIS bands at all. Thus the accuracy of intercomparison relies completely on how well the spectral differences are analyzed over the given target. Since desert sites have higher reflectance and more flat spectra, this study uses desert sites to analyze M11 radiometric performance. In order to better match the RSR between instruments, we have chosen Landsat 8 OLI SWIR band 2 (2.20 μm) to perform intercomparison. This is mainly because OLI SWIR band 2 fully covers the VIIRS band M11 even though OLI has much wider RSR compared to VIIRS. The study suggests that there exists large radiometric inconsistency between VIIRS M11 and OLI, on the order of 5%. The impact due to spectral differences is estimated and accounted for using EO-1 Hyperion observations and MODTRAN.

  2. Texture analysis of radiometric signatures of new sea ice forming in Arctic leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Duane T.; Farmer, L. Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of 33.6-GHz, high-resolution, passive microwave images suggests that new sea ice accumulating in open leads is characterized by a unique textural signature which can be used to discriminate new ice forming in this environment from adjacent surfaces of similar radiometric temperature. Ten training areas were selected from the data set, three of which consisted entirely of first-year ice, four entirely of multilayer ice, and three of new ice in open leads in the process of freezing. A simple gradient operator was used to characterize the radiometric texture in each training region in terms of the degree to which radiometric gradients are oriented. New ice in leads has a sufficiently high proportion of well-oriented features to distinguish it uniquely from first-year ice and multiyear ice. The predominance of well-oriented features probably reflects physical processes by which new ice accumulates in open leads. Banded structures, which are evident in aerial photographs of new ice, apparently give rise to the radiometric signature observed, in which the trend of brightness temperature gradients is aligned parallel to lead trends. First-year ice and multiyear ice, which have been subjected to a more random growth and process history, lack this banded structure and therefore are characterized by signatures in which well-aligned elements are less dominant.

  3. Radiometric surveying applied to an evaluation of Sorrento Field, Cheyenne County, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, A.V.

    1996-06-01

    The radiometric survey was performed in July of 1994 as part of the Colorado School of Mines Reservoir Characterization Project Phase V. The 5.5 square mile field study consisted of geologic; geophysical; reservoir engineering; geochemical; 3-D seismic and radiometric investigations over the Sorrento Field. Radiometric data was acquired over the study area using a 512 cu. In. NaI detector system and four channel digital acquisition system. Twenty foot stations were acquired along the same traverses as the source and receiver lines of the 3-D seismic program. Profiles were plotted for each line. Data was normalized and Z-Transform and ratio maps were produced. A profile interpretation map indicated the presence of several lineaments possibly related to fracturing now known to exist within the study area as a result of the 3-D seismic survey. An experimental north-south profile was also obtained through the study area using a NaI detector and full spectrum analyzer capable of 60,000 CPS. Data was processed into 1000 channels of data. An analysis of the full spectrum data indicates the presence of two discrete (4 to 6 KeV) windows in the lower portion of the gamma spectrum that exhibit a consistent high response over the productive portion of the field. The normally expected low radiometric response over petroleum reservoirs appears to be a function of a general overall decrease, principally in that portion of the gamma spectrum below 1.50 MeV.

  4. MODIS Cloud Optical Property Retrieval Uncertainties Derived from Pixel-Level VNIR/SWIR Radiometric Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.; Wind, G.; Xiong, X.

    2011-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of optical thickness and effective particle radius for liquid water and ice phase clouds employ a well-known VNIR/ SWIR solar reflectance technique. For this type of algorithm, we evaluate the quantitative uncertainty in simultaneous retrievals of these two cloud parameters to pixel-level radiometric calibration estimates and other fundamental (and tractable) error sources.

  5. MODIS Cloud Optical Property Retrieval Uncertainties Derived from Pixel-Level Radiometric Error Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    MODIS retrievals of cloud optical thickness and effective particle radius employ a well-known VNIR/SWIR solar reflectance technique. For this type of algorithm, we evaluate the uncertainty in simultaneous retrievals of these two parameters to pixel-level (scene-dependent) radiometric error estimates as well as other tractable error sources.

  6. (25143) Itokawa: The power of radiometric techniques for the interpretation of remote thermal observations in the light of the Hayabusa rendezvous results*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko

    2014-06-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa was characterized in great detail by the Japanese Hayabusa mission. We revisited the available thermal observations in the light of the true asteroid properties with the goal of evaluating the possibilities and limitations of thermal model techniques. In total, we used 25 published ground-based mid-infrared photometric observations and five so far unpublished measurements from the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI in combination with improved H-G values (absolute magnitude and slope parameter). Our thermophysical model (TPM) approach allowed us to determine correctly the sense of rotation, to estimate the thermal inertia and to derive robust effective size and albedo values by only using a simple spherical shape model. A more complex shape model, derived from light-curve inversion techniques, improved the quality of the predictions considerably and made the interpretation of the thermal light curve possible. The radiometrically derived effective diameter value agrees within 2% with the true Itokawa size value. The combination of our TPM and the final (25143) Itokawa in-situ shape model was then used as a benchmark for deriving and testing radiometric solutions. The consolidated value for the surface-averaged thermal inertia is Γ = 700 ± 200 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1. We found that even the high-resolution shape models still require additional small-scale roughness in order to explain the disk-integrated infrared measurements. Our description of the thermal effects as a function of wavelengths, phase angle, and rotational phase facilitates the planning of crucial thermal observations for sophisticated characterization of small bodies, including other potentially hazardous asteroids. Our analysis shows the power of radiometric techniques to derive the size, albedo, thermal inertia, and also spin-axis orientation from small sets of measurements at thermal infrared wavelengths.

  7. 3D leaf water content mapping using terrestrial laser scanner backscatter intensity with radiometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Niemann, K. Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Leaf water content (LWC) plays an important role in agriculture and forestry management. It can be used to assess drought conditions and wildfire susceptibility. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data have been widely used in forested environments for retrieving geometrically-based biophysical parameters. Recent studies have also shown the potential of using radiometric information (backscatter intensity) for estimating LWC. However, the usefulness of backscatter intensity data has been limited by leaf surface characteristics, and incidence angle effects. To explore the idea of using LiDAR intensity data to assess LWC we normalized (for both angular effects and leaf surface properties) shortwave infrared TLS data (1550 nm). A reflectance model describing both diffuse and specular reflectance was applied to remove strong specular backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle. Leaves with different surface properties were collected from eight broadleaf plant species for modeling the relationship between LWC and backscatter intensity. Reference reflectors (Spectralon from Labsphere, Inc.) were used to build a look-up table to compensate for incidence angle effects. Results showed that before removing the specular influences, there was no significant correlation (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05) between the backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle and LWC. After the removal of the specular influences, a significant correlation emerged (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.05). The agreement between measured and TLS-derived LWC demonstrated a significant reduction of RMSE (root mean square error, from 0.008 to 0.003 g/cm2) after correcting for the incidence angle effect. We show that it is possible to use TLS to estimate LWC for selected broadleaved plants with an R2 of 0.76 (significance level α = 0.05) at leaf level. Further investigations of leaf surface and internal structure will likely result in improvements of 3D LWC mapping for studying physiology and ecology in vegetation.

  8. Absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat using a pseudo invariant calibration site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.; Thome, K.J.; Mishra, N.; Chander, G.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Choi, Tae-young

    2013-01-01

    Pseudo invariant calibration sites (PICS) have been used for on-orbit radiometric trending of optical satellite systems for more than 15 years. This approach to vicarious calibration has demonstrated a high degree of reliability and repeatability at the level of 1-3% depending on the site, spectral channel, and imaging geometries. A variety of sensors have used this approach for trending because it is broadly applicable and easy to implement. Models to describe the surface reflectance properties, as well as the intervening atmosphere have also been developed to improve the precision of the method. However, one limiting factor of using PICS is that an absolute calibration capability has not yet been fully developed. Because of this, PICS are primarily limited to providing only long term trending information for individual sensors or cross-calibration opportunities between two sensors. This paper builds an argument that PICS can be used more extensively for absolute calibration. To illustrate this, a simple empirical model is developed for the well-known Libya 4 PICS based on observations by Terra MODIS and EO-1 Hyperion. The model is validated by comparing model predicted top-of-atmosphere reflectance values to actual measurements made by the Landsat ETM+ sensor reflective bands. Following this, an outline is presented to develop a more comprehensive and accurate PICS absolute calibration model that can be Système international d'unités (SI) traceable. These initial concepts suggest that absolute calibration using PICS is possible on a broad scale and can lead to improved on-orbit calibration capabilities for optical satellite sensors.

  9. Effect of MODIS Terra radiometric calibration improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products: Validation and Terra/Aqua consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by ˜0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and ˜0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by ˜10% and ˜5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  10. Hybridization behavior of mixed DNA/alkylthiol monolayers on gold: characterization by surface plasmon resonance and 32P radiometric assay.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Lee, Chi-Ying; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G; Grainger, David W

    2006-05-15

    Nucleic acid assay from a complex biological milieu is attractive but currently difficult and far from routine. In this study, DNA hybridization from serum dilutions into mixed DNA/mercaptoundecanol (MCU) adlayers on gold was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Immobilized DNA probe and hybridized target densities on these surfaces were quantified using 32P-radiometric assays as a function of MCU diluent exposure. SPR surface capture results correlated with radiometric analysis for hybridization performance, demonstrating a maximum DNA hybridization on DNA/MCU mixed adlayers. The maximum target surface capture produced by MCU addition to the DNA probe layer correlates with structural and conformational data on identical mixed DNA/MCU adlayers on gold derived from XPS, NEXAFS, and fluorescence intensity measurements reported in a related study (Lee, C.-Y.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G. M.; Grainger, D. W.; Castner, D. G.; Gamble, L. J. Anal. Chem. 2006, 78, 3316-3325.). MCU addition into the DNA adlayer on gold also improved surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and serum protein adsorption. Target DNA hybridization from serum dilutions was monitored with SPR on the optimally mixed DNA/MCU adlayers. Both hybridization kinetics and efficiency were strongly affected by nonspecific protein adsorption from a complex milieu even at a minimal serum concentration (e.g., 1%). No target hybridization was detected in SPR assays from serum concentrations above 30%, indicating nonspecific protein adsorption interference of DNA capture and hybridization from complex milieu. Removal of nonsignal proteins from nucleic acid targets prior to assay represents a significant issue for direct sample-to-assay nucleic acid diagnostics from food, blood, tissue, PCR mixtures, and many other biologically complex sample formats. PMID:16689533

  11. Effect of MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration Improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue Aerosol Products: Validation and Terra/Aqua Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by approximately 0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and approximately 0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  12. Cosine response characteristics of radiometric and photometric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III

    1992-05-01

    Global and diffuse irradiance and illuminance are measured with instruments that are assumed to have true cosine responses. It is known, largely from reports with a limited distribution or by word of mouth, that no instrument is perfect in this regard. This paper reports on measurements of cosine responses for several instrument types and manufacture familiar to the solar radiation measurement community. The measurements were made with an automated cosine response test bench using the same protocol for each instrument. The cosine bench measures with variable angular resolution as fine as 0.25 degrees. The automated rotation is in one plane. A manual rotation allows measurements for other azimuths. 6 refs.

  13. Cosine response characteristics of radiometric and photometric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III.

    1992-01-01

    Global and diffuse irradiance and illuminance are measured with instruments that are assumed to have true cosine responses. It is known, largely from reports with a limited distribution or by word of mouth, that no instrument is perfect in this regard. This paper reports on measurements of cosine responses for several instrument types and manufacture familiar to the solar radiation measurement community. The measurements were made with an automated cosine response test bench using the same protocol for each instrument. The cosine bench measures with variable angular resolution as fine as 0.25 degrees. The automated rotation is in one plane. A manual rotation allows measurements for other azimuths. 6 refs.

  14. Application of a radiometric calibration method to lunar Fourier transform IR spectra by using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-emissivity blackbody.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Blumenstock, T; Hase, F

    1997-11-01

    Since winter 1994/1995 the Moon has been used in addition to the Sun as an IR source of radiation to measure atmospheric absorption spectra with a Bruker IR Fourier transform spectrometer IFS 120M located near Kiruna, Sweden. A two-point radiometric calibration method with blackbody references was applied to lunar spectra in the long-wave detector channel to improve the accuracy of evaluation of the column amounts of different atmospheric trace gases. A new liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-emissivity blackbody without an entrance window is described that is used for this calibration method.

  15. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  16. Analyzing Spectral Characteristics of Shadow Area from ADS-40 High Radiometric Resolution Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ta; Wu, Shou-Tsung; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Chen, Jan-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i) The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii) DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii) The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv) The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v) Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI) still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40) is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  17. Inherent limitations of fixed time servo-controlled radiometric calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Duff, M.F.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    There has been some interest in low precision, short run time calorimetry measurements. This type of calorimetry measurement has been proposed for use when high precision measurements are not required, for example, to screen scrap containers to determine if there is enough material to be measured more accurately of for confirmatory measurements that only require low precision results. The equipment needed to make these measurements is a servo-controlled calorimeter with a sample preequilibration bath. The preequilibration bath temperature is set to the internal temperature of the calorimeter running at a fixed servo-controlled wattage level. The sample power value is determined at a fixed time form the sample loading into the calorimeter. There are some limitations and areas of uncertainties in the use of data obtained by this method. Data collected under controlled conditions demonstrate the limitations. Sample packaging, preequilibration time, and item wattage were chosen as the variables most likely to be encountered in a plant environment.

  18. “Once is Enough” in Radiometric Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Gerald T.; Gibson, Charles E.; Yoon, Howard W.; Parr, Albert C.

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of an Optical Technology Division quality system for optical radiation measurement services has provided the opportunity to reconsider the existing calibration procedures to improve quality and reduce costs. We have instituted procedures in our calibration programs to eliminate uninformative repetitive measurements by concentrating our efforts on controlling and understanding the measurement process. The first program in our calibration services to undergo these revisions is described in this paper. PMID:27110453

  19. Spectral calibration of radiometric detectors using tunable laser sources.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Michaela; Nevas, Saulius; Sperling, Armin; Völker, Stephan

    2012-04-20

    This paper describes the analysis of laser-based responsivity measurements using the Tunable Lasers in Photometry setup at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. An approach based on digital signal analysis is proposed to remove interference-caused oscillations in highly resolved spectral data from laser-based measurements, yielding an improved reproducibility and comparability of results. Digital filters are used to selectively suppress the frequency components of interference fringes visible in the measurement data. We describe the algorithm used and discuss the associated uncertainty components of laser-based measurements. Finally, we give examples of the calibration of different detectors with and without interference effects.

  20. Development of a multispectral sensor for crop canopy temperature measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in plant stress has precision agriculture applications in controlling variable rate irrigation and variable rate nutrient application. One approach to plant stress detection is crop canopy temperature measurement by the use of thermographic or radiometric...

  1. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  2. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300–2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5–6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  3. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of the GÖKTÜRK-2 Satellite Sensor Using Tuz GÖLÜ (landnet Site) from Ndvi Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakarya, Ufuk; Hakkı Demirhan, İsmail; Seda Deveci, Hüsne; Teke, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Can; Küpçü, Ramazan; Feray Öztoprak, A.; Efendioğlu, Mehmet; Fehmi Şimşek, F.; Berke, Erdinç; Zübeyde Gürbüz, Sevgi

    2016-06-01

    TÜBİTAK UZAY has conducted a research study on the use of space-based satellite resources for several aspects of agriculture. Especially, there are two precision agriculture related projects: HASSAS (Widespread application of sustainable precision agriculture practices in Southeastern Anatolia Project Region (GAP) Project) and AKTAR (Smart Agriculture Feasibility Project). The HASSAS project aims to study development of precision agriculture practice in GAP region. Multi-spectral satellite imagery and aerial hyperspectral data along with ground measurements was collected to analyze data in an information system. AKTAR aims to develop models for irrigation, fertilization and spectral signatures of crops in Inner Anatolia. By the end of the project precision agriculture practices to control irrigation, fertilization, pesticide and estimation of crop yield will be developed. Analyzing the phenology of crops using NDVI is critical for the projects. For this reason, absolute radiometric calibration of the Red and NIR bands in space-based satellite sensors is an important issue. The Göktürk-2 satellite is an earth observation satellite which was designed and built in Turkey and was launched in 2012. The Göktürk-2 satellite sensor has a resolution 2.5 meters in panchromatic and 5 meters in R/G/B/NIR bands. The absolute radiometric calibration of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor was performed via the ground-based measurements - spectra-radiometer, sun photometer, and meteorological station- in Tuz Gölü cal/val site in 2015. In this paper, the first ground-based absolute radiometric calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor using Tuz Gölü is demonstrated. The absolute radiometric calibration results of this paper are compared with the published cross-calibration results of the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor utilizing Landsat 8 imagery. According to the experimental comparison results, the Göktürk-2 satellite sensor coefficients for red and NIR bands

  4. Towards IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG): impact of improved spectral resolution and radiometric noise on the retrieval of thermodynamic, chemistry and climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevoisier, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Guidard, V.; Phulpin, T.; Armante, R.; Barret, B.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Coheur, P.-F.; Crépeau, L.; Dufour, G.; Labonnote, L.; Lavanant, L.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Herbin, H.; Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Payan, S.; Péquignot, E.; Pierangelo, C.; Sellitto, P.; Stubenrauch, C.

    2014-12-01

    Besides their strong contribution to weather forecast improvement through data assimilation, thermal infrared sounders onboard polar-orbiting platforms are now playing a key role for monitoring atmospheric composition changes. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument developed by the French space agency (CNES) and launched by EUMETSAT onboard the Metop satellite series is providing essential inputs for weather forecasting and pollution/climate monitoring owing to its smart combination of large horizontal swath, good spectral resolution and high radiometric performance. EUMETSAT is currently preparing the next polar-orbiting program (EPS-SG) with the Metop-SG satellite series that should be launched around 2020. In this framework, CNES is studying the concept of a new instrument, the IASI-New Generation (IASI-NG), characterized by an improvement of both spectral and radiometric characteristics as compared to IASI, with three objectives: (i) continuity of the IASI/Metop series; (ii) improvement of vertical resolution; and (iii) improvement of the accuracy and detection threshold for atmospheric and surface components. In this paper, we show that an improvement of spectral resolution and radiometric noise fulfil these objectives by leading to (i) a better vertical coverage in the lower part of the troposphere, thanks to the increase in spectral resolution; and (ii) an increase in the accuracy of the retrieval of several thermodynamic, climate and chemistry variables, thanks to the improved signal-to-noise ratio as well as less interference between the signatures of the absorbing species in the measured radiances. The detection limit of several atmospheric species is also improved. We conclude that IASI-NG has the potential to strongly benefit the numerical weather prediction, chemistry and climate communities now connected through the European GMES/Copernicus initiative.

  5. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  6. Improving Ocean Color Data Products using a Purely Empirical Approach: Reducing the Requirement for Radiometric Calibration Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric calibration is the foundation upon which ocean color remote sensing is built. Quality derived geophysical products, such as chlorophyll, are assumed to be critically dependent upon the quality of the radiometric calibration. Unfortunately, the goals of radiometric calibration are not typically met in global and large-scale regional analyses, and are especially deficient in coastal regions. The consequences of the uncertainty in calibration are very large in terms of global and regional ocean chlorophyll estimates. In fact, stability in global chlorophyll requires calibration uncertainty much greater than the goals, and outside of modern capabilities. Using a purely empirical approach, we show that stable and consistent global chlorophyll values can be achieved over very wide ranges of uncertainty. Furthermore, the approach yields statistically improved comparisons with in situ data, suggesting improved quality. The results suggest that accuracy requirements for radiometric calibration cab be reduced if alternative empirical approaches are used.

  7. Real-Time EDL Navigation Performance Using Spacecraft to Spacecraft Radiometric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Ely, Todd; Duncan, Courtney; Lightsey, Glenn; Campbell, Todd; Mogensen, Andy

    2006-01-01

    A two-year task sponsored by NASA's Mars Technology Program's Advanced Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) work area includes investigation of improvements to EDL navigation by processing spacecraft-to-spacecraft radiometric data. Spacecraft-to- spacecraft navigation will take advantage of the UHF link between two spacecraft (i.e. to an orbiter from an approaching lander for EDL telemetry relay) to build radiometric data, specifically the velocity between the two spacecraft along the radio beam, that are processed to determine position and velocity in real time. The improved onboard state knowledge provided by spacecraft-to-spacecraft navigation will improve the performance of entry guidance by providing a more accurate state estimate and ultimately reduce the landed position error. Work on the final year of this task is reported here.

  8. Mississippi exploration field trials using microbial, radiometrics, free soil gas, and other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.S.; Brown, L.R.; Thieling, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mississippi Office of Geology has conducted field trials using the surface exploration techniques of geomicrobial, radiometrics, and free soil gas. The objective of these trials is to determine if Mississippi oil and gas fields have surface hydrocarbon expression resulting from vertical microseepage migration. Six fields have been surveyed ranging in depth from 3,330 ft to 18,500 ft. The fields differ in trapping styles and hydrocarbon type. The results so far indicate that these fields do have a surface expression and that geomicrobial analysis as well as radiometrics and free soil gas can detect hydrocarbon microseepage from pressurized reservoirs. All three exploration techniques located the reservoirs independent of depth, hydrocarbon type, or trapping style.

  9. Uncertainty propagation algorithm from the radiometric calibration to the restored earth observation radiance.

    PubMed

    Guorui, Jia; Huijie, Zhao; Hao, Lei

    2014-04-21

    The uncertainty of the radiometric calibration affects the accuracy of the earth observation (EO) radiance restored from the remote sensing digital number (DN) data. However, it has not been intensively analyzed whether they are equivalent to each other. The algorithm to deduce the uncertainty of the restored EO radiance in the solar-reflective spectral range (400-2500 nm) along the uncertainty propagation chain in the radiometric calibration process is proposed. It was validated compared with the traditional calibration uncertainty algorithm through an example of calibrating an imaging spectrometer. The interval about the real EO radiance and the corresponding level of confidence was reported as a result, which shows the possibility to accurately expressing the quality of the restored EO radiance following the rules used in the field of metrology.

  10. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  11. Radiometric versus thermometric calibration of IR test systems: which is best?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Philip I.

    1991-09-01

    Radiometric calibration of military IR test equipment is an approach being explored to avoid perceived shortcomings of traditional thermometric calibration. This issue has profound impact on the testing of military systems: the lack of internally consistent calibration architecture can cost military customers millions of dollars in increased maintenance and spares costs due to test result inconsistencies. An example is presented to show that the lack of a standard spectral response definition in this region, and the difficulty in making such a definition, make the radiometric calibration approach seem questionable for the foreseeable future. Calibration errors of more than 7% (not even a worst-case scenario) can result. The best approach to assuring test accuracy and calibration consistency is to employ thermometric calibration in conjunction with intelligent test system design: high, flat spectral transmittance of the test system and high emissivity targets and sources. These are achievable today with proper application of existing materials and coatings.

  12. Radiometric performance results of the New Horizons' ALICE UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Scherrer, John; Stern, S. Alan

    2005-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and calibration results of the New Horizons' ALICE flight model. This ALICE is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W), ultraviolet spectrograph based on the ALICE instrument now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft. Its primary job will be to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition can be determined for the first time. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. Detailed radiometric performance results of the ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  13. [A new, automatic, non-radiometric system for culturing MB/BACT bacilli and its value in the microbiologic diagnosis of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Zofia, Z; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Klatt, M

    1998-01-01

    The MB/BacT is a fully automated, rapid, non-radiometric system, for the culture of Mycobacteria for clinical samples other than blood. CO2 production is measured and reported as reflective units from the MB/BacT Process Bottle colorimetric sensor. We are evaluating the MB/BacT system in comparison to our routine culture method--culture on egg media (glycerol and puruvate), in the Bactec 460-Tb radiometric machine and in MB Redox. A total of 286 clinical samples from respiratory tract were inoculated into three or four culture systems and incubated at 37 degrees C. There was only little difference in mean time to detection between the MB/BacT and Bactec system (for M.tuberculosis 11 days versus 9 days), but both systems were faster than egg media (16 days). Contamination rates for MB/BacT system was 8.4%, and for Bactec 6.9%. The colorimetric technology used in the MB/BacT is a rapid and sensitive for the measurement of mycobacterial growth. PMID:9658878

  14. Effects of operating environment on performance of radiometric calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, R. L., II

    An experimental program was conducted to assess the effects of changes in operating environment on calorimeter performance. An environmental chamber was used to permit bath temperature stability, room temperature stability, room humidity, and the humidity to which the calorimeter's sample chamber is exposed to be varied independently of one another. The resulting effects on the mean and standard deviation of the error for standard measurements were studied. The results of analysis indicated that the interaction of bath and room temperature stability has a significant effect on error standard deviation, while the humidity to which the sample chamber is exposed most significantly affects mean error. This information can be used as part of a measurement assurance program by checking the product of bath and room temperature stability for significant changes with each sample measurement, and by checking for major shifts in humidity to which the sample chamber is exposed.

  15. High-speed radiometric imaging with a gated, intensified, digitally controlled camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Charles C.; Sturz, Richard A.

    1997-05-01

    The development of an advanced instrument for real-time radiometric imaging of high-speed events is described. The Intensified Digitally-Controlled Gated (IDG) camera is a microprocessor-controlled instrument based on an intensified CCD that is specifically designed to provide radiometric optical data. The IDG supports a variety of camera- synchronous and camera-asynchronous imaging tasks in both passive imaging and active laser range-gated applications. It features both automatic and manual modes of operation, digital precision and repeatability, and ease of use. The IDG produces radiometric imagery by digitally controlling the instrument's optical gain and exposure duration, and by encoding and annotating the parameters necessary for radiometric analysis onto the resultant video signal. Additional inputs, such as date, time, GPS, IRIG-B timing, and other data can also be encoded and annotated. The IDG optical sensitivity can be readily calibrated, with calibration data tables stored in the camera's nonvolatile flash memory. The microprocessor then uses this data to provide a linear, calibrated output. The IDG possesses both synchronous and asynchronous imaging modes in order to allow internal or external control of exposure, timing, and direct interface to external equipment such as event triggers and frame grabbers. Support for laser range-gating is implemented by providing precise asynchronous CCD operation and nanosecond resolution of the intensifier photocathode gate duration and timing. Innovative methods used to control the CCD for asynchronous image capture, as well as other sensor and system considerations relevant to high-speed imaging are discussed in this paper.

  16. Reduction of Striping Noise in Overlapping LIDAR Intensity Data by Radiometric Normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Shaker, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    To serve seamless mapping, airborne LiDAR data are usually collected with multiple parallel strips with one or two cross strip(s). Nevertheless, the overlapping regions of LiDAR data strips are usually found with unbalanced intensity values, resulting in the appearance of stripping noise. Despite that physical intensity correction methods are recently proposed, some of the system and environmental parameters are assumed as constant or not disclosed, leading to such an intensity discrepancy. This paper presents a new normalization technique to adjust the radiometric misalignment found in the overlapping LiDAR data strips. The normalization technique is built upon a second-order polynomial function fitted on the joint histogram plot, which is generated with a set of pairwise closest data points identified within the overlapping region. The method was tested on Teledyne Optech's Gemini dataset (at 1064 nm wavelength), where the LiDAR intensity data were first radiometrically corrected based on the radar (range) equation. Five land cover features were selected to evaluate the coefficient of variation (cv) of the intensity values before and after implementing the proposed method. Reduction of cv was found by 19% to 59% in the Gemini dataset, where the striping noise was significantly reduced in the radiometrically corrected and normalized intensity data. The Gemini dataset was also used to conduct land cover classification, and the overall accuracy yielded a notable improvement of 9% to 18%. As a result, LiDAR intensity data should be pre-processed with radiometric correction and normalization prior to any data manipulation.

  17. Initial Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS using Vicarious Calibration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Thome, Kurtis; Aaron, David; Leigh, Larry

    2006-01-01

    NASA SSC maintains four ASD FieldSpec FR spectroradiometers: 1) Laboratory transfer radiometers; 2) Ground surface reflectance for V&V field collection activities. Radiometric Calibration consists of a NIST-calibrated integrating sphere which serves as a source with known spectral radiance. Spectral Calibration consists of a laser and pen lamp illumination of integrating sphere. Environmental Testing includes temperature stability tests performed in environmental chamber.

  18. A procedure for radiometric recalibration of Landsat 5 TM reflective-band data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Haque, M.O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has been benefiting from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for the L5 TM imagery used the detectors' response to the internal calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time, causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20%. In May 2003, the L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center through the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) were updated to use a lifetime lookup-table (LUT) gain model to radiometrically calibrate TM data instead of using scene-specific IC gains. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. The L5 TM data processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work-order report that was included in the original standard data product delivery is available. However, if users do not have the original work-order report, the IC trends can be used for recalibration. The IC trends were generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database. This paper provides the details of the recalibration procedure for the following: 1) data processed using IC where users have the work-order file; 2) data processed using IC where users do not have the work-order file; 3) data processed using prelaunch calibration parameters; and 4) data processed using the previous version of the LUT (e.g., LUT03) that was released before April 2, 2007.

  19. In-flight radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper from 1984 to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis J.; Gellman, David I.; Parada, Robert J., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Slater, Philip N.; Moran, M. Susan

    1993-11-01

    The reflectance-based method is used to determine an absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper for the solar reflective portion of the spectrum. Results are given for data collected at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on 1992-08-15. These results are compared to those obtained from applying a similar processing approach to data collected in 1984, 1985, 1987, and 1988.

  20. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Metzler, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The radiometric characteristics of LANDSAT 5 TM data were analyzed. Effects which were found earlier and quantified in LANDSAT 4 TM data were quantified for LANDSAT-5 data as well, including: scan-direction-related signal droop and scan correlated level shifts. Coincident LANDSAT 4 and 5 fully corrected (CCT-PT) TM data were analyzed, and band-by-band relationships between the two sensors were derived in terms of both signal counts and radiance.

  1. Radiometric Characterization of the IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2007-01-01

    The NASA team of University of Arizona, South Dakota State University, and NASA SSC produce consistent results. The OrbView calibration coefficients do not appear to agree well with the NASA team estimate (approx. 20% difference). Discussions with GeoEye (TradeMark) (formerly ORBIMAGE(Registered TradeMark)) personnel are ongoing to update the calibration coefficients. The NASA team will continue to assess OrbView radiometric accuracy.

  2. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  3. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L B; Strahler, Alan H; Schaaf, Crystal B; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna(®) Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρ(app)), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρ(app) are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρ(app) error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρ(app) from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  4. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine δ18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  5. Relative Radiometric Normalization and Atmospheric Correction of a SPOT 5 Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Mahmoud El; Bégué, Agnès; Lafrance, Bruno; Hagolle, Olivier; Dedieu, Gérard; Rumeau, Matthieu

    2008-01-01

    Multi-temporal images acquired at high spatial and temporal resolution are an important tool for detecting change and analyzing trends, especially in agricultural applications. However, to insure a reliable use of this kind of data, a rigorous radiometric normalization step is required. Normalization can be addressed by performing an atmospheric correction of each image in the time series. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining an atmospheric characterization at a given acquisition date. In this paper, we investigate whether relative radiometric normalization can substitute for atmospheric correction. We develop an automatic method for relative radiometric normalization based on calculating linear regressions between unnormalized and reference images. Regressions are obtained using the reflectances of automatically selected invariant targets. We compare this method with an atmospheric correction method that uses the 6S model. The performances of both methods are compared using 18 images from of a SPOT 5 time series acquired over Reunion Island. Results obtained for a set of manually selected invariant targets show excellent agreement between the two methods in all spectral bands: values of the coefficient of determination (r2 exceed 0.960, and bias magnitude values are less than 2.65. There is also a strong correlation between normalized NDVI values of sugarcane fields (r2 = 0.959). Despite a relative error of 12.66% between values, very comparable NDVI patterns are observed.

  6. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L B; Strahler, Alan H; Schaaf, Crystal B; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-03-02

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna(®) Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρ(app)), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρ(app) are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρ(app) error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρ(app) from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars.

  7. Radiometric Calibration of a Dual-Wavelength, Full-Waveform Terrestrial Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhan; Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Howe, Glenn; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A.; Paynter, Ian; Saenz, Edward J.; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Dual-Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), a full-waveform terrestrial laser scanner with two simultaneously-pulsing infrared lasers at 1064 nm and 1548 nm, provides accurate dual-wavelength apparent reflectance (ρapp), a physically-defined value that is related to the radiative and structural characteristics of scanned targets and independent of range and instrument optics and electronics. The errors of ρapp are 8.1% for 1064 nm and 6.4% for 1548 nm. A sensitivity analysis shows that ρapp error is dominated by range errors at near ranges, but by lidar intensity errors at far ranges. Our semi-empirical model for radiometric calibration combines a generalized logistic function to explicitly model telescopic effects due to defocusing of return signals at near range with a negative exponential function to model the fall-off of return intensity with range. Accurate values of ρapp from the radiometric calibration improve the quantification of vegetation structure, facilitate the comparison and coupling of lidar datasets from different instruments, campaigns or wavelengths and advance the utilization of bi- and multi-spectral information added to 3D scans by novel spectral lidars. PMID:26950126

  8. Radiometric stability assessment of an airborne photogrammetric sensor in a test field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelin, Lauri; Honkavaara, Eija; Hakala, Teemu; Suomalainen, Juha; Peltoniemi, Jouni

    Radiometric stability is a desired property of digital photogrammetric large-format sensors. This article presents a methodology for determining the radiometric stability of airborne imaging sensors in operational conditions in a test field and the results of stability evaluation of a large-format photogrammetric frame sensor DMC, from Intergraph. The imagery was collected in two days using nine different exposure settings, and images collected with variable exposure time and aperture were compared. The results showed promising stability in many cases, up to a level of 2% of the radiance, but less favorable results also appeared. Possible reasons for the unfavorable results could be the limitations of the experimental set-up or the instability of the sensor. DMC showed high radiometric performance potential, but high sensitivity to the exposure settings. Based on the results, recommendations for the future test field calibration and validation procedures were given. One limitation of the analysis was the insufficient information about the sensor stability potential; proposals were given to sensor manufacturers concerning the necessary information.

  9. Validation analysis of the thermal and radiometric integrity of RIT's synthetic image generation model, DIRSIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, John E.; Schott, John R.; Rankin-Parobek, Donna

    1994-06-01

    The digital imaging and remote sensing laboratory's image generation model (DIRSIG) was validated in the long wave infrared (LWIR, 8 - 13.3 micrometers ) and midwife infrared (MWIR, 3 - 5 micrometers ) pass bands. Truth data was collected for all components of the thermal and radiometric submodels including a complete set of meteorological and radiometric data. Truth temperatures were collected using a bank of thermistors and truth radiance images were collected with calibrated InSb (MWIR) and HgCdTe (LWIR) detectors. Sensor spectral response functions were also included in the radiometric analysis. Relative error contributions to the total temperature/radiance digital count were investigated for each component in the multi-spectral model. Largest contributions were found to be wind speed, air temperature, visible emissivity, and fractional sky exposure for the thermal model and atmospheric transmission, temperature, and emissivity for the radiance model. An overall comparison of truth and synthetic images yields rms errors of as low as 1.8 degree(s)C actual temperature and 5 degree(s)C (LWIR) and 6 degree(s)C (MWIR) apparent temperature.

  10. Tests of Australian aerial radiometric data for use in petroleum reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, D.F.; Branch, J.F.; Thompson, C.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Recon Exploration Pty. Ltd. has successfully completed initial testing of a new method for processing and interpretation of AGSO's (Australian Geological Survey Organization, formerly Bureau of Mineral Resources) aerial gamma-ray spectrometer data for petroleum exploration in the Canning Basin, Western Australia and the Otway Basin, Victoria. Count-rate data for potassium and uranium were normalized to the thorium count rate for each sample to suppress unwanted effects of variations in surface lithology or soil type, soil moisture, vegetation cover, and counting geometry. The Canning Basin test area included five producing oil fields. All except one clearly exhibit significant and characteristic radiometric anomalies which include negative normalized potassium and more positive normalized uranium values. The Otway Basin test areas included PPL-1 commercial gas production which is associated with a group of significant radiometric anomalies similar to those in the Canning Basin. These results are similar to extensive ongoing tests in the US and are explained in terms of well-understood geological, geochemical, and geophysical models. Based on 69 wells in the three test areas, it is estimated that the chance of encountering hydrocarbons (economic production or shows) in wells within the radiometrically favorable zones is about 2.6 times greater than outside the favorable areas.

  11. Opportunities to Intercalibrate Radiometric Sensors From International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, C. M.; Lukashin, C.; Speth, P. W.; Thome, K. J.; Young, D. F.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Highly accurate measurements of Earth's thermal infrared and reflected solar radiation are required for detecting and predicting long-term climate change. We consider the concept of using the International Space Station to test instruments and techniques that would eventually be used on a dedicated mission such as the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory. In particular, a quantitative investigation is performed to determine whether it is possible to use measurements obtained with a highly accurate reflected solar radiation spectrometer to calibrate similar, less accurate instruments in other low Earth orbits. Estimates of numbers of samples useful for intercalibration are made with the aid of year-long simulations of orbital motion. We conclude that the International Space Station orbit is ideally suited for the purpose of intercalibration.

  12. Radiometric Analyses of Beach Sands from the Southeast of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Anjos, R. M.; Macario, K.; Veiga, R.; Carvalho, C.; Mosquera, B.

    2007-02-12

    Natural gamma radiation measurements of coastal sand deposits were used to determine the provenance of the sandy sediments and to obtain information about paleo-sea-levels along the coast of three Brazilian States: Sao Paulo (SP), Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Espirito Santo (ES). Th/U and Th/K ratios suggest a considerable positive correlation with the geological evolution of the Quaternary coastal deposits of the Brazilian Southeast.

  13. Trending of Suomi-NPP VIIRS radiometric performance with lunar band ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Choi, Taeyoung; Cao, Changyong; Blonski, Slawomir; Wang, Wenhui; Ban, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Radiometric stability of the lunar surface and its smooth reflectance spectrum makes the moon an ideal target for calibrating satellite-based hyper/multi-band visible imagers, as demonstrated in several lunar calibration studies of satellite radiometers. Most of the lunar calibrations rely on using lunar irradiance models to calibrate satellite radiometers, which require the lunar irradiance model to be highly accurate. In this paper, we use Lunar Band Ratio (LBR) to trend satellite radiometer performance so that the usage of lunar irradiance model is not required. The LBR method is applied to monitor long term radiometric performance of VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) onboard Suomi-NPP. VIIRS observes moon at nearly the same lunar phase angle through Earth view during scheduled spacecraft maneuver. Total lunar digital number are calculated for each VIIRS reflective solar bands (RSBs) from lunar observations and one of the most stable bands of VIIRS such as M4 band is chosen as the reference band for calculating the band ratio. LBRs are compared with the degradation factors derived from VIIRS operational radiometric calibration of RSBs using onboard solar diffuser. The LBR analysis reveals that M6 and M7 degrade the fastest and agree well with the trending independently determined from onboard solar diffuser. For stable bands such as M3-M4 of VIIRS, the variation range of band ratios of M2/M4 and M3/M4 are all within 0.6%, indicating the LBR can be used to reveal the sub percent band to band stability. For M11 band of VIIRS, there have been large uncertainties in verifying its radiometric performance using vicarious ground targets. LBR of M11 provides an independent and useful radiometric stability monitoring tool for verifying the relative stability of M11 band. The LBR analysis also shows that band-to-band variability in the spectrally similar band pairs such as I2 vs. M7 and I3 vs. M10 of VIIRS are consistent within 0.2%. It is demonstrated

  14. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  15. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  16. Landsat-7 ETM+ On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Kaita, Ed; Miller, Jeff; Barsi, Julia; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As of July, 2000 the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor on Landsat-7 has been operating on-orbit for about 15 months. The ETM+ images the Earth in has eight spectral bands in the visible, near-infrared (IR), short wavelength infrared (SWIR), and thermal portions of the spectrum. Three on-board calibration systems are available for the reflective bands: (1) the Internal Calibrator (IC), (2) the Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC), and (3) the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC). The Internal Calibrator also provides the thermal band calibration. Several investigators on the Landsat science team are also regularly performing vicarious calibrations. The internal calibrator, which during much of the pre-launch testing and early on-orbit check out period, showed up to 15% variability with time, has since stabilized as the instrument has assumed a regular schedule of operations and is now typically showing only a few percent variation with time, mostly associated with warm-up. The PASC has been the most variable of the sources: the response to the PASC has increased by as much as 50% is some bands and is oscillating with time, perhaps due to contamination. The FASC has been the most stable of the sources: mid scan response to the FASC diffuser have varied from -4%/yr for band 4 (0.83 microns) to -2%/yr for band 1 (0.49 microns) to +1%/yr for band 7 (2.2 microns). These decreases in response in bands 1-4 would have been about half as large if measured on the right (west) side of the panel and about twice as large if measured on the left side of the panel. The current interpretation is that the FASC diffuser panel is changing non-uniformly in its reflectance characteristics. Vicarious ground measurements have generally been consistent with the pre-launch measurements of the instrument responsivity and have not shown evidence of a change in responsivity with time. The FASC, IC, and vicarious results suggest the instrument has not changed by more than two

  17. Radiometer Design Analysis Based Upon Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for predicting the performance of a radiometer design based on calculating the measurement uncertainty. The variety in radiometer designs and the demand for improved radiometric measurements justify the need for a more general and comprehensive method to assess system performance. Radiometric resolution, or sensitivity, is a figure of merit that has been commonly used to characterize the performance of a radiometer. However when evaluating the performance of a calibration design for a radiometer, the use of radiometric resolution has limited application. These limitations are overcome by considering instead the measurement uncertainty. A method for calculating measurement uncertainty for a generic radiometer design including its calibration algorithm is presented. The result is a generalized technique by which system calibration architectures and design parameters can be studied to optimize instrument performance for given requirements and constraints. Example applications demonstrate the utility of using measurement uncertainty as a figure of merit.

  18. Radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay, a new rapid test for neutralizing antibodies to intact and trypsin-cleaved poliovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hovi, T.; Roivainen, M.

    1989-04-01

    We have developed a new rapid test, the radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay (RACINA), for the determination of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. HeLa cells prelabeled with /sup 51/Cr, (/sup 3/H)leucine, or, preferentially, with (/sup 3/H)uridine are used as sensitive quantitative indicators of residual infectious virus. Both suspensions and monolayer cultures of the indicator cells can be used. Neutralization of a fraction of a high-titer virus preparation can be scored after the first replication cycle at 8 to 10 h. By lowering the incubation temperature to 30/degree/C, the completion of the cytolysis due to the first replication cycle of poliovirus was delayed beyond 21 h. This makes it possible to use the RACINA, unlike the standard microneutralization assay, for measuring antibodies to trypsin-cleaved polioviruses. The RACINA was found to be as sensitive as and more reproducible than the standard microneutralization assay in the measurement of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. The RACINA is a rapid and reliable test for neutralizing antibodies and in principle it may be applicable for quantitation of neutralizing antibodies to other cytolytic agents as well.

  19. Analysis of L-band radiometric data over the Mediterranean Sea from the SMOS Validation Rehearsal campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, C.; Talone, M.; Font, J.

    2009-04-01

    L-band radiometric data obtained with a real aperture airborne radiometer during SMOS validation Rehearsal campaign (April-May 2008) over the NW Mediterranean Sea have been analysed. EMIRAD, a fully polarimetric radiometer developed by the Technical University of Denmark operating in the 1400 - 1427 MHz band, was mounted on board a Skyvan aircraft from the Helsinki University of Technology. Two antennas were used: one facing nadir with 37.6° full aperture at half-power; and one placed towards the rear of the aircraft at 40° zenith angle with 30.6° full aperture at half-power. Two transit flights over the sea from Marseille to Valencia (19 April 2008) and from Valencia to Marseille (3 May 2008) have been studied. Two meteorological and oceanographic buoys were moored 40 Km offshore in front of Tarragona and were overflown during these transits. Additionally, information on sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) was obtained from operational model outputs (Mediterranean Forecasting System - Mediterranean Operational Oceanography Network) and wind speed from QuikSCAT. Measured brightness temperatures (Tb) have been compared with modelled Tb, using a semi-empirical emissivity model: Klein and Swift model is used to define the dielectric constant and Hollinger model for the rough sea emissivity contribution. Comparisons show that in general measured Tb variability fits with modelled variability, although a bias is observed in the aft V channel.

  20. Surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. [for radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Quinn J.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute reflectance-based radiometric calibrations of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) are improved with the inclusion of a method to invert optical-depth measurements to obtain aerosol-particle size distributions, and a non-Lambertian surface reflectance model. The inverted size distributions can predict radiances varying from the previously assumed jungian distributions by as much as 5 percent, though the reduction in the estimated error is less than one percent. Comparison with measured diffuse-to-global ratios show that neither distribution consistently predicts the ratio accurately, and this is shown to be a large contributor to calibration uncertainties. An empirical model for the surface reflectance of White Sands, using a two-degree polynomial fit as a function of scattering angle, was employed. The model reduced estimated errors in radiance predictions by up to one percent. Satellite calibrations dating from October, 1984 were reprocessed using the improved methods and linear estimations of satellite counts per unit radiance versus time since launch were determined which showed a decrease over time for the first four bands.