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Sample records for aboveground breakout tanks

  1. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  2. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  3. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  4. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  5. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  6. 49 CFR 195.132 - Design and construction of aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... constructed in accordance with API Specification 12F. (2) Welded, low-pressure (i.e., internal vapor space... generated by a single vertical axis of revolution must be designed and constructed in accordance with API... constructed in accordance with API Standard 650. (4) High pressure steel tanks (i.e., internal gas or...

  7. 49 CFR 195.132 - Design and construction of aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... constructed in accordance with API Specification 12F. (2) Welded, low-pressure (i.e., internal vapor space... generated by a single vertical axis of revolution must be designed and constructed in accordance with API... constructed in accordance with API Standard 650. (4) High pressure steel tanks (i.e., internal gas or...

  8. 49 CFR 195.132 - Design and construction of aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... constructed in accordance with API Specification 12F. (2) Welded, low-pressure (i.e., internal vapor space... generated by a single vertical axis of revolution must be designed and constructed in accordance with API... constructed in accordance with API Standard 650. (4) High pressure steel tanks (i.e., internal gas or...

  9. 49 CFR 195.132 - Design and construction of aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... constructed in accordance with API Specification 12F. (2) Welded, low-pressure (i.e., internal vapor space... generated by a single vertical axis of revolution must be designed and constructed in accordance with API... constructed in accordance with API Standard 650. (4) High pressure steel tanks (i.e., internal gas or...

  10. 49 CFR 195.132 - Design and construction of aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... constructed in accordance with API Specification 12F. (2) Welded, low-pressure (i.e., internal vapor space... generated by a single vertical axis of revolution must be designed and constructed in accordance with API... constructed in accordance with API Standard 650. (4) High pressure steel tanks (i.e., internal gas or...

  11. 49 CFR 195.432 - Inspection of in-service breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... low-pressure steel aboveground breakout tanks according to API Standard 653 (incorporated by reference... breakout tanks built to API Standard 2510 according to section 6 of API 510. (d) The intervals...

  12. 49 CFR 195.432 - Inspection of in-service breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... low-pressure steel aboveground breakout tanks according to API Standard 653 (incorporated by reference... breakout tanks built to API Standard 2510 according to section 6 of API 510. (d) The intervals...

  13. 49 CFR 195.432 - Inspection of in-service breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... low-pressure steel aboveground breakout tanks according to API Standard 653 (incorporated by reference... breakout tanks built to API Standard 2510 according to section 6 of API 510. (d) The intervals...

  14. 49 CFR 195.432 - Inspection of in-service breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... low-pressure steel aboveground breakout tanks according to API Standard 653 (incorporated by reference... breakout tanks built to API Standard 2510 according to section 6 of API 510. (d) The intervals...

  15. 49 CFR 195.432 - Inspection of in-service breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... low-pressure steel aboveground breakout tanks according to API Standard 653 (incorporated by reference... breakout tanks built to API Standard 2510 according to section 6 of API 510. (d) The intervals...

  16. 49 CFR 195.205 - Repair, alteration and reconstruction of aboveground breakout tanks that have been in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-refrigerated and tanks built to API Standard 650 or its predecessor Standard 12C, repair, alteration, and reconstruction must be in accordance with API Standard 653. (2) For tanks built to API Specification 12F or API..., examination, and material requirements of those respective standards. (3) For high pressure tanks built to...

  17. Aboveground storage tank regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, W. )

    1993-01-01

    There are critical differences between the potential for environmental impact of aboveground and underground oil storage. For example, while leaks from underground storage tanks (USTs) seep into soil or aquifers, the concern with aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) is that an overfill or tank rupture can cause product to escape into a navigable stream and immediately create an oil spill pollution incident. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has very distinct programs outlining regulation parameters for each type of storage, including source of authority, regulatory cutoffs and exclusions, definitions, prevention and response requirements, and penalties, etc. Engineers considering changes or recommending a change in type of storage, particularly from a UST to an AST, need to be aware of existing federal regulations. Since the federal UST program began, remediation costs have skyrocketed as a result of the need to clean up leaking tank and piping sites, backfill and surrounding soil or groundwater. Compliance with federal and state UST regulations has not been cheap, and is expected to top $23 billion, according to some estimates. Partly as a result, market demand has shifted toward use of aboveground storage tanks, a trend that is expected to continue. Industry figures show a 100% increase in factory fabricated aboveground tank activity during the last four years.

  18. 49 CFR 195.205 - Repair, alteration and reconstruction of aboveground breakout tanks that have been in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approximately atmospheric pressure constructed of carbon and low alloy steel, welded or riveted, and non... service must be capable of withstanding the internal pressure produced by the hazardous liquid to be..., examination, and material requirements of those respective standards. (3) For high pressure tanks built to...

  19. 49 CFR 195.205 - Repair, alteration and reconstruction of aboveground breakout tanks that have been in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... approximately atmospheric pressure constructed of carbon and low alloy steel, welded or riveted, and non... service must be capable of withstanding the internal pressure produced by the hazardous liquid to be..., examination, and material requirements of those respective standards. (3) For high pressure tanks built to...

  20. 49 CFR 195.205 - Repair, alteration and reconstruction of aboveground breakout tanks that have been in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approximately atmospheric pressure constructed of carbon and low alloy steel, welded or riveted, and non... service must be capable of withstanding the internal pressure produced by the hazardous liquid to be..., examination, and material requirements of those respective standards. (3) For high pressure tanks built to...

  1. 49 CFR 195.205 - Repair, alteration and reconstruction of aboveground breakout tanks that have been in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... approximately atmospheric pressure constructed of carbon and low alloy steel, welded or riveted, and non... service must be capable of withstanding the internal pressure produced by the hazardous liquid to be..., examination, and material requirements of those respective standards. (3) For high pressure tanks built to...

  2. Aboveground storage tanks: Understanding the rules

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, T.; McCallion, J.

    1995-10-01

    Facility owners and operators using aboveground tanks for storing or processing hazardous wastes or oils must follow Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, or they risk heavy fines and penalties. Every facility storing more than 1320 gallons of hazardous waste or oil aboveground or more than 660 gallons in a single tank are required to have a spill prevention control and countermeasures plan. Given in the article is a table of aboveground tank standards under various agencies or acts. The subject and location of these regulations from the EPA, OSHA, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Underwriter`s Laboratory (UL), the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) cover various aspects of tank construction and safety. Understanding and complying with the codes and regulations can be arduous, but the rewards in safety and environmental stewardship and the potential savings in fines make the effort worthwhile.

  3. Airport, air base benefit from switch to aboveground tanks

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency requires that by the end of 1998 all underground fuel tanks must comply with requirements established for tanks installed after Dec. 22, 1988. To comply with federal and state regulations, authorities at Mansfield (Mass.) Municipal Airport decided during a recent reconstruction effort to replace several 46-year-old underground fuel tanks with an 8,000-gallon, aboveground tank. After researching several types of tanks and weighing recommendations from the airport`s fueling company, officials chose to install a lightweight, double-walled tank from Aero-Power Unitized Fueler Inc., Smithtown, NY. The Fireguard{trademark} tank has a concrete-insulated lining between its two walls that can absorb aviation fuel in case of a pool fire. An outer steel wall provides secondary containment, protecting the insulating material, and resists cracking and spalling. Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Georgia recently installed two 2,000-gallon Fireguard tanks to contain diesel and unleaded fuel for a new military-vehicle refueling station.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-06-30

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as “Aboveground Storage Tanks” and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site: · CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 03-01-04, Tank · CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain

  5. TECHNICAL BASIS REPORT FOR LARGE FIRE ACCIDENTS INVOLVING ABOVEGROUND TANKS & VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    MARCHESE, A.R.

    2005-03-03

    This document analyzes large fire accidents involving aboveground tanks and vessels during Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) operations. The fire accident scenarios are consistent with RPP-22461,''Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis (PFHA) for DBVS''. The radiological and toxicological consequences are determined for a wide spectrum of fire sizes to bracket the range of possible consequences resulting from large fires involving aboveground tanks/vessels that are part of DBVS.

  6. Current leak detection technologies for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    Before the discovery of groundwater contamination at a number of sites that received national attention, tank owners and operators made reasonable but mostly ineffective attempts to prevent leaks in both new and existing tanks. However, the double bottom tank began to be used on new and retrofitted tanks to solve this problem. Extensive experience and use of this design led to variants that include leak detection liners placed over the old tank bottom which function to prevent galvanic corrosion and to ensure the containment of leaks and the use of concrete as the spacer material which has various construction benefits. In addition, liners have been used under new tanks. Any system using a liner of any kind is generically referred to as a tank with a release prevention barrier (RPB). Five different basic technologies for leak detection are covered including use of RPBs, Volumetric, Acoustic Emission, Soil Vapor Monitoring and Enhanced Inventory.

  7. Relative risk to the environment of aboveground hazardous material storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.L.; Weaver, J.L.

    1988-10-01

    The Environmental Monitoring and Compliance (EMC) Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EandHP) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced a listing of the relative risks posed to the environment by each of the aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) at ORNL containing hazardous materials. This document is intended to describe the primary method utilized and provide the resulting rank-ordered listing of ORNL ASTs. The EMC Section received support in this effort from the Health and Safety Research Division, which utilized the Rapid Screening Hazard (RASH) Method to provide an assessment of the toxicity of the various materials in the storage tanks.

  8. 49 CFR 195.565 - How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) capacity built to API Specification 12F, API Standard 620, or API Standard 650 (or its predecessor Standard 12C), you must install the system in accordance with API Recommended Practice 651. However, installation of the system need not comply with API Recommended Practice 651 on any tank for which you note...

  9. 49 CFR 195.565 - How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) capacity built to API Specification 12F, API Standard 620, or API Standard 650 (or its predecessor Standard 12C), you must install the system in accordance with API Recommended Practice 651. However, installation of the system need not comply with API Recommended Practice 651 on any tank for which you note...

  10. 49 CFR 195.565 - How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) capacity built to API Specification 12F, API Standard 620, or API Standard 650 (or its predecessor Standard 12C), you must install the system in accordance with API Recommended Practice 651. However, installation of the system need not comply with API Recommended Practice 651 on any tank for which you note...

  11. 49 CFR 195.565 - How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) capacity built to API Specification 12F, API Standard 620, or API Standard 650 (or its predecessor Standard 12C), you must install the system in accordance with API Recommended Practice 651. However, installation of the system need not comply with API Recommended Practice 651 on any tank for which you note...

  12. 49 CFR 195.565 - How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) capacity built to API Specification 12F, API Standard 620, or API Standard 650 (or its predecessor Standard 12C), you must install the system in accordance with API Recommended Practice 651. However, installation of the system need not comply with API Recommended Practice 651 on any tank for which you note...

  13. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-05-31

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134, Aboveground Storage Tanks. CAU 134 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (2) CAS 03-01-04, Tank; (3) CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (4) CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain. CAS 03-01-03 consists of a mud tank that is located at the intersection of the 3-07 and the 3-12 Roads in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank and its contents are uncontaminated and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. This CAS will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 03-01-04 consists of a potable water tank that is located at the Core Complex in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 15-01-05 consists of an aboveground storage tank (AST) and associated impacted soil, if any. This CAS is located on a steep slope near the Climax Mine in Area 15 of the NTS. The AST is empty and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Soil below the AST will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by chemicals at concentrations exceeding the action levels. It appears that the tank is not at its original location. Soil will also be sampled at the original tank location, if it can be found. If soil at either location has been impacted at concentrations that exceed the action levels, then the extent of contamination will be identified and a use restriction (UR) will be implemented. The site may be clean closed if contamination is less than one cubic yard in extent and can be readily excavated. If action levels are not exceeded, then no

  14. A user`s perspective on aluminum dome roofs for aboveground tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    There is a trend in the petroleum industry to install aluminum dome roofs on storage tanks of all kinds. Although most dome roofs have been installed on floating roof tanks, there is a trend to install them on fixed roof tanks as well, substituting the familiar shallow fixed cone roof with a geodesic dome. In part, this trend has been caused by EPA requirements causing a greater number of closed tanks to be vented to vapor recovery or vapor destruction systems. Both the aluminum roof manufacturing community and the user have moved into a whole new set of problems associated with the change in dome roof applications from atmospheric to those requiring internal pressure. New problems are just now being dealt with and solved because cost factors tend to make the aluminum dome an economic solution for many cases where sealed tank systems must be used. Because of the increased numbers of geodesic domes as either an alternative to a fixed cone roof tank or as a way to convert an external floating roof tank to an internal floating roof tank or as their potential to serve as tools in the environmental arena, it is the intent of this paper to examine them from the user`s perspective. In addition, some areas of research that should resolve some reliability and safety issues are presented for consideration and research by not only manufacturers but the users as well.

  15. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration work plan for Corrective Action Unit 126: Closure of aboveground storage tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This plan addresses the closure of several aboveground storage tanks in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The unit is currently identified as Corrective Action Unit 126 in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and is listed as having six Corrective Action Sites. This plan addresses the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration closure for five of the six sites. Four of the CASs are located at the Engine Test Stand complex and one is located in the Central Support Area. The sites consist of aboveground tanks, two of which were used to store diesel fuel and one stored Nalcool (an antifreeze mixture). The remaining tanks were used as part of a water demineralization process and stored either sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide, and one was used as a charcoal adsorption furnace. Closure will be completed by removal of the associated piping, tank supports and tanks using a front end loader, backhoe, and/or crane. When possible, the tanks will be salvaged as scrap metal. The piping that is not removed will be sealed using a cement grout.

  16. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-01

    The following is an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--1275, dated May 2008. This addendum expands upon information provided in the May 2008 plan. It provides specific details regarding samples to be collected at Corrective Action Sites 15-01-05 and 29-01-01. It also provides discussion and rationale for establishing the spatial boundaries of Corrective Action Sites.

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 120: Areas 5 and 6 Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Allison Urban

    1999-06-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 120. CAU 120 consists of two Corrective Action Sites located in Areas 5 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site. CAS 05-01-01 is located in Area 5 and consists of three 45,800-liter aboveground storage tanks, piping, and debris associated with Well RNM-1. CAS 06-01-01 in Area 6 consists of two aboveground storage tanks and two tanker trailers All the CAU 120 items have been used to convey or contain radiologically contaminated fluid from post-nuclear event activities at the NTS> Closure of this CAU was completed by collecting samples to identify the appropriate method of disposal for tanks, piping, debris, and tankers in each CAS. Placing low-level radioactive waste into the appropriate containers and disposing of waste in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, the Area 9 10C Landfill, and the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site.

  18. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration closure report for Corrective Action Unit 120: Areas 5 and 6 aboveground storage tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 120 of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). CAU 120 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which are approximately 130 kilometers (80 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAS 05-01-01 is located in Area 5 and consists of three 45,800-liter (12,100-gallon) aboveground storage tanks (ASTs), piping, and debris associated with Well RNM-1. CAS 06-01-01 consists of two ASTs and two tanker trailers (all portable) that were originally located at the Area 6 Cp-50 Hot Park and which had been moved to the Area 6 Waste Handling Facility. All of the items in CAU 120 have been used to contain or convey radiologically contaminated fluid that was generated during post-nuclear event activities at the NTS.

  19. Analysis of borehole breakouts

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Z.; Kemeny, J.; Cook, N. G. W.

    1989-06-10

    Boreholes drilled into rock, which is subjected to stresses that amount to a significant fraction of the strength of the rock, may cause the rock to fail adjacent to the borehole surface. Often this results in the elongation of the cross section of the borehole in the direction of the minimum principal (compressive) stress orthogonal to the borehole axis. Such breakouts are valuable indicators of the direction of the minimum compressive stress orthogonal to the axis of the borehole. Their shapes may provide information about the magnitudes of both the maximum and minimum stresses relative to the strength of the rock. Borehole breakouts also may be impediments to drilling and to in situ measurement techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing. Observations and analyses of borehole breakouts raise three important questions. First, how does the shape of the borehole breakout evolve Second, why are breakout shapes stable despite the very high compressive stress concentrations that they produce Third, how is the shape of the breakout related to the magnitudes of the stresses in the rock In this paper, extensile splitting of rock in unconfined, plane strain compression is assumed to be the process of rock failure adjacent to the circumference of the borehole, by which a breakout forms. To simulate the evolution of a borehole breakout, this process is combined with a numerical boundary element analysis of the stresses around a borehole as its cross section evolves from the originally circular shape to that of a stable breakout.

  20. Fluxon modeling of breakout CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Deforest, C. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    The pivotal element of the classic breakout model of CME initiation is reconnection that occurs above inner magnetic field sheared by rotation. We research this model with the FLUX code both with and without reconnection. Without reconnection an eruption occurs after several turns have been injected into the active region. The resultant expansion or eruption is more like a kink-unstable flux rope than a classic breakout CME. By varying whether and where reconnection is allowed, we determine the location of magnetic free energy release in the breakout model.

  1. Furball Explosive Breakout Test

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Joshua David

    2015-08-05

    For more than 30 years the Onionskin test has been the primary way to study the surface breakout of a detonation wave. Currently the Onionskin test allows for only a small, one dimensional, slice of the explosive in question to be observed. Asymmetrical features are not observable with the Onionskin test and its one dimensional view. As a result, in 2011, preliminary designs for the Hairball and Furball were developed then tested. The Hairball used shorting pins connected to an oscilloscope to determine the arrival time at 24 discrete points. This limited number of data points, caused by the limited number of oscilloscope channels, ultimately led to the Hairball’s demise. Following this, the Furball was developed to increase the number of data points collected. Instead of shorting pins the Furball uses fiber optics imaged by a streak camera to determine the detonation wave arrival time for each point. The original design was able to capture the detonation wave’s arrival time at 205 discrete points with the ability to increase the number of data points if necessary.

  2. Technical Interchange Meeting Guidelines Breakout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Along with concept developers, the Systems Evaluation and Assessment (SEA) sub-element of VAMS will develop those scenarios and metrics required for testing the new concepts that reside within the System-Level Integrated Concepts (SLIC) sub-element in the VAMS project. These concepts will come from the NRA process, space act agreements, a university group, and other NASA researchers. The emphasis of those concepts is to increase capacity while at least maintaining the current safety level. The concept providers will initially develop their own scenarios and metrics for self-evaluation. In about a year, the SEA sub-element will become responsible for conducting initial evaluations of the concepts using a common scenario and metric set. This set may derive many components from the scenarios and metrics used by the concept providers. Ultimately, the common scenario\\metric set will be used to help determine the most feasible and beneficial concepts. A set of 15 questions and issues, discussed below, pertaining to the scenario and metric set, and its use for assessing concepts, was submitted by the SEA sub-element for consideration during the breakout session. The questions were divided among the three breakout groups. Each breakout group deliberated on its set of questions and provided a report on its discussion.

  3. Selecting fuel storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R. )

    1993-07-01

    Until the use of underground storage tanks (USTs) for fuel storage was mandated by the 1970 Uniform Fire Code, above-ground storage tanks (ASTs) were widely used. The tanks were relatively crude by today's standards so the technical superiority and fire protection afforded by use of underground tanks soon made USTs the system of choice for almost all uses. As a result, tens of thousands of tanks have been underground for more than 20 years, and at some point, many of them began leaking. Often, the first sign of these leaks appeared when groundwater became contaminated. The EPA responded to this major environmental problem by strictly regulating the use of below-ground tanks to store flammable liquids. These added regulations have had a severe effect on both service stations and private fueling. The removal of underground tanks and the removal and disposal of any contaminated soil is an extremely expensive proposition. Furthermore, new Uniform Fire Code regulations have added to the costs, imposing requirements for double-walled tanks, corrosion protection, electronic leak monitoring, and annual tank testing. These requirements, plus the financial responsibility requirements the EPA imposed on owners and users of below-ground tanks, led directly to a reconsideration of the use of above-ground tanks for some applications.

  4. Storage tanks -- Advances in environmental control technology series

    SciTech Connect

    Cheremisinoff, P.N.

    1996-10-01

    This volume helps in identifying and assessing problems regarding the technical issues as well as regulatory requirements regarding storage tank use, replacement, and remediation. The volume is divided into ten chapters dealing with aboveground and underground storage tanks composition; underground storage tanks; aboveground tanks; aboveground storage tanks regulations and engineering; aboveground tank farm specifications; a comparison of steel and fiberglass construction for underground storage tanks; fuel dispensing tanks--factors to consider in location; a comparison of steel fiber-glass construction; air stripping VOCs from groundwater; and minimizing ecological damage during cleanup of terrestrial and wetland oil spills. It should be found useful as an up-to-date reference to concerned engineers, technicians, scientists, and contractors.

  5. Imaging a Magnetic-breakout Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Zhao, Di; Wu, Zhao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Ruan, Guiping; Feng, Shiwei; Song, Hongqiang

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism initiating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) remains controversial. One of the leading theories is magnetic breakout, in which magnetic reconnection occurring high in the corona removes the confinement on an energized low-corona structure from the overlying magnetic field, thus allowing it to erupt. Here, we report critical observational evidence of this elusive breakout reconnection in a multi-polar magnetic configuration that leads to a CME and an X-class, long-duration flare. Its occurrence is supported by the presence of pairs of heated cusp-shaped loops around an X-type null point and signatures of reconnection inflows. Other peculiar features new to the breakout picture include sequential loop brightening, coronal hard X-rays at energies up to ∼100 keV, and extended high-corona X-rays above the later restored multi-polar structure. These observations, from a novel perspective with clarity never achieved before, present crucial clues to understanding the initiation mechanism of solar eruptions.

  6. NON-RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MEDIATED SHOCK BREAKOUTS. III. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Sapir, Nir; Waxman, Eli; Katz, Boaz

    2013-09-01

    The spectrum of radiation emitted following shock breakout from a star's surface with a power-law density profile {rho}{proportional_to}x{sup n} is investigated. Assuming planar geometry, local Compton equilibrium, and bremsstrahlung emission as the dominant photon production mechanism, numerical solutions are obtained for the photon number density and temperature profiles as a function of time for hydrogen-helium envelopes. The temperature solutions are determined by the breakout shock velocity v{sub 0} and the pre-shock breakout density {rho}{sub 0} and depend weakly on the value of n. Fitting formulae for the peak surface temperature at breakout as a function of v{sub 0} and {rho}{sub 0} are provided, with T{sub peak} approx. 9.44 exp [12.63(v{sub 0}/c){sup 1/2}] eV, and the time dependence of the surface temperature is tabulated. The time integrated emitted spectrum is a robust prediction of the model, determined by T{sub peak} and v{sub 0} alone and insensitive to details of light travel time or slight deviations from spherical symmetry. Adopting commonly assumed progenitor parameters, breakout luminosities of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} and Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.3-10 keV band are expected for blue supergiant (BSG) and red supergiant (RSG)/He-WR progenitors, respectively (T{sub peak} is well below the band for RSGs, unless their radius is {approx}10{sup 13} cm). >30 detections of SN 1987A-like (BSG) breakouts are expected over the lifetime of ROSAT and XMM-Newton. An absence of such detections would imply either that the typical parameters assumed for BSG progenitors are grossly incorrect or that their envelopes are not hydrostatic. The observed spectrum and duration of XRF 080109/SN 2008D are in tension with a non-relativistic breakout from a stellar surface interpretation.

  7. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Breakout Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perka, Alan; Walz, Carl; Cobb, Sharon; Hanford, Anthony; Eppler, Dean

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document summarizes the workings of the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) Breakout group in a Martian environment. The group was tasked with: identifying potential contaminants and pathways for AEVA systems with respect to forward and backward contamination; identifying plausible mitigation alternatives and obstacles for pertinent missions; identifying topics that require further research and technology development and discuss development strategies with uncertain Planetary Protection (PP) requirements; Identifying PP requirements that impose the greatest mission/development costs; Identifying PP requirements/topics that require further definition;

  8. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the

  9. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR THE ABOVE GROUND TANK FAILURE REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    ZACH, J.J.

    2003-03-21

    This document qualitatively evaluates the frequency and consequences of the representative aboveground tank failure accident and associated represented hazardous conditions without controls. Based on the evaluation, it was determined that safety-significant structures, systems, and components, and/or technical safety requirements were not required to prevent or mitigate aboveground tank failure accidents.

  10. Country break-out session highlights.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Franz; Gehring, Klaus; Gallo, Paolo; Lebrun-Frénay, Christine; Moral, Ester; Myhr, Kjell-Morten

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity present a wide range of symptoms and disability levels that are frequently challenging to manage. At the MS Experts Summit 2015, five country breakout sessions were conducted in parallel, and mainly in the native language, to examine various aspects about the management of treatment-resistant MS spasticity. Topics covered included video documentation of MS spasticity management (Germany), use of cannabinoid medicines in daily practice (Italy), multidisciplinary approach to MS spasticity care (France), titration and adherence to treatments for MS spasticity (Spain) and management of MS symptoms (Norway/Rest of World). For the benefit of all attendees, session highlights were collated and presented in a Plenary Session which is summarized herein. PMID:26611270

  11. Detecting the Supernova Breakout Burst in Terrestrial Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Joshua; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the distance-dependent performance of a few representative terrestrial neutrino detectors in detecting and measuring the properties of the νe breakout burst light curve in a Galactic core-collapse supernova. The breakout burst is a signature phenomenon of core collapse and offers a probe into the stellar core through collapse and bounce. We examine cases of no neutrino oscillations and oscillations due to normal and inverted neutrino-mass hierarchies. For the normal hierarchy, other neutrino flavors emitted by the supernova overwhelm the νe signal, making a detection of the breakout burst difficult. For the inverted hierarchy (IH), some detectors at some distances should be able to see the νe breakout burst peak and measure its properties. For the IH, the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured at 10 kpc to accuracies of ∼30% for Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) and ∼60% for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) and Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) lack the mass needed to make an accurate measurement. For the IH, the time of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured in Hyper-K to an accuracy of ∼3 ms at 7 kpc, in DUNE to ∼2 ms at 4 kpc, and JUNO and Super-K can measure the time of maximum luminosity to an accuracy of ∼2 ms at 1 kpc. Detector backgrounds in IceCube render a measurement of the νe breakout burst unlikely. For the IH, a measurement of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst could be used to differentiate between nuclear equations of state.

  12. HOT ELECTROMAGNETIC OUTFLOWS. II. JET BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2013-08-20

    We consider the interaction between radiation, matter, and a magnetic field in a compact, relativistic jet. The entrained matter accelerates outward as the jet breaks out of a star or other confining medium. In some circumstances, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the magnetization of the jet is greatly reduced by an advected radiation field while the jet is optically thick to scattering. Where magnetic flux surfaces diverge rapidly, a strong outward Lorentz force develops and radiation and matter begin to decouple. The increase in magnetization is coupled to a rapid growth in Lorentz factor. We take two approaches to this problem. The first examines the flow outside the fast magnetosonic critical surface, and calculates the flow speed and the angular distribution of the radiation field over a range of scattering depths. The second considers the flow structure on both sides of the critical surface in the optically thin regime, using a relaxation method. In both approaches, we find how the terminal Lorentz factor and radial profile of the outflow depend on the radiation intensity and optical depth at breakout. The effect of bulk Compton scattering on the radiation spectrum is calculated by a Monte Carlo method, while neglecting the effects of internal dissipation. The peak of the scattered spectrum sits near the seed peak if radiation pressure dominates the acceleration, but is pushed to a higher frequency if the Lorentz force dominates. The unscattered seed radiation can form a distinct, low-frequency component of the spectrum, especially if the magnetic Poynting flux dominates.

  13. SHOCK BREAKOUT FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Chang, Philip; Weinberg, Nevin N. E-mail: pchang@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-01-01

    The mode of explosive burning in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remains an outstanding problem. It is generally thought to begin as a subsonic deflagration, but this may transition into a supersonic detonation (the delayed detonation transition, DDT). We argue that this transition leads to a breakout shock, which would provide the first unambiguous evidence that DDTs occur. Its main features are a hard X-ray flash (approx20 keV) lasting approx10{sup -2} s with a total radiated energy of approx10{sup 40} erg, followed by a cooling tail. This creates a distinct feature in the visual light curve, which is separate from the nickel decay. This cooling tail has a maximum absolute visual magnitude of M{sub V} approx -9 to -10 at approx1 day, which depends most sensitively on the white dwarf radius at the time of the DDT. As the thermal diffusion wave moves in, the composition of these surface layers may be imprinted as spectral features, which would help to discern between SN Ia progenitor models. Since this feature should accompany every SNe Ia, future deep surveys (e.g., m = 24) will see it out to a distance of approx80 Mpc, giving a maximum rate of approx60 yr{sup -1}. Archival data sets can also be used to study the early rise dictated by the shock heating (at approx20 days before maximum B-band light). A similar and slightly brighter event may also accompany core bounce during the accretion-induced collapse to a neutron star, but with a lower occurrence rate.

  14. PCB-Based Break-Out Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Break-out boxes (BOBs) are necessary for all electrical integration/cable checkouts and troubleshooting. Because the price of a BOB is high, and no work can be done without one, often the procedure stops, simply waiting for a BOB. A less expensive BOB would take less time in the integration, testing, and troubleshooting process. The PCB-based BOB works and looks the same as a standard JPL BOB, called Gold Boxes. The only differences between the old BOB and the new PCB-based BOB is that the new one has 80 percent of its circuitry in a printed circuit board. This process reduces the time for fabrication, thus making the BOBs less expensive. Moreover, because of its unique design, the new BOBs can be easily assembled and fixed. About 80 percent of the new PCB-based BOB is in a $22 (at the time of this reporting) custom-designed, yet commercially available PCB. This device has been used successfully to verify that BOB cables were properly made. Also, upon completion, the BOB was beeped out via a multimeter to ensure that all sockets on the connectors were properly connected to the respective banana jack. When compared to the Gold Box BOBs, the new BOB has many advantages. It is much more cost efficient, it delivers equal usability at substantially lower cost of the BOB, and the Gold Box is much heavier when compared to the new BOB. The new BOB is also a bit longer and much more versatile in that connectors are easily changeable and if a banana jack is broken, it can be replaced instead of throwing away an entire BOB.

  15. Numeric spectral radiation hydrodynamic calculations of supernova shock breakouts

    SciTech Connect

    Sapir, Nir; Halbertal, Dorri

    2014-12-01

    We present here an efficient numerical scheme for solving the non-relativistic one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics equations including inelastic Compton scattering, which is not included in most codes and is crucial for solving problems such as shock breakout. The devised code is applied to the problems of a steady-state planar radiation mediated shock (RMS) and RMS breakout from a stellar envelope. The results are in agreement with those of a previous work on shock breakout, in which Compton equilibrium between matter and radiation was assumed and the 'effective photon' approximation was used to describe the radiation spectrum. In particular, we show that the luminosity and its temporal dependence, the peak temperature at breakout, and the universal shape of the spectral fluence derived in this earlier work are all accurate. Although there is a discrepancy between the spectral calculations and the effective photon approximation due to the inaccuracy of the effective photon approximation estimate of the effective photon production rate, which grows with lower densities and higher velocities, the difference in peak temperature reaches only 30% for the most discrepant cases of fast shocks in blue supergiants. The presented model is exemplified by calculations for supernova 1987A, showing the detailed evolution of the burst spectrum. The incompatibility of the stellar envelope shock breakout model results with observed properties of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed rates of XRFs remain unexplained.

  16. Borehole Breakouts in Berea Sandstone Reveal a New Fracture Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, B. C.

    - Vertical drilling experiments in high-porosity (22% and 25%) Berea sandstone subjected to critical true triaxial far-field stresses, in which σH (maximum horizontal stress) >σv (vertical stress) >σh (least horizontal stress), revealed a new and non-dilatant failure mechanism that results in thin and very long tabular borehole breakouts that have the appearance of fractures, and which counterintuitively develop orthogonally to σH. These breakouts are fundamentally different from those induced in crystalline rocks, as well as limestones and medium-porosity Berea sandstone. Breakouts in these rocks are typically dog-eared in shape, a result of dilatant multi-cracking tangential to the hole and subparallel to the maximum far-field horizontal stress σH, followed by progressive buckling and shearing of detached rock flakes created by the cracks. In the high-porosity sandstone a narrow layer of grains compacted normal to σH is observed just ahead of the breakout tip. This layer is nearly identical to ``compaction bands'' observed in the field. It is suggested that when a critical tangential stress concentration is reached along the σh spring line at the borehole wall, grain bonding breaks down and a compaction band is formed normal to σH. Debonded loose grains are expelled into the borehole, assisted by the circulating drilling fluid. As the breakout tip advances, the stress concentration ahead of it persists or may even increase, extending the compaction band, which in turn leads to breakout lengthening.

  17. Threshold of Breakout Formation: Stress Orientations and the Mechanics Borehole Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Conin, M.; Flemings, P. B.; Urgeles, R.; Iturrino, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    Borehole breakouts in sedimentary sections at continental margins are common in ODP/IODP holes with resistivity imaging logs. Some examples show horizontally opposed low resistivity (conductive) zones that have been interpreted as breakouts and yield horizontal stress directions interpretable in terms of regional tectonics. Other examples show bilateral high resistivity anomalies that may represent incipient breakouts. These “resistive” breakouts show trends consistent with the more typical “conductive” breakouts. Resistive breakouts in the Gulf of Mexico show predicted hoop stresses around the borehole at well beyond failure, primarily because of the material is very weak and differential fluid pressure between the formation and the hole is high. Experiments on the sediments in this example indicate a relatively high strain before failure and a nearly perfectly plastic response after failure. Thus, the initial breakout process actually involves initial bulging into the borehole that extends the breakout towards the resistivity tool causing a high resistivity response. The small difference between initial and peak strength inhibits spallation into the borehole. “Resistive” breakouts occur in a number of ODP/IODP holes at circumPacific subduction zones and can we used to infer stress orientations along with the traditional “conductive” breakouts once the eye is tuned to their recognition. Overall in ODP/IODP holes breakouts, both incipient and evolved, comprise a reliable indicator of currently active horizontal stresses.

  18. Breakout Reconnection Observed by the TESIS EUV Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Shestov, S. V.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of the coronal mass ejection (CME) breakout reconnection, observed by the TESIS EUV telescope. The telescope could observe solar corona up to 2 R ⊙ from the Sun center in the Fe 171 Å line. Starting from 2009 April 8, TESIS observed an active region (AR) that had a quadrupolar structure with an X-point 0.5 R ⊙ above photosphere. A magnetic field reconstructed from the Michelson Doppler Imager data also has a multipolar structure with an X-point above the AR. At 21:45 UT on April 9, the loops near the X-point started to move away from each other with a velocity of ≈7 km s‑1. At 01:15 UT on April 10, a bright stripe appeared between the loops, and the flux in the GOES 0.5–4 Å channel increased. We interpret the loops’ sideways motion and the bright stripe as evidence of the breakout reconnection. At 01:45 UT, the loops below the X-point started to slowly move up. At 15:10 UT, the CME started to accelerate impulsively, while at the same time a flare arcade formed below the CME. After 15:50 UT, the CME moved with constant velocity. The CME evolution precisely followed the breakout model scenario.

  19. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.; Thompson, B.; Slifko, A.

    1996-12-31

    Throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, hundreds of above- and below-ground storage tanks contain large amounts of high-level waste. The Fernald Environmental Management Project, a site within the DOE complex, contains four aboveground domed, concrete waste tanks. Some structural deterioration has been noted in the walls and domes of the tanks, resulting in concerns about leakage of their contents. Waste retrieval for final remediation must begin in 1997. This report describes the design of a robot named HOUDINI to work in the radioactive waste program.

  20. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  3. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) If your gasoline storage tank is subject to, and complies with, the control requirements of 40 CFR... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category:...

  4. Some technical issues on utilizing borehole breakouts for in-situ stress estimation in deepwater sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Chang, C.; Ong, S.; Song, I.

    2013-12-01

    Stress-induced borehole breakouts have long been used as a reliable indicator of both the orientation and magnitude of in-situ stresses on the basis of the systematic alignment with the minimum horizontal principal far-field stress (σh), and the well-defined correlation between the breakout dimensions and in-situ stress magnitudes. Although breakouts can serve as a reliable stress indicator, cautions must be exercised when using them to constrain the orientation and magnitude of in-situ stresses because the breakout geometry can be altered by some geological characteristics in addition to the usual geomechanical parameters. Two factors are discussed here. We observed alterations in breakout geometry from some of the boreholes drilled along a transection of the Nankai subduction zone. In the C0002A hole, breakouts formed along the depth interval where the beddings are horizontal or sub-horizontal were consistently oriented along the regional σh direction. In contrast, a gradual rotation in breakout orientation with depth and a significant breakout widening at the borehole wall were observed along the deeper section where the beddings are steep (>40o). A geomechanical modeling taking into account the bedding effect shows that such breakout rotation and widening result from strength anisotropy inherent within the thinly bedded formations, and the misalignment between in-situ stresses and bedding dip directions. The model also revealed that there is a considerable difference in the stress magnitudes estimated with and without considering the bedding effect particularly in the steeply bedding intervals. This observation suggests that bedding effects on breakout geometry must be taken into account when using breakouts developed in such formations to estimate the orientation and magnitude of in-situ stresses, failure which would likely to lead to erroneous results. The second factor to discuss is the time-dependent growth of breakouts. While it was straightforward to

  5. Laboratory investigation of borehole breakouts and Multi-step failure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Xiao-Ping; Mao, Ji-Zheng; Cui, Zhan-Tao

    1993-05-01

    Based on our experiment of borehole breakouts with a group of sandstone samples described in this paper, a multi-step failure model of borehole breakouts are proposed to quantitatively explain the relationship between the section shape of borehole breakouts and the state of crustal stress. In this model the borehole spalling is not only related to the state of stress at a single point but also the state of stress on its neighboring area. The comparison between the experimental results of borehole breakouts and the calculation results shows a good agreement.

  6. Storage tanks ASTs and USTs

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, D.E.; Lehmann, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Risks of storage tank failure and ground contamination are just two of the problems facing storage tank owners and operators today. As governmental concern for public safety increases, so does the pressure on operators to implement the necessary changes to satisfy the new regulations within the specified time frame. There is a lot of legislation pending on aboveground storage tanks that will affect companies planning construction in the future. The paper presented here are being presented not only to cover pending legislation, but also prospective legislation. Besides the important regulatory issues, the technical program covers corrosion, leak detection and prevention, contingency planning, emergency response, asset preservation, design, construction, and maintenance. All paper have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  7. 48 CFR 19.403 - Small Business Administration breakout procurement center representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appropriate use of full and open competition, and (2) the breakout of items, when appropriate and while... than full and open competition and make recommendations with respect to such requirements to the... the methods designed to further the breakout of items for procurement through full and...

  8. PAIR INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE: LIGHT CURVES, SPECTRA, AND SHOCK BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.; Heger, Alexander

    2011-06-20

    For the initial mass range (140 M{sub sun} < M < 260 M{sub sun}) stars die in a thermonuclear runaway triggered by the pair-production instability. The supernovae they make can be remarkably energetic (up to {approx}10{sup 53} erg) and synthesize considerable amounts of radioactive isotopes. Here we model the evolution, explosion, and observational signatures of representative pair instability supernovae (PI SNe) spanning a range of initial masses and envelope structures. The predicted light curves last for hundreds of days and range in luminosity from very dim to extremely bright (L {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}). The most massive events are bright enough to be seen at high redshift, but the extended light curve duration ({approx}1 yr)-prolonged by cosmological time-dilation-may make it difficult to detect them as transients. A more promising approach may be to search for the brief and luminous outbreak occurring when the explosion shock wave first reaches the stellar surface. Using a multi-wavelength radiation-hydrodynamics code we calculate that, in the rest frame, the shock breakout transients of PI SNe reach luminosities of 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, peak at wavelengths {approx}30-170 A, and last for several hours. We discuss how observations of the light curves, spectra, and breakout emission can be used to constrain the mass, radius, and metallicity of the progenitor.

  9. Ionization effects of shock breakout in SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M.A.; Meatheringham, S.J.; Nulsen, P.; Wood, P.R.

    1987-11-01

    The epoch of shock breakout in SN 1987A was almost certainly associated with the production of a pulse of UV photons with a characteristic temperature of order 100,000 K and a duration of 2-4 hr. It is proposed that this pulse has the characteristics required to ionize the precursor stellar wind, temporarily ionize any nearby remnants of the red giant wind, and can ionize the surrounding interstellar medium out to distances of several parsecs for several thousand years. These effects could provide transitory free-free absorption of the synchrotron radio source and may offer an explanation of the ionized knot seen in speckle interferometry. A similar but more powerful outburst could also be responsible for the highly ionized halo seen around the SMC supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219. 28 references.

  10. Breakout coronal mass ejections from solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Lynch, Benjamin; MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin; Antiochos, Spiro

    We are performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of single bipolar active regions (ARs) embedded in the Sun's global background field and of pairs of ARs interacting with each other. The magnetic flux near the polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the ARs is subjected to twisting footpoint displacements that introduce strong magnetic shear between the two polarities and gradually inflate the coronal volume occupied by the AR fields. If the initially current-free coronal field contains a magnetic null, then it is vulnerable to eruptions triggered by magnetic breakout, which reconnects aside the previously restraining field lines overhead. The sheared core flux promptly expands outward at the Alfven speed, opening the magnetic field in the vicinity of the PIL. Flare reconnection below the ejecta, across the vertical current sheet thus established, thereafter reforms the magnetic-null configuration above the AR. This reformation sets the stage for subsequent homologous episodes of breakout reconnection and eruption, if the energizing footpoint motions are sustained. The magnetic flux and energy of an isolated AR, relative to those of the background field, determine whether the eruption is confined or ejective, as the sheared flux either comes to rest in the corona or escapes the Sun to interplanetary space, respectively. In the latter case, the field lines accompanying the coronal mass ejection can comprise a weakly twisted "magnetic bottle" as readily as a strongly twisted flux rope, both of which are observed routinely in situ. The latest developments in this research will be reported. In particular, we will emphasize the observational signatures inferred from the simulations that could be sought in STEREO data, such as multiple three-dimensional views, EUV brightenings at reconnection sites, and coronal dimmings in regions of strong expansion. Our research is sponsored by NASA and ONR.

  11. OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVEGROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVEGROUND PORTION IS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. PROVEN ALTERNATIVES FOR ABOVEGROUND TREATMENT OF ARSENIC IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as an issue paper for the EPA Engineering Forum, summarizes experiences with proven aboveground treatment alternatives for arsenic in groundwater, and provides information on their relative performance and cost. The four technologies reviewed are: preci...

  14. Aboveground and belowground competition between willow Salix caprea its understory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, Markéta; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effects of aboveground and belowground competition with the willow S. caprea on its understory plant community were studied in unreclaimed post-mining sites. Belowground competition was evaluated by comparing (i) frames inserted into the soil that excluded woody roots (frame treatment), (ii) frames that initially excluded woody root growth but then allowed regrowth of the roots (open-frame treatment), and (iii) undisturbed soil (no-frame treatment). These treatments were combined with S. caprea thinning to assess the effect of aboveground competition. Three years after the start of the experiment, aboveground competition from S. caprea (as modified by thinning of the S. caprea canopy) had not affected understory biomass or species number but had affected species composition. In contrast, belowground competition significantly affected both the aboveground and belowground biomass of the understory. The aboveground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame treatment (which excluded woody roots) than in the other two treatments. The belowground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame than in the open-frame treatment. Unlike aboveground competition (light availability), belowground competition did not affect understory species composition. Our results suggest that S. caprea is an important component during plant succession on post-mining sites because it considerably modifies its understory plant community. Belowground competition is a major reason for the low cover and biomass of the herbaceous understory in S. caprea stands on post-mining sites.

  15. Introduction of Break-Out Session at the International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Yamamichi, M.; Sample, T.

    2011-07-01

    This presentation outlines review requirements for quality assurance (QA) rating systems, logical design of QA systems, and specific tasks for break-out session 1 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum.

  16. 48 CFR 19.403 - Small Business Administration breakout procurement center representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Small Business... System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Cooperation With the Small Business Administration 19.403 Small Business Administration breakout procurement...

  17. Relativistic Buneman instability in the laser breakout afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-09-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism has been identified in particle-in-cell simulations of high-contrast-ratio ultraintense lasers with very thin (10 s of nm) solid targets [Yin et al., Laser and Particle Beams 24, 291 (2006); Yin et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 072701 (2007)]. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), 'enhanced' TNSA follows. In this stage, the laser rapidly heats all the electrons in the target as the target thickness becomes comparable to the skin depth and enhanced acceleration of the ions results. Then, concomitant with the laser penetrating the target, a large accelerating longitudinal electric field is generated that co-moves with the ions. This last phase has been termed the laser 'breakout afterburner' (BOA). Earlier work suggested that the BOA was associated with the Buneman instability that efficiently converts energy from the drift of the electrons into the ions. In this Brief Communication, this conjecture is found to be consistent with particle-in-cell simulation data and the analytic dispersion relation for the relativistic Buneman instability.

  18. The Breakout Model for Coronal Jets with Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are impulsive, collimated plasma outflows originating low in the solar corona. Many of these events exhibit broad, curtain-like morphologies with helical structure and motions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015) [doi:10.1038/nature14556] reported that such jets are associated with the eruption of small filaments and, therefore, are miniature versions of corona mass ejections (CMEs). This account differs from the traditional picture of jets, in that internal flare reconnection, rather than interchange reconnection with the external ambient magnetic field, creates the bright loops observed at the jet base. We present 3D simulations, performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS), which demonstrate how the magnetic breakout mechanism generates mini-CME-type jets in a compact bipolar region energized by simple footpoint motions. Our numerical model captures the formation of the strongly sheared pre-jet filament structure, the post-jet flare-like loops and ribbons, and the curtain-like untwisting dynamics observed higher in the corona. We will discuss the significance of our new results for understanding solar EUV and X-ray jets and CMEs in general. NASA supported this research by awards to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (P.F.W.) and the LWS TR&T and H-SR programs (C.R.D. & S.K.A.).

  19. Relativistic Buneman instability in the laser breakout afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernández, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism has been identified in particle-in-cell simulations of high-contrast-ratio ultraintense lasers with very thin (10s of nm) solid targets [Yin et al., Laser and Particle Beams 24, 291 (2006); Yin et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 072701 (2007)]. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), "enhanced" TNSA follows. In this stage, the laser rapidly heats all the electrons in the target as the target thickness becomes comparable to the skin depth and enhanced acceleration of the ions results. Then, concomitant with the laser penetrating the target, a large accelerating longitudinal electric field is generated that co-moves with the ions. This last phase has been termed the laser "breakout afterburner" (BOA). Earlier work suggested that the BOA was associated with the Buneman instability that efficiently converts energy from the drift of the electrons into the ions. In this Brief Communication, this conjecture is found to be consistent with particle-in-cell simulation data and the analytic dispersion relation for the relativistic Buneman instability.

  20. Swift Observations of Supernovae during and after Shock Breakout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, space-based observatories have allowed detailed studies of energetic supernova explosions in previously unexplored time domains and wavelength regimes. NASA's Swift observatory is playing an important role in probing the early emission of SNe during and after shock breakout due to its fast response, flexible scheduling capabilities, and large wavelength band coverage, ranging from the optical, W, and X-ray to the Gamma-ray bands. By studying the outgoing SN shocks with material in its surroundings, the explosion physics and nature of progenitor stars can be studied. Furthermore, monitoring the X-ray emission of SNe with space-based X-ray observatories is being used to map the density structure in SN environments out to large radii from the sites of the explosions (>E20 cm), the transition of a SN into an old supernova remnant can be studied, and the mass-loss rates of the progenitor stars are being probed over significant timescales (>E4 years) in the stellar wind history. In combination, these observations give unprecedented insights into the nature of energetic explosions and their environments. During this talk, I will present highlights from recent observations, among them the first observation of a SN DURING the actual explosion with Swift, and I will discuss the "naked eye" burst at a redshift of -1, which was the most distant object humans could ever see with their own eyes.

  1. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Piao, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level ground-measured forest aboveground biomass database with geospatial information from 1-km Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset in a machine learning algorithm (the model tree ensemble, MTE). We show that Chinese forest aboveground biomass is 8.56 Pg C, which is mainly contributed by evergreen needle-leaf forests and deciduous broadleaf forests. The mean forest aboveground biomass density is 56.1 Mg C ha−1, with high values observed in temperate humid regions. The responses of forest aboveground biomass density to mean annual temperature are closely tied to water conditions; that is, negative responses dominate regions with mean annual precipitation less than 1300 mm y−1 and positive responses prevail in regions with mean annual precipitation higher than 2800 mm y−1. During the 2000s, the forests in China sequestered C by 61.9 Tg C y−1, and this C sink is mainly distributed in north China and may be attributed to warming climate, rising CO2 concentration, N deposition, and growth of young forests. PMID:26115195

  2. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guodong; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Piao, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level ground-measured forest aboveground biomass database with geospatial information from 1-km Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset in a machine learning algorithm (the model tree ensemble, MTE). We show that Chinese forest aboveground biomass is 8.56 Pg C, which is mainly contributed by evergreen needle-leaf forests and deciduous broadleaf forests. The mean forest aboveground biomass density is 56.1 Mg C ha-1, with high values observed in temperate humid regions. The responses of forest aboveground biomass density to mean annual temperature are closely tied to water conditions; that is, negative responses dominate regions with mean annual precipitation less than 1300 mm y-1 and positive responses prevail in regions with mean annual precipitation higher than 2800 mm y-1. During the 2000s, the forests in China sequestered C by 61.9 Tg C y-1, and this C sink is mainly distributed in north China and may be attributed to warming climate, rising CO2 concentration, N deposition, and growth of young forests. PMID:26115195

  3. Think Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A new inspection robot from Solex Robotics Systems was designed to eliminate hazardous inspections of petroleum and chemical storage tanks. The submersible robot, named Maverick, is used to inspect the bottoms of tanks, keeping the tanks operational during inspection. Maverick is able to provide services that will make manual tank inspections obsolete. While the inspection is conducted, Maverick's remote human operators remain safe outside of the tank. The risk to human health and life is now virtually eliminated. The risk to the environment is also minimal because there is a reduced chance of spillage from emptying and cleaning the tanks, where previously, tons of pollutants were released through the process of draining and refilling.

  4. Stress induced near fault-zone breakout rotation: Two case studies in TCDP and JFAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. Y.; Brodsky, E. E.; Moe, K.; Kinoshita, M.

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, two successful rapid-response drilling projects have measured breakouts within the nearfault of a recently ruptured fault. Breakout observation is the direct way to detect the far and near filed stress orientation in drilling. Here we compare those data. In 2006, ICDP performed an inland drilling project to penetrate Chelungpu fault plane in central of Taiwan, which had recently slipped in 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. This drilling project succeeded in full coring and collecting comprehensive logging data in the borehole. The resistivity images run by Formation Micro Imager (FMI) indicated that a breakout rotation in the vicinity of the fault (1111mbf). Leak-off tests on site constrained the magnitude of minimum horizontal principal stress. Here we use these data to determine the stress variation in the fault plane in our breakout dislocation model. Based on the amount of breakout azimuth, rotation and fault geometry, the stress drop can be estimated in this model. In 2012, IODP initiated a rapid drilling project after the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan Trench. Due to the deep-water depth, only a real-time resistivity image recorded by Logging While Drilling (LWD) and few core samples are recovered by this expedition. However, the breakout azimuth occurred near the plate boundary (820mbsf) represents the stress disturbance after the dramatic slip comparing to TCDP case. In this research, we are attempting to discuss the possible effect factors and reconstruct the geo-mechanical models to interpret the breakout distribution observed from logging data and the stress state after these huge earthquakes.

  5. Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

  6. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher; Chevalier, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We consider a model for the long-duration, low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The components of our model are: (1) a long-lived (tj ~ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ~ 1045 erg s-1), mildly relativistic jet; (2) a low-mass (~ 10-2 Msun) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ~ 0.1) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the prompt nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ~ 1013 cm can explain the early optical peak. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ~ 30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that ultra-long bursts such as GRB 060218 and GRB 100316D may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt high-energy emission from the supernova.

  7. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  8. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  9. Composite Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A composite tank for containing liquid oxygen and the method of making the same Wherein a water-soluble mandrel having ing the desired tank configuration and a cylindrical protuberance on at least one end is fitted with an inner boss conformance, to the configuration of the mandrel and in outer boss conforming to the configuration of the inner boss, the bosses each having a tubular portion for receiving the protuberance on the mandrel and a spherical portion. The mandrel and the bosses are first coated with a nickel coating. The mandrel is then wrapped with graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and this resin is cured. A layer of insulating foam is then applied to the tank and cured. The insulating foam is machined to a desired concentration and a layer of aramid fibers wetted with a second epoxy resin is wrapped around the tank. The second resin is cured and the water soluble mandrel is washed from inside the tank.

  10. Topological Evolution of a Fast Magnetic Breakout CME in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    W present the extension of the magnetic breakout model for CME initiation to a fully 3-dimensional, spherical geometry. Given the increased complexity of the dynamic magnetic field interactions in 3-dimensions, we first present a summary of the well known axisymmetric breakout scenario in terms of the topological evolution associated with the various phases of the eruptive process. In this context, we discuss the completely analogous topological evolution during the magnetic breakout CME initiation process in the simplest 3-dimensional multipolar system. We show that an extended bipolar active region embedded in an oppositely directed background dipole field has all the necessary topological features required for magnetic breakout, i.e. a fan separatrix surface between the two distinct flux systems, a pair of spine fieldlines, and a true 3-dimensional coronal null point at their intersection. We then present the results of a numerical MHD simulation of this 3-dimensional system where boundary shearing flows introduce free magnetic energy, eventually leading to a fast magnetic breakout CME. The eruptive flare reconnection facilitates the rapid conversion of this stored free magnetic energy into kinetic energy and the associated acceleration causes the erupting field and plasma structure to reach an asymptotic eruption velocity of greater than or approx. equal to 1100 km/s over an approx.15 minute time period. The simulation results are discussed using the topological insight developed to interpret the various phases of the eruption and the complex, dynamic, and interacting magnetic field structures.

  11. Quantifying Annual Aboveground Net Primary Production in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a larger project, methods were developed to quantify current year growth on grasses, forbs, and shrubs. Annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) data are needed for this project to calibrate results from computer simulation models and remote-sensing data. Measuring annual ANPP of ...

  12. Forecasting annual aboveground net primary production in the intermountain west

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many land manager’s annual aboveground net primary production, or plant growth, is a key factor affecting business success, profitability and each land manager's ability to successfully meet land management objectives. The strategy often utilized for forecasting plant growth is to assume every y...

  13. MOST OBSERVATIONS OF {sigma} Ori E: CHALLENGING THE CENTRIFUGAL BREAKOUT NARRATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R. H. D.; Rivinius, Th.; Rowe, J. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Matthews, J. M.; Kallinger, T.; Kuschnig, R.; Bohlender, D.; Neiner, C.; Telting, J. H.; Guenther, D. B.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2013-05-20

    We present results from three weeks' photometric monitoring of the magnetic helium-strong star {sigma} Ori E using the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars microsatellite. The star's light curve is dominated by twice-per-rotation eclipse-like dimmings arising when magnetospheric clouds transit across and occult the stellar disk. However, no evidence is found for any abrupt centrifugal breakout of plasma from the magnetosphere, either in the residual flux or in the depths of the light minima. Motivated by this finding we compare the observationally inferred magnetospheric mass against that predicted by a breakout analysis. The large discrepancy between the values leads us to argue that centrifugal breakout does not play a significant role in establishing the magnetospheric mass budget of {sigma} Ori E.

  14. [Aboveground architecture and biomass distribution of Quercus variabilis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bi-yun; Zhang, Wen-hui; Hu, Xiao-jing; Shen, Jia-peng; Zhen, Xue-yuan; Yang, Xiao-zhou

    2015-08-01

    The aboveground architecture, biomass and its allocation, and the relationship between architecture and biomass of Quercus variabilis of different diameter classes in Shangluo, south slope of Qinling Mountains were researched. The results showed that differences existed in the aboveground architecture and biomass allocation of Q. variabilis of different diameter classes. With the increase of diameter class, tree height, DBH, and crown width increased gradually. The average decline rate of each diameter class increased firstly then decreased. Q. variabilis overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio increased then declined. The specific leaf areas of Q. variabilis of all different diameter classes at vertical direction were 0.02-0.03, and the larger values of leaf mass ratio, LAI and leaf area ratio at vertical direction in diameter level I , II, III appeared in the middle and upper trunk, while in diameter level IV, V, VI, they appeared in the central trunk, with the increase of diameter class, there appeared two peaks in vertical direction, which located in the lower and upper trunk. The trunk biomass accounted for 71.8%-88.4% of Q. variabilis aboveground biomass, while the branch biomass accounted for 5.8%-19.6%, and the leaf biomass accounted for 4.2%-8.6%. With the increase of diameter class, stem biomass proportion of Q. variabilis decreased firstly then increased, while the branch and leaf biomass proportion showed a trend that increased at first then decreased, and then increased again. The aboveground biomass of Q. variabilis was significantly positively correlated to tree height, DBH, crown width and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R2:1), and positively related to the overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R3:2), but there was no significant correlation. Trunk biomass and total biomass aboveground were negatively related to the trunk decline rate, while branch biomass and leaf biomass were positively related to trunk decline

  15. Assessing aboveground tropical forest biomass using Google Earth canopy images.

    PubMed

    Ploton, Pierre; Pélissier, Raphaël; Proisy, Christophe; Flavenot, Théo; Barbier, Nicolas; Rai, S N; Couteron, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) in efforts to combat climate change requires participating countries to periodically assess their forest resources on a national scale. Such a process is particularly challenging in the tropics because of technical difficulties related to large aboveground forest biomass stocks, restricted availability of affordable, appropriate remote-sensing images, and a lack of accurate forest inventory data. In this paper, we apply the Fourier-based FOTO method of canopy texture analysis to Google Earth's very-high-resolution images of the wet evergreen forests in the Western Ghats of India in order to (1) assess the predictive power of the method on aboveground biomass of tropical forests, (2) test the merits of free Google Earth images relative to their native commercial IKONOS counterparts and (3) highlight further research needs for affordable, accurate regional aboveground biomass estimations. We used the FOTO method to ordinate Fourier spectra of 1436 square canopy images (125 x 125 m) with respect to a canopy grain texture gradient (i.e., a combination of size distribution and spatial pattern of tree crowns), benchmarked against virtual canopy scenes simulated from a set of known forest structure parameters and a 3-D light interception model. We then used 15 1-ha ground plots to demonstrate that both texture gradients provided by Google Earth and IKONOS images strongly correlated with field-observed stand structure parameters such as the density of large trees, total basal area, and aboveground biomass estimated from a regional allometric model. Our results highlight the great potential of the FOTO method applied to Google Earth data for biomass retrieval because the texture-biomass relationship is only subject to 15% relative error, on average, and does not show obvious saturation trends at large biomass values. We also provide the first reliable map of tropical forest aboveground biomass predicted

  16. Magnetar-driven Shock Breakout and Double-peaked Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Metzger, Brian D.; Bildsten, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (∼ {10}14 cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths ({T}{{eff}} ≈ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar-driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magnetar heating. A distinct double-peaked light curve may therefore only be conspicuous if thermal heating from the magnetar is suppressed at early times. We describe how such a delay in heating may naturally result from inefficient dissipation and thermalization of the pulsar wind magnetic energy. Without such suppression, the breakout may only be noticeable as a small bump or kink in the early luminosity or color evolution, or as a small but abrupt rise in the photospheric velocity. A similar breakout signature may accompany other central engines in supernovae, such as a black hole accreting fallback material.

  17. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    On the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  18. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  19. Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of storage tank bottom plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafaat, Taufik A.; Ismail, Mokhtar Che

    2015-07-01

    Aboveground atmospheric storage tanks (AST) receive crude oil from offshore for storage and further processing. Integrity issue of AST storing crude oil is not only affected by external corrosion but also internal corrosion from crude oil that supports the growth of the microorganisms originating from the reservoir. The objective of this research is to study the effect of sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB) on the corrosion of AST. The results indicates that SRB has significant effect on the corrosion rate of storage tank bottom plate.

  20. Uncertainty Analysis in Large Area Aboveground Biomass Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccini, A.; Carvalho, L.; Dubayah, R.; Goetz, S. J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite and aircraft-based remote sensing observations are being more frequently used to generate spatially explicit estimates of aboveground carbon stock of forest ecosystems. Because deforestation and forest degradation account for circa 10% of anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere, policy mechanisms are increasingly recognized as a low-cost mitigation option to reduce carbon emission. They are, however, contingent upon the capacity to accurately measures carbon stored in the forests. Here we examine the sources of uncertainty and error propagation in generating maps of aboveground biomass. We focus on characterizing uncertainties associated with maps at the pixel and spatially aggregated national scales. We pursue three strategies to describe the error and uncertainty properties of aboveground biomass maps, including: (1) model-based assessment using confidence intervals derived from linear regression methods; (2) data-mining algorithms such as regression trees and ensembles of these; (3) empirical assessments using independently collected data sets.. The latter effort explores error propagation using field data acquired within satellite-based lidar (GLAS) acquisitions versus alternative in situ methods that rely upon field measurements that have not been systematically collected for this purpose (e.g. from forest inventory data sets). A key goal of our effort is to provide multi-level characterizations that provide both pixel and biome-level estimates of uncertainties at different scales.

  1. Plant-mediated links between detritivores and aboveground herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Wurst, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on plant-mediated above–belowground interactions focus on soil biota with direct trophic links to plant roots such as root herbivores, pathogens, and symbionts. Detritivorous soil fauna, though ubiquitous and present in high abundances and biomasses in soil, are under-represented in those studies. Understanding of their impact on plants is mainly restricted to growth and nutrient uptake parameters. Detritivores have been shown to affect secondary metabolites and defense gene expression in aboveground parts of plants, with potential impacts on aboveground plant–herbivore interactions. The proposed mechanisms range from nutrient mobilization effects and impacts on soil microorganisms to defense induction by passive or active ingestion of roots. Since their negative effects (disruption or direct feeding of roots) may be counterbalanced by their overall beneficial effects (nutrient mobilization), detritivores may not harm, but rather enable plants to respond to aboveground herbivore attacks in a more efficient way. Both more mechanistic and holistic approaches are needed to better understand the involvement of detritivores in plant-mediated above–belowground interactions and their potential for sustainable agriculture. PMID:24069027

  2. Dual Tank Fuel System

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  3. Think Tank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governick, Heather; Wellington, Thom

    1998-01-01

    Examines the options for upgrading, replacing, and removal or closure of underground storage tanks (UST). Reveals the diverse regulatory control involving USTs, the Environmental Protection Agency's interest in pursuing violators, and stresses the need for administrators to be knowledgeable about state and local agency definitions of regulated…

  4. Human and environmental controls over aboveground carbon storage in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate, high-resolution mapping of aboveground carbon density (ACD, Mg C ha-1) could provide insight into human and environmental controls over ecosystem state and functioning, and could support conservation and climate policy development. However, mapping ACD has proven challenging, particularly in spatially complex regions harboring a mosaic of land use activities, or in remote montane areas that are difficult to access and poorly understood ecologically. Using a combination of field measurements, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and satellite data, we present the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon stocks in Madagascar. Results We found that elevation and the fraction of photosynthetic vegetation (PV) cover, analyzed throughout forests of widely varying structure and condition, account for 27-67% of the spatial variation in ACD. This finding facilitated spatial extrapolation of LiDAR-based carbon estimates to a total of 2,372,680 ha using satellite data. Remote, humid sub-montane forests harbored the highest carbon densities, while ACD was suppressed in dry spiny forests and in montane humid ecosystems, as well as in most lowland areas with heightened human activity. Independent of human activity, aboveground carbon stocks were subject to strong physiographic controls expressed through variation in tropical forest canopy structure measured using airborne LiDAR. Conclusions High-resolution mapping of carbon stocks is possible in remote regions, with or without human activity, and thus carbon monitoring can be brought to highly endangered Malagasy forests as a climate-change mitigation and biological conservation strategy. PMID:22289685

  5. Introduction of Break-Out Session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum(Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.

    2011-07-01

    This presentation outlines the goals and specific tasks of break-out session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum, along with a review of accelerated stress tests used for photovoltaics (PV).

  6. Tank 241-S-111: Tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-07

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, ORNL, and PNL tank vapor program. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-S-111 (this tank is on the organic and flammable gas watch list). This tank received Redox plant waste, among other wastes.

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  8. Key issues for the assessment of the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods: breakout group reports.

    PubMed Central

    Germolec, Dori R; Kimber, Ian; Goldman, Lynn; Selgrade, MaryJane

    2003-01-01

    On the final afternoon of the workshop "Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods," held 10-12 December 2001 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of use of human clinical data, animal models to assess food allergy, biomarkers of exposure and effect, sensitive populations, dose-response assessment, and postmarket surveillance. Each group addressed general questions regarding allergenicity of genetically modified foods and specific questions for each subject area. This article is a brief summary of the discussions of each of the six breakout groups regarding our current state of knowledge and what information is needed to advance the field. PMID:12826486

  9. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  10. PROBING SHOCK BREAKOUT AND PROGENITORS OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE THROUGH THEIR EARLY RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of early radio emission from stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe; those of Type IIb/Ib/Ic). We suggest there is a sub-class of stripped-envelope SNe based on their radio properties, including the optically well-studied Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic) 2002ap and 2007gr, showing a rapid rise to a radio peak within {approx}10 days and reaching a low luminosity (at least an order of magnitude fainter than a majority of SNe IIb/Ib/Ic). They show a decline after the peak that is shallower than that of other stripped-envelope SNe while their spectral index is similar. We show that all these properties are naturally explained if the circumstellar material (CSM) density is low and therefore the forward shock is expanding into the CSM without deceleration. Since the forward shock velocity in this situation, as estimated from the radio properties, still records the maximum velocity of the SN ejecta following the shock breakout, observing these SNe in radio wavelengths provides new diagnostics on the nature of both the breakout and the progenitor which otherwise require a quite rapid follow-up in other wavelengths. The inferred post-shock breakout velocities of SNe Ic 2002ap and 2007gr are sub-relativistic, {approx}0.3c. These are higher than that inferred for SN II 1987A, in line with suggested compact progenitors. However, these are lower than expected for a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) progenitor. It may reflect an as yet unresolved nature of the progenitors just before the explosion, and we suggest that the W-R progenitor envelopes might have been inflated which could quickly reduce the maximum ejecta velocity from the initial shock breakout velocity.

  11. Present-day stress directions in California determined through borehole breakout analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, V.S.; Suppe, J.

    1988-03-01

    Borehole elongations or breakouts, observed on unprocessed four-arm dipmeter logs, have been used to map in-situ stress directions throughout onshore California. Approximately 130 wells were analyzed for borehole breakouts in California, with 107 giving useful results. The wells are subvertical (most inclinations > 80/sup 0/) and range in depth from 920 to 5760 m, with 90% of the wells being deeper than 1500 m. Breakouts were observed from depths of 100-5600 m. The number of broken out intervals per well range from 3 to 38 with an average of 12. A regionally consistent stress pattern is observed with maximum horizontal compression generally oriented northeast-southwest. Breakout-determined stress directions are consistent with other stress indicators, including stress directions determined from focal mechanisms for earthquakes occurring at depths of 5-15 km. The direction of maximum compression consistently intersects the San Andreas fault at a high angle (80/sup 0/-90/sup 0/) and is approximately perpendicular to axes of young thrust-related anticlines. Heat-flow and seismic observations limit the shear stress on the San Andreas fault to 10-20 MPa, or less. The observed orientation of maximum horizontal compression (nearly perpendicular) to the San Andreas) allows generation of large regional deviatoric stresses of rock-breaking magnitudes (on the order of 100 MPa). Transpressive plate motion is decoupled into a low-stress strike-slip component and a high-stress compressive component. These observations suggest that standard concepts of transpressive wrench tectonics - which envisage drag on a high-friction fault - are wrong. The thrust structures are largely decoupled from the strike-slip fault.

  12. Analogue and numerical modelling of sub-lithospheric plume-breakout processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, F.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hort, M.; Reston, T.

    2003-04-01

    Here we explore the physics of lateral 'breakout' of buoyant asthenosphere from beneath a rifting subtectospheric thinspot. This mechanism assumes that continental tectospheric thinspots sometimes serve as 'catchment basins' for upwelling plume material, basins whose 'plume-fill' is only discharged by rifting-related thinning and linkage to regions of even thinner overlying lithosphere --- for example linkup to an ocean basin. If plume-fed asthenosphere is hotter and more fluid than underlying 'mesospheric mantle', then its behavior can be treated as that of a finite-sized buoyant low- viscosity sheet embedded between overlying lithosphere/tectosphere of varying thickness and underlying higher-viscosity mesosphere. Even if rift-induced thinning of one (or more) of the tectosphere boundaries to a rifting thinspot occurs uniformly, plume breakout is unlikely to be uniform. If the lateral flux from low-viscosity channel flow is viewed as the 'extrusion' of a low-viscosity swell-root gravity current similar to Peter Olson's model of a hotspot swell-root, then the extrusion rate will strongly depend upon the thickness and time evolution of the 'gap' in the 'lip' of tectosphere surrounding a given plume-catchment basin, in addition to the buoyancy of ponded asthenosphere and viscosity of surrounding mesosphere that it displaces to extrude. Here we will show preliminary results from three model approaches to study the physics of asthenopheric breakout using: (a) analogue experiments with sugar-syrups to represent asthenosphere and mesosphere of differing buoyancy and viscosity; (b) 1-D numerical experiments based upon Olson's boundary layer formulation for flow of an asthenospheric gravity current; (c) 2-D finite element models. The goal of these models is to determine the scaling dependence of breakout fluxes on the thickness, viscosity, and buoyancy of the asthenosphere and mesosphere. This work is still very much in progress!

  13. Aboveground insect infestation attenuates belowground Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Song, Geun Cheol; Lee, Soohyun; Hong, Jaehwa; Choi, Hye Kyung; Hong, Gun Hyong; Bae, Dong-Won; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-07-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease. Although Agrobacterium can be popularly used for genetic engineering, the influence of aboveground insect infestation on Agrobacterium induced gall formation has not been investigated. Nicotiana benthamiana leaves were exposed to a sucking insect (whitefly) infestation and benzothiadiazole (BTH) for 7 d, and these exposed plants were inoculated with a tumorigenic Agrobacterium strain. We evaluated, both in planta and in vitro, how whitefly infestation affects crown gall disease. Whitefly-infested plants exhibited at least a two-fold reduction in gall formation on both stem and crown root. Silencing of isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1), required for salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, compromised gall formation indicating an involvement of SA in whitefly-derived plant defence against Agrobacterium. Endogenous SA content was augmented in whitefly-infested plants upon Agrobacterium inoculation. In addition, SA concentration was three times higher in root exudates from whitefly-infested plants. As a consequence, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of roots of whitefly-infested plants was clearly inhibited when compared to control plants. These results suggest that aboveground whitefly infestation elicits systemic defence responses throughout the plant. Our findings provide new insights into insect-mediated leaf-root intra-communication and a framework to understand interactions between three organisms: whitefly, N. benthamiana and Agrobacterium. PMID:25676198

  14. Analytical prediction of break-out noise from a reactive rectangular plenum with four flexible walls.

    PubMed

    Venkatesham, B; Tiwari, Mayank; Munjal, M L

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes an analytical calculation of break-out noise from a rectangular plenum with four flexible walls by incorporating three-dimensional effects along with the acoustical and structural wave coupling phenomena. The breakout noise from rectangular plenums is important and the coupling between acoustic waves within the plenum and structural waves in the flexible plenum walls plays a critical role in prediction of the transverse transmission loss. The first step in breakout noise prediction is to calculate the inside plenum pressure field and the normal flexible plenum wall vibration by using an impedance-mobility approach, which results in a compact matrix formulation. In the impedance-mobility compact matrix (IMCM) approach, it is presumed that the coupled response can be described in terms of finite sets of the uncoupled acoustic subsystem and the structural subsystem. The flexible walls of the plenum are modeled as an unfolded plate to calculate natural frequencies and mode shapes of the uncoupled structural subsystem. The second step is to calculate the radiated sound power from the flexible walls using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz (KH) integral formulation. Analytical results are validated with finite element and boundary element (FEM-BEM) numerical models. PMID:20968352

  15. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  16. Borehole Breakouts Induced in Arkosic Sandstones and a Discrete Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Moon, T.; Haimson, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    A series of laboratory drilling experiments were conducted on two arkosic sandstones (Tenino and Tablerock) under polyaxial far-field stress conditions (σ h ≠ σ H ≠ σ v ). V-shaped breakouts, aligned with the σ h direction and revealing stress-dependent dimensions (width and length), were observed in the sandstones. The microscale damage pattern leading to the breakouts, however, is different between the two, which is attributed to the difference in their cementation. The dominant micromechanism in Tenino sandstone is intergranular microcracking occurring in clay minerals filling the spaces between clastic grains. On the other hand, intra- and transgranular microcracking taking place in the grain itself prevails in Tablerock sandstone. To capture the grain-scale damage and reproduce the failure localization observed around the borehole in the laboratory, we used a discrete element (DE) model in which a grain breakage algorithm was implemented. The microparameters needed in the numerical model were calibrated by running material tests and comparing the macroscopic responses of the model to the ones measured in the laboratory. It is shown that DE modeling is capable of simulating the microscale damage of the rock and replicating the localized damage zone observed in the laboratory. In addition, the numerically induced breakout width is determined at a very early stage of the damage localization and is not altered for the rest of the failure process.

  17. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  18. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  19. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  20. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each...

  1. Composite Tank Technologies Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The need for cryogenic fuel tanks continues to expand, and research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressing these needs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of composite tank development, including tank testing, cryogenic materials research, tank liners, and dual-walled tanks, at MSFC.

  2. Anatomy of a basin break-out flood: The 2007 Crater Lake break-out lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manville, V.; Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Doyle, E. E.; Cole, S. E.; Procter, J.; Carrivick, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Massey, C.; Jongens, R.; Watson, J.; Halstead, J.; Keys, H. J.; Lawrence, C.

    2010-12-01

    Break-out floods from natural or artificial impoundments are significant hazards in many environments and regions around the world, resulting in loss of life, damage to infrastructure, and dramatic geomorphic changes due to the very high rate of energy expenditure associated with high flow velocities and depths in newly created or underfit pre-existing channels. At Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand, a forecast break-out flood from a summit Crater Lake enabled characterisation of the evolution and impact of a discrete floodwave through: (i) multi-parameter measurement of time-series hydraulic parameters at key locations along the channel by automatic equipment and human observers; and (ii) pre- and post-event high resolution topographic surveys and vertical aerial and oblique imagery of the flowpath. Failure of the tephra dam released c. 1.0 Mm3 of warm, highly mineralised water into the steep gorge of the upper Whangaehu River in <2 hours. LiDAR data indicate 4.5 and 1.4 Mm3 of net erosion and deposition respectively along the first 47 km of channel, with most material (65 %) eroded from the steep bedrock/step-pool upper gorge, comprising inputs from various intra- and extra-channel sources. Net erosion continued across the low-gradient Whangaehu Fan, where the flood anastomosed into multiple distributary channels, and the single-thread meandering river valley further downstream. Overall, patterns of erosion and deposition were a complex function of channel gradient, width and expansion ratio. Stage, discharge, sediment-load, geochemical, and frontal and flow velocity data show that the flood wave propagated as a number of compositionally distinct but overlapping kinematic waveforms. A complex series of interactions with the flowpath produced spatially and temporarily varying sediment loads that affected its density, viscosity, mobility, peak discharge and absolute volume. Peak volumetric bulking factor (3.6) and sediment concentrations (63 vol.%) were achieved early, and

  3. Dynamics of aboveground carbon stocks in a selectively logged tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Lilian; Echard, Marion; Herault, Bruno; Bonal, Damien; Marcon, Eric; Chave, Jérôme; Baraloto, Christopher

    2009-09-01

    The expansion of selective logging in tropical forests may be an important source of global carbon emissions. However, the effects of logging practices on the carbon cycle have never been quantified over long periods of time. We followed the fate of more than 60 000 tropical trees over 23 years to assess changes in aboveground carbon stocks in 48 1.56-ha plots in French Guiana that represent a gradient of timber harvest intensities, with and without intensive timber stand improvement (TSI) treatments to stimulate timber tree growth. Conventional selective logging led to emissions equivalent to more than a third of aboveground carbon stocks in plots without TSI (85 Mg C/ha), while plots with TSI lost more than one-half of aboveground carbon stocks (142 Mg C/ha). Within 20 years of logging, plots without TSI sequestered aboveground carbon equivalent to more than 80% of aboveground carbon lost to logging (-70.7 Mg C/ha), and our simulations predicted an equilibrium aboveground carbon balance within 45 years of logging. In contrast, plots with intensive TSI are predicted to require more than 100 years to sequester aboveground carbon lost to emissions. These results indicate that in some tropical forests aboveground carbon storage can be recovered within half a century after conventional logging at moderate harvest intensities. PMID:19769089

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  5. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  6. Guidelines for the design and safe installation of tank integrity systems under existing ASTs

    SciTech Connect

    Whited, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The technology has been developed to safely and accurately install perforated piping horizontally under existing in-service aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). Piping that is properly networked under a tank is useful for multiple functions including: evaluation of tank bottom-to-soil potentials at various undertank locations; soil side tank bottom corrosion control with the placement of anodes undertank; rapid detection of product leaks and releases; and control and/or remediation of released product. All functions can be employed simultaneously or as needed in the future. They provide an affordable solution to high AST maintenance and operating costs. The design of a multipurpose undertank piping network requires the consideration of numerous factors and objectives. A safe and reliable procedure to install the piping networks in close proximity to a tank bottom is essential. There are important guidelines and criteria that need to be achieved for any technology used to place piping under an AST.

  7. Evolution of stress-induced borehole breakout in inherently anisotropic rock: Insights from discrete element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, K.; Kwok, C. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms controlling the initiation, propagation, and ultimate pattern of borehole breakouts in shale formation when drilled parallel with and perpendicular to beddings. A two-dimensional discrete element model is constructed to explicitly represent the microstructure of inherently anisotropic rocks by inserting a series of individual smooth joints into an assembly of bonded rigid discs. Both isotropic and anisotropic hollow square-shaped samples are generated to represent the wellbores drilled perpendicular to and parallel with beddings at reduced scale. The isotropic model is validated by comparing the stress distribution around borehole wall and along X axis direction with analytical solutions. Effects of different factors including the particle size distribution, borehole diameter, far-field stress anisotropy, and rock anisotropy are systematically evaluated on the stress distribution and borehole breakout propagation. Simulation results reveal that wider particle size distribution results in the local stress perturbations which cause localization of cracks. Reduction of borehole diameter significantly alters the crack failure from tensile to shear and raises the critical pressure. Rock anisotropy plays an important role on the stress state around wellbore which lead to the formation of preferred cracks under hydrostatic stress. Far-field stress anisotropy plays a dominant role in the shape of borehole breakout when drilled perpendicular to beddings while a secondary role when drilled parallel with beddings. Results from this study can provide fundamental insights on the underlying particle-scale mechanisms for previous findings in laboratory and field on borehole stability in anisotropic rock.

  8. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter M.; Tucker, Bradley E.; Rest, Armin; Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Kasen, Daniel; Villar, Victoria; KEGS

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae. Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5±0.4 and 13.3±0.4 rest-frame days respectively. We find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280±20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490±20 R⊙) but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0±0.3 ×1051 erg.The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict possibly due to the supernova shockwave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass loss rate of 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve.No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a type II-P supernova.

  9. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Tucker, B. E.; Rest, A.; Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P.; Kasen, D.; Villar, A.

    2016-03-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R⊙), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1051 erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10-4M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  10. Remedial technologies for leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The electric utility industry owns and operates many underground and aboveground storage tanks as well as other facilities for using, storing, or transferring petroleum products, primarily motor and heating fuels. The prevention, detection, and correction of leakage of these products from underground storage tanks (UST) has gained high priority in the utility industry and within the regulatory agencies. The 1984 amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCTA) require the US EPA to develop new Federal regulations for reducing and controlling environmental damage from underground storage tank leakage. This report presents a summary description and evaluation of 13 remedial methods for soil and groundwater cleanup: in situ technologies - volatilization, biodegradation, leaching and chemical reaction, vitrification, passive remediation, and isolation/containment; and non-in situ technologies - land treatment, thermal treatment, asphalt incorporation, solidification/stabilization, groundwater extraction and treatment, chemical extraction, excavation. The information in this report is organized in terms of four major considerations in evaluating the relative feasibility of each method: technical feasibility, implementation feasibility, environmental feasibility, and economic feasibility.

  11. Proliferation Risks of Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production, and Breakout

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Goldston, A. Glaser, A.F. Ross

    2009-08-13

    Nuclear proliferation risks from fusion associated with access to weapon-usable material can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risk from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if commercial fusion systems are designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

  12. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-11-03

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO`s identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given.

  13. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  14. 2D Radiation-hydrodynamic Simulations of Supernova Shock Breakout in Bipolar Explosions of a Blue Supergiant Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional special relativistic radiation-hydrodynamics code is developed and applied to numerical simulations of supernova shock breakout in bipolar explosions of a blue supergiant. Our calculations successfully simulate the dynamical evolution of a blast wave in the star and its emergence from the surface. Results of the model with spherical energy deposition show a good agreement with previous simulations. Furthermore, we calculate several models with bipolar energy deposition and compare their results with the spherically symmetric model. The bolometric light curves of the shock breakout emission are calculated by a ray-tracing method. Our radiation-hydrodynamic models indicate that the early part of the shock breakout emission can be used to probe the geometry of the blast wave produced as a result of the gravitational collapse of the iron core.

  15. Modeling aboveground biomass of Tamarix ramosissima in the Arkansas River Basin of Southeastern Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evangelista, P.; Kumar, S.; Stohlgren, T.J.; Crall, A.W.; Newman, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Predictive models of aboveground biomass of nonnative Tamarix ramosissima of various sizes were developed using destructive sampling techniques on 50 individuals and four 100-m2 plots. Each sample was measured for average height (m) of stems and canopy area (m2) prior to cutting, drying, and weighing. Five competing regression models (P < 0.05) were developed to estimate aboveground biomass of T. ramosissima using average height and/or canopy area measurements and were evaluated using Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size (AICc). Our best model (AICc = -148.69, ??AICc = 0) successfully predicted T. ramosissima aboveground biomass (R2 = 0.97) and used average height and canopy area as predictors. Our 2nd-best model, using the same predictors, was also successful in predicting aboveground biomass (R2 = 0.97, AICc = -131.71, ??AICc = 16.98). A 3rd model demonstrated high correlation between only aboveground biomass and canopy area (R2 = 0.95), while 2 additional models found high correlations between aboveground biomass and average height measurements only (R2 = 0.90 and 0.70, respectively). These models illustrate how simple field measurements, such as height and canopy area, can be used in allometric relationships to accurately predict aboveground biomass of T. ramosissima. Although a correction factor may be necessary for predictions at larger scales, the models presented will prove useful for many research and management initiatives.

  16. Wavelet analysis for aboveground biomass estimate in temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Fang

    2008-10-01

    The ever-increasing concentration of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and CFCs) has been identified as a likely (greater than 90% confidence) cause of the observed increase of global mean temperatures since the mid-20th century (IPCC, 2007). The effect of human-induced climate change could be unprecedented and far-reaching. Carbon sequestration into trees and forests is an effective and inexpensive way for mitigating the CO2 level in the atmosphere. Hence, accurate measurement of biomass will be of great importance to global carbon cycle and climate change. This study performed a wavelet-based forest aboveground biomass estimation approach in a temperate deciduous forest, the Hoosier National Forest, in Indiana. Wavelet analysis, specifically two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was applied to ASTER images to obtain wavelet coefficients (WCs), which were correlated with forest inventory data using multiple linear regression analysis to investigate the relationship. Different mother wavelets and level of decomposition were tested. Moreover, vegetation indices, RATIO, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and principal component analyses (PCA) were computed and correlated with field biomass measurements. The results indicate that wavelet coefficients correlate better with field biomass data than vegetation indices. For level one decomposition, the correlation coefficients are 0.3 to 0.5, while 0.1-0.3 for vegetation indices; for level two decomposition, the overall R value increased by 0.2, and for level three, the R value can be increased to 0.6-0.7. Meanwhile, tree per acre and basal area were also examined and correlated with field measurements. This study demonstrates that wavelet-based biomass estimation could be a very promising approach for solving the uncertainty between reflectance value from satellite images and forest biomass and therefore providing better biomass estimation; however, further research is needed for identifying

  17. HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    BERRIOCHOA MV

    2011-04-07

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  18. PROPERTIES OF TYPE II PLATEAU SUPERNOVA SNLS-04D2dc: MULTICOLOR LIGHT CURVES OF SHOCK BREAKOUT AND PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    Tominaga, N.; Blinnikov, S.; Nomoto, K.; Baklanov, P.; Morokuma, T.; Suzuki, T. E-mail: tomoki.morokuma@nao.ac.j E-mail: baklanovp@gmail.co E-mail: suzuki@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.j

    2009-11-01

    Shock breakout is the brightest radiative phenomenon in a Type II supernova (SN). Although it was predicted to be bright, direct observation is difficult due to the short duration and X-ray/ultraviolet-peaked spectra. First entire observations of the shock breakouts of Type II Plateau SNe (SNe IIP) were reported in 2008 by ultraviolet and optical observations by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite and supernova legacy survey (SNLS), named SNLS-04D2dc and SNLS-06D1jd. We present multicolor light curves of an SN IIP, including the shock breakout and plateau, calculated with a multigroup radiation hydrodynamical code STELLA and an evolutionary progenitor model. The synthetic multicolor light curves reproduce well the observations of SNLS-04D2dc. This is the first study to reproduce the ultraviolet light curve of the shock breakout and the optical light curve of the plateau consistently. We conclude that SNLS-04D2dc is the explosion with a canonical explosion energy 1.2 x 10{sup 51} erg and that its progenitor is a star with a zero-age main-sequence mass 20 M{sub sun} and a presupernova radius 800 R{sub sun}. The model demonstrates that the peak apparent B-band magnitude of the shock breakout would be m {sub B} approx 26.4 mag if an SN identical to SNLS-04D2dc occurs at a redshift z = 1, which can be reached by 8m-class telescopes. The result evidences that the shock breakout has a great potential to detect SNe IIP at z approx> 1.

  19. Oblique Shock Breakout in Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. I. Dynamics and Observational Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzner, Christopher D.; Levin, Yuri; Ro, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    In a non-spherical stellar explosion, non-radial motions become important near the stellar surface. For realistic deviations from spherical symmetry, non-radial flow dramatically alters the dynamics and emission of shock emergence on a significant fraction of the surface. The breakout flash is stifled, ejecta speeds are limited, and matter is cast sideways. Non-radial ejection allows for collisions outside the star, which may engender a new type of transient. Strongly oblique breakouts are most easily produced in compact stellar progenitors, such as white dwarfs and stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. We study the shock structure and post-shock acceleration using conservation laws, a similarity analysis, and an approximate theory for oblique shocks. The shock is likely to extend vertically from the stellar surface, then kink before joining a deep asymptotic solution. Outflow from the region crossed by an oblique shock is probably unsteady and may affect the surface ahead of the main shock. We comment on the implications for several notable explosions in which the non-spherical dynamics described in this paper are likely to play an important role. We also briefly consider relativistic and superluminal pattern speeds.

  20. GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTONS AT ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC SHOCK BREAKOUT IN SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yukari; Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2013-11-10

    We present theoretical expectations for non-thermal emission due to the bulk Comptonization at the ultra-relativistic shock breakout. We calculate the transfer of photons emitted from the shocked matter with a Monte Carlo code fully taking into account special relativity. As a hydrodynamical model, we use the self-similar solution of Nakayama and Shigeyama. Our calculations reveal that the spectral shape exhibits a double peak or a single peak depending on the shock temperature at breakout; if it is significantly smaller than the rest energy of an electron, the spectrum has a double peak. We also include a few sample light curves, and estimate the total radiation energy. In comparison with observations of γ-ray bursts, a part of the higher energy component in the spectra and the total energy can be reproduced by some parameter sets. Meanwhile, the lower energy counterpart in the Band function is not reproduced by our results and the duration seems too short to represent an entire γ-ray burst. Therefore the subsequent phase will constitute the lower energy part of the spectrum.

  1. Regional Mapping, Modelling, and Monitoring of Tree Aboveground Biomass Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Airborne lidar collections are preferred for mapping aboveground biomass carbon (AGBC), while historical Landsat imagery are preferred for monitoring decadal scale forest cover change. Our modelling approach tracks AGBC change regionally using Landsat time series metrics; training areas are defined by airborne lidar extents within which AGBC is accurately mapped with high confidence. Geospatial topographic and climate layers are also included in the predictive model. Validation is accomplished using systematically sampled Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data that have been independently collected, processed and summarized at the county level. Our goal is to demonstrate that spatially and temporally aggregated annual AGBC map predictions show no bias when compared to annual county-level summaries across the Northwest USA. A prominent source of bias is trees outside forest; much of the more arid portions of our study area meet the FIA definition of non-forest because the tree cover does not exceed their minimum tree cover threshold. We employ detailed tree cover maps derived from high-resolution aerial imagery to extend our AGBC predictions into non-forest areas. We also employ Landsat-derived annual disturbance maps into our mapped AGBC predictions prior to aggregation and validation.

  2. [Dry matter accumulation in rice aboveground part: quantitative simulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Da; Tang, Liang; Chen, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Cao, Wei-Xing; Zhu, Yan

    2010-06-01

    A field experiment with four rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars and different nitrogen application rates was conducted, with the dry matter accumulation (DMA) in the cultivars aboveground part measured at their main growth stages. The dynamic model of relative dry matter accumulation (RDMA) was established with the normalized DMA and TEP (product of thermal effectiveness and PAR) from emergence to maturity, and the temporal characteristics of DMA changes was quantitatively analyzed based on the RDMA model. The dynamic changes of the RDMA could be well described with Richards equation, i. e., RDMA = 1.0157/(1 +e(3.6329-7.5907xRTEP)) 1/0.5574 (r = 0.9938). The model was validated with independent field experiment datasets, involving different eco-sites, cultivars, and nitrogen application rates. The RMSE (root mean square error) between the simulated and observed values of DMA at varied RTEP was 0.86 t x hm(-2). According to the two inflexion points of dry matter accumulation rate equation, the whole process of dry matter accumulation could be divided into early, middle, and late phases. The maximum dry matter accumulation rate (AR(max)), relative TEP at AR(max), and relative dry matter accumulation at AR(max) were found to be 2.24, 0.56, and 0.46, respectively. PMID:20873627

  3. Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

  4. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  6. Distribution of Aboveground Live Biomass in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Houghton, R. A.; DosSantos Alvala, R. C.; Soares, J. V.; Yu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The amount and spatial distribution of forest biomass in the Amazon basin is a major source of uncertainty in estimating the flux of carbon released from land-cover and land-use change. Direct measurements of aboveground live biomass (AGLB) are limited to small areas of forest inventory plots and site-specific allometric equations that cannot be readily generalized for the entire basin. Furthermore, there is no spaceborne remote sensing instrument that can measure tropical forest biomass directly. To determine the spatial distribution of forest biomass of the Amazon basin, we report a method based on remote sensing metrics representing various forest structural parameters and environmental variables, and more than 500 plot measurements of forest biomass distributed over the basin. A decision tree approach was used to develop the spatial distribution of AGLB for seven distinct biomass classes of lowland old-growth forests with more than 80% accuracy. AGLB for other vegetation types, such as the woody and herbaceous savanna and secondary forests, was directly estimated with a regression based on satellite data. Results show that AGLB is highest in Central Amazonia and in regions to the east and north, including the Guyanas. Biomass is generally above 300Mgha(sup 1) here except in areas of intense logging or open floodplains. In Western Amazonia, from the lowlands of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia to the Andean mountains, biomass ranges from 150 to 300Mgha(sup 1). Most transitional and seasonal forests at the southern and northwestern edges of the basin have biomass ranging from 100 to 200Mgha(sup 1). The AGLB distribution has a significant correlation with the length of the dry season. We estimate that the total carbon in forest biomass of the Amazon basin, including the dead and below ground biomass, is 86 PgC with +/- 20% uncertainty.

  7. Stratified aboveground forest biomass estimation by remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Hooman; Fassnacht, Fabian E.; Hartig, Florian; Berger, Christian; Hernández, Jaime; Corvalán, Patricio; Koch, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Remote sensing-assisted estimates of aboveground forest biomass are essential for modeling carbon budgets. It has been suggested that estimates can be improved by building species- or strata-specific biomass models. However, few studies have attempted a systematic analysis of the benefits of such stratification, especially in combination with other factors such as sensor type, statistical prediction method and sampling design of the reference inventory data. We addressed this topic by analyzing the impact of stratifying forest data into three classes (broadleaved, coniferous and mixed forest). We compare predictive accuracy (a) between the strata (b) to a case without stratification for a set of pre-selected predictors from airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data obtained in a managed mixed forest site in southwestern Germany. We used 5 commonly applied algorithms for biomass predictions on bootstrapped subsamples of the data to obtain cross validated RMSE and r2 diagnostics. Those values were analyzed in a factorial design by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to rank the relative importance of each factor. Selected models were used for wall-to-wall mapping of biomass estimates and their associated uncertainty. The results revealed marginal advantages for the strata-specific prediction models over the unstratified ones, which were more obvious on the wall-to-wall mapped area-based predictions. Yet further tests are necessary to establish the generality of these results. Input data type and statistical prediction method are concluded to remain the two most crucial factors for the quality of remote sensing-assisted biomass models.

  8. Development of a Mold Cracking Simulator: The Study of Breakout and Crack Formation in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yexin; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2016-08-01

    Based on the mold simulator technology, a mold-cracking simulator has been successfully developed to study the process of breakout and the shell surface crack formation during the initial solidification of molten steel inside the continuous casting mold. First, a spheroidal protrusion was installed on the mold hot surface to mimic the abnormal force that generated by mold wall deformation, and then the external force was applied to the initial solidified shell, to facilitate the formation of breakout and shell surface cracks. Second, the responding temperature and heat flux across mold hot surface were recovered by an inverse heat conduction problem. The experimental results indicated that the mold breakout occurs around the shell tip by the combined efforts from external horizontal force, ferrostatic pressure, and thermal stresses during positive strip time. The breakout tends to introduce the peak of the responding temperature and heat flux across the mold hot surface. The vertical propagation velocity of the rupture point in the solidification shell has been calculated as 0.42 m/s in this study, which is in good agreement with industrial slabs. The paper also suggested that surface transverse crack formation is related to the segregation of sulfur during the initial solidification of molten steel.

  9. Development of a Mold Cracking Simulator: The Study of Breakout and Crack Formation in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yexin; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2016-06-01

    Based on the mold simulator technology, a mold-cracking simulator has been successfully developed to study the process of breakout and the shell surface crack formation during the initial solidification of molten steel inside the continuous casting mold. First, a spheroidal protrusion was installed on the mold hot surface to mimic the abnormal force that generated by mold wall deformation, and then the external force was applied to the initial solidified shell, to facilitate the formation of breakout and shell surface cracks. Second, the responding temperature and heat flux across mold hot surface were recovered by an inverse heat conduction problem. The experimental results indicated that the mold breakout occurs around the shell tip by the combined efforts from external horizontal force, ferrostatic pressure, and thermal stresses during positive strip time. The breakout tends to introduce the peak of the responding temperature and heat flux across the mold hot surface. The vertical propagation velocity of the rupture point in the solidification shell has been calculated as 0.42 m/s in this study, which is in good agreement with industrial slabs. The paper also suggested that surface transverse crack formation is related to the segregation of sulfur during the initial solidification of molten steel.

  10. [Spatial distribution of aboveground biomass of shrubs in Tianlaochi catchment of the Qilian Mountains].

    PubMed

    Liang, Bei; Di, Li; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Peng, Shou-Zhang; Peng, Huan-Hua; Wang, Chao

    2014-02-01

    This study estimated the spatial distribution of the aboveground biomass of shrubs in the Tianlaochi catchment of Qilian Mountains based on the field survey and remote sensing data. A relationship model of the aboveground biomass and its feasibly measured factors (i. e. , canopy perimeter and plant height) was built. The land use was classified by object-oriented technique with the high resolution image (GeoEye-1) of the study area, and the distribution of shrub coverage was extracted. Then the total aboveground biomass of shrubs in the study area was estimated by the relationship model with the distribution of shrub coverage. The results showed that the aboveground biomass of shrubs in the study area was 1.8 x 10(3) t and the aboveground biomass per unit area was 1598.45 kg x m(-2). The distribution of shrubs mainly was at altitudes of 3000-3700 m, and the aboveground biomass of shrubs on the sunny slope (1.15 x 10(3) t) was higher than that on the shady slope (0.65 x 10(3) t). PMID:24830234

  11. Liquid rocket metal tanks and tank components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. A.; Keller, R. B. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Significant guidelines are presented for the successful design of aerospace tanks and tank components, such as expulsion devices, standpipes, and baffles. The state of the art is reviewed, and the design criteria are presented along with recommended practices. Design monographs are listed.

  12. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-12-14

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104.

  13. Tank 241-SX-106 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-08

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-SX-106.

  14. Tank 241-SX-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-08

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-SX-103.

  15. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-05

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107.

  16. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-24

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103.

  17. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-12-09

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118.

  18. Tank 241-U-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-02-03

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-105.

  19. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-24

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111.

  20. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105.

  1. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-10

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111.

  2. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-20

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101.

  3. Interaction-powered Supernovae: Rise-time versus Peak-luminosity Correlation and the Shock-breakout Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Bersier, David; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; De Cia, Annalisa; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert; Yaron, Ofer

    2014-06-01

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ~104 km s-1). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  4. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  5. Ionization break-out from millisecond pulsar wind nebulae: an X-ray probe of the origin of superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Vurm, Indrek; Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic spin-down of a rapidly rotating (millisecond) neutron star has been proposed as the power source of hydrogen-poor `superluminous' supernovae (SLSNe-I). However, producing an unambiguous test that can distinguish this model from alternatives, such as circumstellar interaction, has proven challenging. After the supernova explosion, the pulsar wind inflates a hot cavity behind the expanding stellar ejecta: the nascent millisecond pulsar wind nebula. Electron/positron pairs injected by the wind cool through inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron emission, producing a pair cascade and hard X-ray spectrum inside the nebula. These X-rays ionize the inner exposed side of the ejecta, driving an ionization front that propagates outwards with time. Under some conditions this front can breach the ejecta surface within months after the optical supernova peak, allowing ˜0.1-1 keV photons to escape the nebula unattenuated with a characteristic luminosity LX ˜ 1043-1045 erg s-1. This `ionization break-out' may explain the luminous X-ray emission observed from the transient SCP 06F, providing direct evidence that this SLSN was indeed engine powered. Luminous break-out requires a low ejecta mass and that the spin-down time of the pulsar be comparable to the photon diffusion time-scale at optical maximum, the latter condition being similar to that required for a supernova with a high optical fluence. These relatively special requirements may explain why most SLSNe-I are not accompanied by detectable X-ray emission. Global asymmetry of the supernova ejecta increases the likelihood of an early break-out along the direction of lowest density. Atomic states with lower threshold energies are more readily ionized at earlier times near optical maximum, allowing `UV break-out' across a wider range of pulsar and ejecta properties than X-ray break-out, possibly contributing to the blue/UV colours of SLSNe-I.

  6. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 Transportation Other....63 Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car..., Large Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous material in...

  7. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 Transportation Other....63 Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car..., Large Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous material in...

  8. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 Transportation Other....63 Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car..., Large Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous material in...

  9. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  10. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  11. Proliferation Risks of Magneetic Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production and Breakout

    SciTech Connect

    A. Glaser and R.J. Goldston

    2012-03-13

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to weapon-usable materials can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of weapon-usable material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material inn a declared facility, and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risks from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if the fusion system is designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

  12. Tomography of massive stars from core collapse to supernova shock breakout

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Matthew D.; Haxton, W. C.; Yüksel, Hasan

    2013-11-20

    Neutrinos and gravitational waves are the only direct probes of the inner dynamics of a stellar core collapse. They are also the first signals to arrive from a supernova (SN) and, if detected, establish the moment when the shock wave is formed that unbinds the stellar envelope and later initiates the optical display upon reaching the stellar surface with a burst of UV and X-ray photons, the shock breakout (SBO). We discuss how neutrino observations can be used to trigger searches to detect the elusive SBO event. Observation of the SBO would provide several important constraints on progenitor structure and the explosion, including the shock propagation time (the duration between the neutrino burst and SBO), an observable that is important in distinguishing progenitor types. Our estimates suggest that next-generation neutrino detectors could exploit the overdensity of nearby SNe to provide several such triggers per decade, more than an order-of-magnitude improvement over the present.

  13. Initial fluxon models of CME onset: loss-of-equilibrium, breakout, tether-cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C.

    2005-12-01

    I will present results from initial models of CME onset using a new force-free magnetic evolution code, FLUX, that uses the novel fluxon approach to MHD modeling. FLUX is a quasi-Lagrangian solver that is free of numerical reconnection and that I am making available as free software. It is currently suitable for studying evolving force-free equilibria in the presence of only controlled reconnection; development work is ongoing to add plasma static and dynamic forces. I plan to consider three simple configurations typical of three current genres of CME onset model: loss of equilibrium under smooth motion by the photosphere; "tether-cutting" (reconnection of a containment field underneath a twisted prominence field); and "breakout" (reconnection of a containment field above a twisted prominence field). In each case I will estimate the magnetic energy available to accelerate mass, and discuss the resulting shape of the remnant open field regions ("dimming regions") after liftoff.

  14. 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne breakout reaction and impact on X-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Tan, W P; Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Couder, M; Wiescher, M

    2007-06-15

    The breakout reaction 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne, which regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rp process, is critical for the explanation of the burst amplitude and periodicity of x-ray bursters. We report on the first successful measurement of the critical alpha-decay branching ratios of relevant states in 19Ne populated via 19F(3He,t)19Ne. Based on the experimental results and our previous lifetime measurements of these states, we derive the first experimental rate of 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne. The impact of our experimental results on the burst pattern and periodicity for a range of accretion rates is analyzed. PMID:17677960

  15. Reduction of ejecta from asperities on a metal surface upon shock breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, William; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Tyler, Troy; Zimmermann, Joerg

    2015-06-01

    Ejecta can be produced when a shock breaks out of a metallic surface with imperfections. The amount of material ejected depends on the strength of the shock and the surface roughness. This work focuses on the differences between square wave and Taylor wave loading, as well as examining techniques to reduce the amount of ejecta produced. In the case of square wave loading, an explosively driven flyer was launched onto an aluminum target featuring machined V-grooves on its surface. The velocity of ejecta launched into vacuum was monitored by photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). The Taylor wave was produced by detonating a high explosive next to the aluminum target and the ejecta again monitored with PDV. To attempt to suppress the ejecta, the shock breakout pressure was reduced by the addition of an air gap. A nearly shock-less compression was also achieved by evacuating the space between the explosive and the target.

  16. Proliferation risks of magnetic fusion energy: clandestine production, covert production and breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, A.; Goldston, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to weapon-usable materials can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of weapon-usable material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material in a declared facility and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper, we address each of these categories of risks from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if the fusion system is designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

  17. Explosive Nuclear Burning in the pp-Chain Region and the Breakout Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Hou, S. Q.; He, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear reactions in the pp-chain region and on the breakout process from the pp-chain region under very high temperature conditions are reviewed, and some possibilities for experimental investigation are discussed. The reactions discussed could play an important role typically for the primordial nucleosynthesis and supernova nucleosynthesis. Specifically, I discuss here the reactions starting from the two key nuclei, 7Be and 7Li. The 7Be(n,α) reaction, which destroys 7Be, is considered to have a large impact to the primordial 7Li problem. Our recent estimate of the reaction rate indicates that the reaction rate can be about one order of magnitude smaller than the rate currently adopted, suggesting this channel has a minor effect for the 7Li problem. Under a proton-rich environment at high temperature like the νp-process, the 7Be(α,γ)11C(α,p)14N pathway is expected to play a majpr role for heavy element synthesis, comparable to the triple alpha process. These two reactions on the pathway were investigated by using low-energy, high-intensity RI beams of 7Be and 11C. The results support the theoretical prediction of heavy nucleus production at around mass 90-100 by the νp-process, where the anomalously abundant p-nuclei exist. The reactions on the breakout sequence of 7Li(n,γ)8Li(α,n)11B are also discussed which could paly a crucial role in nuetron-rich envirnments, like in the primirdial universe as well as the early stage of the r-process. The cross sections of the first step reaction 7Li(n,γ)8Li seems well confirmed, but the second step reaction 8Li(α,n)11B still is not well known yet, whose status of the study is discussed.

  18. Developing a generalized allometric equation for aboveground biomass estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Balamuta, J. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A key potential uncertainty in estimating carbon stocks across multiple scales stems from the use of empirically calibrated allometric equations, which estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) from plant characteristics such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and/or height (H). The equations themselves contain significant and, at times, poorly characterized errors. Species-specific equations may be missing. Plant responses to their local biophysical environment may lead to spatially varying allometric relationships. The structural predictor may be difficult or impossible to measure accurately, particularly when derived from remote sensing data. All of these issues may lead to significant and spatially varying uncertainties in the estimation of AGB that are unexplored in the literature. We sought to quantify the errors in predicting AGB at the tree and plot level for vegetation plots in California. To accomplish this, we derived a generalized allometric equation (GAE) which we used to model the AGB on a full set of tree information such as DBH, H, taxonomy, and biophysical environment. The GAE was derived using published allometric equations in the GlobAllomeTree database. The equations were sparse in details about the error since authors provide the coefficient of determination (R2) and the sample size. A more realistic simulation of tree AGB should also contain the noise that was not captured by the allometric equation. We derived an empirically corrected variance estimate for the amount of noise to represent the errors in the real biomass. Also, we accounted for the hierarchical relationship between different species by treating each taxonomic level as a covariate nested within a higher taxonomic level (e.g. species < genus). This approach provides estimation under incomplete tree information (e.g. missing species) or blurred information (e.g. conjecture of species), plus the biophysical environment. The GAE allowed us to quantify contribution of each different

  19. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    PubMed Central

    Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  20. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  1. Aboveground vs. Belowground Carbon Stocks in African Tropical Lowland Rainforest: Drivers and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Marijn; Hufkens, Koen; Lisingo, Janvier; Baert, Geert; Verbeeck, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background African tropical rainforests are one of the most important hotspots to look for changes in the upcoming decades when it comes to C storage and release. The focus of studying C dynamics in these systems lies traditionally on living aboveground biomass. Belowground soil organic carbon stocks have received little attention and estimates of the size, controls and distribution of soil organic carbon stocks are highly uncertain. In our study on lowland rainforest in the central Congo basin, we combine both an assessment of the aboveground C stock with an assessment of the belowground C stock and analyze the latter in terms of functional pools and controlling factors. Principal Findings Our study shows that despite similar vegetation, soil and climatic conditions, soil organic carbon stocks in an area with greater tree height (= larger aboveground carbon stock) were only half compared to an area with lower tree height (= smaller aboveground carbon stock). This suggests that substantial variability in the aboveground vs. belowground C allocation strategy and/or C turnover in two similar tropical forest systems can lead to significant differences in total soil organic C content and C fractions with important consequences for the assessment of the total C stock of the system. Conclusions/Significance We suggest nutrient limitation, especially potassium, as the driver for aboveground versus belowground C allocation. However, other drivers such as C turnover, tree functional traits or demographic considerations cannot be excluded. We argue that large and unaccounted variability in C stocks is to be expected in African tropical rain-forests. Currently, these differences in aboveground and belowground C stocks are not adequately verified and implemented mechanistically into Earth System Models. This will, hence, introduce additional uncertainty to models and predictions of the response of C storage of the Congo basin forest to climate change and its contribution to

  2. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-23

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985.

  3. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks, each buried or submerged pipeline must have an external coating for external corrosion control if the...

  4. 49 CFR 195.428 - Overpressure safety devices and overfill protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... API Standard 2510 after October 2, 2000, must have an overfill protection system installed according to section 5.1.2 of API Standard 2510. Other aboveground breakout tanks with 600 gallons (2271 liters... have an overfill protection system installed according to API Recommended Practice 2350....

  5. 49 CFR 195.428 - Overpressure safety devices and overfill protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... API Standard 2510 after October 2, 2000, must have an overfill protection system installed according to section 5.1.2 of API Standard 2510. Other aboveground breakout tanks with 600 gallons (2271 liters... have an overfill protection system installed according to API Recommended Practice 2350....

  6. 49 CFR 195.428 - Overpressure safety devices and overfill protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... API Standard 2510 after October 2, 2000, must have an overfill protection system installed according to section 5.1.2 of API Standard 2510. Other aboveground breakout tanks with 600 gallons (2271 liters... have an overfill protection system installed according to API Recommended Practice 2350....

  7. 49 CFR 195.428 - Overpressure safety devices and overfill protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... API Standard 2510 after October 2, 2000, must have an overfill protection system installed according to section 5.1.2 of API Standard 2510. Other aboveground breakout tanks with 600 gallons (2271 liters... have an overfill protection system installed according to API Recommended Practice 2350....

  8. 49 CFR 195.428 - Overpressure safety devices and overfill protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... API Standard 2510 after October 2, 2000, must have an overfill protection system installed according to section 5.1.2 of API Standard 2510. Other aboveground breakout tanks with 600 gallons (2271 liters... have an overfill protection system installed according to API Recommended Practice 2350....

  9. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks,...

  10. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks,...

  11. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks,...

  12. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks,...

  13. Filling Tanks with Hydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, K.

    2004-10-01

    At the Hydrazine workshop in 2002 in Noordwijk several presentations dealt with the filling of satellite tanks. I was a bit surprised about the amount of manpower that is needed for this work. But I saw the same during the filling of the SCA system tanks some years ago in Trauen/Germany. I want to present the work flow of filling RESUS Hydrazine tanks. This bladder tanks have a capacity of 64 litres and are similar to some of the satellite tanks. We fill this tanks 25 to 50 times a year. Although the specifications are not exactly the same as those for satellite tank filling, it might be interesting to see how this work can be done half-automatically, because handling with Hydrazine is not a nice job, and the faster it goes, the better.

  14. Soil nutrients affect spatial patterns of aboveground biomass and emergent tree density in southwestern Borneo.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Gary D; Curran, Lisa M; Slik, J W F

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the relationship between soil fertility and aboveground biomass in lowland tropical forests have yielded conflicting results, reporting positive, negative and no effect of soil nutrients on aboveground biomass. Here, we quantify the impact of soil variation on the stand structure of mature Bornean forest throughout a lowland watershed (8-196 m a.s.l.) with uniform climate and heterogeneous soils. Categorical and bivariate methods were used to quantify the effects of (1) parent material differing in nutrient content (alluvium > sedimentary > granite) and (2) 27 soil parameters on tree density, size distribution, basal area and aboveground biomass. Trees > or =10 cm (diameter at breast height, dbh) were enumerated in 30 (0.16 ha) plots (sample area = 4.8 ha). Six soil samples (0-20 cm) per plot were analyzed for physiochemical properties. Aboveground biomass was estimated using allometric equations. Across all plots, stem density averaged 521 +/- 13 stems ha(-1), basal area 39.6 +/- 1.4 m(2) ha(-1) and aboveground biomass 518 +/- 28 Mg ha(-1) (mean +/- SE). Adjusted forest-wide aboveground biomass to account for apparent overestimation of large tree density (based on 69 0.3-ha transects; sample area = 20.7 ha) was 430 +/- 25 Mg ha(-1). Stand structure did not vary significantly among substrates, but it did show a clear trend toward larger stature on nutrient-rich alluvium, with a higher density and larger maximum size of emergent trees. Across all plots, surface soil phosphorus (P), potassium, magnesium and percentage sand content were significantly related to stem density and/or aboveground biomass (R (Pearson) = 0.368-0.416). In multiple linear regression, extractable P and percentage sand combined explained 31% of the aboveground biomass variance. Regression analyses on size classes showed that the abundance of emergent trees >120 cm dbh was positively related to soil P and exchangeable bases, whereas trees 60-90 cm dbh were negatively related to these

  15. Estimating forest and woodland aboveground biomass using active and passive remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Aboveground biomass was estimated from active and passive remote sensing sources, including airborne lidar and Landsat-8 satellites, in an eastern Arizona (USA) study area comprised of forest and woodland ecosystems. Compared to field measurements, airborne lidar enabled direct estimation of individual tree height with a slope of 0.98 (R2 = 0.98). At the plot-level, lidar-derived height and intensity metrics provided the most robust estimate for aboveground biomass, producing dominant species-based aboveground models with errors ranging from 4 to 14Mg ha –1 across all woodland and forest species. Landsat-8 imagery produced dominant species-based aboveground biomass models with errors ranging from 10 to 28 Mg ha –1. Thus, airborne lidar allowed for estimates for fine-scale aboveground biomass mapping with low uncertainty, while Landsat-8 seems best suited for broader spatial scale products such as a national biomass essential climate variable (ECV) based on land cover types for the United States.

  16. Belowground ABA boosts aboveground production of DIMBOA and primes induction of chlorogenic acid in maize.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Flors, Victor; Camañes, Gemma; Turlings, Ted C J; Ton, Jurriaan

    2009-07-01

    Plants are important mediators between above- and belowground herbivores. Consequently, interactions between root and shoot defenses can have far-reaching impacts on entire food webs. We recently reported that infestation of maize roots by larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera induced shoot resistance against herbivores and pathogens. Root herbivory also enhanced aboveground DIMBOA and primed for enhanced induction of chlorogenic acid, two secondary metabolites that have been associated with plant stress resistance. Interestingly, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) emerged as a putative long-distance signal in the regulation of these systemic defenses. In this addendum, we have investigated the role of root-derived ABA in aboveground regulation of DIMBOA and the phenolic compounds chlorogenic acid, caffeic and ferulic acid. Furthermore, we discuss the relevance of ABA in relation to defense against the leaf herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Soil-drench treatment with ABA mimicked root herbivore-induced accumulation of DIMBOA in the leaves. Similarly, ABA mimicked aboveground priming of chlorogenic acid production, causing augmented induction of this compound after subsequent shoot attack by S. littoralis caterpillars. These findings confirm our notion that ABA acts as an important signal in the regulation of aboveground defenses during belowground herbivory. However, based on our previous finding that ABA alone is not sufficient to trigger aboveground resistance against S. littoralis caterpillars, our results also suggest that the ABA-inducible effects on DIMBOA and chlorogenic acid are not solely responsible for root herbivore-induced resistance against S. littoralis. PMID:19820311

  17. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration workplan for Corrective Action Unit 198: Test Cell C filter tank closure, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This plan addresses characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 198 identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The site is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 Test Cell C Complex. The CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-12 which includes two aboveground radioactive wastewater filter tanks. The tanks have an estimated capacity of 2,271 liters (600 gallons) each and were used to filter radioactive wastewater originating from the Test Cell C ``Nuclear Furnace 1`` testing. The tanks contain radioisotopes. Process knowledge indicates that the most likely isotopes of concern include {sup 90}Strontium and {sup 137}Cesium.

  18. Multifunctional Tanks for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David H.; Lewis, Joseph C.; MacNeal, Paul D.

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses multifunctional tanks as means to integrate additional structural and functional efficiencies into designs of spacecraft. Whereas spacecraft tanks are traditionally designed primarily to store fluids and only secondarily to provide other benefits, multifunctional tanks are designed to simultaneously provide multiple primary benefits. In addition to one or more chamber(s) for storage of fluids, a multifunctional tank could provide any or all of the following: a) Passageways for transferring the fluids; b) Part or all of the primary structure of a spacecraft; c) All or part of an enclosure; d) Mechanical interfaces to components, subsystems, and/or systems; e) Paths and surfaces for transferring heat; f)Shielding against space radiation; j) Shielding against electromagnetic interference; h) Electrically conductive paths and surfaces; and i) Shades and baffles to protect against sunlight and/or other undesired light. Many different multifunctional-tank designs are conceivable. The design of a particular tank can be tailored to the requirements for the spacecraft in which the tank is to be installed. For example, the walls of the tank can be flat or curved or have more complicated shapes, and the tank can include an internal structure for strengthening the tank and/or other uses.

  19. Landfast sea ice break-out events in the Chukchi Sea: Two case studies illuminating long-term observations at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Mv, R.; Kambhamettu, C.; Fukamachi, Y.; Ohshima, K. I.

    2012-12-01

    Landfast sea ice in northern Alaska is an important coastal feature. It protects coasts from the impacts of storms, acts as a platform for travel and subsistence activities by native communities, and can be an obstacle to near-shore maritime enterprise. These services provided by landfast ice depend upon its presence and extent, as well as the ice cover's capacity to remain stably in place for long periods of time during the ice season. Along the eastern Chukchi coast and specifically at Barrow, Alaska, the near-shore ice conditions are highly dynamic. In recent years, break-outs of the landfast ice have been observed at Barrow, removing larger stretches of previously immobile landfast ice from shore and potentially threatening people and equipment. Indigenous knowledge by local Iñupiaq ice experts extending back several decades indicates that such events were rare or absent until the 1990s. Using imagery from a land-based marine radar, a component of the Barrow Sea Ice Observatory of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, landfast ice formation at Barrow, AK, has been tracked each season since 2005, and a number of break-out events have been identified. A detailed analysis of atmospheric, oceanic and sea ice conditions associated with such events can shed light on local knowledge and understanding of such events, and help develop approaches to predict and respond to break-outs. Here, two break-out events (on February 27, 2009 and March 24, 2010) are the subjects of case studies aimed at determining primary causes of break-outs. The radar imagery is used to track near-shore ice deformation prior to the break-out and to estimate the extent of grounded sea ice ridges. Oceanic and atmospheric data are used to estimate current and wind stress on the landfast ice cover. Sea level measurements provide insight as to whether or not a grounded ridge's keel could be lifted out of its bed, a potential precondition for a break-out to occur. Preliminary results suggest different

  20. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Large Packaging, cargo tank, or multi-unit tank car tank) containing a hazardous material in container... not transport a cargo tank or multi-unit tank car tank containing a hazardous material in TOFC or COFC... Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 Transportation...

  1. Character and distribution of borehole breakouts and their relationship to in situ stresses in deep Columbia River Basalts ( Washington State, USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Kim, K.

    1987-01-01

    The character and distribution of borehole breakouts in deeply buried basalts at the Hanford Site in S central Washington State are examined in light of stress indicator data and hydraulic- fracturing stress data by means of acoustic televiewer and acoustic waveform logging systems. A series of boreholes penetrating the Grande Ronde Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group were logged to examine the extent of breakouts at depths near 1000 m. -from Authors

  2. Aboveground predation by an American badger (Taxidea taxus) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eads, D.A.; Biggins, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    During research on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), we repeatedly observed a female American badger (Taxidea taxus) hunting prairie dogs on a colony in southern Phillips County, Montana. During 1-14 June 2006, we observed 7 aboveground attacks (2 successful) and 3 successful excavations of prairie dogs. The locations and circumstances of aboveground attacks suggested that the badger improved her probability of capturing prairie dogs by planning the aboveground attacks based on perceptions of speeds, angles, distances, and predicted escape responses of prey. Our observations add to previous reports on the complex and varied predatory methods and cognitive capacities of badgers. These observations also underscore the individuality of predators and support the concept that predators are active participants in predator-prey interactions.

  3. Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9.

  4. Below-ground herbivory limits induction of extrafloral nectar by above-ground herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants produce extrafloral nectar (EFN), and increase production following above-ground herbivory, presumably to attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Below-ground herbivores, alone or in combination with those above ground, may also alter EFN production depending on the specificity of this defence response and the interactions among herbivores mediated through plant defences. To date, however, a lack of manipulative experiments investigating EFN production induced by above- and below-ground herbivory has limited our understanding of how below-ground herbivory mediates indirect plant defences to affect above-ground herbivores and their natural enemies. Methods In a greenhouse experiment, seedlings of tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) were subjected to herbivory by a specialist flea beetle (Bikasha collaris) that naturally co-occurs as foliage-feeding adults and root-feeding larvae. Seedlings were subjected to above-ground adults and/or below-ground larvae herbivory, and EFN production was monitored. Key Results Above- and/or below-ground herbivory significantly increased the percentage of leaves with active nectaries, the volume of EFN and the mass of soluble solids within the nectar. Simultaneous above- and below-ground herbivory induced a higher volume of EFN and mass of soluble solids than below-ground herbivory alone, but highest EFN production was induced by above-ground herbivory when below-ground herbivores were absent. Conclusions The induction of EFN production by below-ground damage suggests that systemic induction underlies some of the EFN response. The strong induction by above-ground herbivory in the absence of below-ground herbivory points to specific induction based on above- and below-ground signals that may be adaptive for this above-ground indirect defence. PMID:25681822

  5. Interrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free-living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Khaitov, Botir; Patiño-Ruiz, José David; Pina, Tatiana; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aboveground plant performance is strongly influenced by belowground microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic and have negative effects, while others, such as nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, usually have positive effects. Recent research revealed that belowground interactions between plants and functionally distinct groups of microorganisms cascade up to aboveground plant associates such as herbivores and their natural enemies. However, while functionally distinct belowground microorganisms commonly co-occur in the rhizosphere, their combined effects, and relative contributions, respectively, on performance of aboveground plant-associated organisms are virtually unexplored. Here, we scrutinized and disentangled the effects of free-living nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (DB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae (AMF) on host plant choice and reproduction of the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris. Additionally, we assessed plant growth, and AMF and DB occurrence and density as affected by each other. Both AMF alone and DB alone increased spider mite reproduction to similar levels, as compared to the control, and exerted additive effects under co-occurrence. These effects were similarly apparent in host plant choice, that is, the mites preferred leaves from plants with both AMF and DB to plants with AMF or DB to plants grown without AMF and DB. DB, which also act as AMF helper bacteria, enhanced root colonization by AMF, whereas AMF did not affect DB abundance. AMF but not DB increased growth of reproductive plant tissue and seed production, respectively. Both AMF and DB increased the biomass of vegetative aboveground plant tissue. Our study breaks new ground in multitrophic belowground–aboveground research by providing first insights into the fitness implications of plant-mediated interactions between interrelated belowground fungi

  6. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of the survey will cover a representative sample of 1050 facilities and approximately 2800 tanks. EPA will analyze the questionnaires and then select a sub-sample of about 500 tanks to examine leakage problems in more detail. In the absence of specific groundwater protection legislation or regulation, EPA is planning to use the Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate underground tanks.

  7. Composite Tank Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on composite tank development. There is a need for oxidizer tanks and reliable, lightweight fuel. The need for cost-effective and scalable manufacturing is also evident. In order to achieve these goals, tooling methods for tank development must be applied, methods for producing easily adaptable and scalable vessel liners must be developed, insulation layer or protective barriers for containers must be manufactured, and an appropriate fiber/resin system for composite overwrap structures must be identified.

  8. Range vegetation type mapping and above-ground green biomass estimations using multispectral imagery. [Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Range vegetation types have been successfully mapped on a portion of the 68,000 acre study site located west of Baggs, Wyoming, using ERTS-1 imagery. These types have been ascertained from field transects over a five year period. Comparable studies will be made with EREP imagery. Above-ground biomass estimation studies are being conducted utilizing double sampling techniques on two similar study sites. Information obtained will be correlated with percent relative reflectance measurements obtained on the ground which will be related to image brightness levels. This will provide an estimate of above-ground green biomass with multispectral imagery.

  9. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  10. CLUST; A non-disruptive secondary containment technology for underground storage tank farms

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, T.P.; Roberge, M.F. )

    1987-01-01

    To reduce the adverse effects of gasoline or hazardous waste leakage from underground storage tanks, a non-disruptive, secondary containment technology for containing leaking underground storage tanks (CLUST) is being developed. The CLUST process involves the selective emplacement of an impermeable polymeric barrier in the soil/gravel fill which surrounds underground storage tanks. The process can also be used to emplace an impermeable barrier below aboveground storage tanks which are either leaking or have a high potential for leaking. CLUST formulations, based on the experimental results to-date are presented. They show excellent compatibility with kerosene and a good compatibility with a variety of organic solvents. These formulations will thus be very useful in containing leaking underground storage tanks which contain gasoline, solvents, or other petroleum related products. Laboratory testing indicates that the performance of the CLUST barrier materials is an order of magnitude better in a simulated underground storage tank setting than in the bulk phase compatibility tests. The developed technique will allow the construction of secondary containment facilities without disrupting existing underground tank farms and their piping infrastructure. CLUST is intended to prevent and mitigate sudden releases and/or resulting environmental impacts from high hazard/high risk'' chemical and petroleum storage situations. Criteria for usage for the test barrier formulations are presented.

  11. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  12. Horizontal principal stress orientation in the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) transect from borehole breakouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, A.; Saito, S.; Vannucchi, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) drilled the Pacific margin of the Middle America Trench just north of where the Cocos Ridge enters the subduction zone, resulting in basal erosion of the upper plate. Here we report the orientations of the maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) from borehole breakouts detected by logging-while-drilling and wireline downhole measurements. All SHmax directions were estimated in the sediment cover of the margin, above the deeper rocks of the deformed margin wedge. We observe three overall SHmax orientations: NNE-SSW (25° azimuth) in the deepest interval drilled at the upper slope Site U1379; ENE-WSW (82°) in the rest of Site U1379 and in Site U1413, also drilled in the upper slope; and NNW-SSE (157°) in the mid-slope Site U1378. Our preferred interpretation is that the deepest interval of Site U1379 records the stress conditions in the underlying margin wedge, as SHmax is parallel to the direction of the Cocos-Caribbean plate convergence and of the compressional axes of plate boundary fault earthquakes. The variable SHmax directions observed elsewhere are likely due to the effect of a network of normal faults that subdivide the sediment cover into a number of independently deforming blocks. In addition, the observed SHmax directions may be influenced by the subducting Cocos Ridge, which acts as an indenter causing oblique deformation, and by the transition to seismogenic subduction along the plate boundary fault.

  13. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernández, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the "laser breakout afterburner" (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 1021W/cm2, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of ˜2GeV.

  14. Effects of Light Ion Contaminants on the Laser Break-Out Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernández, J. C.

    2006-10-01

    A novel laser ion acceleration mechanism was reported by Yin et al. [Laser and Particle Beams 24, 291; see also invited talk by L. Yin this meeting] that allows, through careful target and laser conditioning, greatly enhanced peak beam ion energy (>2 GeV energy carbon ions with an I=10^21 W/cm^2 laser) and conversion efficiency from laser to fast ions. After a brief phase of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), the break-out afterburner (BOA) undergoes a period of enhanced TNSA followed by intense ion acceleration associated with penetration of the laser through the thin target. One of the outstanding questions regarding realization of the BOA experimentally is whether cleaning of ultra-thin targets is required to remove protons that collect on the target. Particle-in-cell simulations of BOA with and without contaminants will be shown. These simulations, using the LANL VPIC code, can be used to assess the effects on ion acceleration and beam quality resulting from the presence of contaminants.

  15. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of {approx}2 GeV.

  16. Shock break-out: how a GRB revealed the beginnings of a supernova.

    PubMed

    Blustin, Alexander J

    2007-05-15

    In February 2006, Swift caught a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the act of turning into a supernova, and made the first ever direct observations of the break-out and early expansion of a supernova shock wave. GRB 060218 began with an exceptionally long burst of non-thermal gamma-rays, lasting over 2000s, as a jet erupted through the surface of the star. While this was in progress, an optically-thick thermal component from the shock wave of the supernova explosion grew to prominence, and we were able to track the mildly relativistic expansion of this shell as the blackbody peak moved from the X-rays into the UV and optical bands. The initial radius of the shock implied that it was a blue supergiant that had exploded, but the lack of hydrogen emission lines in the supernova spectrum indicated a more compact star. The most likely scenario is that the shock ploughed into the massive stellar wind of a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, with the shock breaking-out and becoming visible to us once it reached the radius where the wind became optically-thin. I present the Swift observations of this landmark event, and discuss the new questions and answers it leaves us with. PMID:17293341

  17. Dofasco`s No. 4 blast furnace hearth breakout, repair and rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, R.J.; Fischer, A.J.; Sharp, R.M.; Stothart, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    On May 5, 1994, after producing 9.5 million metric tons of iron, Dofasco`s No. 4 Blast Furnace experienced a hearth breakout 250 millimeters below the west taphole. The hot metal spill caused a fire resulting in severe damage and 33 days of lost production. During a 26-day period, electrical wiring, water drainage systems and both tapholes were repaired. Recovery from an unprepared furnace stop of this length, with the deadman depleted is difficult. To aid with the rescue Hoogovens-designed oxygen/fuel lances were commissioned. The furnace recovery began with a lance in each taphole and all tuyeres plugged. Six days after startup the furnace was casting into torpedo cars, and after nine days operation had returned to normal. This incident prompted Dofasco to expand the hearth monitoring system to detect and prevent similar occurrences. During the repair, 203 new thermocouples were installed in the hearth, concentrating on the tapholes and elephant foot areas. These thermocouples were installed at various depths and locations to allow heat flux calculations. This hearth monitoring system has already identified other problem areas and provided valuable information about hearth drainage patterns. This information has allowed them to develop control strategies to manage localized problem areas.

  18. Report on design, construction, and testing of CO/sub 2/ breakout system for geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.

    1984-03-01

    A skid mounted test facility has been built for determining conditions at which CO/sub 2/ flashes from geothermal brines. The system has been checked and operated at one geothermal plant. It performed as designed. The equipment is designed to operate at temperatures and pressures typical of wells near Heber, California. (Nominally 180/sup 0/C and 300 to 500 psig). It has heat exchangers which can cool the brine to less than 70/sup 0/C. (The cooling water is recirculated after being cooled by a forced air heat exchanger). Breakout pressures can be determined for any temperature between 70/sup 0/C and wellhead temperature. An adjustable orifice provides final control on pressure required to initiate flashing. The orifice is at the bottom of a sight glass. A light beam shines through the sight glass and focuses on a photoelectric cell. The presence of bubbles scatters light and decreases the output of the cell. Results using the cell were more reproducible than those using the naked eye. Results from one test show a smooth curve over the temperature range 75/sup 0/C to 165/sup 0/C. Agreement between the experimental values and calculated ones is discussed.

  19. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BREAKOUT CRITERIA FOR ACCRETION-POWERED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai; Ioka, Kunihito

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency {eta}. By varying the efficiency {eta} and opening angle {theta}{sub op} for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition {eta} {approx}> 10{sup -4}({theta}{sub op}/8 Degree-Sign ){sup 2} is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.

  20. SUPERNOVA PTF 09UJ: A POSSIBLE SHOCK BREAKOUT FROM A DENSE CIRCUMSTELLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, E. O.; Neill, J. D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Forster, K.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Law, N.; Martin, C.; Quimby, R. M.; Rabinak, I.; Arcavi, I.; Waxman, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Poznanski, D.; Nugent, P. E.; Jacobsen, J.; Bildsten, L.; Howell, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Type-IIn supernovae (SNe IIn), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of an SN IIn, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a timescale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n {approx} 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate ({approx}0.1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe IIn.

  1. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation Other... Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.401 Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks....

  2. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation Other... Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.401 Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks....

  3. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation Other... Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.401 Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks....

  4. 49 CFR 179.401 - Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks. 179.401 Section 179.401 Transportation Other... Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.401 Individual specification requirements applicable to inner tanks for cryogenic liquid tank car tanks....

  5. Horizontal stresses from well-bore breakouts and lithologies associated with their formation, Oklahoma and Texas Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    Orientations of crustal stresses are inferred from stress-induced well-bore breakouts in three areas in the south-central United States: the eastern part of the Anadarko basin in central Oklahoma, the Marietta basin in south-central Oklahoma, and the Bravo dome area of the central Texas Panhandle. Inferred directions of maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) are ENE for the eastern Anadarko basin, and NE for the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area. For the Bravo dome area, the magnitudes of the three principal stresses (S1, S2, S3) are known from existing hydraulic-fracturing (hydrofrac) measurements, and a normal-faulting stress regime (SV > SHmax > SHmin) is implied. For the eastern Anadarko basin and the Marietta basin, the magnitudes of the principal stresses are not known. Because Quaternary left-lateral oblique slip on the Meers fault in south-central Oklahoma suggests strike-slip (SHmax > Sv > SHmin) and reverse faulting (SHmax > SHmin > SV), the study region is inferred to be a possible transition zone between areas of extensional and compressional stresses. Breakout data from the eastern Anadarko basin yield a single consistent SHmax orientation. Data from the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area have bimodal-orthogonal distributions consisting of breakouts and orthogonal sets of well-bore enlargement orientations. Orthogonal trends in the data are probably related to drilling-induced hydraulic fracturing of the well bore, or to preexisting natural fractures or joint sets intersecting the well bore. On the dipmeter log, breakouts and fracture enlargements have elliptical cross sections of similar size and shape. Orthogonally oriented well-bore enlargements are differentiated by comparing their long-axis orientations with directions of known or inferred horizontal stress. Dispersion, or data scatter, among enlargement orientations (bimodal data sets) increases the standard deviations for many well data sets from the Marietta basin and the Bravo

  6. Facilitation and inhibition: changes in plant nitrogen and secondary metabolites mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, it remains unclear how herbivore-induced changes in plant primary and secondary metabolites impact aboveground and belowground herbivore interactions. Here we report the effects of aboveground (adult) and belowground (larval) feeding by Bikasha collaris on nitrogen and secondary chemicals i...

  7. HAWAII UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a point coverage of underground storage tanks(UST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more underground storage tanks occur. Each fa...

  8. Underground Tank Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednar, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    The harm to human health and our environment caused by leaking underground storage tanks can be devastating. Schools can meet new federal waste management standards by instituting daily inventory monitoring, selecting a reliable volumetric testing company, locating and repairing leaks promptly, and removing and installing tanks appropriately. (MLH)

  9. Aboveground net primary production responses to water availability in the Chihuhuan Desert: importance of legacy effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In arid ecosystems, current year precipitation explains a small proportion of annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Precipitation that occurred in previous years may be responsible for the observed difference between actual and expected ANPP, a concept that we called legacy. Thus, previo...

  10. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the fundamental role of below-aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms-mycorrhizas and legume-rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand-have been found to influence each other, with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. Here we review the mechanisms that may link these two-level mutualisms, mostly reported for native plant species, and make predictions about their relevance during alien plant invasions. We propose that alien plants establishing effective mutualisms with belowground microbes might improve their reproductive success through positive interactions between those mutualists and pollinators and seed dispersers. On the other hand, changes in the abundance and diversity of soil mutualists induced by invasion can also interfere with below-aboveground links for native plant species. We conclude that further research on this topic is needed in the field of invasion ecology as it can provide interesting clues on synergistic interactions and invasional meltdowns during alien plant invasions. PMID:26034049

  11. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect

    MANGAN, D.

    2003-03-20

    The purpose of the Technical Basis Document is to determine the consequences and frequency of aboveground structure failures. These failures include drops of contained equipment, such as a pump, from a SST or DST, a crane failure resulting in a load drop onto a HEPA filter. These failures can result in an uncontrolled release of radiological and toxicological material.

  12. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  13. Switchgrass and intermediate wheatgrass aboveground and belowground response to nitrogen and calcium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrient management will be critical in developing sustainable perennial biofeedstocks. Calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) treatments (2, 8, and 32 mg L-1) were investigated on aboveground and belowground growth of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and intermediate wheatgrass [Thinopyrum interme...

  14. Impact of predatory carabids on below- and aboveground pests and yield in strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of adult carabid beetles on below- and above-ground pests and fruit yield was examined in a two-year strawberry field study. Plots (2 m x 2 m) enclosed with barriers were used to augment or exclude adult carabids, and compared to open control plots. Pterostichus melanarius was the predo...

  15. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the fundamental role of below–aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms—mycorrhizas and legume–rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand—have been found to influence each other, with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. Here we review the mechanisms that may link these two-level mutualisms, mostly reported for native plant species, and make predictions about their relevance during alien plant invasions. We propose that alien plants establishing effective mutualisms with belowground microbes might improve their reproductive success through positive interactions between those mutualists and pollinators and seed dispersers. On the other hand, changes in the abundance and diversity of soil mutualists induced by invasion can also interfere with below–aboveground links for native plant species. We conclude that further research on this topic is needed in the field of invasion ecology as it can provide interesting clues on synergistic interactions and invasional meltdowns during alien plant invasions. PMID:26034049

  16. Use of Radar to Estimate Above-Ground Biomass in Disturbed Tropical Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    The overall purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of satellite radar in distinguishing, first, different cover classes in tropical landscapes and, second, cover classes with different amounts of above-ground biomass. The work focused on Ama7onian forests around Paragominas, Para, Brazil where extensive ground data had been obtained through previous field work.

  17. Root growth dynamics linked to aboveground growth in walnuts (Juglans regia L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims: Examination of belowground plant responses to canopy and soil moisture manipulation is scant compared to that aboveground but needed to understand whole plant responses to environmental factors. Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root growth in respon...

  18. Characteristics of train noise in above-ground and underground stations with side and island platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-04-01

    Railway stations can be principally classified by their locations, i.e., above-ground or underground stations, and by their platform styles, i.e., side or island platforms. However, the effect of the architectural elements on the train noise in stations is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to determine the different acoustical characteristics of the train noise for each station style. The train noise was evaluated by (1) the A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure level ( LAeq), (2) the amplitude of the maximum peak of the interaural cross-correlation function (IACC), (3) the delay time ( τ1) and amplitude ( ϕ1) of the first maximum peak of the autocorrelation function. The IACC, τ1 and ϕ1 are related to the subjective diffuseness, pitch and pitch strength, respectively. Regarding the locations, the LAeq in the underground stations was 6.4 dB higher than that in the above-ground stations, and the pitch in the underground stations was higher and stronger. Regarding the platform styles, the LAeq on the side platforms was 3.3 dB higher than on the island platforms of the above-ground stations. For the underground stations, the LAeq on the island platforms was 3.3 dB higher than that on the side platforms when a train entered the station. The IACC on the island platforms of the above-ground stations was higher than that in the other stations.

  19. A study on estimation of aboveground wet biomass based on the microwave vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation biomass is an important parameter in the carbon cycle study. In this paper, a new technique to estimate aboveground vegetation wet biomass based on the Microwave Vegetation Indices (MVIs), which are computed through the observed brightness temperature of AMSR-E/Aqua under two adjacent fre...

  20. Above-ground biomass of mangrove species. I. Analysis of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Mário Luiz Gomes; Schaeffer-Novelli, Yara

    2005-10-01

    This study analyzes the above-ground biomass of Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa located in the mangroves of Bertioga (SP) and Guaratiba (RJ), Southeast Brazil. Its purpose is to determine the best regression model to estimate the total above-ground biomass and compartment (leaves, reproductive parts, twigs, branches, trunk and prop roots) biomass, indirectly. To do this, we used structural measurements such as height, diameter at breast-height (DBH), and crown area. A combination of regression types with several compositions of independent variables generated 2.272 models that were later tested. Subsequent analysis of the models indicated that the biomass of reproductive parts, branches, and prop roots yielded great variability, probably because of environmental factors and seasonality (in the case of reproductive parts). It also indicated the superiority of multiple regression to estimate above-ground biomass as it allows researchers to consider several aspects that affect above-ground biomass, specially the influence of environmental factors. This fact has been attested to the models that estimated the biomass of crown compartments.

  1. Closure report for underground storage tank 141-R3U1 and its associated underground piping

    SciTech Connect

    Mallon, B.J.; Blake, R.G.

    1994-03-01

    Underground storage tank UST 141-R3U1 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984. This tank system consisted of a concrete tank, lined with polyvinyl chloride, and approximately 100 feet of PVC underground piping. UST 141-R3U1 had a capacity of 450 gallons. The underground piping connected three floor drains and one sink inside Building 141 to UST 141-R3U1. The wastewater collected in UST 141-R3U1 contained organic solvents, metals, and inorganic acids. On November 30, 1987, the 141-R3U1 tank system failed a precision tank test. The 141-R3U1 tank system was subsequently emptied and removed from service pending further precision tests to determine the location of the leak within the tank system. A precision tank test on February 5, 1988, was performed to confirm the November 30, 1987 test. Four additional precision tests were performed on this tank system between February 25, 1988, and March 6, 1988. The leak was located where the inlet piping from Building 141 penetrates the concrete side of UST 141-R3U1. The volume of wastewater that entered the backfill and soil around and/or beneath UST 141-R3U1 is unknown. On December 13, 1989, the LLNL Environmental Restoration Division submitted a plan to close UST 141-R3U1 and its associated piping to the Alameda County Department of Environmental Health. UST 141-R3U1 was closed as an UST, and shall be used instead as additional secondary containment for two aboveground storage tanks.

  2. Liquid Hydrogen Tank for the External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photograph shows an inside view of a liquid hydrogen tank for the Space Shuttle external tank (ET) Main Propulsion Test Article (MPTA). The ET provides liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to the Shuttle's three main engines during the first 8.5 minutes of flight. At 154-feet long and more than 27-feet in diameter, the ET is the largest component of the Space Shuttle, the structural backbone of the entire Shuttle system, and is the only part of the vehicle that is not reusable. The ET is manufactured at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, by the Martin Marietta Corporation under management of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. Tank characterization reference guide

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

  4. Regional contingencies in the relationship between aboveground Bbomass and litter in the world’s grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O’Halloran, Lydia R.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Cleland, Elsa E.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Hobbie, Sarah; Harpole, W. Stan; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Davies, Kendi F.; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Li, Wei; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Stevens, Carly J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on regional-scale studies, aboveground production and litter decomposition are thought to positively covary, because they are driven by shared biotic and climatic factors. Until now we have been unable to test whether production and decomposition are generally coupled across climatically dissimilar regions, because we lacked replicated data collected within a single vegetation type across multiple regions, obfuscating the drivers and generality of the association between production and decomposition. Furthermore, our understanding of the relationships between production and decomposition rests heavily on separate meta-analyses of each response, because no studies have simultaneously measured production and the accumulation or decomposition of litter using consistent methods at globally relevant scales. Here, we use a multi-country grassland dataset collected using a standardized protocol to show that live plant biomass (an estimate of aboveground net primary production) and litter disappearance (represented by mass loss of aboveground litter) do not strongly covary. Live biomass and litter disappearance varied at different spatial scales. There was substantial variation in live biomass among continents, sites and plots whereas among continent differences accounted for most of the variation in litter disappearance rates. Although there were strong associations among aboveground biomass, litter disappearance and climatic factors in some regions (e.g. U.S. Great Plains), these relationships were inconsistent within and among the regions represented by this study. These results highlight the importance of replication among regions and continents when characterizing the correlations between ecosystem processes and interpreting their global-scale implications for carbon flux. We must exercise caution in parameterizing litter decomposition and aboveground production in future regional and global carbon models as their relationship is complex.

  5. Estimating above-ground carbon biomass in a newly restored coastal plain wetland using remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Joseph B; Bernhardt, Emily; Swenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging) is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R(2) values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively). Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R(2) of 0.37). These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas. PMID:23840837

  6. Deer browsing delays succession by altering aboveground vegetation and belowground seed banks.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Antonio; Morris, Scott H; Parker, John D; Cone, Caitlin L; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-01-01

    Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15 × 15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently followed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005-2010), we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005-2008) and tree density (2005-2012). The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity), reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials), and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually recruit from an

  7. Estimating Above-Ground Carbon Biomass in a Newly Restored Coastal Plain Wetland Using Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Joseph B.; Bernhardt, Emily; Swenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging) is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R2 values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively). Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R2 of 0.37). These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas. PMID:23840837

  8. Plant genetic variation mediates an indirect ecological effect between belowground earthworms and aboveground aphids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between aboveground and belowground terrestrial communities are often mediated by plants, with soil organisms interacting via the roots and aboveground organisms via the shoots and leaves. Many studies now show that plant genetics can drive changes in the structure of both above and belowground communities; however, the role of plant genetic variation in mediating aboveground-belowground interactions is still unclear. We used an earthworm-plant-aphid model system with two aphid species (Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum) to test the effect of host-plant (Vicia faba) genetic variation on the indirect interaction between the belowground earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the aboveground aphid populations. Results Our data shows that host-plant variety mediated an indirect ecological effect of earthworms on generalist black bean aphids (A. fabae), with earthworms increasing aphid growth rate in three plant varieties but decreasing it in another variety. We found no effect of earthworms on the second aphid species, the pea aphid (A. pisum), and no effect of competition between the aphid species. Plant biomass was increased when earthworms were present, and decreased when A. pisum was feeding on the plant (mediated by plant variety). Although A. fabae aphids were influenced by the plants and worms, they did not, in turn, alter plant biomass. Conclusions Previous work has shown inconsistent effects of earthworms on aphids, but we suggest these differences could be explained by plant genetic variation and variation among aphid species. This study demonstrates that the outcome of belowground-aboveground interactions can be mediated by genetic variation in the host-plant, but depends on the identity of the species involved. PMID:25331082

  9. Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Chave, Jérôme; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Búrquez, Alberto; Chidumayo, Emmanuel; Colgan, Matthew S; Delitti, Welington B C; Duque, Alvaro; Eid, Tron; Fearnside, Philip M; Goodman, Rosa C; Henry, Matieu; Martínez-Yrízar, Angelina; Mugasha, Wilson A; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Nelson, Bruce W; Ngomanda, Alfred; Nogueira, Euler M; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar; Pélissier, Raphaël; Ploton, Pierre; Ryan, Casey M; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Vieilledent, Ghislain

    2014-10-01

    Terrestrial carbon stock mapping is important for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation policies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric models to infer oven-dry aboveground biomass of trees from census data. The degree of uncertainty associated with previously published pantropical aboveground biomass allometries is large. We analyzed a global database of directly harvested trees at 58 sites, spanning a wide range of climatic conditions and vegetation types (4004 trees ≥ 5 cm trunk diameter). When trunk diameter, total tree height, and wood specific gravity were included in the aboveground biomass model as covariates, a single model was found to hold across tropical vegetation types, with no detectable effect of region or environmental factors. The mean percent bias and variance of this model was only slightly higher than that of locally fitted models. Wood specific gravity was an important predictor of aboveground biomass, especially when including a much broader range of vegetation types than previous studies. The generic tree diameter-height relationship depended linearly on a bioclimatic stress variable E, which compounds indices of temperature variability, precipitation variability, and drought intensity. For cases in which total tree height is unavailable for aboveground biomass estimation, a pantropical model incorporating wood density, trunk diameter, and the variable E outperformed previously published models without height. However, to minimize bias, the development of locally derived diameter-height relationships is advised whenever possible. Both new allometric models should contribute to improve the accuracy of biomass assessment protocols in tropical vegetation types, and to advancing our understanding of architectural and evolutionary constraints on woody plant development. PMID:24817483

  10. Deer Browsing Delays Succession by Altering Aboveground Vegetation and Belowground Seed Banks

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Antonio; Morris, Scott H.; Parker, John D.; Cone, Caitlin L.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15×15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently fallowed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005–2010), we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005–2008) and tree density (2005–2012). The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity), reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials), and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually recruit

  11. Cadmium uptake in above-ground parts of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiwang; Pang, Yan; Ji, Puhui; Gao, Pengcheng; Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Tong, Yan'an

    2016-03-01

    Because of its high Cd uptake and translocation, lettuce is often used in Cd contamination studies. However, there is a lack of information on Cd accumulation in the above-ground parts of lettuce during the entire growing season. In this study, a field experiment was carried out in a Cd-contaminated area. Above-ground lettuce parts were sampled, and the Cd content was measured using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results showed that the Cd concentration in the above-ground parts of lettuce increased from 2.70 to 3.62mgkg(-1) during the seedling stage, but decreased from 3.62 to 2.40mgkg(-1) during organogenesis and from 2.40 to 1.64mgkg(-1) during bolting. The mean Cd concentration during the seedling stage was significantly higher than that during organogenesis (a=0.05) and bolting (a=0.01). The Cd accumulation in the above-ground parts of an individual lettuce plant could be described by a sigmoidal curve. Cadmium uptake during organogenesis was highest (80% of the total), whereas that during bolting was only 4.34%. This research further reveals that for Rome lettuce: (1) the highest Cd content of above-ground parts occurred at the end of the seedling phase; (2) the best harvest time with respect to Cd phytoaccumulation is at the end of the organogenesis stage; and (3) the organogenesis stage is the most suitable time to enhance phytoaccumulation efficiency by adjusting the root:shoot ratio. PMID:26685781

  12. Tank 241-U-202 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-202.

  13. Tank 241-U-201 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 22-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-U-201.

  14. Tank 241-BY-103 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-10-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL 329 Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BY-103.

  15. Tank 241-BY-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-105.

  16. Tank 241-C-201: Tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-03-06

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-C-201.

  17. ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel pump house (TAN-611), engine fuel tank, water pump house, water storage tank. Camera facing northwest. Not edge of shielding berm at left of view. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9217 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Large-scale internal structure in volcanogenic breakout flood deposits: Extensive GPR survey on volcaniclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, K.; Gomez, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale outburst floods from volcanic lakes such as caldera lakes or volcanically dammed river-valleys tend to be voluminous with total discharge of > 1-10s km3 and peak discharge of >10000s to 100000s m3 s-1. Such a large flood can travel long distance and leave sediments and bedforms/landforms extensively with large-scale internal structures, which are difficult to assess from single local sites. Moreover, the sediments and bedforms/landforms are sometimes untraceable, and outcrop information obtained by classical geological and geomorphological field surveys is limited to the dissected/terraced parts of fan body, road cuts and/or large quarries. Therefore, GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar), using the properties of electromagnetic waves' propagation through media, seems best adapted for the appraisal of large-scale subsurface structures. Recently, studies on GPR applications to volcanic deposits have successfully captured images of lava flows and volcaniclastic deposits and proved the usefulness of this method even onto the volcanic areas which often encompass complicated stratigraphy and structures with variable material, grainsize, and ferromagnetic content. Using GPR, the present study aims to understand the large-scale internal structures of volcanogenic flood deposits. The survey was carried out over two volcanogenic flood fan (or apron) sediments in northeast Japan, at Numazawa and Towada volcanoes. The 5 ka Numazawa flood deposits in the Tadami river catchment that has been emplaced by a breakout flood from ignimbrite-dammed valley leaving pumiceous gravelly sediments with meter-sized boulders in the flow path. At Towada volcano, a comparable flood event originating from a breach in the caldera rim emplaced the 13-15 ka Sanbongi fan deposits in the Oirase river valley, which is characterized by a bouldery fan deposits. The GPR data was collected following 200 to 500 m long lateral and longitudinal transects, which were captured using a GPR Pulse

  19. Tow Tank #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Digging the channel for the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.Published in NACA TR No. 470, 'The N.A.C.A. Tank: A High-Speed Towing Basin for Testing Models of Seaplane Floats,' by Starr Truscott, 1933.

  20. GeV Laser Ion Acceleration from Ultrathin Targets: The Laser Break-Out Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lin

    2006-10-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism has been identified using particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ``laser break-out afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target and generates a large longitudinal electric field localized at the rear of the target with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. This mechanism allows ion acceleration to GeV energies at vastly reduced laser intensities compared with earlier acceleration schemes. The new mechanism enables the acceleration of carbon ions to greater than 2 GeV energy at a laser intensity of only 10^21 W/cm^2, an intensity that has been realized in existing laser systems. Other techniques for achieving these energies in the literature [D. Habs et al., Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, 46, 375 (2001); T. Esirkepov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 175003-1 (2004)] rely upon intensities of 10^24 W/cm^2 or above, i.e., 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than any laser intensity that has been demonstrated to date. Also, the BOA mechanism attains higher energy and efficiency than TNSA where the scaling laws [Hegelich et al., Phys. Plasmas, 12, 056314 (2005)] predict carbon energies of 50 MeV/u for identical laser conditions. In the early stages of the BOA, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasi-monoenergetic bunch with median energy higher than that realized recently experimentally [Hegelich et al., Nature, 441, 439 (2006)].

  1. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  2. NACA Tow Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    L4695 shows the interior view of construction of the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' This picture shows the tank before the coving was added. This brought the rails for the carriage closer together and helped suppress waves produced by the models. The finished tank would be filled with approximately 4 million gallons of salt water pumped in from the Back River. The tank was covered by a shelter which protected the water surface. The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.

  3. TANK FARM ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    TIFFT, S.R.

    2003-06-26

    Through regulations, permitting or binding negotiations, Regulators establish requirements, limits, permit conditions and Notice of Construction (NOC) conditions with which the Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) must comply. Operating Specifications are technical limits which are set on a process to prevent injury to personnel, or damage to the facility or environment, The main purpose of this document is to provide specification limits and recovery actions for the TFC Environmental Surveillance Program at the Hanford Site. Specification limits are given for monitoring frequencies and permissible variation of readings from an established baseline or previous reading. The requirements in this document are driven by environmental considerations and data analysis issues, rather than facility design or personnel safety issues. This document is applicable to all single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank (DST) waste tanks, and the associated catch tanks and receiver tanks, and transfer systems. This Tank Farm Environmental Specifications Document (ESD) implements environmental-regulatory limits on the configuration and operation of the Hanford Tank Farms facility that have been established by Regulators. This ESD contains specific field operational limits and recovery actions for compliance with airborne effluent regulations and agreements, liquid effluents regulations and agreements, and environmental tank system requirements. The scope of this ESD is limited to conditions that have direct impact on Operations/Projects or that Operations Projects have direct impact upon. This document does not supercede or replace any Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, regulatory permits, notices of construction, or Regulatory agency agreements binding on the ORP or the TFC. Refer to the appropriate regulation, permit, or Notice of Construction for an inclusive listing of requirements.

  4. Tank farm potential ignition sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scaief, C.C. III

    1996-01-01

    This document identifies equipment, instrumentation, and sensors that are located in-tank as well as ex-tank in areas that may have communication paths with the tank vapor space. For each item, and attempt is made to identify the potential for ignition of flammable vapors using a graded approach. The scope includes all 177 underground storage tanks.

  5. Storage tanks: Going above ground

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.C. )

    1994-03-01

    This article examines the trend toward above ground storage tanks for petroleum products and certain hazardous substances. The topics of the article include the advantages and disadvantages of above ground storage tanks, regulations for use of above ground storage tanks, design options, safety issues, and a description of typical users of above ground storage tanks.

  6. Contribution of aboveground plant respiration to carbon cycling in a Bornean tropical rainforet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ayumi; Tanaka, Kenzo; Ichie, Tomoaki; Kume, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ohashi, Mizue; Kumagai, Tomo'omi

    2014-05-01

    Bornean tropical rainforests have a different characteristic from Amazonian tropical rainforests, that is, larger aboveground biomass caused by higher stand density of large trees. Larger biomass may cause different carbon cycling and allocation pattern. However, there are fewer studies on carbon allocation and each component in Bornean tropical rainforests, especially for aboveground plant respiration, compared to Amazonian forests. In this study, we measured woody tissue respiration and leaf respiration, and estimated those in ecosystem scale in a Bornean tropical rainforest. Then, we examined carbon allocation using the data of soil respiration and aboveground net primary production obtained from our previous studies. Woody tissue respiration rate was positively correlated with diameter at breast height (dbh) and stem growth rate. Using the relationships and biomass data, we estimated woody tissue respiration in ecosystem scale though methods of scaling resulted in different estimates values (4.52 - 9.33 MgC ha-1 yr-1). Woody tissue respiration based on surface area (8.88 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was larger than those in Amazon because of large aboveground biomass (563.0 Mg ha-1). Leaf respiration rate was positively correlated with height. Using the relationship and leaf area density data at each 5-m height, leaf respiration in ecosystem scale was estimated (9.46 MgC ha-1 yr-1), which was similar to those in Amazon because of comparable LAI (5.8 m2 m-2). Gross primary production estimated from biometric measurements (44.81 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was much higher than those in Amazon, and more carbon was allocated to woody tissue respiration and total belowground carbon flux. Large tree with dbh > 60cm accounted for about half of aboveground biomass and aboveground biomass increment. Soil respiration was also related to position of large trees, resulting in high soil respiration rate in this study site. Photosynthesis ability of top canopy for large trees was high and leaves for

  7. Tank waste characterization basis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1996-08-09

    This document describes the issues requiring characterization information, the process of determining high priority tanks to obtain information, and the outcome of the prioritization process. In addition, this document provides the reasoning for establishing and revising priorities and plans.

  8. Waste tank sample transport

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.; Mercado, M.S.; Smith, R.J.; Thornton, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    Since 1943, radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The waste was the result of chemical separation processes for the production of fissile defense materials. Associated with the current environmental cleanup mission, waste characterization and processing programs are requiring the extraction of samples from the tanks. Approved onsite packaging are in place and in use for transfers of samples from the tanks to onsite laboratories. Initiatives are under way to develop and procure packaging for sample shipments to offsite laboratories. This paper will provide a current status of the tank sample packaging used at the Hanford Site, as well as the project status for new packaging to be used for offsite shipments.

  9. SPRING_TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  10. Tank 48 - Chemical Destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

    2013-01-09

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory-scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents.

  11. Three-dimensional dynamics of breakout afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Albright, B J; Bowers, K J; Jung, D; Fernández, J C; Hegelich, B M

    2011-07-22

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility. PMID:21867015

  12. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  13. Low-energy RI beam technology and nuclear clusters in the explosive pp-chain breakout process

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D. M.; Ohshiro, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kase, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Hashimoto, T.; Fukuda, Y.; He, J. J.; Goto, A.; Muto, H.

    2014-05-09

    The lecture includes two parts: One is a discussion on the technology for developing RIB beam facility based on the in-flight method and relevant experimental technology. The second part is a discussion on experimental efforts for studying the breakout process from the pp-chain region based on recent works with low energy RI beams. The discussion of the second part specifically covers the problem of the vp-process in type II supernovae in terms of alpha cluster nature for the reactions.

  14. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  15. Tow Tank #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Digging the channel for the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' The tank was dedicated on May 27, 1931. In 1936 the tank was extended to a total length of 2,960 feet. In 1959 the facility was turned over to the U.S. Navy.

  16. Propellant tank resupply system

    SciTech Connect

    Schweickert, T.F.; Orton, G.F.

    1986-09-02

    This patent describes an attitude control system for a spacecraft or the like having a primary propulsion system including at least one primary engine, a source of fuel and a source of oxidizer, and separate fuel pump means and oxidizer pump means for pressurizing fuel and oxidizer for burning in the at least one primary engine, the attitude control system including at least one thruster engine and a pressurized fuel supply tank and a pressurized oxidizer supply tank for supplying fuel and oxidizer to the thruster engine. The improvement consists of: a. first conduit means operatively connected at one end to the outlet of the fuel pump means and at the other end to the thruster engine fuel supply tank, b. second conduit means operatively connected at one end to the outlet of the oxidizer pump means and at the other end to the thruster engine oxidizer supply tank; and c. control valve means within the first and second conduit means for controllably diverting, respectively, fuel and oxidizer under pressure from the fuel and oxidizer pump means to the thruster engine fuel and oxidizer supply tanks during operation of the at least one primary engine whereby the thruster engine fuel and oxidizer supply tanks are resupplied under pressure during the operation of the at least one primary engine.

  17. Shifts in Aboveground Biomass Allocation Patterns of Dominant Shrub Species across a Strong Environmental Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Kumordzi, Bright B.; Gundale, Michael J.; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Wardle, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Most plant biomass allocation studies have focused on allocation to shoots versus roots, and little is known about drivers of allocation for aboveground plant organs. We explored the drivers of within-and between-species variation of aboveground biomass allocation across a strong environmental resource gradient, i.e., a long-term chronosequence of 30 forested islands in northern Sweden across which soil fertility and plant productivity declines while light availability increases. For each of the three coexisting dominant understory dwarf shrub species on each island, we estimated the fraction of the total aboveground biomass produced year of sampling that was allocated to sexual reproduction (i.e., fruits), leaves and stems for each of two growing seasons, to determine how biomass allocation responded to the chronosequence at both the within-species and whole community levels. Against expectations, within-species allocation to fruits was least on less fertile islands, and allocation to leaves at the whole community level was greatest on intermediate islands. Consistent with expectations, different coexisting species showed contrasting allocation patterns, with the species that was best adapted for more fertile conditions allocating the most to vegetative organs, and with its allocation pattern showing the strongest response to the gradient. Our study suggests that co-existing dominant plant species can display highly contrasting biomass allocations to different aboveground organs within and across species in response to limiting environmental resources within the same plant community. Such knowledge is important for understanding how community assembly, trait spectra, and ecological processes driven by the plant community vary across environmental gradients and among contrasting ecosystems. PMID:27270445

  18. Topographic Variation in Aboveground Biomass in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dunmei; Lai, Jiangshan; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Mi, Xiangcheng; Ma, Keping

    2012-01-01

    The subtropical forest biome occupies about 25% of China, with species diversity only next to tropical forests. Despite the recognized importance of subtropical forest in regional carbon storage and cycling, uncertainties remain regarding the carbon storage of subtropical forests, and few studies have quantified within-site variation of biomass, making it difficult to evaluate the role of these forests in the global and regional carbon cycles. Using data for a 24-ha census plot in east China, we quantify aboveground biomass, characterize its spatial variation among different habitats, and analyse species relative contribution to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats. The average aboveground biomass was 223.0 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals [217.6, 228.5]) and varied substantially among four topographically defined habitats, from 180.6 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [167.1, 195.0]) in the upper ridge to 245.9 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [238.3, 253.8]) in the lower ridge, with upper and lower valley intermediate. In consistent with our expectation, individual species contributed differently to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats, reflecting significant species habitat associations. Different species show differently in habitat preference in terms of biomass contribution. These patterns may be the consequences of ecological strategies difference among different species. Results from this study enhance our ability to evaluate the role of subtropical forests in the regional carbon cycle and provide valuable information to guide the protection and management of subtropical broad-leaved forest for carbon sequestration and carbon storage. PMID:23118961

  19. Are Inventory Based and Remotely Sensed Above-Ground Biomass Estimates Consistent?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Timothy C.; Williams, Mathew; Bloom, A. Anthony; Mitchard, Edward T. A.; Ryan, Casey M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon emissions resulting from deforestation and forest degradation are poorly known at local, national and global scales. In part, this lack of knowledge results from uncertain above-ground biomass estimates. It is generally assumed that using more sophisticated methods of estimating above-ground biomass, which make use of remote sensing, will improve accuracy. We examine this assumption by calculating, and then comparing, above-ground biomass area density (AGBD) estimates from studies with differing levels of methodological sophistication. We consider estimates based on information from nine different studies at the scale of Africa, Mozambique and a 1160 km2 study area within Mozambique. The true AGBD is not known for these scales and so accuracy cannot be determined. Instead we consider the overall precision of estimates by grouping different studies. Since an the accuracy of an estimate cannot exceed its precision, this approach provides an upper limit on the overall accuracy of the group. This reveals poor precision at all scales, even between studies that are based on conceptually similar approaches. Mean AGBD estimates for Africa vary from 19.9 to 44.3 Mg ha−1, for Mozambique from 12.7 to 68.3 Mg ha−1, and for the 1160 km2 study area estimates range from 35.6 to 102.4 Mg ha−1. The original uncertainty estimates for each study, when available, are generally small in comparison with the differences between mean biomass estimates of different studies. We find that increasing methodological sophistication does not appear to result in improved precision of AGBD estimates, and moreover, inadequate estimates of uncertainty obscure any improvements in accuracy. Therefore, despite the clear advantages of remote sensing, there is a need to improve remotely sensed AGBD estimates if they are to provide accurate information on above-ground biomass. In particular, more robust and comprehensive uncertainty estimates are needed. PMID:24069275

  20. Characterization of S-waves Generated from Aboveground and Underground Explosions in Alluvium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Napoli, V.; Reinke, R.

    2014-12-01

    The source of S-waves from explosions is debated within the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The HUMBLE REDWOOD III (HRIII) experiment series in 2012 located in New Mexico provides a unique dataset to further our understanding of the generation of S-waves in alluvium by comparing and contrasting co-located aboveground and underground explosions. Two 91 kg explosions were detonated in alluvium at the same location, but HRIII-1 was detonated at 2 m aboveground and HRIII-2 was detonated at 7 m belowground and was fully coupled. A semicircular seismic network of 21 stations was deployed at 1 km to record the explosions. We determined that the belowground HRIII-2 explosion generated P-waves that were 2.4x larger than the aboveground HRIII-1 shot, thus we scaled the aboveground signals by this factor. Visual inspection of the waveforms after scaling showed similar P-wave, higher mode (HM) Rayleigh-wave, and fundamental mode Rayleigh-wave amplitudes for both shots on the vertical and radial components; however the largest differences were observed on the transverse components. Additional Love wave (or SH) energy is generated by the underground explosion that is not accounted for in the P-wave scaling factor. Spectral ratios confirm that the increased SH generation occurs at frequencies between 10-100 Hz. Future work includes modeling of these waveforms to explain the larger SH waves as well as analysis of S-wave generation from a similar set of above- and below-ground explosions in limestone.

  1. Shifts in Aboveground Biomass Allocation Patterns of Dominant Shrub Species across a Strong Environmental Gradient.

    PubMed

    Kumordzi, Bright B; Gundale, Michael J; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Wardle, David A

    2016-01-01

    Most plant biomass allocation studies have focused on allocation to shoots versus roots, and little is known about drivers of allocation for aboveground plant organs. We explored the drivers of within-and between-species variation of aboveground biomass allocation across a strong environmental resource gradient, i.e., a long-term chronosequence of 30 forested islands in northern Sweden across which soil fertility and plant productivity declines while light availability increases. For each of the three coexisting dominant understory dwarf shrub species on each island, we estimated the fraction of the total aboveground biomass produced year of sampling that was allocated to sexual reproduction (i.e., fruits), leaves and stems for each of two growing seasons, to determine how biomass allocation responded to the chronosequence at both the within-species and whole community levels. Against expectations, within-species allocation to fruits was least on less fertile islands, and allocation to leaves at the whole community level was greatest on intermediate islands. Consistent with expectations, different coexisting species showed contrasting allocation patterns, with the species that was best adapted for more fertile conditions allocating the most to vegetative organs, and with its allocation pattern showing the strongest response to the gradient. Our study suggests that co-existing dominant plant species can display highly contrasting biomass allocations to different aboveground organs within and across species in response to limiting environmental resources within the same plant community. Such knowledge is important for understanding how community assembly, trait spectra, and ecological processes driven by the plant community vary across environmental gradients and among contrasting ecosystems. PMID:27270445

  2. Dynamics of Aboveground Phytomass of the Circumpolar Arctic Tundra During the Past Three Decades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Howard E.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Walker, Donald A.; Bhatt, Uma S.; Tucker, Compton J.; Pinzon, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the dynamics of Arctic tundra vegetation throughout the past few decades, using remotely sensed proxies of vegetation, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). While extremely useful, these coarse-scale satellite-derived measurements give us minimal information with regard to how these changes are being expressed on the ground, in terms of tundra structure and function. In this analysis, we used a strong regression model between NDVI and aboveground tundra phytomass, developed from extensive field-harvested measurements of vegetation biomass, to estimate the biomass dynamics of the circumpolar Arctic tundra over the period of continuous satellite records (1982-2010). We found that the southernmost tundra subzones (C-E) dominate the increases in biomass, ranging from 20 to 26%, although there was a high degree of heterogeneity across regions, floristic provinces, and vegetation types. The estimated increase in carbon of the aboveground live vegetation of 0.40 Pg C over the past three decades is substantial, although quite small relative to anthropogenic C emissions. However, a 19.8% average increase in aboveground biomass has major implications for nearly all aspects of tundra ecosystems including hydrology, active layer depths, permafrost regimes, wildlife and human use of Arctic landscapes. While spatially extensive on-the-ground measurements of tundra biomass were conducted in the development of this analysis, validation is still impossible without more repeated, long-term monitoring of Arctic tundra biomass in the field.

  3. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Duncan, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  4. Temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass decreases as spatial variability increases.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Devan Allen; Hovick, Torre J; Elmore, R Dwayne; Engle, David M; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Winter, Stephen L; Miller, James R; Debinski, Diane M

    2016-03-01

    Ecological theory predicts that diversity decreases variability in ecosystem function. We predict that, at the landscape scale, spatial variability created by a mosaic of contrasting patches that differ in time since disturbance will decrease temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. Using data from a multi-year study of seven grazed tallgrass prairie landscapes, each experimentally managed for one to eight patches, we show that increased spatial variability driven by spatially patchy fire and herbivory reduces temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. This pattern is associated with statistical evidence for the portfolio effect and a positive relationship between temporal variability and functional group synchrony as predicted by metacommunity variability theory. As disturbance from fire and grazing interact to create a shifting mosaic of spatially heterogeneous patches within a landscape, temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass can be dampened. These results suggest that spatially heterogeneous disturbance regimes contribute to a portfolio of ecosystem functions provided by biodiversity, including wildlife habitat, fuel, and forage. We discuss how spatial patterns of disturbance drive variability within and among patches. PMID:27197382

  5. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Vu Thanh; van Kuijk, Marijke; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB) and root biomass (RB) based on 300 (of 45 species) and 40 (of 25 species) sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H), wood density (WD) was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam. PMID:27309718

  6. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  7. Topographically mediated controls on aboveground biomass across a mediterranean-type landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, K.; Asner, G. P.; Field, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aboveground biomass accumulation is a useful metric for evaluating habitat restoration and ecosystem services projects, in addition to being a robust measure of carbon sequestration. However, at the landscape scale non-anthropogenic controls on biomass accumulation are poorly understood. In this study we combined field measurements, high resolution data from the NASA JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) system to create a comprehensive map of aboveground biomass across a patchy mediterranean-type landscape (Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford, CA). Candidate explanatory variables (e.g. slope, elevation, incident solar radiation) were developed using a geologic map and a digital elevation model derived from the lidar data. Finally, candidate variables were tested, and a model was produced to predict aboveground biomass from environmental data. Though many of the explanatory variables have only indirect effects on plant growth, the model permits inferences to be made about the relative importance of light, water, temperature, and edaphic characteristics on carbon accumulation in mediterranean-type systems.

  8. Improving Aboveground Carbon Estimates in Dryland Ecosystems with Airborne LiDAR and Satellite Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, N. F.; Shrestha, R.; Li, A.; Spaete, L.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the utility of ground and airborne LiDAR data to quantify ecosystem structure. In addition, data from satellite-based laser altimetry (e.g. ICESat's GLAS instrument) have been used to estimate vegetation heights, aboveground carbon, and topography in forested areas. With the upcoming ICESAT-2 satellite scheduled to launch in 2017, we have the potential to map vegetation characteristics and dynamics in other ecosystems, including semiarid and low-height ecosystems, at global and regional scales. The ICESat-2 satellite will include the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) with a configuration of 6 laser beams with 532 nm wavelength and photon counting detectors. We will demonstrate the potential of ICESat-2 to provide estimates of vegetation structure and topography in a dryland ecosystem by simulating the configuration of the ATLAS mission. We will also examine how airborne LiDAR can be used together with ICESat-2 and other satellite data to achieve estimates of aboveground carbon. We will explore how these data may be used for future monitoring and quantification of spatial and temporal changes in aboveground carbon and topography.

  9. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nam, Vu Thanh; van Kuijk, Marijke; Anten, Niels P R

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB) and root biomass (RB) based on 300 (of 45 species) and 40 (of 25 species) sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H), wood density (WD) was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam. PMID:27309718

  10. Multicolor Light Curve Simulations of Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Shock Breakout to 56Co Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Blinnikov, Sergey; Suzuki, Tomoharu

    2016-04-01

    The properties of the first generation of stars and their supernova (SN) explosions remain unknown due to the lack of actual observations. Recently, many transient surveys have been conducted and the feasibility of detecting supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars is growing. In this paper, we study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse SN models (25–100 {M}ȯ ) to determine the indicators for the detection and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models that explain the observed abundance patterns of metal-poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using the multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code stella. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with non-zero-metallicity models and several observed SNe. We have found that the shock breakout characteristics, the evolution of the photosphere’s velocity, the luminosity, and the duration and color evolution of the plateau, that is, all of the SN phases from shock breakout to 56Co decay, are helpful for estimating the parameters of the SN progenitor: the mass, the radius, the explosion energy, and the metallicity. We conclude that the multicolor light curves could potentially be used to identify first-generation SNe in current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, James Webb Space Telescope). They are also suitable for identifying low-metallicity SNe in the nearby universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).

  11. Core-log integration for rock mechanics using borehole breakouts and rock strength experiments: Recent results from plate subduction margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Lin, W.

    2014-12-01

    Core-log integration has been applied for rock mechanics studies in scientific ocean drilling since 2007 in plate subduction margins such as Nankai Trough, Costa Rica margin, and Japan Trench. State of stress in subduction wedge is essential for controlling dynamics of plate boundary fault. One of the common methods to estimate stress state is analysis of borehole breakouts (drilling induced borehole wall compressive failures) recorded in borehole image logs to determine the maximum horizontal principal stress orientation. Borehole breakouts can also yield possible range of stress magnitude based on a rock compressive strength criterion. In this study, we constrained the stress magnitudes based on two different rock failure criteria, the Mohr-Coulomb (MC) criteria and the modified Wiebols-Cook (mWC) criteria. As the MC criterion is the same as that under unconfined compression state, only one rock parameter, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) is needed to constrain stress magnitudes. The mWC criterion needs the UCS, Poisson's ratio and internal frictional coefficient determined by triaxial compression experiments to take the intermediate principal stress effects on rock strength into consideration. We conducted various strength experiments on samples taken during IODP Expeditions 334/344 (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project) to evaluate reliable method to estimate stress magnitudes. Our results show that the effects of the intermediate principal stress on the rock compressive failure occurred on a borehole wall is not negligible.

  12. Oblique shock breakout in supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. II. Numerical solutions for non-relativistic pattern speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Salbi, Pegah; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ro, Stephen; Levin, Yuri

    2014-07-20

    Non-spherical explosions develop non-radial flows as the pattern of shock emergence progresses across the stellar surface. In supernovae, these flows can limit ejecta speeds, stifle shock breakout emission, and cause collisions outside the star. Similar phenomena occur in stellar and planetary collisions, tidal disruption events, accretion-induced collapses, and propagating detonations. We present two-dimensional, nested-grid Athena simulations of non-radial shock emergence in a frame comoving with the breakout pattern, focusing on the adiabatic, non-relativistic limit in a plane stratified envelope. We set boundary conditions using a known self-similar solution and explore the role of box size and resolution on the result. The shock front curves toward the stellar surface, and exhibits a kink from which weak discontinuities originate. Flow around the point of shock emergence is neither perfectly steady nor self-similar. Waves and vortices, which are not predominantly due to grid effects, emanate from this region. The post-shock flow is deflected along the stellar surface and its pressure disturbs the stellar atmosphere upstream of the emerging shock. We use the numerical results and their analytical limits to predict the effects of radiation transfer and gravity, which are not included in our simulations.

  13. Oblique Shock Breakout in Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. II. Numerical Solutions for Non-relativistic Pattern Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salbi, Pegah; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ro, Stephen; Levin, Yuri

    2014-07-01

    Non-spherical explosions develop non-radial flows as the pattern of shock emergence progresses across the stellar surface. In supernovae, these flows can limit ejecta speeds, stifle shock breakout emission, and cause collisions outside the star. Similar phenomena occur in stellar and planetary collisions, tidal disruption events, accretion-induced collapses, and propagating detonations. We present two-dimensional, nested-grid Athena simulations of non-radial shock emergence in a frame comoving with the breakout pattern, focusing on the adiabatic, non-relativistic limit in a plane stratified envelope. We set boundary conditions using a known self-similar solution and explore the role of box size and resolution on the result. The shock front curves toward the stellar surface, and exhibits a kink from which weak discontinuities originate. Flow around the point of shock emergence is neither perfectly steady nor self-similar. Waves and vortices, which are not predominantly due to grid effects, emanate from this region. The post-shock flow is deflected along the stellar surface and its pressure disturbs the stellar atmosphere upstream of the emerging shock. We use the numerical results and their analytical limits to predict the effects of radiation transfer and gravity, which are not included in our simulations.

  14. Shock Breakout Driven by the Remnant of a Neutron Star Binary Merger: An X-Ray Precursor of Mergernova Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2016-03-01

    A supra-massive neutron star (NS) spinning extremely rapidly could survive from a merger of an NS-NS binary. The spin-down of this remnant NS that is highly magnetized could power the isotropic merger ejecta to produce a bright mergernova emission in the ultraviolet/optical bands. Before the mergernova, the early interaction between the NS wind and the ejecta could drive a forward shock propagating outward into the ejecta. As a result, a remarkable amount of heat can be accumulated behind the shock front and the final escape of this heat could produce a shock breakout emission. We describe the dynamics and thermal emission of this shock with a semi-analytical model. It is found that a few hours after the merger, by leading the mergernova emission as a precursor, sharp and luminous breakout emission appears mainly in soft X-rays, with a luminosity of ∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. Therefore, the detection of such an X-ray precursor could provide evidence for identifying NS-powered mergernovae and distinguishing them from radioactivity-powered novae (i.e., kilonovae or macronovae). The discovery of NS-powered mergernovae could finally help to confirm the gravitational wave signals due to the mergers and the existence of supra-massive NSs.

  15. Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass and vegetation structure parameters for improved carbon estimate from lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Schaaf, Crystal; Yao, Tian; Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Blair, J. Bryan

    2010-06-01

    Lidar-based aboveground biomass is derived based on the empirical relationship between lidar-measured vegetation height and aboveground biomass, often leading to large uncertainties of aboveground biomass estimates at large scales. This study investigates whether the use of any additional lidar-derived vegetation structure parameters besides height improves aboveground biomass estimation. The analysis uses data collected in the field and with the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS), and the Echidna® validation instrument (EVI), a ground-based hemispherical-scanning lidar data in New England in 2003 and 2007. Our field data analysis shows that using wood volume (approximated by the product of basal area and top 10% tree height) and vegetation type (conifer/softwood or deciduous/hardwood forests, providing wood density) has the potential to improve aboveground biomass estimates at large scales. This result is comparable to previous individual-tree based analyses. Our LVIS data analysis indicates that structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction, such as RH100*cover and RH50*cover, are closely related to wood volume and thus biomass particularly for conifer forests. RH100*cover and RH50*cover perform similarly or even better than RH50, a good biomass predictor found in previous study. This study shows that the use of structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction (rather than height alone) improves the aboveground biomass estimate, and that the fusion of lidar and optical remote sensing (to provide vegetation type) will provide better aboveground biomass estimates than using lidar alone. Our ground lidar analysis shows that EVI provides good estimates of wood volume, and thus accurate estimates of aboveground biomass particularly at the stand level.

  16. Root herbivore effects on aboveground multitrophic interactions: patterns, processes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soler, Roxina; Van der Putten, Wim H; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Vet, Louise E M; Dicke, Marcel; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2012-06-01

    In terrestrial food webs, the study of multitrophic interactions traditionally has focused on organisms that share a common domain, mainly above ground. In the last two decades, it has become clear that to further understand multitrophic interactions, the barrier between the belowground and aboveground domains has to be crossed. Belowground organisms that are intimately associated with the roots of terrestrial plants can influence the levels of primary and secondary chemistry and biomass of aboveground plant parts. These changes, in turn, influence the growth, development, and survival of aboveground insect herbivores. The discovery that soil organisms, which are usually out of sight and out of mind, can affect plant-herbivore interactions aboveground raised the question if and how higher trophic level organisms, such as carnivores, could be influenced. At present, the study of above-belowground interactions is evolving from interactions between organisms directly associated with the plant roots and shoots (e.g., root feeders - plant - foliar herbivores) to interactions involving members of higher trophic levels (e.g., parasitoids), as well as non-herbivorous organisms (e.g., decomposers, symbiotic plant mutualists, and pollinators). This multitrophic approach linking above- and belowground food webs aims at addressing interactions between plants, herbivores, and carnivores in a more realistic community setting. The ultimate goal is to understand the ecology and evolution of species in communities and, ultimately how community interactions contribute to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we summarize studies on the effects of root feeders on aboveground insect herbivores and parasitoids and discuss if there are common trends. We discuss the mechanisms that have been reported to mediate these effects, from changes in concentrations of plant nutritional quality and secondary chemistry to defense signaling. Finally, we discuss how the traditional

  17. Mapping Aboveground Biomass in the Amazon Basin: Exploring Sensors, Scales, and Strategies for Optimal Data Linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, W. S.; Baccini, A.

    2013-05-01

    Information on the distribution and density of carbon in tropical forests is critical to decision-making on a host of globally significant issues ranging from climate stabilization and biodiversity conservation to poverty reduction and human health. Encouraged by recent progress at both the international and jurisdictional levels on the design of incentive-based policy mechanisms to compensate tropical nations for maintaining their forests intact, governments throughout the tropics are moving with urgency to implement robust national and sub-national forest monitoring systems for operationally tracking and reporting on changes in forest cover and associated carbon stocks. Monitoring systems will be required to produce results that are accurate, consistent, complete, transparent, and comparable at sub-national to pantropical scales, and satellite-based remote sensing supported by field observations is widely-accepted as the most objective and cost-effective solution. The effectiveness of any system for large-area forest monitoring will necessarily depend on the capacity of current and near-future Earth observation satellites to provide information that meets the requirements of developing monitoring protocols. However, important questions remain regarding the role that spatially explicit maps of aboveground biomass and carbon can play in IPCC-compliant forest monitoring systems, with the majority of these questions stemming from doubts about the inherit sensitivity of satellite data to aboveground forest biomass, confusion about the relationship between accuracy and resolution, and a general lack of guidance on optimal strategies for linking field reference and remote sensing data sources. Here we demonstrate the ability of a state-of-the-art satellite radar sensor, the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR, and a venerable optical platform, Landsat 5, to support large-area mapping of aboveground tropical woody biomass across a 153,000-km2 region in the southwestern Amazon

  18. Optical Cryogenic Tank Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffell, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Cryogenic fluids play an important role in space transportation. Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are vital fuel components for liquid rocket engines. It is also difficult to accurately measure the liquid level in the cryogenic tanks containing the liquids. The current methods use thermocouple rakes, floats, or sonic meters to measure tank level. Thermocouples have problems examining the boundary between the boiling liquid and the gas inside the tanks. They are also slow to respond to temperature changes. Sonic meters need to be mounted inside the tank, but still above the liquid level. This causes problems for full tanks, or tanks that are being rotated to lie on their side.

  19. 131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    131. NORTH PLANT TANK CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P.; Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E.; Divine, J.R.; Foster, G.M.

    1995-03-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

  1. Composite overwrapped metallic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudill, C. L.; Kirlin, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Work is reported for fabricating and testing the fiberglass overwrapped titanium pressure vessel for cryogenic service. Difficulties encountered in the tank liner fabrication phase involved explosive forming, vacuum annealing, chemical milling and electron beam welding. While each of these processes and the nondestructive test methods employed are normally considered to be individually reliable, the combination of poor material together with fabrication and development reversals prevented the full achievement of the desired end results. Eight tanks plus a prototype and tool proofing article were produced. Six of the vessels failed during the hydrostatic sizing operation. One of the remaining tanks was hydrostatically pressurized to burst and the other was pressurized repeatedly at 75 F from 100 psi to the operating pressure until failure occurred. As a result, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions as to the true value of the design concept due to the problems encountered in the program.

  2. Fireman's Air Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Together with NASA's Johnson Space Center, A-T-O Inc.'s Scott Aviation has developed light-weight firefighter's air tanks. New backpack system weighs only 20 pounds for 30 minute air supply, 13 pounds less than conventional firefighting tanks. They are pressurized at 4,500 psi, (twice current tanks). Made of aluminum liner wrapped by resin-impregnated glass fibers, eliminating corrosion as well as lightening the load. Redesigned face mask permits better vision. Warning device to tell fireman he is running out of air is personalized so it can't be heard by others reducing confusion in an already hectic environment. Structural Composites Inc., The Boeing Co., and Martin- Marietta Corp. have developed uses for this technology.

  3. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  4. Tank waste isotope contributions

    SciTech Connect

    VANKEUREN, J.C.

    1999-08-26

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 137}Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste.

  5. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  6. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

    2009-08-11

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  7. Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    1999-06-24

    'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

  8. Assessing General Relationships Between Above-Ground Biomass and Vegetation Structure Parameters for Improved Carbon Estimate from Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, W.; Lee, S.; Strahler, A. H.; Woodcock, C. E.; Schaaf, C.; Yao, T.; Ranson, J.; Sun, G.; Blair, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing uses vegetation height to estimate large-scale above-ground biomass. However, lidar height and biomass relationships are empirical and thus often lead to large uncertainties in above-ground biomass estimates. This study uses vegetation structure measurements from field: an airborne lidar (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor, LVIS)) and a full wave form ground-based lidar (Echidna® validation instrument, EVI) collected in the New England region in 2003 and 2007, to investigate using additional vegetation structure parameters besides height for improved above-ground biomass estimation from lidar. Our field data analysis shows that using woody volume (approximated by the product of basal area and top 10% tree height) and vegetation type (conifer/softwood or deciduous/hardwood forests, providing wood density) has the potential to improve above-ground biomass estimates at large scale. This result is comparable to previous work by Chave et al. (2005), which focused on individual trees. However this study uses a slightly different approach, and our woody volume is estimated differently from Chave et al. (2005). Previous studies found that RH50 is a good predictor of above-ground biomass (Drake et al., 2002; 2003). Our LVIS data analysis shows that structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction, such as RH100*cover and RH50*cover, perform similarly or even better than RH50. We also found that the close relationship of RH100*cover and RH50*cover with woody volume explains why they are good predictors of above-ground biomass. RH50 is highly related to RH100*cover, and this explains why RH50 is a better predictor of biomass than RH100. This study shows that using structure parameters combining height and gap fraction improve above-ground biomass estimate compared to height alone, and fusion of lidar and optical remote sensing (to provide vegetation type) will provide better above-ground biomass estimates than lidar alone. Ground lidar analysis

  9. EIT Crinkles as Evidence for the Breakout Model of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, R. L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of two homologous flares in NOAA active region 8210 occurring on 1998 May 1 and May 2, using EUV data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), high-resolution and high-time cadence images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, images or fluxes from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh and the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), and Ca xix soft X-ray spectra from the Bragg crystal spectrometer (BCS) on Yohkoh. Magnetograms indicate that the flares occurred in a complex magnetic topology, consisting of an emerging flux region (EFR) sandwiched between a sunspot to the west and a coronal hole to the east. In an earlier study we found that in EIT images, both flaring episodes showed the formation of a crinkle-like pattern of emission ("EIT crinkles") occurring in the coronal hole vicinity, well away from a central "core field" area near the EFR-sunspot boundary. With our expanded data set, here we find that most of the energetic activity occurs in the core region in both events, with some portions of the core brightening shortly after the onset of the EIT crinkles, and other regions of the core brightening several minutes later, coincident with a burst of hard X-rays: there are no obvious core brightenings prior to the onset of the EIT crinkles. These timings are consistent with the "breakout model" of solar eruptions, whereby the emerging flux is initially constrained by a system of overlying magnetic field lines, and is able to erupt only after an opening develops in the overlying fields as a consequence of magnetic reconnection at a magnetic null point. In our case, the EIT crinkles would be a signature of this pre-impulsive-phase magnetic reconnection, and brightening of the core only occurs after the core fields begin to escape through the newly-created opening in the overlying fields. Morphology in soft X-ray images and properties

  10. EIT Crinkles as Evidence for the Breakout Model of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of two homologous flares in NOAA Active Region 8210 occurring on 1998 May 1 and 2, using EUV data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, high-resolution and high-time cadence images from the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh, images or fluxes from the hard X-ray telescope on Yohkoh and the BATSE experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Ca(XIX) soft X-ray spectra from the Bragg crystal spectrometer (BCS) on Yohkoh. Magnetograms indicate that the flares occurred in a complex magnetic topology, consisting of an emerging flux region (EFR) sandwiched between a sunspot to the west and a coronal hole to the east. In an earlier study we found that in EIT images, both flaring episodes showed the formation of a crinkle-like pattern of emission (EIT crinkles) occurring in the coronal hole vicinity, well away from a central 'core field' area near the EFR-sunspot boundary. With our expanded data set, here we find that most of the energetic activity occurs in the core region in both events, with some portions of the core brightening shortly after the onset of the EIT crinkles, and other regions of the core brightening several minutes later, coincident with a burst of hard X-rays; there are no obvious core brightenings prior to the onset of the EIT crinkles. These timings are consistent with the 'breakout model' of solar eruptions, whereby the emerging flux is initially constrained by a system of overlying magnetic field lines, and is able to erupt only after an opening develops in the overlying fields as a consequence of magnetic reconnection at a magnetic null point. In our case, the EIT crinkles would be a signature of this pre-impulsive phase magnetic reconnection, and brightening of the core only occurs after the core fields begin to escape through the newly created opening in the overlying fields. Morphology in soft X-ray images and properties in hard X-rays differ between the two events

  11. Evaluation, Proposed Solution and Current Status of the Crater Lake Breakout Problem, Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornas, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    Rapid rise of Mount Pinatubo's crater lake and recent geological assessments of the crater's lowest point, the Maraunot Notch, raised concern about a breakout lahar down the northwestern slope of the volcano. Three factors indicated a serious hazard. First, the lake rose about 50 m from May 98-August 2001 and was expected to overtop the Maraunot Notch within the last trimester 2001. Overtopping might well have occurred at the height of a strong typhoon or under heavy monsoonal rainstorms. Second, the uppermost 10-20 m of "dam" was erodible ash and poorly indurated coarse breccia, susceptible to failure by overtopping and erosion as at many landslide and other natural dams. Third, the volumes of lake discharge corresponding to 10 and 20 m of erosion would have been 28 and 55 million m3; peak discharges at a breach could have been as high as 3,200 m3/sec to 11,000 m3/sec, respectively. These discharges would have eroded 1991 pyroclastic and lahar material on the volcano's slopes, increased the flow volume by 3-6x, and entered the Bucao River as a large-magnitude lahar. The Municipality of Botolan (pop. ca. 40,000) lies on the delta of the Bucao River valley some 40 km downriver from the notch, and could have been at great risk. Given this potential risk, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in early August 2001 advocated three actions. (1) An intentional breaching of the Maraunot Notch by the construction of a spillway or canal, by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Early breaching would limit further rise of the lake and thus reduce the magnitude of potential flood. Also, breaching would be scheduled during good weather to eliminate the danger of overtopping at an unknown time and/or under typhoon/rainstorm conditions. (2) An information campaign in Botolan in order to educate and prepare residents for breaching. (3) Evacuation of people at risk, one day before the scheduled breaching. A spillway was excavated by as many

  12. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF CORONAL NULL POINTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MAGNETIC BREAKOUT MODEL OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G. R.; Mackay, D. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu E-mail: duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.u

    2009-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate the solar cycle variation of coronal null points and magnetic breakout configurations in spherical geometry, using a combination of magnetic flux transport and potential field source surface models. Within the simulations, a total of 2843 coronal null points and breakout configurations are found over two solar cycles. It is found that the number of coronal nulls present at any time varies cyclically throughout the solar cycle, in phase with the flux emergence rate. At cycle maximum, peak values of 15-17 coronal nulls per day are found. No significant variation in the number of nulls is found from the rising to the declining phase. This indicates that the magnetic breakout model is applicable throughout both phases of the solar cycle. In addition, it is shown that when the simulations are used to construct synoptic data sets, such as those produced by Kitt Peak, the number of coronal nulls drops by a factor of 1/6. The vast majority of the coronal nulls are found to lie above the active latitudes and are the result of the complex nature of the underlying active region fields. Only 8% of the coronal nulls are found to be connected to the global dipole. Another interesting feature is that 18% of coronal nulls are found to lie above the equator due to cross-equatorial interactions between bipoles lying in the northern and southern hemispheres. As the majority of coronal nulls form above active latitudes, their average radial extent is found to be in the low corona below 1.25 R {sub sun} (175, 000 km above the photosphere). Through considering the underlying photospheric flux, it is found that 71% of coronal nulls are produced though quadrupolar flux distributions resulting from bipoles in the same hemisphere interacting. When the number of coronal nulls present in each rotation is compared to the number of bipoles emerging, a wide scatter is found. The ratio of coronal nulls to emerging bipoles is found to be approximately 1/3. Overall

  13. CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

  14. SRS Tank Structural Integrity Program

    SciTech Connect

    Maryak, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    The mission of the Structural Integrity Program is to ensure continued safe management and operation of the waste tanks for whatever period of time these tanks are required. Matthew Maryak provides an overview of the Structural Integrity Program to open Session 5 (Waste Storage and Tank Inspection) of the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange.

  15. [Vegetation above-ground biomass and its affecting factors in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-guo; Fan, Jun; Wang, Quan-jiu; Wang, Li

    2011-03-01

    Field investigations were conducted in Liudaogou small watershed in late September 2009 to study the differences of vegetation above-ground biomass, soil moisture content, and soil nutrient contents under different land use patterns, aimed to approach the vegetation above-ground biomass level and related affecting factors in typical small watershed in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau. The above-ground dry biomass of the main vegetations in Liudaogou was 177-2207 g x m(-2), and that in corn field, millet field, abandoned farmland, artificial grassland, natural grassland, and shrub land was 2097-2207, 518-775, 248-578, 280-545, 177-396, and 372-680 g x m(-2), respectively. The mean soil moisture content in 0-100 layer was the highest (14.2%) in farmlands and the lowest (10.9%) in shrub land. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture content was the greatest (26. 7% ) in abandoned farmland, indicating the strong spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture in this kind of farmland. The mean soil water storage was in the order of farmland > artificial grassland > natural grassland > shrub land. Soil dry layer was observed in alfalfa and caragana lands. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.639, P < 0.05) between above-ground dry biomass and 0-100 cm soil water storage, and also, a very significant positive correlation between above-ground fresh biomass and vegetation height. The above-ground biomass of the higher vegetations could potentially better control the wind and water erosion in the water/wind erosion crisscross region. Vegetation above-ground biomass was highly correlated with soil moisture and nutrient contents, but had no significant correlations with elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, and soil bulk density. PMID:21657007

  16. Plating Tank Control Software

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  17. Hybrid Tank Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have accomplished great advances in pressure vessel technology by applying high-performance composite materials as an over-wrap to metal-lined pressure vessels. These composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) are used in many areas, from air tanks for firefighters and compressed natural gas tanks for automobiles, to pressurant tanks for aerospace launch vehicles and propellant tanks for satellites and deep-space exploration vehicles. NASA and commercial industry are continually striving to find new ways to make high-performance pressure vessels safer and more reliable. While COPVs are much lighter than all-metal pressure vessels, the composite material, typically graphite fibers with an epoxy matrix resin, is vulnerable to impact damage. Carbon fiber is most frequently used for the high-performance COPV applications because of its high strength-to-weight characteristics. Other fibers have been used, but with limitations. For example, fiberglass is inexpensive but much heavier than carbon. Aramid fibers are impact resistant but have less strength than carbon and their performance tends to deteriorate.

  18. Pasture burning in Amazonia: Dynamics of residual biomass and the storage and release of aboveground carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Reinaldo Imbrózio; Fearnside, Philip M.

    1996-11-01

    Aboveground biomass in cattle pasture converted from tropical dense forest was studied both before and after reburning in Brazilian Amazonia. In a 7-year-old pasture studied in Apiaú, Roraima, the aboveground dry weight of biomass (live plus dead) exposed to burning consisted of 96.3 t ha-1 of original forest remains, 6.2 t ha-1 of secondary successional vegetation (woody invaders in the pasture), and 8.0 t ha-1 of pasture grass (carbon contents 48.2%, 45.4%, and 42.2%, respectively). In terms of carbon, burning efficiencies for these three categories were 13.2%, 66.7% and 94.6%, respectively. Net charcoal formation was 0.35 t C ha-1 or 0.63% of the carbon exposed to the reburn, while the total accumulated since conversion (including the initial burn) is estimated at 2.3 t ha-1 (1.82% of the predeforestation aboveground biomass carbon stock). The dynamics of the original forest remains were represented in simulations that included parameters such as charcoal formation, burning efficiency and carbon concentration in different biomass components. Releases from initial burning of the cleared forest (44.0 t C ha-1) plus releases over the course of the succeeding decade through combustion (12.5 t C ha-1) and decay (51.5 t C ha-1) total 92% of the original forest biomass carbon (126 t C ha-1). Of biomass carbon remaining after the initial burn (84.3 t C ha-1), 76.0% is released: 61.1% through decay and 14.9% through combustion in reburns, while 1.2% is net conversion to charcoal in the reburns. These results indicate an amount of charcoal accumulation that is smaller than some carbon calculations have assumed, therefore suggesting a greater impact on global warming from conversion of forest to pasture.

  19. Net changes in aboveground woody carbon stock in western juniper woodlands, 1946-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Eva K.; Vierling, Lee A.; Smith, Alistair M. S.; Bunting, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    Although regional increases in woody plant cover in semiarid ecosystems have been identified as a worldwide phenomenon affecting the global carbon budget, quantifying the impact of these vegetation shifts on C pools and fluxes is challenging. Challenges arise because woody encroachment is governed by ecological processes that occur at fine spatial resolutions (1-10 m) and, in many cases, at slow (decadal-scale) temporal rates over large areas. We therefore analyzed time series aerial photography, which exhibits both the necessary spatial precision and temporal extent, to quantify the expansion of western juniper into sagebrush steppe landscapes in southwestern Idaho. We established upper and lower bounds of aboveground woody carbon change across the landscape via two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis, image texture analysis, and field data collection. Forty-eight 100-ha blocks across a 330,000-ha region were stratified by topography, soil characteristics, and land stewardship for analyses. Across the area we estimate aboveground woody carbon accumulation rates of 3.3 gCm-2yr-1 and 10.0 gCm-2yr-1 using the wavelet and texture method, respectively, during the time period 1946-1998. Carbon accumulation rates were significantly affected by soil properties and were highly dependent on the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. For example, at a 100-ha scale the aboveground carbon accumulation varied from -1.7 to 9.9 gCm-2yr-1, while at the 1-ha scale the range of variability increased to -11 to 22 gCm-2yr-1. These values are an order of magnitude lower than those previously suggested due to woody encroachment, highlighting the need for examining multiple spatial scales when accounting for changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  20. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands. PMID:27164912

  1. Belowground induction by Delia radicum or phytohormones affect aboveground herbivore communities on field-grown broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, S. P.; Dugravot, S.; Hervé, M. R.; Hassan, H. M.; van Dam, N. M.; Cortesero, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Induced plant defence in response to phytophagous insects is a well described phenomenon. However, so far little is known about the effect of induced plant responses on subsequently colonizing herbivores in the field. Broccoli plants were induced in the belowground compartment using (i) infestation by the root-herbivore Delia radicum, (ii) root application of jasmonic acid (JA) or (iii) root application of salicylic acid (SA). The abundance of D. radicum and six aboveground herbivores displaying contrasting levels of host specialization were surveyed for 5 weeks. Our study showed that the response of herbivores was found to differ from one another, depending on the herbivore species, its degree of specialization and the root treatment. The abundance of the root herbivore D. radicum and particularly the number of emerging adults was decreased by both phytohormone treatments, while the number of D. radicum eggs was increased on conspecific infested plants. The root infestation exhibited moderate effects on the aboveground community. The abundance of the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae was strongly increased on D. radicum infested plants, but the other species were not impacted. Root hormone applications exhibited a strong effect on the abundance of specialist foliar herbivores. A higher number of B. brassicae and Pieris brassicae and a lower number of Plutella xylostella were found on JA treated plants. On SA treated plants we observed a decrease of the abundance of B. brassicae, Pi. rapae, and P. xylostella. Surprisingly, generalist species, Mamestra brassicae and Myzus persicae were not affected by root induction treatments. Finally, root treatments had no significant effect on either glucosinolate (GLS) profiles of the heads or on plant quality parameters. These results are discussed from the perspective of below- aboveground interactions and adaptations of phytophagous insects to induced plant responses according to their trophic specialization level. PMID:23970888

  2. Aboveground vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore impact on net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands.

    PubMed

    Risch, Anita C; Schotz, Martin; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L; Van Der Putten, Wim H; Duyts, Henk; Raschein, Ursina; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Busse, Matt D; Page-dumroese, Deborah S; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Aboveground herbivores have strong effects on grassland nitrogen (N) cycling. They can accelerate or slow down soil net N mineralization depending on ecosystem productivity and grazing intensity. Yet, most studies only consider either ungulates or invertebrate herbivores, but not the combined effect of several functionally different vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore species or guilds. We assessed how a diverse herbivore community affects net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands. By using size-selective fences, we progressively excluded large, medium, and small mammals, as well as invertebrates from two vegetation types, and assessed how the exclosure types (ET) affected net N mineralization. The two vegetation types differed in long-term management (centuries), forage quality, and grazing history and intensity. To gain a more mechanistic understanding of how herbivores affect net N mineralization, we linked mineralization to soil abiotic (temperature; moisture; NO3-, NH4+, and total inorganic N concentrations/pools; C, N, P concentrations; pH; bulk density), soil biotic (microbial biomass; abundance of collembolans, mites, and nematodes) and plant (shoot and root biomass; consumption; plant C, N, and fiber content; plant N pool) properties. Net N mineralization differed between ET, but not between vegetation types. Thus, short-term changes in herbivore community composition and, therefore, in grazing intensity had a stronger effect on net N mineralization than long-term management and grazing history. We found highest N mineralization values when only invertebrates were present, suggesting that mammals had a negative effect on net N mineralization. Of the variables included in our analyses, only mite abundance and aboveground plant biomass explained variation in net N mineralization among ET. Abundances of both mites and leaf-sucking invertebrates were positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, and biomass increased with progressive exclusion

  3. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  4. Detecting spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground production in a tallgrass prairie using remotely sensed data

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.R.; Briggs, J.M.; Knapp, A.K.; Blair, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of aboveground production is a tallgrass prairie ecosystem constitute one of the important spatial components associated with ecological processes and biophysical resources (e.g. water and nutrients). This study addresses the effects of disturbance, topography, and climate on the spatial and temporal patterns of North American tallgrass prairie at a landscape level by using high resolution satellite data. Spatial heterogeneity derived from the satellite data was related to the impacts of the disturbance of fire and grazing, topographical gradient, and amount of precipitation during the growing season. The result suggests that ecological processes and biophysical resources can be quantified with high resolution satellite data for tallgrass prairie management.

  5. Tanks focus area. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, J.

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

  6. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  7. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400 General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank...

  8. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400 General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank...

  9. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  10. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  11. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  12. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks....

  13. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks....

  14. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks....

  15. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks....

  16. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  17. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400 General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank...

  18. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  19. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400 General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank...

  20. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  1. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  2. Laser-driven 1 GeV carbon ions from preheated diamond targets in the break-out afterburner regime

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching; Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching ; Yin, L.; Gautier, D. C.; Wu, H.-C.; Letzring, S.; Shah, R.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Albright, B. J.; Dromey, B.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching

    2013-08-15

    Experimental data are presented for laser-driven carbon C{sup 6+} ion-acceleration, verifying 2D-PIC studies for multi-species targets in the Break-Out Afterburner regime. With Trident's ultra-high contrast at relativistic intensities of 5 × 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} and nm-scale diamond targets, acceleration of carbon ions has been optimized by using target laser-preheating for removal of surface proton contaminants. Using a high-resolution wide angle spectrometer, carbon C{sup 6+} ion energies exceeding 1 GeV or 83 MeV/amu have been measured, which is a 40% increase in maximum ion energy over uncleaned targets. These results are consistent with kinetic plasma modeling and analytic theory.

  3. Laser-driven 1 GeV carbon ions from preheated diamond targets in the break-out afterburner regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Yin, L.; Gautier, D. C.; Wu, H.-C.; Letzring, S.; Dromey, B.; Shah, R.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Albright, B. J.

    2013-08-01

    Experimental data are presented for laser-driven carbon C6+ ion-acceleration, verifying 2D-PIC studies for multi-species targets in the Break-Out Afterburner regime. With Trident's ultra-high contrast at relativistic intensities of 5 × 1020 W/cm2 and nm-scale diamond targets, acceleration of carbon ions has been optimized by using target laser-preheating for removal of surface proton contaminants. Using a high-resolution wide angle spectrometer, carbon C6+ ion energies exceeding 1 GeV or 83 MeV/amu have been measured, which is a 40% increase in maximum ion energy over uncleaned targets. These results are consistent with kinetic plasma modeling and analytic theory.

  4. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330 Section 172.330 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS,...

  5. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-04-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. It is probable that tank 241-C-112 exceeds the 1,000 g-mol inventory criteria established for the Ferrocyanide USQ; however, extensive energetic analysis of the waste has determined a maximum exothermic value of -9 cal/g dry waste. This value is substantially below any levels of concern (-75 cal/g). In addition, an investigation of potential mechanisms to generate concentration levels of radionuclides high enough to be of concern was performed. No credible mechanism was postulated that could initiate the formation of such concentration levels in the tank. Tank 241-C-112 waste is a complex material made up primarily of water and inert salts. The insoluble solids are a mixture of phosphates, sulfates, and hydroxides in combination with aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, and uranium. Disodium nickel ferrocyanide and sodium cesium nickel ferrocyanide probably exist in the tank; however, there appears to have been significant degradation of this material since the waste was initially settled in the tank.

  6. TankSIM: A Cryogenic Tank Performance Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Moder, J. P.; Schnell, A. R.; Sutherlin, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the thermodynamic state of the cryogenic propellants in launch vehicle tanks is necessary for mission planning and successful execution. Cryogenic propellant storage and transfer in space environments requires that tank pressure be controlled. The pressure rise rate is determined by the complex interaction of external heat leak, fluid temperature stratification, and interfacial heat and mass transfer. If the required storage duration of a space mission is longer than the period in which the tank pressure reaches its allowable maximum, an appropriate pressure control method must be applied. Therefore, predictions of the pressurization rate and performance of pressure control techniques in cryogenic tanks are required for development of cryogenic fluid long-duration storage technology and planning of future space exploration missions. This paper describes an analytical tool, Tank System Integrated Model (TankSIM), which can be used for modeling pressure control and predicting the behavior of cryogenic propellant for long-term storage for future space missions. It is written in the FORTRAN 90 language and can be compiled with any Visual FORTRAN compiler. A thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is used to achieve tank pressure control. Utilizing TankSIM, the following processes can be modeled: tank self-pressurization, boiloff, ullage venting, and mixing. Details of the TankSIM program and comparisons of its predictions with test data for liquid hydrogen and liquid methane will be presented in the final paper.

  7. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Xugao; Liang, Chao; Hao, Zhanqing; Zhou, Lisha; Ma, Sam; Li, Xiaobin; Yang, Shan; Yao, Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We documented different patterns of aboveground-belowground diversity relationships in these forests. We observed no linkage between plant and bacterial α-diversity in the early successional forest, and even a negative correlation in the late successional forest, indicating that high bacterial α-diversity is not always linked to high plant α-diversity. Beta-diversity coupling was only found at the late successional stage, while in the early successional forest, the bacterial β-diversity was closely correlated with soil property distances. Additionally, we showed that the dominant competitive tree species in the late successional forest may play key roles in driving forest succession by shaping the soil bacterial community in the early successional stage. This study sheds new light on the potential aboveground-belowground linkage in natural ecosystems, which may help us understand the mechanisms that drive ecosystem succession. PMID:26184121

  8. Aboveground Tree Growth Varies with Belowground Carbon Allocation in a Tropical Rainforest Environment

    PubMed Central

    Raich, James W.; Clark, Deborah A.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Wood, Tana E.

    2014-01-01

    Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15–20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production). In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:24945351

  9. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Xugao; Liang, Chao; Hao, Zhanqing; Zhou, Lisha; Ma, Sam; Li, Xiaobin; Yang, Shan; Yao, Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We documented different patterns of aboveground-belowground diversity relationships in these forests. We observed no linkage between plant and bacterial α-diversity in the early successional forest, and even a negative correlation in the late successional forest, indicating that high bacterial α-diversity is not always linked to high plant α-diversity. Beta-diversity coupling was only found at the late successional stage, while in the early successional forest, the bacterial β-diversity was closely correlated with soil property distances. Additionally, we showed that the dominant competitive tree species in the late successional forest may play key roles in driving forest succession by shaping the soil bacterial community in the early successional stage. This study sheds new light on the potential aboveground-belowground linkage in natural ecosystems, which may help us understand the mechanisms that drive ecosystem succession. PMID:26184121

  10. Linking aboveground net primary productivity to soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Fox S.; Lajtha, Kate J.

    2013-07-01

    Factors influencing soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in complex terrain, where vegetation, climate, and topography vary over the scale of a few meters, are not well understood. We examined the spatial correlations of lidar and geographic information system-derived landscape topography, empirically measured soil characteristics, and current and historical vegetation composition and structure versus SOM fractions and DOC pools and leaching on a small catchment (WS1) in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, located in the western Cascades Range of Oregon, USA. We predicted that aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), litter fall, and nitrogen mineralization would be positively correlated with SOM, DOC, and carbon (C) content of the soil based on the principle that increased C inputs cause C stores in and losses from in the soil. We expected that in tandem, certain microtopographical and microclimatic characteristics might be associated with elevated C inputs and correspondingly, soil C stores and losses. We confirmed that on this site, positive relationships exist between ANPP, C inputs (litter fall), and losses (exportable DOC), but we did not find that these relationships between ANPP, inputs, and exports were translated to SOM stores (mg C/g soil), C content of the soil (% C/g soil), or DOC pools (determined with salt and water extractions). We suggest that the biogeochemical processes controlling C storage and lability in soil may relate to longer-term variability in aboveground inputs that result from a heterogeneous and evolving forest stand.

  11. Study on forest above-ground biomass synergy inversion from GLAS and HJ-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhou; Cao, Chunxiang; Ji, Wei; Xu, Min; Chen, Wei

    2012-10-01

    The need exists to develop a systematic approach to inventory and monitor global forests, both for carbon stock evaluation and for land use change analysis. The use of freely available satellite-based data for carbon stock estimation mitigates both the cost and the spatial limitations of field-based techniques. Spaceborne lidar data have been demonstrated as useful for forest aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation over a wide range of biomass values and forest types. However, the application of these data is limited because of their spatially discrete nature. Spaceborne multispectral sensors have been used extensively to estimate AGB, but these methods have been demonstrated as inappropriate for forest structure characterization in high-biomass mature forests. This study uses an integration of ICESat Geospatial Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) lidar and HJ-1 satellites data to develop methods to estimate AGB in an area of Qilian Mountains, Northwest China. Considering the study area belongs to mountainous terrain, the difficulties of this article are how to extract canopy height from GLAS waveform metrics. Combining with HJ-1 data and ground survey data of the study area, we establish forest biomass estimation model for the GLAS data based on BP neural network model. In order to estimate AGB, the training sample data includes the canopy height extracted from GLAS, LAI, vegetation coverage and several kinds of vegetation indices from HJ-1 data. The results of forest aboveground biomass are very close to the fields measured results, and are consistent with land cover data in the spatial distribution.

  12. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Xugao; Liang, Chao; Hao, Zhanqing; Zhou, Lisha; Ma, Sam; Li, Xiaobin; Yang, Shan; Yao, Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We documented different patterns of aboveground-belowground diversity relationships in these forests. We observed no linkage between plant and bacterial α-diversity in the early successional forest, and even a negative correlation in the late successional forest, indicating that high bacterial α-diversity is not always linked to high plant α-diversity. Beta-diversity coupling was only found at the late successional stage, while in the early successional forest, the bacterial β-diversity was closely correlated with soil property distances. Additionally, we showed that the dominant competitive tree species in the late successional forest may play key roles in driving forest succession by shaping the soil bacterial community in the early successional stage. This study sheds new light on the potential aboveground-belowground linkage in natural ecosystems, which may help us understand the mechanisms that drive ecosystem succession.

  13. Plant Diversity Impacts Decomposition and Herbivory via Changes in Aboveground Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Anne; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Abbas, Maike; Eisenhauer, Nico; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lange, Markus; Scherber, Christoph; Vogel, Anja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plant diversity influences essential ecosystem processes as aboveground productivity, and can have cascading effects on the arthropod communities in adjacent trophic levels. However, few studies have examined how those changes in arthropod communities can have additional impacts on ecosystem processes caused by them (e.g. pollination, bioturbation, predation, decomposition, herbivory). Therefore, including arthropod effects in predictions of the impact of plant diversity loss on such ecosystem processes is an important but little studied piece of information. In a grassland biodiversity experiment, we addressed this gap by assessing aboveground decomposer and herbivore communities and linking their abundance and diversity to rates of decomposition and herbivory. Path analyses showed that increasing plant diversity led to higher abundance and diversity of decomposing arthropods through higher plant biomass. Higher species richness of decomposers, in turn, enhanced decomposition. Similarly, species-rich plant communities hosted a higher abundance and diversity of herbivores through elevated plant biomass and C:N ratio, leading to higher herbivory rates. Integrating trophic interactions into the study of biodiversity effects is required to understand the multiple pathways by which biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. PMID:25226237

  14. Estimating aboveground biomass of broadleaved woody plants in the understory of Florida Keys pine forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sah, J.P.; Ross, M.S.; Koptur, S.; Snyder, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Species-specific allometric equations that provide estimates of biomass from measured plant attributes are currently unavailable for shrubs common to South Florida pine rocklands, where fire plays an important part in shaping the structure and function of ecosystems. We developed equations to estimate total aboveground biomass and fine fuel of 10 common hardwood species in the shrub layer of pine forests of the lower Florida Keys. Many equations that related biomass categories to crown area and height were significant (p < 0.05), but the form and variables comprising the best model varied among species. We applied the best-fit regression models to structural information from the shrub stratum in 18 plots on Big Pine Key, the most extensive pine forest in the Keys. Estimates based on species-specific equations indicated clearly that total aboveground shrub biomass and shrub fine fuel increased with time since last fire, but the relationships were non-linear. The relative proportion of biomass constituted by the major species also varied with stand age. Estimates based on mixed-species regressions differed slightly from estimates based on species-specific models, but the former could provide useful approximations in similar forests where species-specific regressions are not yet available. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation about the effects of exterior surface paint color on temperature development in aboveground pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Farzaneh-Gord, Mahmood; Rasekh, Alireza; Nabati, Amin; Saadat, Morteza

    2010-12-15

    A practical analytical model for predicting temperature development of incompressible flow inside an aboveground pipeline has been constructed and presented in this research work. The outer surface of the pipeline is exposed to solar radiation and wind stream. The radiation heat exchange with ambient is also taken into account. The effects of exterior surface paint color represented by emissivity and absorptivity, have been studied. The model has been developed to study crude oil flow temperature development through a specific pipeline. The results obtained by the model show that the bulk temperature inclined to a limiting value in some distance which affected mainly by Reynolds numbers. It is found that emissivity and absorptivity of surface are predominant parameters in temperature development in an aboveground pipeline flow which can increase or decrease pipe surface and fluid temperature especially for low Reynolds number flow. Based on the results which indicated significantly of exterior surface paint color, one should choose the paint color by considering its effects on temperature development. (author)

  16. Deep Neural Networks for Above-Ground Detection in Very High Spatial Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmanis, D.; Adam, F.; Datcu, M.; Esch, T.; Stilla, U.

    2015-03-01

    Deep Learning techniques have lately received increased attention for achieving state-of-the-art results in many classification problems, including various vision tasks. In this work, we implement a Deep Learning technique for classifying above-ground objects within urban environments by using a Multilayer Perceptron model and VHSR DEM data. In this context, we propose a novel method called M-ramp which significantly improves the classifier's estimations by neglecting artefacts, minimizing convergence time and improving overall accuracy. We support the importance of using the M-ramp model in DEM classification by conducting a set of experiments with both quantitative and qualitative results. Precisely, we initially train our algorithm with random DEM tiles and their respective point-labels, considering less than 0.1% over the test area, depicting the city center of Munich (25 km2). Furthermore with no additional training, we classify two much larger unseen extents of the greater Munich area (424 km2) and Dongying city, China (257 km2) and evaluate their respective results for proving knowledge-transferability. Through the use of M-ramp, we were able to accelerate the convergence by a magnitude of 8 and achieve a decrease in above-ground relative error by 24.8% and 5.5% over the different datasets.

  17. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McLearn, M.E.; Miller, M.J.; Kostecki, P.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Presio, L.M.; Suyama, W.; Kucharski, W.A.

    1988-04-01

    Remedial options for leaking underground storage tanks were investigated in a joint project of the Electric Power Research Institute and the Underground Storage Tank Committee of the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group. Both existing and emerging technologies were examined. Thirteen remedial techniques were identified and initially characterized as in situ or non-in situ. In situ methods include volatilization, biodegradation, leaching and chemical reaction, vitrification, passive remediation, and isolation or containment. Non-in situ techniques include land treatment, thermal treatment, asphalt incorporation, solidification and stabilization, groundwater extraction and treatment, chemical extraction, and excavation. Soil and groundwater remediation problems have many site-specific consideration which must be considered in choosing an appropriate remedial option; these include cleanup goals, site and contaminant characteristics, cost, exposures pathways, and others. Appropriate remedial techniques are chosen by assessing technical, implementational, environmental and economic consideration of each available option to achieve the desired cleanup goal at the specified site.

  18. Underground tank leak detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Niaki, Shahzad; Broscious, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks has had a significant adverse environmental impact on the US. Current estimates from government and industry sources are that between 1.5 to 3.5 million underground storage tanks exist in the nation. Estimates of the number of leaking tanks range from 75,000 to 100,000; and 350,000 others may develop leaks within the next five years. The 1983 National Petroleum News Factbook Issue forecasts the existence of approximately 140,000 gasoline service stations in the US at the end of 1983. New York State estimates that 19% of its 83,000 active underground gasoline tanks are now leaking. Maine estimates that 25% of its 1,600 retail gasoline underground tanks are leaking approximately 11 million gallons yearly. In Michigan 39% of ground water contamination incidents are attributed to storage tanks. One of the primary causes of tank leakage is corrosion of the storage tanks. Product loss from leaking tanks may cause an adverse effect on the environment, endanger lives, reduce income, and require the expenditure of millions of dollars for cleanup. To prevent or reduce the adverse effects of gasoline leakage, an accurate method must be used to determine whether or not an underground tank is leaking.

  19. Housekeeping Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 119: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-26

    The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order was entered into by the State of Nevada, US Department of Energy, and US Department of Defense to identify sites of potential historical contamination and implement corrective actions based on public health and environmental considerations. The facilities subject to this agreement include the Nevada Test Site (NTS), parts of the Tonopah Test Range, parts to the Nellis Air Force Range, the Central Nevada Test Area, and the Project Shoal Area. Corrective Action Sites (CASs) are areas potentially requiring corrective actions and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal, or release sites. Based on geography, technical similarity, agency responsibility, or other appropriate reasons, CASs are grouped together into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for the purpose of determining appropriate corrective actions. This report contains the Closure Verification Forms for cleanup activities that were performed at 19 CASs with in CAU 119 on the NTS. The form for each CAS provides the location, directions to the site, general description, and photographs of the site before and after cleanup activities. Activities included verification of the prior removal of both aboveground and underground gas/oil storage tanks, gas sampling tanks, pressure fuel tanks, tank stands, trailers, debris, and other material. Based on these former activities, no further action is required at these CASs.

  20. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics `D` waste codes; and against state waste codes.

  1. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  2. Aboveground production does not increase after ten years of elevated CO2 in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newingham, B. A.; Vanier, C. H.; Charlet, D.; Zitzer, S. F.; Smith, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) is assumed to increase primary production, particularly in desert systems through stimulatory effects on plant water-use efficiency. We examined the effects of elevated [CO2] at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO2 Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem. At the NDFF, ambient and elevated [CO2] levels were 360 and 550 μmol mol-1 [CO2], respectively. CO2 treatments were applied continuously from 1997-2007 in intact plots 25 m in diameter. While other studies focused on soil and root responses to elevated [CO2], our study focused on aboveground production of annuals and perennial plants. In 1997, diameters and heights of all perennial individuals were recorded and mapped. In 2007, diameters and heights were re-measured and aboveground biomass was harvested for every mapped perennial individual. Harvest data were used to construct regressions for twenty perennial species to predict starting biomass based on diameters and heights. Annual plants were harvested yearly at peak biomass from permanent transects. We found no significant effect of elevated [CO2] on total perennial plant biomass or cover at the end of the experiment. Regardless of [CO2] treatment, perennial cover increased while total biomass did not change over the ten years of the experiment. Perennial biomass allocation to vegetative, twig and woody biomass was not differentially affected by elevated [CO2], although leaf area index increased under elevated [CO2]. Similarly, there was no consistent elevated [CO2] effect on yearly production of annual (ephemeral) plants, although an exotic grass (Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens) exhibited a higher relative stimulation in production at elevated [CO2] than did native dicot and grass species. Other studies in our research group have shown that increases in production are only seen in wet years during the ten-year period of CO2 treatments at the NDFF, and so future effects of rising [CO2] may primarily

  3. Landscape Patterns of Wood Density and Aboveground Biomass Along a Tropical Elevation Gradient in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    This research sought to understand how tree wood density and taxonomic diversity relate to topography and three-dimensional vegetation structure in the tropical montane forest of Braulio Carrillo National Park in Costa Rica. The study utilized forest inventory and botanical data from twenty 1-ha plots ranging from 55 m to 2800 m above sea level and remote sensing data from an airborne lidar sensor (NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor [LVIS]) to quantify variations in forest structure. There is growing evidence that ecosystem structure may help to control the functional variations across landscapes. This study relates patterns of tree functional wood density and alpha diversity to three-dimensional structure using remote sensing observations of forest structure. We were able to test the effect of the gradient on wood density measured from collected tree cores and on the subsequent aboveground biomass estimations. We sought to determine if there was a significant pattern of wood density across the altitudinal gradient, which has implications for conservation of both ecosystem services and biodiversity. We also wanted to determine how many random individuals could be sampled to accurately estimate aboveground biomass in a one-hectare plot. Our results indicate that there is a strong relationship between LVIS-derived forest 3D-structure and alpha diversity, likely controlled by variations in abiotic factors and topography along the elevation. Using spatial analysis with the aid of remote sensing data, we found patterns along the environmental gradients defining species composition and forest structure. Wood density values were found to vary significantly from database values for the same species. This variation in tree growth has repercussions on overall forest structure, and subsequent carbon estimates extrapolated from field measurements. Because these wood density values are directly tied to biomass estimates, it is possible that carbon storage has been

  4. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  5. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  6. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  7. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  8. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at...

  9. 27 CFR 19.183 - Scale tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scale tanks. 19.183... Tank Requirements § 19.183 Scale tanks. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this..., the tank must be mounted on scales and the contents of the tank must be determined by weight....

  10. 27 CFR 19.183 - Scale tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scale tanks. 19.183... Tank Requirements § 19.183 Scale tanks. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this..., the tank must be mounted on scales and the contents of the tank must be determined by weight....

  11. 27 CFR 19.183 - Scale tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scale tanks. 19.183... Tank Requirements § 19.183 Scale tanks. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this..., the tank must be mounted on scales and the contents of the tank must be determined by weight....

  12. 27 CFR 19.183 - Scale tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scale tanks. 19.183... Tank Requirements § 19.183 Scale tanks. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this..., the tank must be mounted on scales and the contents of the tank must be determined by weight....

  13. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling...

  14. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of...

  15. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling...

  16. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling...

  17. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of...

  18. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of...

  19. 49 CFR 174.63 - Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable tanks, IM portable tanks, IBCs, Large Packagings, cargo tanks, and multi-unit tank car tanks. 174.63 Section 174.63 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  20. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling...

  1. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of...

  2. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of...

  3. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling...

  4. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the...

  5. 27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks... Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where a shipment of distilled spirits from customs custody to the distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings affording access to...

  6. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks....

  7. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the...

  8. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  9. 27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks... Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where a shipment of distilled spirits from customs custody to the distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings affording access to...

  10. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to §§ 179.100...

  11. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks....

  12. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to §§ 179.100...

  13. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks....

  14. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  15. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  16. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  17. 27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks... Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where a shipment of distilled spirits from customs custody to the distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings affording access to...

  18. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks....

  19. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to §§ 179.100...

  1. 46 CFR 153.250 - Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. 153.250... Equipment Cargo Tanks § 153.250 Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. Except in those cases in which Commandant (CG-ENG) specifically approves another arrangement, such as a double-bottom or deep tank as...

  2. 46 CFR 153.250 - Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. 153.250... Equipment Cargo Tanks § 153.250 Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. Except in those cases in which Commandant (CG-ENG) specifically approves another arrangement, such as a double-bottom or deep tank as...

  3. 46 CFR 153.250 - Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. 153.250... Equipment Cargo Tanks § 153.250 Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. Except in those cases in which Commandant (CG-522) specifically approves another arrangement, such as a double-bottom or deep tank as...

  4. 46 CFR 153.250 - Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. 153.250... Equipment Cargo Tanks § 153.250 Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. Except in those cases in which Commandant (CG-522) specifically approves another arrangement, such as a double-bottom or deep tank as...

  5. 46 CFR 153.250 - Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. 153.250... Equipment Cargo Tanks § 153.250 Double-bottom and deep tanks as cargo tanks. Except in those cases in which Commandant (CG-ENG) specifically approves another arrangement, such as a double-bottom or deep tank as...

  6. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to §§ 179.100...

  7. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the...

  8. Statewide Mapping of Aboveground Biomass by Integrating Airborne Lidar Data and National Forestry Inventory Plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; McRoberts, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The freely available airborne lidar data at the sub-national level in the United States provide unprecedented opportunities for mapping large-area yet accurate information about vegetation structure, biomass, and carbon. However, the challenge of processing massive lidar data and extracting useful information is huge. This study is to conduct a statewide mapping study of aboveground biomass (AGB) by integrating airborne lidar data and FIA (Forest Inventory and Analysis) plot data for the whole state of Minnesota. We will share our experience and lessons in issues including 1) automatic generation of Digital Terrain Model from point cloud, 2) classification of vegetation returns, 3) calculation of AGB from FIA plots using different allometric models, 4) statistical modeling of AGB by integrating with FIA plots, and 5) assessing the uncertainty of mapped AGB.

  9. Mid-Term Status of the Forest Dragon III: Data Collection and Regional Aboveground Biomass Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yong; Li, Zengyuan; Liu, Luxia; Lu, Hao; Jia, Wen; Liu, Qingwang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Ruiying; Shmullius, Christiana

    2014-11-01

    In the 1st two years of Forest Dragon 3 project, Chinese groups engaged in following activities: 1) field measurements and airborne campaigns for forest map validation, 2) regional forest aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation algorithm development and map generation. The AGB estimation by fusion multisensor fusion was investigated. Two campaigns consist of in-situ observation, airborne flight and spaceborne measurements were designed and implemented in the Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province of China. The Heilongjiang Province is located in Northeast China and has typical temperate forest. The Yunnan Province is located in Southwest China and contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. By using these observation data from different scales, multi-source satellite data were used to estimate spatial explicit AGB for Da Xinganling study area.

  10. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California forests.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, Thomas W.; Shook, Christine D.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  11. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California, forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, T.W.; Shook, C.D.; Keeley, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  12. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms. PMID:27197388

  13. Aboveground Live Forest Biomass Map for the US From Satellite Imagery and Inventory Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, E.; Blackard, J.; Finco, M.; Holden, G.; Hoppus, M.; Jacobs, D.; Lister, A.; Moisen, G.; Nelson, M.; Riemann, R.; Ruefenacht, B.; Salajanu, D.; Weyermann, D.; Winterberger, K.; Czaplewski, R.; Tymcio, R.; Brandeis, T.

    2004-12-01

    A gridded map of aboveground live forest biomass for the conterminous U.S., Alaska and Puerto Rico with a 250-m cell size resulted from integrating plot-level biomass estimates, from USDA Forest Service (USFS) nation-wide forest inventory data, with satellite imagery and ancillary geospatial data. The image and other predictor layers included MOD09 8-Day surface reflectance imagery (1) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS-derived proportional tree cover (2), Landsat image-derived proportional land cover (3-4), climate averages (5-6) and topographic variables (7). By state or mapping zone (8), plot-based aboveground live forest biomass estimates generally fell within 5 percent of map-based estimates, and the map provided previously unavailable spatial detail. Here we describe the inventory data, the modeling approach, and the error maps. We secondly compare estimates of U.S. forest carbon storage in live woody biomass from this map with other estimates. We also critically evaluate the modeling process and spatial scaling issues. (1)Vermote EF, Vermueulen A. 1999. MOD09 ATBD, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, 107 pp. (2) Hansen M, DeFries R, et al. 2003. GLCF, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (3) Vogelmann JE, Howard S, et al. 2001. Photogramm Eng Rem S 67:650 (4) Helmer E, Ramos O, et al. 2002. Caribbean J Sci 38:165 (5) Daly C, Kittel T, et al. 2000. 12th AMS Conf on Applied Climatology, Amer Meteorol Soc, Asheville (6) Daly C, Helmer E, et al. 2003. Intl J Climatology 23:1359 (7) Gesch D, Oimoen M, et al. 2002. Photogramm Eng Rem S 68:5 (8) Homer C, Huang C, et al. 2004. Photogramm Eng Rem S 70:829

  14. Controls over aboveground forest carbon density on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaro, J.; Asner, G. P.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; van Breugel, M.; Hall, J.; Dahlin, K.

    2011-06-01

    Despite the importance of tropical forests to the global carbon cycle, ecological controls over landscape-level variation in live aboveground carbon density (ACD) in tropical forests are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a spatially comprehensive analysis of ACD variation for a continental tropical forest - Barro Colorado Island, Panama (BCI) - and tested site factors that may control such variation. We mapped ACD over 1256 ha of BCI using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which was well-correlated with ground-based measurements of ACD in Panamanian forests of various ages (r2 = 0.84, RMSE = 17 Mg C ha-1, P < 0.0001). We used multiple regression to examine controls over LiDAR-derived ACD, including slope angle, forest age, bedrock, and soil texture. Collectively, these variables explained 14 % of the variation in ACD at 30-m resolution, and explained 33 % at 100-m resolution. At all resolutions, slope (linked to underlying bedrock variation) was the strongest driving factor; standing carbon stocks were generally higher on steeper slopes. This result suggests that physiography may be more important in controlling ACD variation in Neotropical forests than currently thought. Although BCI has been largely undisturbed by humans for a century, past land-use over approximately half of the island still influences ACD variation, with younger forests (80-130 years old) averaging ~15 % less carbon storage than old-growth forests (>400 years old). If other regions of relatively old tropical secondary forests also store less carbon aboveground than primary forests, the effects on the global carbon cycle could be substantial and difficult to detect with traditional satellite monitoring.

  15. Controls over aboveground forest carbon density on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaro, J.; Asner, G. P.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; van Breugel, M.; Hall, J.; Dahlin, K.

    2010-12-01

    Despite the importance of tropical forests to the global carbon cycle, ecological controls over landscape-level variation in live aboveground carbon density (ACD) in tropical forests are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a spatially comprehensive analysis of ACD variation for a mainland tropical forest - Barro Colorado Island, Panama (BCI) - and tested site factors that may control such variation. We mapped ACD over 98% of BCI (~1500 ha) using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which was well-correlated with ground-based measurements of ACD in Panamanian forests of various ages (r2 = 0.77, RMSE = 29 Mg C ha-1, P < 0.0001). We used multiple regression to examine controls over LiDAR-derived ACD, including slope angle, bedrock, soil texture, and forest age. Collectively, these variables explained 14% of the variation in ACD at 30-m resolution, and explained 33% at 100-m resolution. At all resolutions, slope (linked to underlying bedrock variation) was the strongest driving factor; standing carbon stocks were generally higher on steeper slopes, where erosion rates tend to exceed weathering rates, compared to gentle slopes, where weathering in place produces deep, oxic soils. This result suggests that physiography may be more important in controlling ACD variation in Neotropical forests than currently thought. Although BCI has been largely undisturbed by humans for a century, past land-use over approximately half of the island still influences ACD variation, with younger forests (80-130 years old) averaging ~15% less carbon storage than old-growth forests (>400 years old). If other regions of relatively old tropical secondary forests also store less carbon aboveground than primary forests, the effects on the global carbon cycle could be substantial and difficult to detect with satellite monitoring.

  16. Interactions between herbivory and warming in aboveground biomass production of arctic vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Christian; Post, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies investigating the ecosystem effects of global climate change have focused on arctic ecosystems because the Arctic is expected to undergo the earliest and most pronounced changes in response to increasing global temperatures, and arctic ecosystems are considerably limited by low temperatures and permafrost. In these nutrient limited systems, a warmer climate is expected to increase plant biomass production, primarily through increases in shrubs over graminoids and forbs. But, the influence of vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores has been largely absent in studies investigating the effects of vegetation responses to climate change, despite the fact that herbivory can have a major influence on plant community composition, biomass and nutrient cycling. Here, we present results from a multi-annual field experiment investigating the effects of vertebrate herbivory on plant biomass response to simulated climate warming in arctic Greenland. Results The results after four years of treatments did not give any clear evidence of increased biomass of shrubs in response climate warming. Nor did our study indicate that vertebrate grazing mediated any increased domination of shrubs over other functional plant groups in response to warming. However, our results indicate an important role of insect outbreaks on aboveground biomass. Intense caterpillar foraging from a two-year outbreak of the moth Eurois occulta during two growing seasons may have concealed any treatment effects. However, there was some evidence suggesting that vertebrate herbivores constrain the biomass production of shrubs over graminoids and forbs. Conclusion Although inconclusive, our results were likely constrained by the overwhelming influence of an unexpected caterpillar outbreak on aboveground biomass. It is likely that the role of large vertebrate herbivores in vegetation response to warming will become more evident as this experiment proceeds and the plant community recovers from

  17. Plant systemic induced responses mediate interactions between root parasitic nematodes and aboveground herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Wondafrash, Mesfin; Van Dam, Nicole M; Tytgat, Tom O G

    2013-01-01

    Insects and nematodes are the most diverse and abundant groups of multicellular animals feeding on plants on either side of the soil-air interface. Several herbivore-induced responses are systemic, and hence can influence the preference and performance of organisms in other plant organs. Recent studies show that plants mediate interactions between belowground plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) and aboveground herbivorous insects. Based on the knowledge of plant responses to pathogens, we review the emerging insights on plant systemic responses against root-feeding nematodes and shoot-feeding insects. We discuss the potential mechanisms of plant-mediated indirect interactions between both groups of organisms and point to gaps in our knowledge. Root-feeding nematodes can positively or negatively affect shoot herbivorous insects, and vice versa. The outcomes of the interactions between these spatially separated herbivore communities appear to be influenced by the feeding strategy of the nematodes and the insects, as well as by host plant susceptibility to both herbivores. The potential mechanisms for these interactions include systemic induced plant defense, interference with the translocation and dynamics of locally induced secondary metabolites, and reallocation of plant nutritional reserves. During evolution, PPNs as well as herbivorous insects have acquired effectors that modify plant defense responses and resource allocation patterns to their advantage. However, it is also known that plants under herbivore attack change the allocation of their resources, e.g., for compensatory growth responses, which may affect the performance of other organisms feeding on the plant. Studying the chemical and molecular basis of these interactions will reveal the molecular mechanisms that are involved. Moreover, it will lead to a better understanding of the ecological relevance of aboveground-belowground interactions, as well as support the development of sustainable pest management

  18. Aboveground total and green biomass of dryland shrub derived from terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsoy, Peter J.; Glenn, Nancy F.; Clark, Patrick E.; Derryberry, DeWayne R.

    2014-02-01

    Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), a dominant shrub species in the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem of the western US, is declining from its historical distribution due to feedbacks between climate and land use change, fire, and invasive species. Quantifying aboveground biomass of sagebrush is important for assessing carbon storage and monitoring the presence and distribution of this rapidly changing dryland ecosystem. Models of shrub canopy volume, derived from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds, were used to accurately estimate aboveground sagebrush biomass. Ninety-one sagebrush plants were scanned and sampled across three study sites in the Great Basin, USA. Half of the plants were scanned and destructively sampled in the spring (n = 46), while the other half were scanned again in the fall before destructive sampling (n = 45). The latter set of sagebrush plants was scanned during both spring and fall to further test the ability of the TLS to quantify seasonal changes in green biomass. Sagebrush biomass was estimated using both a voxel and a 3-D convex hull approach applied to TLS point cloud data. The 3-D convex hull model estimated total and green biomass more accurately (R2 = 0.92 and R2 = 0.83, respectively) than the voxel-based method (R2 = 0.86 and R2 = 0.73, respectively). Seasonal differences in TLS-predicted green biomass were detected at two of the sites (p < 0.001 and p = 0.029), elucidating the amount of ephemeral leaf loss in the face of summer drought. The methods presented herein are directly transferable to other dryland shrubs, and implementation of the convex hull model with similar sagebrush species is straightforward.

  19. Latitudinal Characteristics of Below- and Above-ground Biomass of Typha: a Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    ASAEDA, TAKASHI; HAI, DINH NGOC; MANATUNGE, JAGATH; WILLIAMS, DAVID; ROBERTS, JANE

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The latitudinal differences in the growth characteristics of Typha are largely unknown, although a number of studies have pointed out the effects of climate on the growth and productivity of Typha. Therefore, a dynamic growth model was developed for Typha to examine the effects of latitudinal changes in temperature and radiation on partitioning of the total biomass during the growing season into rhizomes, roots, flowering and vegetative shoots, and inflorescences. • Methods After validating the model with data from growth studies of Typha found in past literature, it was used to investigate the dynamics of above- and below-ground biomasses at three latitudes: 30°, 40° and 50°. • Key Results Regardless of the initial rhizome biomass, both above- and below-ground biomass values converged to a latitude-specific equilibrium produced by the balance between the total production and respiration and mortality losses. Above-ground biomass was high from 10° to 35° latitude with sufficient radiation, despite high metabolic losses; however, it decreased markedly at higher latitudes due to a low photosynthetic rate. Below-ground biomass, on the other hand, increased with latitude up to 40° due to decreasing metabolic losses, and then markedly decreased at higher latitudes. Above-ground biomass was enhanced with an increasing number of cohorts regardless of latitude. However, although more cohorts resulted in a larger below-ground biomass at low latitudes, the largest below-ground biomass was provided by a smaller number of cohorts at high latitudes. This difference is due to low production rates of late-season cohorts in high latitudes, compared with consumption for shooting and establishing foliage. • Conclusions The model could be used to predict the potential growth of Typha in given conditions over a wide range of latitudes and is useful for practical applications such as wetland management or wastewater treatment systems using Typha

  20. Mapping aboveground forest biomass combining dendrometric data and spectral signature of forest species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avocat, H.; Tourneux, F.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measures and explicit spatial representations of forest biomass compose an important aspect to model the forest productivity and crops, and to implement sustainable forest management. Several methods have been developed to estimate and to map forest biomass, combining point-sources measurements of biophysical variables such as diameter-at-breast height (DBH), tree height, crown size, crown length, crown volume and remote sensing data (spectral vegetation index values). In this study, we propose a new method for aboveground biomass (AGB) mapping of forests and isolated trees. This method is tested on a 1100 km2 area located in the eastern France. In contrast to most of studies, our model is not calibrated using field plot measurements or point-source inventory data. The primary goal of this model is to propose an accessible and reproducible method for AGB mapping of temperate forests, by combining standard biomass values coming from bibliography and remotely sensed data. This method relies on three steps. (1) The first step consists of produce a map of wooded areas including small woods and isolated trees, and to identify the major forest stands. To do this, we use an unsupervised classification of a Landsat 7 ETM+ image. Results are compared and improved with various land cover data. (2) The second step consists of extract the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values of main forest stands. (3) Finally, these values are combined with standard AGB values provided by bibliography, to calibrate four AGB estimation models of different forest types (broadleaves, coniferous, coppices, and mixed stands). This method provides a map of aboveground biomass for forests and isolated trees with a 30 meters spatial resolution. Results demonstrate that 71 % of AGB values for hardwoods vary between 143 and 363 t.ha-1, i.e. × 1 standard deviation around the average. For coniferous stands, most of values of AGB range from 167 to 256 t.ha-1.

  1. 39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. DIABLO POWERHOUSE: GRAVITY LUBRICATING OIL TANKS. THESE TANKS ARE LOCATED AT ROOF LEVEL AT THE NORTHEAST REAR CORNER OF DIABLO POWERHOUSE, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  2. 11. Station Accumulator Tanks, view to the northeast. The tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Station Accumulator Tanks, view to the northeast. The tanks are visible along the right side of photograph, opposite a wall of the Unit 1 turbine pit. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  3. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  4. Tank closure reducing grout

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  5. GALEX AND PAN-STARRS1 DISCOVERY OF SN IIP 2010aq: THE FIRST FEW DAYS AFTER SHOCK BREAKOUT IN A RED SUPERGIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gezari, S.; Huber, M. E.; Grav, T.; Rest, A.; Narayan, G.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Martin, D. C.; Valenti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Dombeck, T.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W.

    2010-09-01

    We present the early UV and optical light curve of Type IIP supernova (SN) 2010aq at z = 0.0862, and compare it to analytical models for thermal emission following SN shock breakout in a red supergiant star. SN 2010aq was discovered in joint monitoring between the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Time Domain Survey (TDS) in the NUV and the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS) in the g, r, i, and z bands. The GALEX and Pan-STARRS1 observations detect the SN less than 1 day after the shock breakout, measure a diluted blackbody temperature of 31, 000 {+-} 6000 K 1 day later, and follow the rise in the UV/optical light curve over the next 2 days caused by the expansion and cooling of the SN ejecta. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the simultaneous UV and optical photometry allows us to fit for a progenitor star radius of 700 {+-} 200R {sub sun}, the size of a red supergiant star. An excess in UV emission two weeks after shock breakout compared with SNe well fitted by model atmosphere-code synthetic spectra with solar metallicity is best explained by suppressed line blanketing due to a lower metallicity progenitor star in SN 2010aq. Continued monitoring of PS1 MDS fields by the GALEX TDS will increase the sample of early UV detections of Type II SNe by an order of magnitude and probe the diversity of SN progenitor star properties.

  6. SINDA/FLUINT Stratified Tank Modeling for Cryrogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A general purpose SINDA/FLUINT (S/F) stratified tank model was created to simulate self-pressurization and axial jet TVS; Stratified layers in the vapor and liquid are modeled using S/F lumps.; The stratified tank model was constructed to permit incorporating the following additional features:, Multiple or singular lumps in the liquid and vapor regions of the tank, Real gases (also mixtures) and compressible liquids, Venting, pressurizing, and draining, Condensation and evaporation/boiling, Wall heat transfer, Elliptical, cylindrical, and spherical tank geometries; Extensive user logic is used to allow detailed tailoring - Don't have to rebuilt everything from scratch!!; Most code input for a specific case is done through the Registers Data Block:, Lump volumes are determined through user input:; Geometric tank dimensions (height, width, etc); Liquid level could be input as either a volume percentage of fill level or actual liquid level height

  7. Drivers of variation in aboveground net primary productivity and plant community composition differe across a broad precipitation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has long been a goal of ecology to determine what factors drive variation in aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Total annual precipitation has been shown to be a strong predictor of ANPP across broad spatial scales, but a poor predictor at local scales. Here we aim to determine the amount...

  8. Estimating Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) Leaf Area Index and Aboveground Biomass with the Use of Hyperspectral Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral remote-sensed data were obtained via a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager-II (CASI-II) and used to estimate leaf-area index (LAI) and aboveground biomass of a highly invasive weed species, yellow starthistle (YST). In parallel, 34 ground-based field plots were used to measure abov...

  9. Estimating leaf area index and aboveground biomass of an invasive weed (yellow starthistle, Centaurea solstitalis L.) using airborne hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral remote sensed data was obtained via a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) and used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) and aboveground biomass of a highly invasive weed species, yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis L.). In parallel, 34 ground-based field plots were used t...

  10. Spatial heterogeneity in aboveground net primary production and species richness at multiple scales in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We analyzed patterns in spatial heterogeneity and the processes driving these patterns in two ecosystem properties, aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and species richness, at multiple scales in the Chihuahuan Desert. We used long-term data (1990-2009) to examine the importance of a suite of...

  11. Filling an Unvented Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Phillip; Willen, Gary S.

    1987-01-01

    Slow-cooling technique enables tank lacking top vent to be filled with cryogenic liquid. New technique: pressure buildup prevented through condensation of accumulating gas resulting in condensate being added to bulk liquid. Filling method developed for vibration test on vacuum-insulated spherical tank containing liquid hydrogen.

  12. HAWAII LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage of leaking underground storage tanks(LUST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more leaking underground storage tank exists. ...

  13. Relativistic transparency and non-axisymmetry of laser-accelerated ion beams from the Break-Out Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Huang, Chengkun; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    In the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration mechanism [1], an ultraintense, ultrahigh contrast laser interacts with a nano-scale, solid-density target, which expands as the electrons under the laser spot heat to relativistic temperatures. When the electron density drops below the relativistic critical density, the target turns transparent and a period of enhanced ion acceleration, called the Break Out Afterburner, ensues. A large (tens of TeV), longitudinal electric field forms that co-moves with the target ions. A defining features of the BOA, as seen in VPIC kinetic plasma simulations and observed in experiments at the LANL Trident laser facility, is that the ion beams form as a pair of lobes with density and energy possessing maxima in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization. This paper will focus on analytic theory explaining how these lobes form as a consequence of subtle effects of the laser ponderomotive force. [1] Yin et al. Laser and Part. Beams 24, 2, 291 (2006).

  14. Preliminary study on the relationships between aboveground storage and remotely sensed data at Pingdong plain afforestation land in Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Chen, J. M.; Yu, J.; Cheng, C.; Lai, Y.; Chiang, P.; Hong, C.; Chang, C.; Wey, T.; Tsai, M.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This research aims on the relationships between LAI and five vegetation index (BR, SRBR, BD, NDVI and TNDVI) from remotely sensed images, in situ measurements and aboveground storage for 10-11yr old plain afforestation (14 species) located at Wanlong farm of subtropical-tropical region at the southern part of Taiwan which originally governed by Taiwan Sugar Corporation. The preliminary results show the aboveground storage is 14.19×9.19 m3 ha-1 and the correlation coefficient between aboveground storage and BR, SRBR, BD, NDVI and TNDVI is 0.331 (p=0.211), 0.317 (p=0.232), 0.310 (p=0.244), 0.714 (p=0.002) and 0.706 (p=0.002) while NDVI performs the best correlation. LAI value using Fisheye or Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies (TRAC) is 0.76×0.37 and 3.89×2.81, respectively. Besides, CI measured by TRAC is 0.83×0.09 and the correlation coefficient with LAI is 0.868 (p<0.001). It shows feasible to estimate aboveground storage using ground investigation incorporating remotely sensed data for young plain afforestation stand. Due to the mixed-plantation and difference between growing and non-growing season at the sample site, the relationship between aboveground storage, LAI and VI is yet to be developed for independent species and may need to modify due to seasonally and inter-annually variation.

  15. Hanford site waste tank characterization

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the on-going work in the characterization of the Hanford-Site high-level waste tanks. The waste in these tanks was produced as part of the nuclear weapons materials processing mission that occupied the Hanford Site for the first 40 years of its existence. Detailed and defensible characterization of the tank wastes is required to guide retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal technology development, to address waste stability and reactivity concerns, and to satisfy the compliance criteria for the various regulatory agencies overseeing activities at the Hanford Site. The resulting Tank Characterization Reports fulfill these needs, as well as satisfy the tank waste characterization milestones in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  16. Summary report for the tank tightness testing of underground storage tanks, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Between August 14, 1989, and August 26, 1989, 16 underground storage tanks were tank tightness tested for leaks as part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory tank management program. This report summarizes the results of these tank tightness tests, the modifications and repairs made to the tank systems, fuel transfer records, and any problems that affected the tank testing schedule. Of the 16 underground storage tanks tested, five failed the tank tightness test. Attempts were made to repair the tanks that failed the tank tightness test. Of those tanks, two were tested three times (one passed and one failed), and three were tested twice (two passed and one failed). The five failed tanks were removed and will be replaced with tanks that meet the Environmental Protection Agency regulations of underground storage tanks. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

  18. Tank-automotive robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Gerald R.

    1999-07-01

    To provide an overview of Tank-Automotive Robotics. The briefing will contain program overviews & inter-relationships and technology challenges of TARDEC managed unmanned and robotic ground vehicle programs. Specific emphasis will focus on technology developments/approaches to achieve semi- autonomous operation and inherent chassis mobility features. Programs to be discussed include: DemoIII Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV), Tactical Mobile Robotics (TMR), Intelligent Mobility, Commanders Driver Testbed, Collision Avoidance, International Ground Robotics Competition (ICGRC). Specifically, the paper will discuss unique exterior/outdoor challenges facing the IGRC competing teams and the synergy created between the IGRC and ongoing DoD semi-autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicle and DoT Intelligent Transportation System programs. Sensor and chassis approaches to meet the IGRC challenges and obstacles will be shown and discussed. Shortfalls in performance to meet the IGRC challenges will be identified.

  19. Insulated solar storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Eldighidy, S.M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental investigation of an insulated parallelepiped, outdoor solar, water-filled storage tank of size 1 m {times} 0.5 m {times} 0.3 m, that is made from galvanized iron. The absorption coefficient of the insulating material has been determined. The effects of plastic covers and insulation thickness on the water temperature and the energy gained or lost by water are investigated. Moreover, the effects of insulation thickness on the temperature profiles of the insulating material are discussed. The results show that the absorption coefficient decreases as the insulation thickness increases. Also, it is found that the glass wool insulation of 2.5 cm thickness has the best results compared with the other thicknesses (5 cm, 7.5 cm, and 10 cm) as far as the water temperature and the energy gained by water are concerned.

  20. 49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other... § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. (a) General... periodically as specified in Retest Table 1 of paragraph (b)(5) of this section. Retests may be made at...

  1. 49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other... § 180.519 Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks. (a) General... periodically as specified in Retest Table 1 of paragraph (b)(5) of this section. Retests may be made at...

  2. Tank farms hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  3. An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, David F; Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J

    2009-02-17

    This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2

  4. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  5. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  6. Ability of LANDSAT-8 Oli Derived Texture Metrics in Estimating Aboveground Carbon Stocks of Coppice Oak Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, A.; Sohrabi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The role of forests as a reservoir for carbon has prompted the need for timely and reliable estimation of aboveground carbon stocks. Since measurement of aboveground carbon stocks of forests is a destructive, costly and time-consuming activity, aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques have gained many attentions in this field. Despite the fact that using aerial data for predicting aboveground carbon stocks has been proved as a highly accurate method, there are challenges related to high acquisition costs, small area coverage, and limited availability of these data. These challenges are more critical for non-commercial forests located in low-income countries. Landsat program provides repetitive acquisition of high-resolution multispectral data, which are freely available. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of multispectral Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) derived texture metrics in quantifying aboveground carbon stocks of coppice Oak forests in Zagros Mountains, Iran. We used four different window sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7, and 9×9), and four different offsets ([0,1], [1,1], [1,0], and [1,-1]) to derive nine texture metrics (angular second moment, contrast, correlation, dissimilar, entropy, homogeneity, inverse difference, mean, and variance) from four bands (blue, green, red, and infrared). Totally, 124 sample plots in two different forests were measured and carbon was calculated using species-specific allometric models. Stepwise regression analysis was applied to estimate biomass from derived metrics. Results showed that, in general, larger size of window for deriving texture metrics resulted models with better fitting parameters. In addition, the correlation of the spectral bands for deriving texture metrics in regression models was ranked as b4>b3>b2>b5. The best offset was [1,-1]. Amongst the different metrics, mean and entropy were entered in most of the regression models. Overall, different models based on derived texture metrics

  7. Downstream Impacts of Tank 48H In-tank and Out-of-tank Processing Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    2003-12-22

    This document discusses a number of possible impacts that an in-tank or out-of-tank process may have on downstream processing facilities. The analysis is part of a task to develop processes to destroy tetraphenylborate using Fenton Chemistry (metal catalyst plus hydrogen peroxide). Two processes being evaluated are funded by a grant from DOE's National Energy Technology Center. The first is an in-tank process, where the tetraphenylborate is destroyed by decreasing the pH, increasing the temperature and adding a catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as required. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, likely concentrated in the HLW evaporators, and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The second process is an out-of-tank Fenton process. This process produces two streams, a high cesium stream that feeds to DWPF and a low cesium feed that returns to a HLW tank with the DWPF recycle. The recycle stream may be evaporated in the HLW evaporators, and will later be fed to the Saltstone Facility or the Actinide Removal Process. An additional two processes being evaluated are in-tank processes. In the first, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed by decreasing the pH and increasing the temperature. In the second process, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed in by decreasing the pH, adding a catalyst, and increasing the temperature. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, will likely be concentrated in the HLW evaporators and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This evaluation is designed to identify possible downstream impacts that may limit the productivity or quality of existing and proposed processing facilities, including the Salt Waste

  8. Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-S-107

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.

    1996-09-19

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-S-107. This report supports the requirements of Tri- Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  9. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... affecting § 157.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... washing water. (c) Design. A slop tank required in this section: (1) Must minimize turbulence,...

  10. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... affecting § 157.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... washing water. (c) Design. A slop tank required in this section: (1) Must minimize turbulence,...

  11. 33 CFR 157.15 - Slop tanks in tank vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... affecting § 157.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... washing water. (c) Design. A slop tank required in this section: (1) Must minimize turbulence,...

  12. Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-20

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has directed the DOE to concentrate ear-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of issues (Conway 1993). The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process; Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.`` This document satisfies that requirement for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107).

  13. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  14. Ecodesign of Liquid Fuel Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicevska, Jana; Bazbauers, Gatis; Repele, Mara

    2011-01-01

    The subject of the study is a 10 litre liquid fuel tank made of metal and used for fuel storage and transportation. The study dealt with separate life cycle stages of this product, compared environmental impacts of similar fuel tanks made of metal and plastic, as well as analysed the product's end-of-life cycle stage, studying the waste treatment and disposal scenarios. The aim of this study was to find opportunities for improvement and to develop proposals for the ecodesign of 10 litre liquid fuel tank.

  15. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J.; McKeen, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

  16. 46 CFR 64.29 - Tank saddles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank saddles. 64.29 Section 64.29 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.29 Tank saddles. If a tank is not completely supported by a...

  17. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oil tanks. 230.116 Section 230.116 Transportation... Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil burning steam locomotives shall be maintained free from leaks. The oil supply pipe shall be equipped with a safety cut-off device that: (a) Is...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 25.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 25.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 25.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 29.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  2. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil tanks. 230.116 Section 230.116 Transportation... Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil burning steam locomotives shall be maintained free from leaks. The oil supply pipe shall be equipped with a safety cut-off device that: (a) Is...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 25.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  4. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil tanks. 230.116 Section 230.116 Transportation... Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil burning steam locomotives shall be maintained free from leaks. The oil supply pipe shall be equipped with a safety cut-off device that: (a) Is...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 29.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 29.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oil tanks. 25.1013 Section 25.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Oil System § 25.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 25.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  8. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oil tanks. 230.116 Section 230.116 Transportation... Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil burning steam locomotives shall be maintained free from leaks. The oil supply pipe shall be equipped with a safety cut-off device that: (a) Is...

  9. 49 CFR 230.116 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil tanks. 230.116 Section 230.116 Transportation... Locomotive Tanks § 230.116 Oil tanks. The oil tanks on oil burning steam locomotives shall be maintained free from leaks. The oil supply pipe shall be equipped with a safety cut-off device that: (a) Is...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 29.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1013 - Oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oil tanks. 29.1013 Section 29.1013... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Oil System § 29.1013 Oil tanks. (a) Installation. Each oil tank installation must meet the requirements of § 29.967. (b) Expansion space. Oil tank...

  12. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under §...

  13. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under §...

  14. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under §...

  15. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under §...

  16. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under §...

  17. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Examination of tank car or... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor...

  18. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Examination of tank car or... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor...

  19. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Examination of tank car or... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor...

  20. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Examination of tank car or... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor...

  1. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examination of tank car or... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor...

  2. Aboveground roofed design for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    The conceptual designs proposed in this report resulted from a study for the Maine Low-level Radioactive Waste Authority to develop conceptual designs for a safe and reliable disposal facility for Maine`s low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Freezing temperatures, heavy rainfall, high groundwater tables, and very complex and shallow glaciated soils found in Maine place severe constraints on the design. The fundamental idea behind the study was to consider Maine`s climatic and geological conditions at the beginning of conceptual design rather than starting with a design for another location and adapting it for Maine`s conditions. The conceptual designs recommended are entirely above ground and consist of an inner vault designed to provide shielding and protection against inadvertent intrusion and an outer building to protect the inner vault from water. The air dry conditions within the outer building should lead to almost indefinite service life for the concrete inner vault and the waste containers. This concept differs sharply from the usual aboveground vault in its reliance on at least two independent, but more or less conventional, roofing systems for primary and secondary protection against leakage of radioisotopes from the facility. Features include disposal of waste in air dry environment, waste loading and visual inspection by remote-controlled overhead cranes, and reliance on engineered soils for tertiary protection against release of radioactive materials.

  3. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, B. C.; Hicke, J. A.; Hudak, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40-50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75-89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3-6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale.

  4. Contrasting effects of defaunation on aboveground carbon storage across the global tropics

    PubMed Central

    Osuri, Anand M.; Ratnam, Jayashree; Varma, Varun; Alvarez-Loayza, Patricia; Hurtado Astaiza, Johanna; Bradford, Matt; Fletcher, Christine; Ndoundou-Hockemba, Mireille; Jansen, Patrick A.; Kenfack, David; Marshall, Andrew R.; Ramesh, B. R.; Rovero, Francesco; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Defaunation is causing declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees in tropical forests worldwide, but whether and how these declines will affect carbon storage across this biome is unclear. Here we show, using a pan-tropical data set, that simulated declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees have contrasting effects on aboveground carbon stocks across Earth's tropical forests. In our simulations, African, American and South Asian forests, which have high proportions of animal-dispersed species, consistently show carbon losses (2–12%), but Southeast Asian and Australian forests, where there are more abiotically dispersed species, show little to no carbon losses or marginal gains (±1%). These patterns result primarily from changes in wood volume, and are underlain by consistent relationships in our empirical data (∼2,100 species), wherein, large-seeded animal-dispersed species are larger as adults than small-seeded animal-dispersed species, but are smaller than abiotically dispersed species. Thus, floristic differences and distinct dispersal mode–seed size–adult size combinations can drive contrasting regional responses to defaunation. PMID:27108957

  5. Aboveground carbon loss in natural and managed tropical forests from 2000 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Baccini, A.; Hansen, M. C.; Potapov, P. V.; Stehman, S. V.; Houghton, R. A.; Krylov, A. M.; Turubanova, S.; Goetz, S. J.

    2015-07-01

    Tropical forests provide global climate regulation ecosystem services and their clearing is a significant source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and resultant radiative forcing of climate change. However, consensus on pan-tropical forest carbon dynamics is lacking. We present a new estimate that employs recommended good practices to quantify gross tropical forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss from 2000 to 2012 through the integration of Landsat-derived tree canopy cover, height, intactness and forest cover loss and GLAS-lidar derived forest biomass. An unbiased estimate of forest loss area is produced using a stratified random sample with strata derived from a wall-to-wall 30 m forest cover loss map. Our sample-based results separate the gross loss of forest AGC into losses from natural forests (0.59 PgC yr-1) and losses from managed forests (0.43 PgC yr-1) including plantations, agroforestry systems and subsistence agriculture. Latin America accounts for 43% of gross AGC loss and 54% of natural forest AGC loss, with Brazil experiencing the highest AGC loss for both categories at national scales. We estimate gross tropical forest AGC loss and natural forest loss to account for 11% and 6% of global year 2012 CO2 emissions, respectively. Given recent trends, natural forests will likely constitute an increasingly smaller proportion of tropical forest GHG emissions and of global emissions as fossil fuel consumption increases, with implications for the valuation of co-benefits in tropical forest conservation.

  6. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  7. Aboveground biomass and carbon stocks modelling using non-linear regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain Mohd Zaki, Nurul; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Nazip Suratman, Mohd; Zainee Zainal, Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important source of uncertainty in the carbon estimation for the tropical forest due to the variation biodiversity of species and the complex structure of tropical rain forest. Nevertheless, the tropical rainforest holds the most extensive forest in the world with the vast diversity of tree with layered canopies. With the usage of optical sensor integrate with empirical models is a common way to assess the AGB. Using the regression, the linkage between remote sensing and a biophysical parameter of the forest may be made. Therefore, this paper exemplifies the accuracy of non-linear regression equation of quadratic function to estimate the AGB and carbon stocks for the tropical lowland Dipterocarp forest of Ayer Hitam forest reserve, Selangor. The main aim of this investigation is to obtain the relationship between biophysical parameter field plots with the remotely-sensed data using nonlinear regression model. The result showed that there is a good relationship between crown projection area (CPA) and carbon stocks (CS) with Pearson Correlation (p < 0.01), the coefficient of correlation (r) is 0.671. The study concluded that the integration of Worldview-3 imagery with the canopy height model (CHM) raster based LiDAR were useful in order to quantify the AGB and carbon stocks for a larger sample area of the lowland Dipterocarp forest.

  8. Salinity influences on aboveground and belowground net primary productivity in tidal wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierfelice, Kathryn N.; Graeme Lockaby, B.; Krauss, Ken W.; Conner, William H.; Noe, Gregory; Ricker, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to climate change and rising sea levels. However salinification within these systems is poorly understood, therefore, productivity (litterfall, woody biomass, and fine roots) were investigated on three forested tidal wetlands [(1) freshwater, (2) moderately saline, and (3) heavily salt-impacted] and a marsh along the Waccamaw and Turkey Creek in South Carolina. Mean aboveground (litterfall and woody biomass) production on the freshwater, moderately saline, heavily salt-impacted, and marsh, respectively, was 1,061, 492, 79, and 0  g m−2 year−1 versus belowground (fine roots) 860, 490, 620, and 2,128  g m−2 year−1. Litterfall and woody biomass displayed an inverse relationship with salinity. Shifts in productivity across saline sites is of concern because sea level is predicted to continue rising. Results from the research reported in this paper provide baseline data upon which coupled hydrologic/wetland models can be created to quantify future changes in tidal forest functions.

  9. The response of aboveground plant productivity to earlier snowmelt and summer warming in an Arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livensperger, C.; Steltzer, H.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Sullivan, P.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Weintraub, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Plant communities in the Arctic are undergoing changes in structure and function due to shifts in seasonality from changing winters and summer warming. These changes will impact biogeochemical cycling, surface energy balance, and functioning of vertebrate and invertebrate communities. To examine seasonal controls on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) in a moist acidic tundra ecosystem in northern Alaska, we shifted the growing season by accelerating snowmelt (using radiation absorbing shadecloth) and warming air and soil temperature (using 1 m2 open-top chambers), individually and in combination. After three years, we measured ANPP by harvesting up to 16 individual ramets, tillers and rhizomes for each of 7 plant species, including two deciduous shrubs, two graminoids, two evergreen shrubs and one forb during peak season. Our results show that ANPP per stem summed across the 7 species increased when snow melt occurred earlier. However, standing biomass, excluding current year growth, was also greater. The ratio of ANPP/standing biomass decreased in all treatments compared to the control. ANPP per unit standing biomass summed for the four shrub species decreases due to summer warming alone or in combination with early snowmelt; however early snowmelt alone did not lead to lower ANPP for the shrubs. ANPP per tiller or rhizome summed for the three herbaceous species increased in response to summer warming. Understanding the differential response of plants to changing seasonality will inform predictions of future Arctic plant community structure and function.

  10. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26-44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage. PMID:27278688

  11. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26–44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage. PMID:27278688

  12. Costs of jasmonic acid induced defense in aboveground and belowground parts of corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanjiao; Wang, Jianwu; Luo, Shiming; Fan, Huizhi; Jin, Qiong

    2012-08-01

    Costs of jasmonic acid (JA) induced plant defense have gained increasing attention. In this study, JA was applied continuously to the aboveground (AG) or belowground (BG) parts, or AG plus BG parts of corn (Zea mays L.) to investigate whether JA exposure in one part of the plant would affect defense responses in another part, and whether or not JA induced defense would incur allocation costs. The results indicated that continuous JA application to AG parts systemically affected the quantities of defense chemicals in the roots, and vice versa. Quantities of DIMBOA and total amounts of phenolic compounds in leaves or roots generally increased 2 or 4 wk after the JA treatment to different plant parts. In the first 2 wk after application, the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots was accompanied by a significant decrease of root length, root surface area, and root biomass. Four weeks after the JA application, however, no such costs for the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots were detected. Instead, shoot biomass and root biomass increased. The results suggest that JA as a defense signal can be transferred from AG parts to BG parts of corn, and vice versa. Costs for induced defense elicited by continuous JA application were found in the early 2 wk, while distinct benefits were observed later, i.e., 4 wk after JA treatment. PMID:22744011

  13. Contrasting effects of defaunation on aboveground carbon storage across the global tropics.

    PubMed

    Osuri, Anand M; Ratnam, Jayashree; Varma, Varun; Alvarez-Loayza, Patricia; Hurtado Astaiza, Johanna; Bradford, Matt; Fletcher, Christine; Ndoundou-Hockemba, Mireille; Jansen, Patrick A; Kenfack, David; Marshall, Andrew R; Ramesh, B R; Rovero, Francesco; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Defaunation is causing declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees in tropical forests worldwide, but whether and how these declines will affect carbon storage across this biome is unclear. Here we show, using a pan-tropical data set, that simulated declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees have contrasting effects on aboveground carbon stocks across Earth's tropical forests. In our simulations, African, American and South Asian forests, which have high proportions of animal-dispersed species, consistently show carbon losses (2-12%), but Southeast Asian and Australian forests, where there are more abiotically dispersed species, show little to no carbon losses or marginal gains (±1%). These patterns result primarily from changes in wood volume, and are underlain by consistent relationships in our empirical data (∼2,100 species), wherein, large-seeded animal-dispersed species are larger as adults than small-seeded animal-dispersed species, but are smaller than abiotically dispersed species. Thus, floristic differences and distinct dispersal mode-seed size-adult size combinations can drive contrasting regional responses to defaunation. PMID:27108957

  14. Quantification of aboveground forest biomass using Quickbird imagery, topographic variables, and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Zhong; Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Haize

    2013-01-01

    Optical remote sensing is the most widely used method for obtaining forest biomass information. This research investigated the potential of using topographical and high-resolution optical data from Quickbird for measurement of black locust plantation aboveground biomass (AGB) grown in the hill-gully region of the Loess Plateau. Three different processing techniques, including spectral vegetation indices (SVIs), texture, and topography were evaluated, both individually and combined. Simple linear regression and stepwise multiple-linear regression models were developed to describe the relationship between image parameters obtained using these approaches and field measurements. SVI and topography-based approaches did not yield reliable AGB estimates, accounting for at best 23 and 19% of the observed variation in AGB. Texture-based methods were better, explaining up to 70% of the observed variation. A combination of SVIs, texture, and topography yielded an even better R value of 0.74 with the lowest root mean square error (17.21 t/ha) and bias (-1.85 t/ha). The results suggest that texture information from high-resolution optical data was more effective than SVIs and topography to estimate AGB. The performance of AGB estimation can be improved by adding SVIs and topography results to texture data; the best results can be obtained using a combination of these three data types.

  15. Wildfires in bamboo-dominated Amazonian forest: impacts on above-ground biomass and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jos; Silveira, Juliana M; Mestre, Luiz A M; Andrade, Rafael B; Camacho D'Andrea, Gabriela; Louzada, Julio; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z; Numata, Izaya; Lacau, Sébastien; Cochrane, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Fire has become an increasingly important disturbance event in south-western Amazonia. We conducted the first assessment of the ecological impacts of these wildfires in 2008, sampling forest structure and biodiversity along twelve 500 m transects in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre, Brazil. Six transects were placed in unburned forests and six were in forests that burned during a series of forest fires that occurred from August to October 2005. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) calculations, based on Landsat reflectance data, indicate that all transects were similar prior to the fires. We sampled understorey and canopy vegetation, birds using both mist nets and point counts, coprophagous dung beetles and the leaf-litter ant fauna. Fire had limited influence upon either faunal or floral species richness or community structure responses, and stems <10 cm DBH were the only group to show highly significant (p = 0.001) community turnover in burned forests. Mean aboveground live biomass was statistically indistinguishable in the unburned and burned plots, although there was a significant increase in the total abundance of dead stems in burned plots. Comparisons with previous studies suggest that wildfires had much less effect upon forest structure and biodiversity in these south-western Amazonian forests than in central and eastern Amazonia, where most fire research has been undertaken to date. We discuss potential reasons for the apparent greater resilience of our study plots to wildfire, examining the role of fire intensity, bamboo dominance, background rates of disturbance, landscape and soil conditions. PMID:22428035

  16. Dryland Wheat Domestication Changed the Development of Aboveground Architecture for a Well-Structured Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu-Fang; Cheng, Zheng-Guo; Ma, Bao-Luo; Palta, Jairo A.; Kong, Hai-Yan; Mo, Fei; Wang, Jian-Yong; Zhu, Ying; Lv, Guang-Chao; Batool, Asfa; Bai, Xue; Li, Feng-Min; Xiong, You-Cai

    2014-01-01

    We examined three different-ploidy wheat species to elucidate the development of aboveground architecture and its domesticated mechanism under environment-controlled field conditions. Architecture parameters including leaf, stem, spike and canopy morphology were measured together with biomass allocation, leaf net photosynthetic rate and instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi). Canopy biomass density was decreased from diploid to tetraploid wheat, but increased to maximum in hexaploid wheat. Population yield in hexaploid wheat was higher than in diploid wheat, but the population fitness and individual competition ability was higher in diploid wheats. Plant architecture was modified from a compact type in diploid wheats to an incompact type in tetraploid wheats, and then to a more compact type of hexaploid wheats. Biomass accumulation, population yield, harvest index and the seed to leaf ratio increased from diploid to tetraploid and hexaploid, associated with heavier specific internode weight and greater canopy biomass density in hexaploid and tetraploid than in diploid wheat. Leaf photosynthetic rate and WUEi were decreased from diploid to tetraploid and increased from tetraploid to hexaploid due to more compact leaf type in hexaploid and diploid than in tetraploid. Grain yield formation and WUEi were closely associated with spatial stance of leaves and stems. We conclude that the ideotype of dryland wheats could be based on spatial reconstruction of leaf type and further exertion of leaf photosynthetic rate. PMID:25181037

  17. Comment on 'A first map of tropical Africa's above-ground biomass derived from satellite imagery'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchard, E. T. A.; Saatchi, S. S.; Lewis, S. L.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Gerard, F. F.; Woodhouse, I. H.; Meir, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present a critical evaluation of the above-ground biomass (AGB) map of Africa published in this journal by Baccini et al (2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 045011). We first test their map against an independent dataset of 1154 scientific inventory plots from 16 African countries, and find only weak correspondence between our field plots and the AGB value given for the surrounding 1 km pixel by Baccini et al. Separating our field data using a continental landcover classification suggests that the Baccini et al map underestimates the AGB of forests and woodlands, while overestimating the AGB of savannas and grasslands. Secondly, we compare their map to 216 000 × 0.25 ha spaceborne LiDAR footprints. A comparison between Lorey's height (basal-area-weighted average height) derived from the LiDAR data for 1 km pixels containing at least five LiDAR footprints again does not support the hypothesis that the Baccini et al map is accurate, and suggests that it significantly underestimates the AGB of higher AGB areas. We conclude that this is due to the unsuitability of some of the field data used by Baccini et al to create their map, and overfitting in their model, resulting in low accuracies outside the small areas from which their field data are drawn.

  18. Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Simon L.; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sunderland, Terry; Begne, Serge K.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje M. F.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi; Baker, Timothy R.; Banin, Lindsay; Bastin, Jean-François; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles; Chezeaux, Eric; Clark, Connie J.; Collins, Murray; Djagbletey, Gloria; Djuikouo, Marie Noël K.; Droissart, Vincent; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Ewango, Cornielle E. N.; Fauset, Sophie; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Foli, Ernest G.; Gillet, Jean-François; Hamilton, Alan C.; Harris, David J.; Hart, Terese B.; de Haulleville, Thales; Hladik, Annette; Hufkens, Koen; Huygens, Dries; Jeanmart, Philippe; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Leal, Miguel E.; Lloyd, Jon; Lovett, Jon C.; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marshall, Andrew R.; Ojo, Lucas; Peh, Kelvin S.-H.; Pickavance, Georgia; Poulsen, John R.; Reitsma, Jan M.; Sheil, Douglas; Simo, Murielle; Steppe, Kathy; Taedoumg, Hermann E.; Talbot, Joey; Taplin, James R. D.; Taylor, David; Thomas, Sean C.; Toirambe, Benjamin; Verbeeck, Hans; Vleminckx, Jason; White, Lee J. T.; Willcock, Simon; Woell, Hannsjorg; Zemagho, Lise

    2013-01-01

    We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stem density and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha−1 (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha−1) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- compared with neotropical forests. However, mean stem density is low (426 ± 11 stems ha−1 greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationships with C : N ratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus–AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes. PMID:23878327

  19. Does the aboveground herbivore assemblage influence soil bacterial community composition and richness in subalpine grasslands?

    PubMed

    Hodel, Melanie; Schütz, Martin; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L; Frey, Beat; Albrecht, Matthias; Busse, Matt D; Risch, Anita C

    2014-10-01

    Grassland ecosystems support large communities of aboveground herbivores that are known to directly and indirectly affect belowground properties such as the microbial community composition, richness, or biomass. Even though multiple species of functionally different herbivores coexist in grassland ecosystems, most studies have only considered the impact of a single group, i.e., large ungulates (mostly domestic livestock) on microbial communities. Thus, we investigated how the exclusion of four groups of functionally different herbivores affects bacterial community composition, richness, and biomass in two vegetation types with different grazing histories. We progressively excluded large, medium, and small mammals as well as invertebrate herbivores using exclosures at 18 subalpine grassland sites (9 per vegetation type). We assessed the bacterial community composition using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) at each site and exclosure type during three consecutive growing seasons (2009-2011) for rhizosphere and mineral soil separately. In addition, we determined microbial biomass carbon (MBC), root biomass, plant carbon:nitrogen ratio, soil temperature, and soil moisture. Even though several of these variables were affected by herbivore exclusion and vegetation type, against our expectations, bacterial community composition, richness, or MBC were not. Yet, bacterial communities strongly differed between the three growing seasons as well as to some extent between our study sites. Thus, our study indicates that the spatiotemporal variability in soil microclimate has much stronger effects on the soil bacterial communities than the grazing regime or the composition of the vegetation in this high-elevation ecosystem. PMID:24889285

  20. Total aboveground biomass (TAGB) estimation using IFSAR: speckle noise effect on TAGB in tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbari, S.; Hashim, M.

    2014-02-01

    Total Aboveground Biomass (TAGB) estimation is critically important to enhance understanding of dynamics of carbon fluxes between atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem. For humid tropical forest, it is a challenging task for researchers due to complex canopy structure and predominant cloud cover. Optical sensors are only able to sense canopy crown. In contrast, radar technology is able to sense sub-canopy structure of the forest with penetration ability through the cloud for precise biomass estimation with validation from field data including diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees. This study is concerned about estimation of TAGB through the utilization of Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR). Based on this study, it is found that the stand parameters such as DBH and backscattered on IFSAR image has high correlation, R2=0.6411. The most suitable model for TAGB estimation on IFSAR is Chave Model with R2=0.9139. This study analyzes the impact brought by speckle noises on IFSAR image. It is found that filtering process has improves TAGB estimation about +30% using several filtering schemes especially Gamma filter for 11×11 window size. Using field data obtained from a primary tropical forest at Gerik, Perak, TAGBestimation can be validated and the assessment has been carried out.