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Sample records for aboveground carbon density

  1. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zald, Harold S.J.; Spies, Thomas A.; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J.; Olsen, Keith A.; Steel, E. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  2. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA.

    PubMed

    Zald, Harold S J; Spies, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J; Olsen, Keith A; Steel, E Ashley

    2016-04-15

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  3. Automated Aboveground Carbon Estimation of Forests with Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Piper

    Canada's forests are believed to contain 86 gigatons of carbon, stored above and below ground. These forests are large in area, making them difficult to monitor using conventional means. Understanding the carbon cycle and the role of forests as carbon sinks is crucial in the investigation and mitigation of climate change to address national obligations. One economical solution for monitoring the carbon content of Canada's forests is the development of an automated computer system which uses multisource remotely sensed data to estimate the aboveground carbon of trees. The process involves data fusion of remotely sensed hyperspectral data for tree species information and lidar (light detection and ranging) and radar (radio detection and ranging) for tree height. The size and dimensionality of the data necessitate the efficient use of computing resources for analysis. The outcome is a useful carbon measuring system. The three research questions are: (1) How do we map with remote sensing aboveground carbon in the forests? (2) How do we determine the accuracies of these aboveground carbon maps? (3) How can an automated system be designed for creating aboveground carbon maps?

  4. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason M.; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  5. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2016-10-12

    A substantial amount of global carbon is stored in mature trees. However, no experiments to date test how warming affects mature tree carbon storage. Using a unique, citywide, factorial experiment, we investigated how warming and insect herbivory affected physiological function and carbon sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future.

  6. Contribution of aboveground plant respiration to carbon cycling in a Bornean tropical rainforet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ayumi; Tanaka, Kenzo; Ichie, Tomoaki; Kume, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ohashi, Mizue; Kumagai, Tomo'omi

    2014-05-01

    Bornean tropical rainforests have a different characteristic from Amazonian tropical rainforests, that is, larger aboveground biomass caused by higher stand density of large trees. Larger biomass may cause different carbon cycling and allocation pattern. However, there are fewer studies on carbon allocation and each component in Bornean tropical rainforests, especially for aboveground plant respiration, compared to Amazonian forests. In this study, we measured woody tissue respiration and leaf respiration, and estimated those in ecosystem scale in a Bornean tropical rainforest. Then, we examined carbon allocation using the data of soil respiration and aboveground net primary production obtained from our previous studies. Woody tissue respiration rate was positively correlated with diameter at breast height (dbh) and stem growth rate. Using the relationships and biomass data, we estimated woody tissue respiration in ecosystem scale though methods of scaling resulted in different estimates values (4.52 - 9.33 MgC ha-1 yr-1). Woody tissue respiration based on surface area (8.88 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was larger than those in Amazon because of large aboveground biomass (563.0 Mg ha-1). Leaf respiration rate was positively correlated with height. Using the relationship and leaf area density data at each 5-m height, leaf respiration in ecosystem scale was estimated (9.46 MgC ha-1 yr-1), which was similar to those in Amazon because of comparable LAI (5.8 m2 m-2). Gross primary production estimated from biometric measurements (44.81 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was much higher than those in Amazon, and more carbon was allocated to woody tissue respiration and total belowground carbon flux. Large tree with dbh > 60cm accounted for about half of aboveground biomass and aboveground biomass increment. Soil respiration was also related to position of large trees, resulting in high soil respiration rate in this study site. Photosynthesis ability of top canopy for large trees was high and leaves for

  7. Management trade-off between aboveground carbon storage and understory plant species richness in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Burton, Julia I; Ares, Adrian; Olson, Deanna H; Puettmann, Klaus J

    2013-09-01

    Because forest ecosystems have the capacity to store large quantities of carbon (C), there is interest in managing forests to mitigate elevated CO2 concentrations and associated effects on the global climate. However, some mitigation techniques may contrast with management strategies for other goals, such as maintaining and restoring biodiversity. Forest thinning reduces C storage in the overstory and recruitment of detrital C. These C stores can affect environmental conditions and resource availability in the understory, driving patterns in the distribution of early and late-seral species. We examined the effects of replicated (N = 7) thinning experiments on aboveground C and understory vascular plant species richness, and we contrasted relationships between aboveground C and early- vs. late-seral species richness. Finally, we used structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine relationships among early- and late-seral species richness and live and detrital aboveground C stores. Six years following thinning, aboveground C was greater in the high-density treatment and untreated control than in moderate- (MD) and variable-density (VD) treatments as a result of reductions in live overstory C. In contrast, all thinning treatments increased species richness relative to controls. Between the growing seasons of years 6 and 11 following treatments, the live overstory C increment tended to increase with residual density, while richness decreased in MD and VD treatments. The richness of early-seral species was negatively related to aboveground C in MD and VD, while late-seral species richness was positively (albeit weakly) related to aboveground C. Structural equation modeling analysis revealed strong negative effects of live overstory C on early-seral species richness balanced against weaker positive effects on late-seral species richness, as well as positive effects of detrital C stocks. A trade-off between carbon and plant species richness thus emerges as a net result of

  8. Future forest aboveground carbon dynamics in the central United States: the importance of forest demographic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wenchi; He, Hong S.; Thompson, Frank R.; Wang, Wen J.; Fraser, Jacob S.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Hanberry, Brice B.; Dijak, William D.

    2017-02-01

    The Central Hardwood Forest (CHF) in the United States is currently a major carbon sink, there are uncertainties in how long the current carbon sink will persist and if the CHF will eventually become a carbon source. We used a multi-model ensemble to investigate aboveground carbon density of the CHF from 2010 to 2300 under current climate. Simulations were done using one representative model for each of the simple, intermediate, and complex demographic approaches (ED2, LANDIS PRO, and LINKAGES, respectively). All approaches agreed that the current carbon sink would persist at least to 2100. However, carbon dynamics after current carbon sink diminishes to zero differ for different demographic modelling approaches. Both the simple and the complex demographic approaches predicted prolonged periods of relatively stable carbon densities after 2100, with minor declines, until the end of simulations in 2300. In contrast, the intermediate demographic approach predicted the CHF would become a carbon source between 2110 and 2260, followed by another carbon sink period. The disagreement between these patterns can be partly explained by differences in the capacity of models to simulate gross growth (both birth and subsequent growth) and mortality of short-lived, relatively shade-intolerant tree species.

  9. Future forest aboveground carbon dynamics in the central United States: the importance of forest demographic processes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wenchi; He, Hong S.; Thompson, Frank R.; Wang, Wen J.; Fraser, Jacob S.; Shifley, Stephen R.; Hanberry, Brice B.; Dijak, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Central Hardwood Forest (CHF) in the United States is currently a major carbon sink, there are uncertainties in how long the current carbon sink will persist and if the CHF will eventually become a carbon source. We used a multi-model ensemble to investigate aboveground carbon density of the CHF from 2010 to 2300 under current climate. Simulations were done using one representative model for each of the simple, intermediate, and complex demographic approaches (ED2, LANDIS PRO, and LINKAGES, respectively). All approaches agreed that the current carbon sink would persist at least to 2100. However, carbon dynamics after current carbon sink diminishes to zero differ for different demographic modelling approaches. Both the simple and the complex demographic approaches predicted prolonged periods of relatively stable carbon densities after 2100, with minor declines, until the end of simulations in 2300. In contrast, the intermediate demographic approach predicted the CHF would become a carbon source between 2110 and 2260, followed by another carbon sink period. The disagreement between these patterns can be partly explained by differences in the capacity of models to simulate gross growth (both birth and subsequent growth) and mortality of short-lived, relatively shade-intolerant tree species. PMID:28165483

  10. Fire recurrence effects on aboveground plant and soil carbon stocks in Mediterranean shrublands with Aleppo pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, J.; den Ouden, J.; Mohren, G. M. J.; Retana, J.; Serrasolses, I.

    2009-04-01

    greatest impact on aboveground plant carbon stocks. Aboveground plants in control plots amounted to 8652 g m-2C, of which 93 % was stored in trees, while carbon storage in the most frequently burned sites was only 509 g m-2C. Shrub carbon varied barely between fire frequencies, corroborating the high resilience of resprouting shrub species to fire recurrence. The most striking result was the immense decrease in Aleppo pine carbon stock which varied between 7770 g m-2in control plots and 25.6 g m-2in 3-fires plots. Differences between control and burned plots are principally explained by the age of the plots. The decrease in Aleppo pine carbon stock within burned plots was not associated with a growth reduction, but was due to a decrease in stem density. The results indeed indicate that the recruitment of Aleppo pine on more frequently burned plots is obstructed due to cumulative effects of short fire return-intervals (

  11. Carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species in lower Gangetic plain.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bipal K; Biswas, Soumyajit; Majumder, Mrinmoy; Roy, Pankaj K; Mazumdar, Asis

    2011-07-01

    Carbon is sequestered by the plant photosynthesis and stored as biomass in different parts of the tree. Carbon sequestration rate has been measured for young species (6 years age) of Shorea robusta at Chadra forest in Paschim Medinipur district, Albizzia lebbek in Indian Botanic Garden in Howrah district and Artocarpus integrifolia at Banobitan within Kolkata in the lower Gangetic plain of West Bengal in India by Automated Vaisala Made Instrument GMP343 and aboveground biomass carbon has been analyzed by CHN analyzer. The specific objective of this paper is to measure carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia. The carbon sequestration rate (mean) from the ambient air during winter season as obtained by Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 11.13 g/h, 14.86 g/h and 4.22g/h, respectively. The annual carbon sequestration rate from ambient air were estimated at 8.97 t C ha(-1) by Shorea robusta, 11.97 t C ha(-1) by Albizzia lebbek and 3.33 t C ha(-1) by Artocarpus integrifolia. The percentage of carbon content (except root) in the aboveground biomass of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 47.45, 47.12 and 43.33, respectively. The total aboveground biomass carbon stock per hectare as estimated for Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 5.22 t C ha(-1) , 6.26 t C ha(-1) and 7.28 t C ha(-1), respectively in these forest stands.

  12. Conventional tree height-diameter relationships significantly overestimate aboveground carbon stocks in the Central Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsley, Elizabeth; Hufkens, Koen; Steppe, Kathy; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Verbeeck, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Accurate estimates of the amount of carbon stored in tropical forests represent crucial baseline data for recent climate change mitigation policies. Such data are needed to quantify possible emissions due to deforestation and forest degradation, and to evaluate the potential of these forests to act as carbon sinks. Currently, only rough estimates of the carbon stocks for Central African tropical forests are available due to a lack of field data, and little is known about the response of these stocks to climate change. We present the first field-based carbon stock data for the Central Congo Basin in Yangambi, Democratic Republic of Congo. We found an average aboveground carbon stock of 162 ± 20 Mg C ha-1 for intact old-growth forest, which is significantly lower than stocks recorded in the outer regions of the Congo Basin. The best available tree height-diameter relationships derived for Central Africa do not render accurate canopy height estimates for our study area. Aboveground carbon stocks would be overestimated by 24% if these inaccurate relationships were used. The studied forests have a lower stature compared with forests in the outer regions of the basin, which confirms remotely sensed patterns. We identified a significant difference in height-diameter relations across the Congo Basin as a driver for spatial differences in carbon stocks. The study of a more detailed interaction of the environment and the available tree species pool as drivers for differences in carbon storage could have large implications. The effect of the species pool on carbon storage can be large since species differ in their ability to sequester carbon, and the collective functional characteristics of plant communities could be a major driver of carbon accumulation. Numerous species-specific tree height-diameter relations are established for two sites around Kisangani, central Congo Basin, with differing stand height-diameter relationships. The species-specific relations for the two

  13. Aboveground Tree Carbon Stocks and Flux Following Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, E. M.; Hicke, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Mountain pine beetle outbreaks result in tree mortality across millions of acres in North America, with significant effects on forest ecosystem processes such as carbon cycling. Following outbreak-related mortality, forest stands continue taking up carbon (C) via the growth of 1) surviving trees and/or 2) tree seedlings that establish during and after outbreaks. To date, the degree to which surviving trees can, in the absence of post-outbreak seedling establishment, recover pre-outbreak C stocks and flux is largely unknown. To address this uncertainty we asked: (1) Do aboveground stocks and flux among pure lodgepole pine stands recover to pre-outbreak levels independent of post-outbreak regeneration? 2) What is the long-term effect of the mountain pine beetle outbreaks on modeled aboveground C stocks and flux? We used measurements from several stands affected by a recent mountain pine beetle outbreak as input to the Forest Vegetation Simulator, an individual tree-based growth model, to predict stand-level aboveground C stocks and flux. The simulation time period spanned from just prior to the bark beetle outbreak and for 200 years following outbreak collapse. At five-year intervals, we compared C stocks and fluxes in stands affected by the disturbance to conditions in the same stands immediately preceding the outbreak, as well as identical stands modeled as if the outbreak had not occurred. Crown closure of surviving trees was predicted by the model in all stands following outbreak collapse, but measured outbreak mortality did not significantly reverse increases of growth dominance by relatively large trees. Stand-level growth dominance and increases of stand density following crown closure have been associated with declines in stand-level primary productivity and productivity efficiency. Thus, unlike stand- level C stocks, predicted C flux did not recover relative to pre-outbreak levels, although we observed basic patterns of C flux rise, peak, and long

  14. Aboveground vs. Belowground Carbon Stocks in African Tropical Lowland Rainforest: Drivers and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Marijn; Hufkens, Koen; Lisingo, Janvier; Baert, Geert; Verbeeck, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background African tropical rainforests are one of the most important hotspots to look for changes in the upcoming decades when it comes to C storage and release. The focus of studying C dynamics in these systems lies traditionally on living aboveground biomass. Belowground soil organic carbon stocks have received little attention and estimates of the size, controls and distribution of soil organic carbon stocks are highly uncertain. In our study on lowland rainforest in the central Congo basin, we combine both an assessment of the aboveground C stock with an assessment of the belowground C stock and analyze the latter in terms of functional pools and controlling factors. Principal Findings Our study shows that despite similar vegetation, soil and climatic conditions, soil organic carbon stocks in an area with greater tree height (= larger aboveground carbon stock) were only half compared to an area with lower tree height (= smaller aboveground carbon stock). This suggests that substantial variability in the aboveground vs. belowground C allocation strategy and/or C turnover in two similar tropical forest systems can lead to significant differences in total soil organic C content and C fractions with important consequences for the assessment of the total C stock of the system. Conclusions/Significance We suggest nutrient limitation, especially potassium, as the driver for aboveground versus belowground C allocation. However, other drivers such as C turnover, tree functional traits or demographic considerations cannot be excluded. We argue that large and unaccounted variability in C stocks is to be expected in African tropical rain-forests. Currently, these differences in aboveground and belowground C stocks are not adequately verified and implemented mechanistically into Earth System Models. This will, hence, introduce additional uncertainty to models and predictions of the response of C storage of the Congo basin forest to climate change and its contribution to

  15. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  16. Carbon dynamics in aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöngart, J.; Arieira, J.; Felfili Fortes, C.; Cezarine de Arruda, E.; Nunes da Cunha, C.

    2008-05-01

    This is the first estimation on carbon dynamics in the aboveground coarse wood biomass (AGWB) of wetland forests in the Pantanal, located in Central Southern America. In four 1-ha plots in stands characterized by the pioneer species Vochysia divergens Pohl (Vochysiaceae) forest inventories (trees ≥10 cm diameter at breast height, DBH) have been performed and converted to predictions of AGWB by five different allometric models using two or three predicting parameters (DBH, tree height, wood density). Best prediction has been achieved using allometric equations with three independent variables. Carbon stocks (50% of AGWB) vary from 7.4 to 100.9 Mg C ha-1 between the four stands. Carbon sequestration differs 0.50-4.24 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 estimated by two growth models derived from tree-ring analysis describing the relationships between age and DBH for V. divergens and other tree species. We find a close correlation between estimated tree age and C-stock, C-sequestration and C-turnover (mean residence of C in AGWB).

  17. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  18. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  19. An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, David F; Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J

    2009-02-17

    This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2

  20. Aboveground Tree Growth Varies with Belowground Carbon Allocation in a Tropical Rainforest Environment

    PubMed Central

    Raich, James W.; Clark, Deborah A.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Wood, Tana E.

    2014-01-01

    Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15–20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production). In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:24945351

  1. Aboveground tree growth varies with belowground carbon allocation in a tropical rainforest environment.

    PubMed

    Raich, James W; Clark, Deborah A; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Wood, Tana E

    2014-01-01

    Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15-20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production). In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  2. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  3. Conventional tree height-diameter relationships significantly overestimate aboveground carbon stocks in the Central Congo Basin.

    PubMed

    Kearsley, Elizabeth; de Haulleville, Thales; Hufkens, Koen; Kidimbu, Alidé; Toirambe, Benjamin; Baert, Geert; Huygens, Dries; Kebede, Yodit; Defourny, Pierre; Bogaert, Jan; Beeckman, Hans; Steppe, Kathy; Boeckx, Pascal; Verbeeck, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Policies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation largely depend on accurate estimates of tropical forest carbon stocks. Here we present the first field-based carbon stock data for the Central Congo Basin in Yangambi, Democratic Republic of Congo. We find an average aboveground carbon stock of 162 ± 20  Mg  C  ha(-1) for intact old-growth forest, which is significantly lower than stocks recorded in the outer regions of the Congo Basin. The best available tree height-diameter relationships derived for Central Africa do not render accurate canopy height estimates for our study area. Aboveground carbon stocks would be overestimated by 24% if these inaccurate relationships were used. The studied forests have a lower stature compared with forests in the outer regions of the basin, which confirms remotely sensed patterns. Additionally, we find an average soil carbon stock of 111 ± 24  Mg  C  ha(-1), slightly influenced by the current land-use change.

  4. Seeing the Forest through the Trees: Citizen Scientists Provide Critical Data to Refine Aboveground Carbon Estimates in Restored Riparian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viers, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Integrating citizen scientists into ecological informatics research can be difficult due to limited opportunities for meaningful engagement given vast data streams. This is particularly true for analysis of remotely sensed data, which are increasingly being used to quantify ecosystem services over space and time, and to understand how land uses deliver differing values to humans and thus inform choices about future human actions. Carbon storage and sequestration are such ecosystem services, and recent environmental policy advances in California (i.e., AB 32) have resulted in a nascent carbon market that is helping fuel the restoration of riparian forests in agricultural landscapes. Methods to inventory and monitor aboveground carbon for market accounting are increasingly relying on hyperspatial remotely sensed data, particularly the use of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technologies, to estimate biomass. Because airborne discrete return LiDAR can inexpensively capture vegetation structural differences at high spatial resolution (< 1 m) over large areas (> 1000 ha), its use is rapidly increasing, resulting in vast stores of point cloud and derived surface raster data. While established algorithms can quantify forest canopy structure efficiently, the highly complex nature of native riparian forests can result in highly uncertain estimates of biomass due to differences in composition (e.g., species richness, age class) and structure (e.g., stem density). This study presents the comparative results of standing carbon estimates refined with field data collected by citizen scientists at three different sites, each capturing a range of agricultural, remnant forest, and restored forest cover types. These citizen science data resolve uncertainty in composition and structure, and improve allometric scaling models of biomass and thus estimates of aboveground carbon. Results indicate that agricultural land and horticulturally restored riparian forests store similar

  5. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  6. Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass and vegetation structure parameters for improved carbon estimate from lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Schaaf, Crystal; Yao, Tian; Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Blair, J. Bryan

    2010-06-01

    Lidar-based aboveground biomass is derived based on the empirical relationship between lidar-measured vegetation height and aboveground biomass, often leading to large uncertainties of aboveground biomass estimates at large scales. This study investigates whether the use of any additional lidar-derived vegetation structure parameters besides height improves aboveground biomass estimation. The analysis uses data collected in the field and with the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS), and the Echidna® validation instrument (EVI), a ground-based hemispherical-scanning lidar data in New England in 2003 and 2007. Our field data analysis shows that using wood volume (approximated by the product of basal area and top 10% tree height) and vegetation type (conifer/softwood or deciduous/hardwood forests, providing wood density) has the potential to improve aboveground biomass estimates at large scales. This result is comparable to previous individual-tree based analyses. Our LVIS data analysis indicates that structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction, such as RH100*cover and RH50*cover, are closely related to wood volume and thus biomass particularly for conifer forests. RH100*cover and RH50*cover perform similarly or even better than RH50, a good biomass predictor found in previous study. This study shows that the use of structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction (rather than height alone) improves the aboveground biomass estimate, and that the fusion of lidar and optical remote sensing (to provide vegetation type) will provide better aboveground biomass estimates than using lidar alone. Our ground lidar analysis shows that EVI provides good estimates of wood volume, and thus accurate estimates of aboveground biomass particularly at the stand level.

  7. National-scale estimation of gross forest aboveground carbon loss: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S. V.; Potapov, P. V.; Turubanova, S. A.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing enable the mapping and monitoring of carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where national forest inventories (NFI) are either non-existent or out of date. Here we demonstrate a method for estimating national-scale gross forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss and associated uncertainties using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Lidar data were used as a surrogate for NFI plot measurements to estimate carbon stocks and AGC loss based on forest type and activity data derived using time-series multispectral imagery. Specifically, DRC forest type and loss from the FACET (Forêts d’Afrique Centrale Evaluées par Télédétection) product, created using Landsat data, were related to carbon data derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Validation data for FACET forest area loss were created at a 30-m spatial resolution and compared to the 60-m spatial resolution FACET map. We produced two gross AGC loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a map-scale estimate (53.3 ± 9.8 Tg C yr-1) accounting for whole-pixel classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a sub-grid estimate (72.1 ± 12.7 Tg C yr-1) that took into account 60-m cells that experienced partial forest loss. Our sub-grid forest cover and AGC loss estimates, which included smaller-scale forest disturbances, exceed published assessments. Results raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and validation, and subsequent impacts on remotely sensed carbon stock change estimation, particularly for smallholder dominated systems such as the DRC.

  8. Aboveground biomass and carbon stocks modelling using non-linear regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain Mohd Zaki, Nurul; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Nazip Suratman, Mohd; Zainee Zainal, Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important source of uncertainty in the carbon estimation for the tropical forest due to the variation biodiversity of species and the complex structure of tropical rain forest. Nevertheless, the tropical rainforest holds the most extensive forest in the world with the vast diversity of tree with layered canopies. With the usage of optical sensor integrate with empirical models is a common way to assess the AGB. Using the regression, the linkage between remote sensing and a biophysical parameter of the forest may be made. Therefore, this paper exemplifies the accuracy of non-linear regression equation of quadratic function to estimate the AGB and carbon stocks for the tropical lowland Dipterocarp forest of Ayer Hitam forest reserve, Selangor. The main aim of this investigation is to obtain the relationship between biophysical parameter field plots with the remotely-sensed data using nonlinear regression model. The result showed that there is a good relationship between crown projection area (CPA) and carbon stocks (CS) with Pearson Correlation (p < 0.01), the coefficient of correlation (r) is 0.671. The study concluded that the integration of Worldview-3 imagery with the canopy height model (CHM) raster based LiDAR were useful in order to quantify the AGB and carbon stocks for a larger sample area of the lowland Dipterocarp forest.

  9. Contrasting effects of defaunation on aboveground carbon storage across the global tropics.

    PubMed

    Osuri, Anand M; Ratnam, Jayashree; Varma, Varun; Alvarez-Loayza, Patricia; Hurtado Astaiza, Johanna; Bradford, Matt; Fletcher, Christine; Ndoundou-Hockemba, Mireille; Jansen, Patrick A; Kenfack, David; Marshall, Andrew R; Ramesh, B R; Rovero, Francesco; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2016-04-25

    Defaunation is causing declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees in tropical forests worldwide, but whether and how these declines will affect carbon storage across this biome is unclear. Here we show, using a pan-tropical data set, that simulated declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees have contrasting effects on aboveground carbon stocks across Earth's tropical forests. In our simulations, African, American and South Asian forests, which have high proportions of animal-dispersed species, consistently show carbon losses (2-12%), but Southeast Asian and Australian forests, where there are more abiotically dispersed species, show little to no carbon losses or marginal gains (±1%). These patterns result primarily from changes in wood volume, and are underlain by consistent relationships in our empirical data (∼2,100 species), wherein, large-seeded animal-dispersed species are larger as adults than small-seeded animal-dispersed species, but are smaller than abiotically dispersed species. Thus, floristic differences and distinct dispersal mode-seed size-adult size combinations can drive contrasting regional responses to defaunation.

  10. Contrasting effects of defaunation on aboveground carbon storage across the global tropics

    PubMed Central

    Osuri, Anand M.; Ratnam, Jayashree; Varma, Varun; Alvarez-Loayza, Patricia; Hurtado Astaiza, Johanna; Bradford, Matt; Fletcher, Christine; Ndoundou-Hockemba, Mireille; Jansen, Patrick A.; Kenfack, David; Marshall, Andrew R.; Ramesh, B. R.; Rovero, Francesco; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Defaunation is causing declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees in tropical forests worldwide, but whether and how these declines will affect carbon storage across this biome is unclear. Here we show, using a pan-tropical data set, that simulated declines of large-seeded animal-dispersed trees have contrasting effects on aboveground carbon stocks across Earth's tropical forests. In our simulations, African, American and South Asian forests, which have high proportions of animal-dispersed species, consistently show carbon losses (2–12%), but Southeast Asian and Australian forests, where there are more abiotically dispersed species, show little to no carbon losses or marginal gains (±1%). These patterns result primarily from changes in wood volume, and are underlain by consistent relationships in our empirical data (∼2,100 species), wherein, large-seeded animal-dispersed species are larger as adults than small-seeded animal-dispersed species, but are smaller than abiotically dispersed species. Thus, floristic differences and distinct dispersal mode–seed size–adult size combinations can drive contrasting regional responses to defaunation. PMID:27108957

  11. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (5-year interval) airborne lidar data set for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved and/or coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change was estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 yr-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 yr-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01 (fire return rate of 100 years), as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon

  12. Modelling above-ground carbon dynamics using multi-temporal airborne lidar: insights from a Mediterranean woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, W.; Ruiz-Benito, P.; Valladares, F.; Coomes, D.

    2015-09-01

    Woodlands represent highly significant carbon sinks globally, though could lose this function under future climatic change. Effective large-scale monitoring of these woodlands has a critical role to play in mitigating for, and adapting to, climate change. Mediterranean woodlands have low carbon densities, but represent important global carbon stocks due to their extensiveness and are particularly vulnerable because the region is predicted to become much hotter and drier over the coming century. Airborne lidar is already recognized as an excellent approach for high-fidelity carbon mapping, but few studies have used multi-temporal lidar surveys to measure carbon fluxes in forests and none have worked with Mediterranean woodlands. We use a multi-temporal (five year interval) airborne lidar dataset for a region of central Spain to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon dynamics in typical mixed broadleaved/coniferous Mediterranean woodlands. Field calibration of the lidar data enabled the generation of grid-based maps of AGB for 2006 and 2011, and the resulting AGB change were estimated. There was a close agreement between the lidar-based AGB growth estimate (1.22 Mg ha-1 year-1) and those derived from two independent sources: the Spanish National Forest Inventory, and a~tree-ring based analysis (1.19 and 1.13 Mg ha-1 year-1, respectively). We parameterised a simple simulator of forest dynamics using the lidar carbon flux measurements, and used it to explore four scenarios of fire occurrence. Under undisturbed conditions (no fire occurrence) an accelerating accumulation of biomass and carbon is evident over the next 100 years with an average carbon sequestration rate of 1.95 Mg C ha-1 year-1. This rate reduces by almost a third when fire probability is increased to 0.01, as has been predicted under climate change. Our work shows the power of multi-temporal lidar surveying to map woodland carbon fluxes and provide parameters for carbon dynamics models. Space

  13. Assessing General Relationships Between Above-Ground Biomass and Vegetation Structure Parameters for Improved Carbon Estimate from Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, W.; Lee, S.; Strahler, A. H.; Woodcock, C. E.; Schaaf, C.; Yao, T.; Ranson, J.; Sun, G.; Blair, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing uses vegetation height to estimate large-scale above-ground biomass. However, lidar height and biomass relationships are empirical and thus often lead to large uncertainties in above-ground biomass estimates. This study uses vegetation structure measurements from field: an airborne lidar (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor, LVIS)) and a full wave form ground-based lidar (Echidna® validation instrument, EVI) collected in the New England region in 2003 and 2007, to investigate using additional vegetation structure parameters besides height for improved above-ground biomass estimation from lidar. Our field data analysis shows that using woody volume (approximated by the product of basal area and top 10% tree height) and vegetation type (conifer/softwood or deciduous/hardwood forests, providing wood density) has the potential to improve above-ground biomass estimates at large scale. This result is comparable to previous work by Chave et al. (2005), which focused on individual trees. However this study uses a slightly different approach, and our woody volume is estimated differently from Chave et al. (2005). Previous studies found that RH50 is a good predictor of above-ground biomass (Drake et al., 2002; 2003). Our LVIS data analysis shows that structure parameters that combine height and gap fraction, such as RH100*cover and RH50*cover, perform similarly or even better than RH50. We also found that the close relationship of RH100*cover and RH50*cover with woody volume explains why they are good predictors of above-ground biomass. RH50 is highly related to RH100*cover, and this explains why RH50 is a better predictor of biomass than RH100. This study shows that using structure parameters combining height and gap fraction improve above-ground biomass estimate compared to height alone, and fusion of lidar and optical remote sensing (to provide vegetation type) will provide better above-ground biomass estimates than lidar alone. Ground lidar analysis

  14. Above-ground woody carbon sequestration measured from tree rings is coherent with net ecosystem productivity at five eddy-covariance sites.

    PubMed

    Babst, Flurin; Bouriaud, Olivier; Papale, Dario; Gielen, Bert; Janssens, Ivan A; Nikinmaa, Eero; Ibrom, Andreas; Wu, Jian; Bernhofer, Christian; Köstner, Barbara; Grünwald, Thomas; Seufert, Günther; Ciais, Philippe; Frank, David

    2014-03-01

    • Attempts to combine biometric and eddy-covariance (EC) quantifications of carbon allocation to different storage pools in forests have been inconsistent and variably successful in the past. • We assessed above-ground biomass changes at five long-term EC forest stations based on tree-ring width and wood density measurements, together with multiple allometric models. Measurements were validated with site-specific biomass estimates and compared with the sum of monthly CO₂ fluxes between 1997 and 2009. • Biometric measurements and seasonal net ecosystem productivity (NEP) proved largely compatible and suggested that carbon sequestered between January and July is mainly used for volume increase, whereas that taken up between August and September supports a combination of cell wall thickening and storage. The inter-annual variability in above-ground woody carbon uptake was significantly linked with wood production at the sites, ranging between 110 and 370 g C m(-2) yr(-1) , thereby accounting for 10-25% of gross primary productivity (GPP), 15-32% of terrestrial ecosystem respiration (TER) and 25-80% of NEP. • The observed seasonal partitioning of carbon used to support different wood formation processes refines our knowledge on the dynamics and magnitude of carbon allocation in forests across the major European climatic zones. It may thus contribute, for example, to improved vegetation model parameterization and provides an enhanced framework to link tree-ring parameters with EC measurements.

  15. Impacts of fire management on aboveground tree carbon stocks in Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matchett, John R.; Lutz, James A.; Tarnay, Leland W.; Smith, Douglas G.; Becker, Kendall M.L.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    We compared our landscape carbon estimates in YOSE to remotely-sensed carbon estimates from the NASA–CASA project and found that the two methods roughly agree. Our analysis and comparisons suggest, however, that fire severity should be integrated into future carbon mapping efforts. We illustrate this with an example using the 2013 Rim Fire, which we estimate burned an area containing over 5 Tg of aboveground tree carbon, but likely left a large fraction of that carbon on the landscape if one accounts for fire severity.

  16. Ability of LANDSAT-8 Oli Derived Texture Metrics in Estimating Aboveground Carbon Stocks of Coppice Oak Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, A.; Sohrabi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The role of forests as a reservoir for carbon has prompted the need for timely and reliable estimation of aboveground carbon stocks. Since measurement of aboveground carbon stocks of forests is a destructive, costly and time-consuming activity, aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques have gained many attentions in this field. Despite the fact that using aerial data for predicting aboveground carbon stocks has been proved as a highly accurate method, there are challenges related to high acquisition costs, small area coverage, and limited availability of these data. These challenges are more critical for non-commercial forests located in low-income countries. Landsat program provides repetitive acquisition of high-resolution multispectral data, which are freely available. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of multispectral Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) derived texture metrics in quantifying aboveground carbon stocks of coppice Oak forests in Zagros Mountains, Iran. We used four different window sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7, and 9×9), and four different offsets ([0,1], [1,1], [1,0], and [1,-1]) to derive nine texture metrics (angular second moment, contrast, correlation, dissimilar, entropy, homogeneity, inverse difference, mean, and variance) from four bands (blue, green, red, and infrared). Totally, 124 sample plots in two different forests were measured and carbon was calculated using species-specific allometric models. Stepwise regression analysis was applied to estimate biomass from derived metrics. Results showed that, in general, larger size of window for deriving texture metrics resulted models with better fitting parameters. In addition, the correlation of the spectral bands for deriving texture metrics in regression models was ranked as b4>b3>b2>b5. The best offset was [1,-1]. Amongst the different metrics, mean and entropy were entered in most of the regression models. Overall, different models based on derived texture metrics

  17. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, B. C.; Hicke, J. A.; Hudak, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40-50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75-89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3-6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale.

  18. Aboveground carbon loss in natural and managed tropical forests from 2000 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Baccini, A.; Hansen, M. C.; Potapov, P. V.; Stehman, S. V.; Houghton, R. A.; Krylov, A. M.; Turubanova, S.; Goetz, S. J.

    2015-07-01

    Tropical forests provide global climate regulation ecosystem services and their clearing is a significant source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and resultant radiative forcing of climate change. However, consensus on pan-tropical forest carbon dynamics is lacking. We present a new estimate that employs recommended good practices to quantify gross tropical forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss from 2000 to 2012 through the integration of Landsat-derived tree canopy cover, height, intactness and forest cover loss and GLAS-lidar derived forest biomass. An unbiased estimate of forest loss area is produced using a stratified random sample with strata derived from a wall-to-wall 30 m forest cover loss map. Our sample-based results separate the gross loss of forest AGC into losses from natural forests (0.59 PgC yr-1) and losses from managed forests (0.43 PgC yr-1) including plantations, agroforestry systems and subsistence agriculture. Latin America accounts for 43% of gross AGC loss and 54% of natural forest AGC loss, with Brazil experiencing the highest AGC loss for both categories at national scales. We estimate gross tropical forest AGC loss and natural forest loss to account for 11% and 6% of global year 2012 CO2 emissions, respectively. Given recent trends, natural forests will likely constitute an increasingly smaller proportion of tropical forest GHG emissions and of global emissions as fossil fuel consumption increases, with implications for the valuation of co-benefits in tropical forest conservation.

  19. Temperate forest fragments maintain aboveground carbon stocks out to the forest edge despite changes in community composition.

    PubMed

    Ziter, Carly; Bennett, Elena M; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Edge effects are among the primary mechanisms by which forest fragmentation can influence the link between biodiversity and ecosystem processes, but relatively few studies have quantified these mechanisms in temperate regions. Carbon storage is an important ecosystem function altered by edge effects, with implications for climate change mitigation. Two opposing hypotheses suggest that aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks at the forest edge will (a) decrease due to increased tree mortality and compositional shifts towards smaller, lower wood density species (e.g., as seen in tropical systems) or, less often, (b) increase due to light/temperature-induced increases in diversity and productivity. We used field-based measurements, allometry, and mixed models to investigate the effects of proximity to the forest edge on AGC stocks, species richness, and community composition in 24 forest fragments in southern Quebec. We also asked whether fragment size or connectivity with surrounding forests altered these edge effects. AGC stocks remained constant across a 100 m edge-to-interior gradient in all fragment types, despite changes in tree community composition and stem density consistent with expectations of forest edge effects. We attribute this constancy primarily to compensatory effects of small trees at the forest edge; however, it is due in some cases to the retention of large trees at forest edges, likely a result of forest management. Our results suggest important differences between temperate and tropical fragments with respect to mechanisms linking biodiversity and AGC dynamics. Small temperate forest fragments may be valuable in conservation efforts based on maintaining biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services.

  20. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26–44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage. PMID:27278688

  1. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-06-09

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26-44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage.

  2. Mapping 2002-2012 Aboveground Biomass Carbon from LiDAR and Landsat Time Series across Northern Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, A. T.; Fekety, P.; Falkowski, M. J.; Kennedy, R. E.; Crookston, N.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The heavy investment by public and private land management entities in commercial off-the-shelf airborne lidar provides an optimum basis for a Carbon Monitoring System due to the known sensitivity of lidar to vegetation canopy structure. The ability to accurately map aboveground carbon pools from lidar and collocated field plot data has been demonstrated in many studies. Our goal is to upscale this biomass information, mapped at 30 m resolution, to the regional level using wall-to-wall, multi-temporal Landsat imagery. We use the LandTrendr approach to transform Landsat time series into annual maps of Brightness, Greenness, and Wetness along with annual change estimates of these same tasseled cap indices. These, along with ancillary layers of canopy height (e.g., GLAS-derived), topography (e.g., insolation), and climate (e.g., mean annual precipitation) are used to predict 2002-2012 aboveground carbon annually across the northern half of Idaho, USA. Ecoregion-specific models are developed to impute aboveground biomass and forest type beneath a forest/non-forest mask. Annual maps are then summarized at the county-level and compared to publically available Forest Inventory and Analysis estimates for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification.

  3. Improving estimation of tree carbon stocks by harvesting aboveground woody biomass within airborne LiDAR flight areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M.; Asner, G. P.; Swemmer, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The accurate estimation of carbon stored in a tree is essential to accounting for the carbon emissions due to deforestation and degradation. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been successful in estimating aboveground carbon density (ACD) by correlating airborne metrics, such as canopy height, to field-estimated biomass. This latter step is reliant on field allometry which is applied to forest inventory quantities, such as stem diameter and height, to predict the biomass of a given tree stem. Constructing such allometry is expensive, time consuming, and requires destructive sampling. Consequently, the sample sizes used to construct such allometry are often small, and the largest tree sampled is often much smaller than the largest in the forest population. The uncertainty resulting from these sampling errors can lead to severe biases when the allometry is applied to stems larger than those harvested to construct the allometry, which is then subsequently propagated to airborne ACD estimates. The Kruger National Park (KNP) mission of maintaining biodiversity coincides with preserving ecosystem carbon stocks. However, one hurdle to accurately quantifying carbon density in savannas is that small stems are typically harvested to construct woody biomass allometry, yet they are not representative of Kruger's distribution of biomass. Consequently, these equations inadequately capture large tree variation in sapwood/hardwood composition, root/shoot/leaf allocation, branch fall, and stem rot. This study eliminates the "middleman" of field allometry by directly measuring, or harvesting, tree biomass within the extent of airborne LiDAR. This enables comparisons of field and airborne ACD estimates, and also enables creation of new airborne algorithms to estimate biomass at the scale of individual trees. A field campaign was conducted at Pompey Silica Mine 5km outside Kruger National Park, South Africa, in Mar-Aug 2010 to harvest and weigh tree mass. Since

  4. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  5. Drivers of aboveground wood production in a lowland tropical forest of West Africa: teasing apart the roles of tree density, tree diversity, soil phosphorus, and historical logging.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Tommaso; Sanchez, Aida Cuni; Lindsell, Jeremy A; Allen, Harriet D; Amable, Gabriel S; Coomes, David A

    2016-06-01

    Tropical forests currently play a key role in regulating the terrestrial carbon cycle and abating climate change by storing carbon in wood. However, there remains considerable uncertainty as to whether tropical forests will continue to act as carbon sinks in the face of increased pressure from expanding human activities. Consequently, understanding what drives productivity in tropical forests is critical. We used permanent forest plot data from the Gola Rainforest National Park (Sierra Leone) - one of the largest tracts of intact tropical moist forest in West Africa - to explore how (1) stand basal area and tree diversity, (2) past disturbance associated with past logging, and (3) underlying soil nutrient gradients interact to determine rates of aboveground wood production (AWP). We started by statistically modeling the diameter growth of individual trees and used these models to estimate AWP for 142 permanent forest plots. We then used structural equation modeling to explore the direct and indirect pathways which shape rates of AWP. Across the plot network, stand basal area emerged as the strongest determinant of AWP, with densely packed stands exhibiting the fastest rates of AWP. In addition to stand packing density, both tree diversity and soil phosphorus content were also positively related to productivity. By contrast, historical logging activities negatively impacted AWP through the removal of large trees, which contributed disproportionately to productivity. Understanding what determines variation in wood production across tropical forest landscapes requires accounting for multiple interacting drivers - with stand structure, tree diversity, and soil nutrients all playing a key role. Importantly, our results also indicate that logging activities can have a long-lasting impact on a forest's ability to sequester and store carbon, emphasizing the importance of safeguarding old-growth tropical forests.

  6. Modeling the spatial distribution of above-ground carbon in Mexican coniferous forests using remote sensing and a geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeana-Pizaña, J. Mauricio; López-Caloca, Alejandra; López-Quiroz, Penélope; Silván-Cárdenas, José Luis; Couturier, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    Forest conservation is considered an option for mitigating the effect of greenhouse gases on global climate, hence monitoring forest carbon pools at global and local levels is important. The present study explores the capability of remote-sensing variables (vegetation indices and textures derived from SPOT-5; backscattering coefficient and interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR images) for modeling the spatial distribution of above-ground biomass in the Environmental Conservation Zone of Mexico City. Correlation and spatial autocorrelation coefficients were used to select significant explanatory variables in fir and pine forests. The correlation for interferometric coherence in HV polarization was negative, with correlations coefficients r = -0.83 for the fir and r = -0.75 for the pine forests. Regression-kriging showed the least root mean square error among the spatial interpolation methods used, with 37.75 tC/ha for fir forests and 29.15 tC/ha for pine forests. The results showed that a hybrid geospatial method, based on interferometric coherence data and a regression-kriging interpolator, has good potential for estimating above-ground biomass carbon.

  7. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer to true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.

  8. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE PAGES

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; ...

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore » true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  9. Carbon dynamics in aboveground biomass of co-dominant plant species in a temperate grassland ecosystem: same or different?

    PubMed

    Ostler, Ulrike; Schleip, Inga; Lattanzi, Fernando A; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of individual organisms in whole-ecosystem carbon (C) fluxes is probably the biggest current challenge in C cycle research. Thus, it is unknown whether different plant community members share the same or different residence times in metabolic (τmetab ) and nonmetabolic (i.e. structural) (τnonmetab ) C pools of aboveground biomass and the fraction of fixed C allocated to aboveground nonmetabolic biomass (Anonmetab ). We assessed τmetab , τnonmetab and Anonmetab of co-dominant species from different functional groups (two bunchgrasses, a stoloniferous legume and a rosette dicot) in a temperate grassland community. Continuous, 14-16-d-long (13) C-labeling experiments were performed in September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007. A two-pool compartmental system, with a well-mixed metabolic and a nonmixed nonmetabolic pool, was the simplest biologically meaningful model that fitted the (13) C tracer kinetics in the whole-shoot biomass of all species. In all experimental periods, the species had similar τmetab (5-8 d), whereas τnonmetab ranged from 20 to 58 d (except for one outlier) and Anonmetab from 7 to 45%. Variations in τnonmetab and Anonmetab were not systematically associated with species or experimental periods, but exhibited relationships with leaf life span, particularly in the grasses. Similar pool kinetics of species suggested similar kinetics at the community level.

  10. Carbon distribution and aboveground net primary production in aspen, jack pine, and black spruce stands in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, S. T.; Vogel, J. G.; Norman, J. M.; Kucharik, C. J.; Steele, S. J.; Stow, T. K.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to (1) characterize the carbon (C) content, leaf area index, and aboveground net primary production (ANPP) for mature aspen, black spruce, and young and mature jack pine stands at the southern and northern Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) areas and (2) compare net primary production and carbon allocation coefficients for the major boreal forest types of the world. Direct estimates of leaf area index, defined as one half of the total leaf surface area, range from a minimum of 1.8 for jack pine forests to a maximum of 5.6 for black spruce forests; stems comprise 5 to 15% of the total overstory plant area. In the BOREAS study, total ecosystem (vegetation plus detritus plus soil) carbon content is greatest in the black spruce forests (445,760-479,380 kg C ha-1), with 87 to 88% of the C in the soil, and is lowest in the jack pine stands (68,370-68,980 kg C ha-1) with a similar distribution of carbon in the vegetation and soil. Forest floor carbon content and mean residence time (MRT) also vary more among forest types in a study area than between study areas for a forest type; forest floor MRT range from 16 to 19 years for aspen stands to 28 to 39 years for jack pine stands. ANPP differs significantly among the mature forests at each of the BOREAS study areas, ranging from a maximum of 3490 to 3520 kg C ha-1 yr-1 for aspen stands to 1170 to 1220 kg C ha-1 yr-1 for jack pine stands. Both net primary production (NPP) and carbon allocation differ between boreal evergreen and deciduous forests in the world, suggesting global primary production models should distinguish between these two forest types. On average, 56% of NPP for boreal forests occurs as detritus and illustrates the need to better understand factors controlling aboveground and below-ground detritus production in boreal forests.

  11. Age-related and stand-wise estimates of carbon stocks and sequestration in the aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöngart, J.; Arieira, J.; Felfili Fortes, C.; Cezarine de Arruda, E.; Nunes da Cunha, C.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we use allometric models combined with tree ring analysis to estimate carbon stocks and sequestration in the aboveground coarse wood biomass (AGWB) of wetland forests in the Pantanal, located in central South America. In four 1-ha plots in stands characterized by the pioneer tree species Vochysia divergens Pohl (Vochysiaceae) forest inventories (trees ≥10 cm diameter at breast height, D) have been performed and converted to estimates of AGWB by two allometric models using three independent parameters (D, tree height H and wood density ρ). We perform a propagation of measurement errors to estimate uncertainties in the estimates of AGWB. Carbon stocks of AGWB vary from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 97.2 ± 14.4 Mg C ha-1 between the four stands. From models relating tree ages determined by dendrochronological techniques to C-stocks in AGWB we derived estimates for C-sequestration which differs from 0.50 ± 0.03 to 3.34 ± 0.31 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Maps based on geostatistic techniques indicate the heterogeneous spatial distribution of tree ages and C-stocks of the four studied stands. This distribution is the result of forest dynamics due to the colonizing and retreating of V. divergens and other species associated with pluriannual wet and dry episodes in the Pantanal, respectively. Such information is essential for the management of the cultural landscape of the Pantanal wetlands.

  12. Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Daniel; Ouimet, Rock; Lambert, Marie-Claude; Logan, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (∼375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km2 of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha−1, which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec’s managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041–2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec’s forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests. PMID:26966680

  13. Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Louis; Houle, Daniel; Ouimet, Rock; Lambert, Marie-Claude; Logan, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (∼375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km(2) of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha(-1), which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec's managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041-2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec's forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests.

  14. Carbon dynamics in aboveground biomass of co-dominant plant species: related rather to leaf life span than to species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Schleip, Inga; Lattanzi, Fernando A.; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of individual organisms in whole ecosystem carbon (C) fluxes. It is currently unknown if different plant community members share the same or different kinetics of C pools in aboveground biomass, thereby adding (or not) variability to the first steps in ecosystem C cycling. We assessed the residence times in metabolic and non-metabolic (or structural) C pools and the allocation pattern of assimilated C in aboveground plant parts of four co-existing, co-dominant species from different functional groups in a temperate grassland community. For this purpose continuous, 14-16 day long 13CO2/12CO2-labeling experiments were performed in Sept. 2006, May 2007 and Sept. 2007, and the tracer kinetics were analysed with compartmental modeling. In all experimental periods, the species shared vastly similar residence times in metabolic C (5-8 d). In contrast, the residence times in non-metabolic C ranged from 20 to 58 d (except one outlier) and the fraction of fixed C allocated to the non-metabolic pool from 7 to 45%. These variations in non-metabolic C kinetics were not systematically associated with species or experimental periods, but exhibited close relationships with (independent estimates of) leaf life span, particularly in the grasses. This adds new meaning to leaf life span as a functional trait in the leaf and plant economics spectrum and its implication for C cycle studies in grassland and also forest systems. As the four co-dominant species accounted for ~80% of total community shoot biomass, we should also expect that the observed similarities in pool kinetics and allocation will scale up to similar relationships at the community level.

  15. Predicting Impacts of Climate Change on the Aboveground Carbon Sequestration Rate of a Temperate Forest in Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Hu, Yuanman; Bu, Rencang; Chang, Yu; Deng, Huawei; Qin, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The aboveground carbon sequestration rate (ACSR) reflects the influence of climate change on forest dynamics. To reveal the long-term effects of climate change on forest succession and carbon sequestration, a forest landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS Pro7.0) was used to simulate the ACSR of a temperate forest at the community and species levels in northeastern China based on both current and predicted climatic data. On the community level, the ACSR of mixed Korean pine hardwood forests and mixed larch hardwood forests, fluctuated during the entire simulation, while a large decline of ACSR emerged in interim of simulation in spruce-fir forest and aspen-white birch forests, respectively. On the species level, the ACSR of all conifers declined greatly around 2070s except for Korean pine. The ACSR of dominant hardwoods in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, such as Manchurian ash, Amur cork, black elm, and ribbed birch fluctuated with broad ranges, respectively. Pioneer species experienced a sharp decline around 2080s, and they would finally disappear in the simulation. The differences of the ACSR among various climates were mainly identified in mixed Korean pine hardwood forests, in all conifers, and in a few hardwoods in the last quarter of simulation. These results indicate that climate warming can influence the ACSR in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, and the largest impact commonly emerged in the A2 scenario. The ACSR of coniferous species experienced higher impact by climate change than that of deciduous species. PMID:24763409

  16. Predicting impacts of climate change on the aboveground carbon sequestration rate of a temperate forest in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Hu, Yuanman; Bu, Rencang; Chang, Yu; Deng, Huawei; Qin, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The aboveground carbon sequestration rate (ACSR) reflects the influence of climate change on forest dynamics. To reveal the long-term effects of climate change on forest succession and carbon sequestration, a forest landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS Pro7.0) was used to simulate the ACSR of a temperate forest at the community and species levels in northeastern China based on both current and predicted climatic data. On the community level, the ACSR of mixed Korean pine hardwood forests and mixed larch hardwood forests, fluctuated during the entire simulation, while a large decline of ACSR emerged in interim of simulation in spruce-fir forest and aspen-white birch forests, respectively. On the species level, the ACSR of all conifers declined greatly around 2070s except for Korean pine. The ACSR of dominant hardwoods in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, such as Manchurian ash, Amur cork, black elm, and ribbed birch fluctuated with broad ranges, respectively. Pioneer species experienced a sharp decline around 2080s, and they would finally disappear in the simulation. The differences of the ACSR among various climates were mainly identified in mixed Korean pine hardwood forests, in all conifers, and in a few hardwoods in the last quarter of simulation. These results indicate that climate warming can influence the ACSR in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, and the largest impact commonly emerged in the A2 scenario. The ACSR of coniferous species experienced higher impact by climate change than that of deciduous species.

  17. Consequences of long-term severe industrial pollution for aboveground carbon and nitrogen pools in northern taiga forests at local and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Sirkku; Zverev, Vitali; Bergman, Igor; Kozlov, Mikhail V

    2015-12-01

    Boreal coniferous forests act as an important sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The overall tree carbon (C) sink in the forests of Europe has increased during the past decades, especially due to management and elevated nitrogen (N) deposition; however, industrial atmospheric pollution, primarily sulphur dioxide and heavy metals, still negatively affect forest biomass production at different spatial scales. We report local and regional changes in forest aboveground biomass, C and N concentrations in plant tissues, and C and N pools caused by long-term atmospheric emissions from a large point source, the nickel-copper smelter in Monchegorsk, in north-western Russia. An increase in pollution load (assessed as Cu concentration in forest litter) caused C to increase in foliage but C remained unchanged in wood, while N decreased in foliage and increased in wood, demonstrating strong effects of pollution on resource translocation between green and woody tissues. The aboveground C and N pools were primarily governed by plant biomass, which strongly decreased with an increase in pollution load. In our study sites (located 1.6-39.7 km from the smelter) living aboveground plant biomass was 76 to 4888 gm(-2), and C and N pools ranged 35-2333 g C m(-2) and 0.5-35.1 g N m(-2), respectively. We estimate that the aboveground plant biomass is reduced due to chronic exposure to industrial air pollution over an area of about 107,200 km2, and the total (aboveground and belowground) loss of phytomass C stock amounts to 4.24×10(13) g C. Our results emphasize the need to account for the overall impact of industrial polluters on ecosystem C and N pools when assessing the C and N dynamics in northern boreal forests because of the marked long-term negative effects of their emissions on structure and productivity of plant communities.

  18. [Influence of fire disturbance on aboveground deadwood debris carbon storage in Huzhong forest region of Great Xing'an Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Da; He, Hong-shi; Wu, Zhi-wei; Liang, Yu; Huang, Chao; Luo, Xu; Xiao, Jiang-tao; Zhang, Qing-long

    2015-02-01

    Based on the field inventory data, the aboveground deadwood debris carbon storage under different fire severities was analyzed in Huzhong forest region of Great Xing' an Mountains. The results showed that the fire severity had a significant effect on aboveground deadwood debris carbon storage. The deadwood debris carbon storage was in the order of high-severity > low-severity > unburned in Larix gmelinii stands, and mixed conifer-broadleaf stands ( L. gmelinii and Betula platyphylla), and in the order of high severity > unburned > low-severity in B. platyphylla stands. Fire disturbance significantly changed the component percentage of the deadwood debris carbon storage. The component percentage of snags increased and litter decreased with the increasing fire severity. Logs and stumps did not change significantly with the increasing fire severity. The spatial variation of deadwood debris carbon storage in forests burned with low-severity fire was higher than that in unburned forests. The spatial variation of deadwood debris carbon storage with high-severity fires was lowest. This spatial variation needed to be accounted when calculating forest deadwood debris carbon storage.

  19. Local Atomic Density of Microporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Contescu, Cristian I.; Llobet, Anna; Gallego, Nidia C.; Egami, Takeskhi

    2012-07-12

    We investigated the structure of two disordered carbons: activated carbon fibers (ACF) and ultramicroporous carbon (UMC). These carbons have highly porous structure with large surface areas and consequently low macroscopic density that should enhance adsorption of hydrogen. We used the atomic pair distribution function to probe the local atomic arrangements. The results show that the carbons maintain an in-plane local atomic structure similar to regular graphite, but the stacking of graphitic layers is strongly disordered. Although the local atomic density of these carbons is lower than graphite, it is only {approx}20% lower and is much higher than the macroscopic density due to the porosity of the structure. For this reason, the density of graphene sheets that have optimum separation for hydrogen adsorption is lower than anticipated.

  20. Assessing the influence of return density on estimation of lidar-based aboveground biomass in tropical peat swamp forests of Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuri, Solichin; Andersen, Hans-Erik; McGaughey, Robert J.; Brack, Cris

    2017-04-01

    The airborne lidar system (ALS) provides a means to efficiently monitor the status of remote tropical forests and continues to be the subject of intense evaluation. However, the cost of ALS acquisition can vary significantly depending on the acquisition parameters, particularly the return density (i.e., spatial resolution) of the lidar point cloud. This study assessed the effect of lidar return density on the accuracy of lidar metrics and regression models for estimating aboveground biomass (AGB) and basal area (BA) in tropical peat swamp forests (PSF) in Kalimantan, Indonesia. A large dataset of ALS covering an area of 123,000 ha was used in this study. This study found that cumulative return proportion (CRP) variables represent a better accumulation of AGB over tree heights than height-related variables. The CRP variables in power models explained 80.9% and 90.9% of the BA and AGB variations, respectively. Further, it was found that low-density (and low-cost) lidar should be considered as a feasible option for assessing AGB and BA in vast areas of flat, lowland PSF. The performance of the models generated using reduced return densities as low as 1/9 returns per m2 also yielded strong agreement with the original high-density data. The use model-based statistical inferences enabled relatively precise estimates of the mean AGB at the landscape scale to be obtained with a fairly low-density of 1/4 returns per m2, with less than 10% standard error (SE). Further, even when very low-density lidar data was used (i.e., 1/49 returns per m2) the bias of the mean AGB estimates were still less than 10% with a SE of approximately 15%. This study also investigated the influence of different DTM resolutions for normalizing the elevation during the generation of forest-related lidar metrics using various return densities point cloud. We found that the high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) had little effect on the accuracy of lidar metrics calculation in PSF. The accuracy of

  1. Fire and the distribution and uncertainty of carbon sequestered as above-ground tree biomass in Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lutz, James A.; Matchett, John R.; Tarnay, Leland W.; Smith, Douglas F.; Becker, Kendall M.L.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2017-01-01

    Fire is one of the principal agents changing forest carbon stocks and landscape level distributions of carbon, but few studies have addressed how accurate carbon accounting of fire-killed trees is or can be. We used a large number of forested plots (1646), detailed selection of species-specific and location-specific allometric equations, vegetation type maps with high levels of accuracy, and Monte Carlo simulation to model the amount and uncertainty of aboveground tree carbon present in tree species (hereafter, carbon) within Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. We estimated aboveground carbon in trees within Yosemite National Park to be 25 Tg of carbon (C) (confidence interval (CI): 23–27 Tg C), and in Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Park to be 20 Tg C (CI: 18–21 Tg C). Low-severity and moderate-severity fire had little or no effect on the amount of carbon sequestered in trees at the landscape scale, and high-severity fire did not immediately consume much carbon. Although many of our data inputs were more accurate than those used in similar studies in other locations, the total uncertainty of carbon estimates was still greater than ±10%, mostly due to potential uncertainties in landscape-scale vegetation type mismatches and trees larger than the ranges of existing allometric equations. If carbon inventories are to be meaningfully used in policy, there is an urgent need for more accurate landscape classification methods, improvement in allometric equations for tree species, and better understanding of the uncertainties inherent in existing carbon accounting methods.

  2. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guodong; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Piao, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level ground-measured forest aboveground biomass database with geospatial information from 1-km Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset in a machine learning algorithm (the model tree ensemble, MTE). We show that Chinese forest aboveground biomass is 8.56 Pg C, which is mainly contributed by evergreen needle-leaf forests and deciduous broadleaf forests. The mean forest aboveground biomass density is 56.1 Mg C ha-1, with high values observed in temperate humid regions. The responses of forest aboveground biomass density to mean annual temperature are closely tied to water conditions; that is, negative responses dominate regions with mean annual precipitation less than 1300 mm y-1 and positive responses prevail in regions with mean annual precipitation higher than 2800 mm y-1. During the 2000s, the forests in China sequestered C by 61.9 Tg C y-1, and this C sink is mainly distributed in north China and may be attributed to warming climate, rising CO2 concentration, N deposition, and growth of young forests.

  3. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Piao, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level ground-measured forest aboveground biomass database with geospatial information from 1-km Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset in a machine learning algorithm (the model tree ensemble, MTE). We show that Chinese forest aboveground biomass is 8.56 Pg C, which is mainly contributed by evergreen needle-leaf forests and deciduous broadleaf forests. The mean forest aboveground biomass density is 56.1 Mg C ha−1, with high values observed in temperate humid regions. The responses of forest aboveground biomass density to mean annual temperature are closely tied to water conditions; that is, negative responses dominate regions with mean annual precipitation less than 1300 mm y−1 and positive responses prevail in regions with mean annual precipitation higher than 2800 mm y−1. During the 2000s, the forests in China sequestered C by 61.9 Tg C y−1, and this C sink is mainly distributed in north China and may be attributed to warming climate, rising CO2 concentration, N deposition, and growth of young forests. PMID:26115195

  4. Spatial Distribution of Aboveground Carbon Stock of the Arboreal Vegetation in Brazilian Biomes of Savanna, Atlantic Forest and Semi-Arid Woodland.

    PubMed

    Scolforo, Henrique Ferraco; Scolforo, Jose Roberto Soares; Mello, Carlos Rogerio; Mello, Jose Marcio; Ferraz Filho, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map the spatial distribution of aboveground carbon stock (using Regression-kriging) of arboreal plants in the Atlantic Forest, Semi-arid woodland, and Savanna Biomes in Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. The database used in this study was obtained from 163 forest fragments, totaling 4,146 plots of 1,000 m2 distributed in these Biomes. A geographical model for carbon stock estimation was parameterized as a function of Biome, latitude and altitude. This model was applied over the samples and the residuals generated were mapped based on geostatistical procedures, selecting the exponential semivariogram theoretical model for conducting ordinary Kriging. The aboveground carbon stock was found to have a greater concentration in the north of the State, where the largest contingent of native vegetation is located, mainly the Savanna Biome, with Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna phytophysiognomes. The largest weighted averages of carbon stock per hectare were found in the south-center region (48.6 Mg/ha) and in the southern part of the eastern region (48.4 Mg/ha) of Minas Gerais State, due to the greatest predominance of Atlantic Forest Biome forest fragments. The smallest weighted averages per hectare were found in the central (21.2 Mg/ha), northern (20.4 Mg/ha), and northwestern (20.7 Mg/ha) regions of Minas Gerais State, where Savanna Biome fragments are predominant, in the phytophysiognomes Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna.

  5. Spatial Distribution of Aboveground Carbon Stock of the Arboreal Vegetation in Brazilian Biomes of Savanna, Atlantic Forest and Semi-Arid Woodland

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map the spatial distribution of aboveground carbon stock (using Regression-kriging) of arboreal plants in the Atlantic Forest, Semi-arid woodland, and Savanna Biomes in Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. The database used in this study was obtained from 163 forest fragments, totaling 4,146 plots of 1,000 m2 distributed in these Biomes. A geographical model for carbon stock estimation was parameterized as a function of Biome, latitude and altitude. This model was applied over the samples and the residuals generated were mapped based on geostatistical procedures, selecting the exponential semivariogram theoretical model for conducting ordinary Kriging. The aboveground carbon stock was found to have a greater concentration in the north of the State, where the largest contingent of native vegetation is located, mainly the Savanna Biome, with Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna phytophysiognomes. The largest weighted averages of carbon stock per hectare were found in the south-center region (48.6 Mg/ha) and in the southern part of the eastern region (48.4 Mg/ha) of Minas Gerais State, due to the greatest predominance of Atlantic Forest Biome forest fragments. The smallest weighted averages per hectare were found in the central (21.2 Mg/ha), northern (20.4 Mg/ha), and northwestern (20.7 Mg/ha) regions of Minas Gerais State, where Savanna Biome fragments are predominant, in the phytophysiognomes Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna. PMID:26066508

  6. Carbon pool densities and a first estimate of the total carbon pool in the Mongolian forest-steppe.

    PubMed

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Klinge, Michael; Degener, Jan; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Bat-Enerel, Banzragch; Yeruult, Yolk; Saindovdon, Davaadorj; Ganbaatar, Kherlenchimeg; Tsogtbaatar, Jamsran; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The boreal forest biome represents one of the most important terrestrial carbon stores, which gave reason to intensive research on carbon stock densities. However, such an analysis does not yet exist for the southernmost Eurosiberian boreal forests in Inner Asia. Most of these forests are located in the Mongolian forest-steppe, which is largely dominated by Larix sibirica. We quantified the carbon stock density and total carbon pool of Mongolia's boreal forests and adjacent grasslands and draw conclusions on possible future change. Mean aboveground carbon stock density in the interior of L. sibirica forests was 66 Mg C ha(-1) , which is in the upper range of values reported from boreal forests and probably due to the comparably long growing season. The density of soil organic carbon (SOC, 108 Mg C ha(-1) ) and total belowground carbon density (149 Mg C ha(-1) ) are at the lower end of the range known from boreal forests, which might be the result of higher soil temperatures and a thinner permafrost layer than in the central and northern boreal forest belt. Land use effects are especially relevant at forest edges, where mean carbon stock density was 188 Mg C ha(-1) , compared with 215 Mg C ha(-1) in the forest interior. Carbon stock density in grasslands was 144 Mg C ha(-1) . Analysis of satellite imagery of the highly fragmented forest area in the forest-steppe zone showed that Mongolia's total boreal forest area is currently 73 818 km(2) , and 22% of this area refers to forest edges (defined as the first 30 m from the edge). The total forest carbon pool of Mongolia was estimated at ~ 1.5-1.7 Pg C, a value which is likely to decrease in future with increasing deforestation and fire frequency, and global warming.

  7. Topographic Control of Aboveground Carbon Pools Across an Environmental Gradient, Eastern Slope of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetnam, T. L.; Brooks, P. D.; Gallo, E. L.; Barnard, H. R.; Harpold, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluating at high spatial-resolution the topographical and ecological structures of the critical zone (CZ) are now routine with aerial LiDAR. Here we evaluated the eco-hydrological differences of topographic metrics (the independent variables) versus individual tree and gridded aboveground carbon (AGC) pools (as dependent variables) at multiple length-scales across an elevation modified gradient of precipitation and temperature in the Boulder Creek CZ Observatory Watershed, Colorado USA. We describe the responses in AGC within the context of a three-zone eco-hydrological model, e.g. toe slope and valley bottoms (Zone 1), transitional hillslopes (Zone 2), and upper slopes to ridges (Zone 3). In a GIS we compared three separate zero-order basins: (1) the Betasso Preserve: 1,810-2,024 meters above mean sea level (m aμsl), area = 0.45 km2, n = 17,286 trees; (2) Upper and Lower Gordon Gulch: 2,446-2,737 m aμsl, area = 3.57 km2, n = 178,469 trees; and (3) Como Creek: 2,900m-3,560 m aμsl, area = 6.64 km2, n = 317,274 trees. In each of the three catchments Zone 1 held the greatest mean AGC (μ = 52.88-60.97 Mg C ha-1) and maximum AGC (99% confidence interval (CI, p = 0.01) = 152.95-184.95 Mg C ha-1) relative to Zone 2 (μ = 27.84-44.52 Mg C ha-1, 99% CI = 99.67-122.4 Mg C ha-1) and Zone 3 (μ = 12.63-30.33 Mg C ha-1, 99% CI = 62.16-92.65 Mg C ha-1). Topography with negative general curvatures (i.e. convergent shapes) had greater AGC (μ = 73.7-96.3 Mg C ha-1, 99% CI = 189.0-355.8 Mg C ha-1) than positive general curvatures (i.e. divergent shapes) (μ = 17.4-30.8 Mg C ha-1, 99% CI = 88.2-120.4 Mg C ha-1), but only when evaluated at longer length scales (<10 m). Larger AGC pools are postulated to be related to (1) increased soil depth which provides larger rooting zones and (2) access to groundwater along Zone 1, vs Zones 2 and 3 which have (a) shallower soils and (b) less or zero accessibility to groundwater.

  8. Linking Carbon Fluxes with Remotely-Sensed Vegetation Indices for Leaf Area and Aboveground Biomass Through Footprint Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayson, C.; Clark, K.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Skowronski, N.; Schmid, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    A major challenge of bottom-up scaling is that in-situ flux observations are spatially limited. Thus, to achieve valid regional exchange rates, models are used to interpolate and extrapolate to the vegetational/spatial domain covered by these observations. To parameterize these models from flux data, efforts must be made to select data that best represents the region being modeled as well as linking the fluxes to remotely-sensed data products that can be produced from site to regional scales. Because most long-term flux stations are not in spatially extensive, homogeneous locations, this requirement is often a challenge. However, this requirement can be met by selecting observation periods whose flux footprints are statistically representative of the type of ecosystem identified in the model. The flux footprint function indicates the time-varying surface “field-of-view” (or spatial sampling window) of an eddy-flux sensor, oriented mostly in upwind direction. For each observation period, the modeled flux footprint window is overlain with a high-resolution vegetation index map to determine a footprint-weighted vegetation index for which the observation is representative. Using flux-footprint analysis to link fluxes to models using just an enhanced vegetation index (EVI) map shows a positive trend between EVI and eddy covariance measured fluxes, but the link is not strong. Leaf area is linked with carbon (C) uptake, but forests tend to maximize leaf area, as determined through remote sensing, early on with forests having similar leaf areas across a wide range of ages. Adding another remotely-sensed dataset, aboveground biomass map (AGB), helps capture the processes of lower productivity rates (as biomass increases per unit of leaf area there is a decline, due to the forest ageing) and the C losses due to respiration, both heterotrophic and autotrophic (linked to live and detrital biomass pools). Adding biomass from LIDAR and a combined EVI-biomass layer to examine

  9. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  10. Response of aboveground carbon balance to long-term, experimental enhancements in precipitation seasonality is contingent on plant community type in cold-desert rangelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAbee, Kathryn; Reinhardt, Keith; Germino, Matthew; Bosworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Semi-arid rangelands are important carbon (C) pools at global scales. However, the degree of net C storage or release in water-limited systems is a function of precipitation amount and timing, as well as plant community composition. In northern latitudes of western North America, C storage in cold-desert ecosystems could increase with boosts in wintertime precipitation, in which climate models predict, due to increases in wintertime soil water storage that enhance summertime productivity. However, there are few long-term, manipulative field-based studies investigating how rangelands will respond to altered precipitation amount or timing. We measured aboveground C pools and fluxes at leaf, soil, and ecosystem scales over a single growing season in plots that had 200 mm of supplemental precipitation added in either winter or summer for the past 21 years, in shrub- and exotic-bunchgrass-dominated garden plots. At our cold-desert site (298 mm precipitation during the study year), we hypothesized that increased winter precipitation would stimulate the aboveground C uptake and storage relative to ambient conditions, especially in plots containing shrubs. Our hypotheses were generally supported: ecosystem C uptake and long-term biomass accumulation were greater in winter- and summer-irrigated plots compared to control plots in both vegetation communities. However, substantial increases in the aboveground biomass occurred only in winter-irrigated plots that contained shrubs. Our findings suggest that increases in winter precipitation will enhance C storage of this widespread ecosystem, and moreso in shrub- compared to grass-dominated communities.

  11. Response of aboveground carbon balance to long-term, experimental enhancements in precipitation seasonality is contingent on plant community type in cold-desert rangelands.

    PubMed

    McAbee, Kathryn; Reinhardt, Keith; Germino, Matthew J; Bosworth, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Semi-arid rangelands are important carbon (C) pools at global scales. However, the degree of net C storage or release in water-limited systems is a function of precipitation amount and timing, as well as plant community composition. In northern latitudes of western North America, C storage in cold-desert ecosystems could increase with boosts in wintertime precipitation, in which climate models predict, due to increases in wintertime soil water storage that enhance summertime productivity. However, there are few long-term, manipulative field-based studies investigating how rangelands will respond to altered precipitation amount or timing. We measured aboveground C pools and fluxes at leaf, soil, and ecosystem scales over a single growing season in plots that had 200 mm of supplemental precipitation added in either winter or summer for the past 21 years, in shrub- and exotic-bunchgrass-dominated garden plots. At our cold-desert site (298 mm precipitation during the study year), we hypothesized that increased winter precipitation would stimulate the aboveground C uptake and storage relative to ambient conditions, especially in plots containing shrubs. Our hypotheses were generally supported: ecosystem C uptake and long-term biomass accumulation were greater in winter- and summer-irrigated plots compared to control plots in both vegetation communities. However, substantial increases in the aboveground biomass occurred only in winter-irrigated plots that contained shrubs. Our findings suggest that increases in winter precipitation will enhance C storage of this widespread ecosystem, and moreso in shrub- compared to grass-dominated communities.

  12. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  13. Temporal changes in allocation and partitioning of new carbon as (11)C elicited by simulated herbivory suggest that roots shape aboveground responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Abigail P; Agtuca, Beverly; Appel, Heidi M; Ferrieri, Richard A; Schultz, Jack C

    2013-02-01

    Using the short-lived isotope (11)C (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) as (11)CO(2), we captured temporal changes in whole-plant carbon movement and partitioning of recently fixed carbon into primary and secondary metabolites in a time course (2, 6, and 24 h) following simulated herbivory with the well-known defense elicitor methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to young leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both (11)CO(2) fixation and (11)C-photosynthate export from the labeled source leaf increased rapidly (2 h) following MeJA treatment relative to controls, with preferential allocation of radiolabeled resources belowground. At the same time, (11)C-photosynthate remaining in the aboveground sink tissues showed preferential allocation to MeJA-treated, young leaves, where it was incorporated into (11)C-cinnamic acid. By 24 h, resource allocation toward roots returned to control levels, while allocation to the young leaves increased. This corresponded to an increase in invertase activity and the accumulation of phenolic compounds, particularly anthocyanins, in young leaves. Induction of phenolics was suppressed in sucrose transporter mutant plants (suc2-1), indicating that this phenomenon may be controlled, in part, by phloem loading at source leaves. However, when plant roots were chilled to 5°C to disrupt carbon flow between above- and belowground tissues, source leaves failed to allocate resources belowground or toward damaged leaves following wounding and MeJA treatment to young leaves, suggesting that roots may play an integral role in controlling how plants respond defensively aboveground.

  14. [Carbon density and production in valley spruce-fir forest in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui-Ying; Di, Xue-Ying; Jin, Guang-Ze

    2014-10-01

    The carbon density and production were measured using both forest inventory and allometry approaches in the declining valley spruce-fir forest in Xiaoxing' an Mountains. Results showed that the total carbon density of the forest was 268. 14 t C · hm(-2) in 2011, and carbon densities of the vegetation, detritus and soil were 74.25, 16.86 and 177.03 t C · hm(-2), respectively. From 2006 to 2011, tree layer carbon density decreased from 80.86 t C · hm(-2) to 71.73 t C · hm(-2). The average decrease proportions per year of carbon density were 0.5%, 1.2%, 2.7% and 3.7% for Abies nephrolepis, Betula platyphylla, Picea spp., and Larix gmelinii, respectively. However, carbon densities were increased by 2.9%, 3.9% and 7.2% per year for Alnus sibirica, Pinus koraiensis and Acer ukurunduense, respectively. Net primary production (NPP) of the forest was 4.69 t C · hm(-2) · a(-1). The ratio of belowground NPP to aboveground NPP was 0.56. Litterfall accounted for the largest proportion of the NPP of forest with a value of 34.5%. As the two most important carbon output approaches of forest ecosystems, the fluxes of heterotrophic respiration and coarse woody debris decomposition were 293.67 and 119.29 g C · m(-2) · a(-1), respectively. Net ecosystem production (NEP) of the forest was 55.90 g C · m(-2) a(-1). The results indicated that the valley spruce-fir forest in the declining state still had a certain carbon sink capacity.

  15. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  16. [Simulating climate change effect on aboveground carbon sequestration rates of main broadleaved trees in the Xiaoxing'an Mountains area, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Bu, Rencang; Deng, Hua-Wei; Hu, Yuan-Man; Qin, Qin; Han, Feng-Lin

    2014-09-01

    LANDIS Pro 7.0 model was used to simulate the dynamics of aboveground biomass of ten broadleaved tree species in the Xiao Xing' an Mountains area under current and various climate change scenarios from 2000 to 2200, and carbon content coefficients (CCCs) were coupled to cal- culate the aboveground carbon sequestration rates (ACSRs) of these species. The results showed that in the initial year of simulation, the biomasses and their proportions of Fraxinus mandshurica, Phellodendron amurense, Quercus mongolica, Ulmus propinqua, and Acer mono were relatively low, while those of Betula costata, Betula platyphylla, and Populus davidiana were higher. A trend of rise after decline occurred in ACSR for pioneer species in the mid and late periods of simulation years, but ACSRs for the other broadleaved tree species were considerably complex. The ACSRs of Q. mongolica and Tilla amurensis fluctuated in the ranges of -0.05-0.25 t · hm(-2) · 10 a(-1) and 0.16-1.29 t · hm(-2) · 10 a(-1) in simulation years, respectively. The ACSRs of F. mandshurica, U. propinqua, A. mono, and B. costata showed a trend of decline after rise in late simulation years. There were significant differences in ACSR for P. amurense and B. davurica among various climate change scenarios in the periods of 2050-2100 and 2150-2200, while no significant difference in ACSR for the other species would be detected. Difference of sensitivity of various species in ACSR for future climate scenarios in the Small Khingan Mountains area existed. However, the un- certainty of future climates would not yield significant difference in ACSR for most broadleaved tree species. Moreover, a time lag would exist in the process of climate change effects on temperate forest's ACSR.

  17. Extensive Sampling of Forest Carbon using High Density Power Line Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, H. M.; Chen, Q.; Dye, D. G.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Estimating carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from forest management, natural processes, and disturbance is of growing interest for mitigating global warming. Ponderosa pine is common at mid-elevations throughout the western United States and is a dominant tree species in southwestern forests. Existing unmanaged "relict" sites and stand reconstructions of southwestern ponderosa pine forests from before European settlement (late 1800s) provide evidence of forests of larger trees of lower density and less vulnerability to severe fires than today's typical conditions of high densities of small trees that have resulted from a century of fire suppression. Forest treatments to improve forest health in the region include tree cutting focused on small-diameter trees (thinning), low-intensity prescribed burning, and monitoring rather than suppressing wildfires. Stimulated by several uncharacteristically-intense fires in the last decade, a collaborative process found strong stakeholder agreement to accelerate forest treatments to reduce fire risk and restore ecological conditions. Land use planning to ramp up management is underway and could benefit from quick and inexpensive techniques to inventory tree-level carbon because existing inventory data are not adequate to capture the range of forest structural conditions. Our approach overcomes these shortcomings by employing recent breakthroughs in estimating aboveground biomass from high resolution light detection and ranging (lidar) remote sensing. Lidar is an active remote sensing technique, analogous to radar, which measures the time required for a transmitted pulse of laser light to return to the sensor after reflection from a target. Lidar data can capture 3-dimensional forest structure with greater detail and broader spatial coverage than is feasible with conventional field measurements. We developed a novel methodology for extensive sampling and field validation of forest carbon, applicable to managed and

  18. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  19. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of composite laminate.structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure that is filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477 deg K and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 KN/sq m pressure at 450 deg K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527 deg K to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  20. Above-ground biomass and carbon estimates of Shorea robusta and Tectona grandis forests using QuadPOL ALOS PALSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, M. D.; Tripathi, P.; Mishra, B.; Kumar, Shashi; Chitale, V. S.; Behera, Soumit K.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms to mitigate climate change in tropical countries such as India require information on forest structural components i.e., biomass and carbon for conservation steps to be implemented successfully. The present study focuses on investigating the potential use of a one time, QuadPOL ALOS PALSAR L-band 25 m data to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) using a water cloud model (WCM) in a wildlife sanctuary in India. A significant correlation was obtained between the SAR-derived backscatter coefficient (σ°) and the field measured AGB, with the maximum coefficient of determination for cross-polarized (HV) σ° for Shorea robusta, and the weakest correlation was observed with co-polarized (HH) σ° for Tectona grandis forests. The biomass of S. robusta and that of T. grandis were estimated on the basis of field-measured data at 444.7 ± 170.4 Mg/ha and 451 ± 179.4 Mg/ha respectively. The mean biomass values estimated using the WCM varied between 562 and 660 Mg/ha for S. robusta; between 590 and 710 Mg/ha for T. grandis using various polarized data. Our results highlighted the efficacy of one time, fully polarized PALSAR data for biomass and carbon estimate in a dense forest.

  1. Tree-centric mapping of forest carbon density from airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Dalponte, Michele; Coomes, David A

    2016-10-01

    Forests are a major component of the global carbon cycle, and accurate estimation of forest carbon stocks and fluxes is important in the context of anthropogenic global change. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets are increasingly recognized as outstanding data sources for high-fidelity mapping of carbon stocks at regional scales.We develop a tree-centric approach to carbon mapping, based on identifying individual tree crowns (ITCs) and species from airborne remote sensing data, from which individual tree carbon stocks are calculated. We identify ITCs from the laser scanning point cloud using a region-growing algorithm and identifying species from airborne hyperspectral data by machine learning. For each detected tree, we predict stem diameter from its height and crown-width estimate. From that point on, we use well-established approaches developed for field-based inventories: above-ground biomasses of trees are estimated using published allometries and summed within plots to estimate carbon density.We show this approach is highly reliable: tests in the Italian Alps demonstrated a close relationship between field- and ALS-based estimates of carbon stocks (r(2) = 0·98). Small trees are invisible from the air, and a correction factor is required to accommodate this effect.An advantage of the tree-centric approach over existing area-based methods is that it can produce maps at any scale and is fundamentally based on field-based inventory methods, making it intuitive and transparent. Airborne laser scanning, hyperspectral sensing and computational power are all advancing rapidly, making it increasingly feasible to use ITC approaches for effective mapping of forest carbon density also inside wider carbon mapping programs like REDD++.

  2. Influence of the Wax Lake Delta sediment diversion on aboveground plant productivity and carbon storage in deltaic island and mainland coastal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Sasser, C. E.; Evers-Hebert, E.; White, J. R.; Roberts, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    Coastal Louisiana is experiencing a significant loss of coastal wetland area due to increasing sea level rise, subsidence, sediment starvation and marsh collapse. The construction of large scale Mississippi River sediment diversions is currently being planned in an effort to help combat coastal wetlands losses at a rate of >50 km-2 y-1. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) is currently being used as a model for evaluating potential land gain from large scale diversions of Mississippi River water and sediment. In this study, we determine the impact of the WLD diversion on plant production at newly formed islands within the delta and adjacent, mainland freshwater marshes. Plant aboveground productivity, sediment nutrient status and short term accretion were measured at three locations on a transect at each of three fresh water marsh sites along Hog Bayou and at six newly formed emerging island sites in the delta. Spring flooding has resulted in a greater increase in plant production and consequently, greater carbon sequestration potential in adjacent mainland marshes compared to the newly formed island sites, which contain less total carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in the sediment. While sediment diversions are predicted to create land, as seen in island formation in the WLD, the greatest benefit of river sediment diversions from a carbon credit perspective might be to the adjacent freshwater mainland marshes for several reasons. Both greater plant production and sediment C accumulation are two important factors for marsh stability, while perhaps even more critical, is the prevention of the loss of stored sediment C in the marsh profile. This stored C would be lost without the introduction of freshwater, nutrients and sediment through river sediment diversion efforts.

  3. Estimating Aboveground Forest Carbon Stock of Major Tropical Forest Land Uses Using Airborne Lidar and Field Measurement Data in Central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, R. B.; Watanabe, M.; Motohka, T.; Shiraishi, T.; shimada, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are providing environmental goods and services including carbon sequestration, energy regulation, water fluxes, wildlife habitats, fuel, and building materials. Despite the policy attention, the tropical forest reserve in Southeast Asian region is releasing vast amount of carbon to the atmosphere due to deforestation. Establishing quality forest statistics and documenting aboveground forest carbon stocks (AFCS) are emerging in the region. Airborne and satellite based large area monitoring methods are developed to compliment conventional plot based field measurement methods as they are costly, time consuming, and difficult to implement for large regions. But these methods still require adequate ground measurements for calibrating accurate AFCS model. Furthermore, tropical region comprised of varieties of natural and plantation forests capping higher variability of forest structures and biomass volumes. To address this issue and the needs for ground data, we propose the systematic collection of ground data integrated with airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne LiDAR enables accurate measures of vertical forest structure, including canopy height and volume demanding less ground measurement plots. Using an appropriate forest type based LiDAR sampling framework, structural properties of forest can be quantified and treated similar to ground measurement plots, producing locally relevant information to use independently with satellite data sources including synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this study, we examined LiDAR derived forest parameters with field measured data and developed general and specific AFCS models for tropical forests in central Sumatra. The general model is fitted for all types of natural and plantation forests while the specific model is fitted to the specific forest type. The study region consists of natural forests including peat swamp and dry moist forests, regrowth, and mangrove and plantation forests

  4. Estimating aboveground forest biomass carbon and fire consumption in the U.S. Utah High Plateaus using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program, Landsat, and LANDFIRE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Zhu, Z.; Vogelmann, J.; Li, Z.; Ohlen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increasing and greatly affecting global climate and socio-economic systems. Actively growing forests are generally considered to be a major carbon sink, but forest wildfires lead to large releases of biomass carbon into the atmosphere. Aboveground forest biomass carbon (AFBC), an important ecological indicator, and fire-induced carbon emissions at regional scales are highly relevant to forest sustainable management and climate change. It is challenging to accurately estimate the spatial distribution of AFBC across large areas because of the spatial heterogeneity of forest cover types and canopy structure. In this study, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, Landsat, and Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (LANDFIRE) data were integrated in a regression tree model for estimating AFBC at a 30-m resolution in the Utah High Plateaus. AFBC were calculated from 225 FIA field plots and used as the dependent variable in the model. Of these plots, 10% were held out for model evaluation with stratified random sampling, and the other 90% were used as training data to develop the regression tree model. Independent variable layers included Landsat imagery and the derived spectral indicators, digital elevation model (DEM) data and derivatives, biophysical gradient data, existing vegetation cover type and vegetation structure. The cross-validation correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.81 for the training model. Independent validation using withheld plot data was similar with r value of 0.82. This validated regression tree model was applied to map AFBC in the Utah High Plateaus and then combined with burn severity information to estimate loss of AFBC in the Longston fire of Zion National Park in 2001. The final dataset represented 24 forest cover types for a 4 million ha forested area. We estimated a total of 353 Tg AFBC with an average of 87 MgC/ha in the Utah High

  5. Carbon stocks in tropical forests decrease with liana density.

    PubMed

    Durán, Sandra M; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2013-08-23

    Tropical forests are experiencing structural changes that may reduce carbon storage potential. The recent increase in liana abundance and biomass is one such potential change. Lianas account for approximately 25 per cent of woody stems and may have a strong impact on tree dynamics because severe liana infestation reduces tree growth and increases tree mortality. Based on forest inventory data from 0.1 ha plots, we evaluated the association between above-ground carbon stocks and liana abundance in 145 tropical forests worldwide. Liana abundance was negatively associated with carbon stocks of large trees (greater than 10 cm diameter), while it was not related to small trees (10 cm diameter or less). Results suggest that liana abundance may have pervasive effects on carbon stocks in tropical forests, as large trees store about 90 per cent of total forest carbon. We stress the need to include liana abundance in carbon stocks estimates, as this can enhance the accuracy of predictions of global changes in tropical forests.

  6. Soil C:N stoichiometry controls carbon sink partitioning between above-ground tree productivity and soil organic matter in high fertility forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, M.; Alberti, G.; Vicca, S.; Inglima, I.; Belelli-Marchesini, L.; Genesio, L.; Miglietta, F.; Marjanovic, H.; Martinez, C.; Matteucci, G.; Peressotti, A.; Petrella, L.; Rodeghiero, M.

    2013-12-01

    The release of organic compounds from roots is a key process influencing soil carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems and is a process by which plants stimulate microbial activity and soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization thus releasing nitrogen (N) to sustain their gross and net primary production (GPP and NPP). Root inputs also contribute to soil organic matter (SOM) formation. In this study, we quantified the annual net root derived C input to soil (Net-Croot) across six high fertile forests using an in-growth core isotope technique. On the basis of Net-Croot, wood and coarse root biomass changes and eddy covariance data, we quantified net belowground C sequestration. This and GPP were inversely related to soil C:N, but not to climate or age. Because, at these high fertile sites, biomass growth did not change with soil C:N ratio, biomass growth-to-GPP ratio significantly increased with increasing soil C:N. This was true for both our six forest sites and for high fertile sites across a set of other 23 sites selected at global scale. We suggest that, at high fertile sites, the interaction between plant demand for nutrients, soil stoichiometry and microbial activity sustain higher ecosystem C-sink allocation to above ground tree biomass with increasing soil C:N ratio and that this clear and strong relationship can be used for modelling forest C sink partitioning between plant biomass and soil. When C:N is high, microbes have a low C use efficiency, respire more of the fresh C inputs by roots and prime SOM decomposition increasing N availability for tree uptake. Soil C sequestration would therefore decrease, whereas the extra N released during SOM decomposition can promote tree growth and ecosystem C sink allocation in aboveground biomass. Conversely, C is sequestered in soil when the low soil C:N promotes microbial C use efficiency and new SOM formation.

  7. The impact of integrating WorldView-2 sensor and environmental variables in estimating plantation forest species aboveground biomass and carbon stocks in uMgeni Catchment, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2016-09-01

    Reliable and accurate mapping and extraction of key forest indicators of ecosystem development and health, such as aboveground biomass (AGB) and aboveground carbon stocks (AGCS) is critical in understanding forests contribution to the local, regional and global carbon cycle. This information is critical in assessing forest contribution towards ecosystem functioning and services, as well as their conservation status. This work aimed at assessing the applicability of the high resolution 8-band WorldView-2 multispectral dataset together with environmental variables in quantifying AGB and aboveground carbon stocks for three forest plantation species i.e. Eucalyptus dunii (ED), Eucalyptus grandis (EG) and Pinus taeda (PT) in uMgeni Catchment, South Africa. Specifically, the strength of the Worldview-2 sensor in terms of its improved imaging agilities is examined as an independent dataset and in conjunction with selected environmental variables. The results have demonstrated that the integration of high resolution 8-band Worldview-2 multispectral data with environmental variables provide improved AGB and AGCS estimates, when compared to the use of spectral data as an independent dataset. The use of integrated datasets yielded a high R2 value of 0.88 and RMSEs of 10.05 t ha-1 and 5.03 t C ha-1 for E. dunii AGB and carbon stocks; whereas the use of spectral data as an independent dataset yielded slightly weaker results, producing an R2 value of 0.73 and an RMSE of 18.57 t ha-1 and 09.29 t C ha-1. Similarly, high accurate results (R2 value of 0.73 and RMSE values of 27.30 t ha-1 and 13.65 t C ha-1) were observed from the estimation of inter-species AGB and carbon stocks. Overall, the findings of this work have shown that the integration of new generation multispectral datasets with environmental variables provide a robust toolset required for the accurate and reliable retrieval of forest aboveground biomass and carbon stocks in densely forested terrestrial ecosystems.

  8. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid−liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  9. Markedly divergent estimates of Amazon forest carbon density from ground plots and satellites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchard, Edward T A; Feldpausch, Ted R; Brienen, Roel J W; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; Monteagudo, Abel; Baker, Timothy R; Lewis, Simon L; Lloyd, Jon; Quesada, Carlos A; Gloor, Manuel; ter Steege, Hans; Meir, Patrick; Alvarez, Esteban; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Arroyo, Luzmila; Aymard, Gerardo; Banki, Olaf; Bonal, Damien; Brown, Sandra; Brown, Foster I; Cerón, Carlos E; Chama Moscoso, Victor; Chave, Jerome; Comiskey, James A; Cornejo, Fernando; Corrales Medina, Massiel; Da Costa, Lola; Costa, Flavia R C; Di Fiore, Anthony; Domingues, Tomas F; Erwin, Terry L; Frederickson, Todd; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio Coronado, Euridice N; Killeen, Tim J; Laurance, William F; Levis, Carolina; Magnusson, William E; Marimon, Beatriz S; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur; Mendoza Polo, Irina; Mishra, Piyush; Nascimento, Marcelo T; Neill, David; Núñez Vargas, Mario P; Palacios, Walter A; Parada, Alexander; Pardo Molina, Guido; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pitman, Nigel; Peres, Carlos A; Poorter, Lourens; Prieto, Adriana; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Restrepo Correa, Zorayda; Roopsind, Anand; Roucoux, Katherine H; Rudas, Agustin; Salomão, Rafael P; Schietti, Juliana; Silveira, Marcos; de Souza, Priscila F; Steininger, Marc K; Stropp, Juliana; Terborgh, John; Thomas, Raquel; Toledo, Marisol; Torres-Lezama, Armando; van Andel, Tinde R; van der Heijden, Geertje M F; Vieira, Ima C G; Vieira, Simone; Vilanova-Torre, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Wang, Ophelia; Zartman, Charles E; Malhi, Yadvinder; Phillips, Oliver L

    2014-01-01

    Aim The accurate mapping of forest carbon stocks is essential for understanding the global carbon cycle, for assessing emissions from deforestation, and for rational land-use planning. Remote sensing (RS) is currently the key tool for this purpose, but RS does not estimate vegetation biomass directly, and thus may miss significant spatial variations in forest structure. We test the stated accuracy of pantropical carbon maps using a large independent field dataset. Location Tropical forests of the Amazon basin. The permanent archive of the field plot data can be accessed at: http://dx.doi.org/10.5521/FORESTPLOTS.NET/2014_1 Methods Two recent pantropical RS maps of vegetation carbon are compared to a unique ground-plot dataset, involving tree measurements in 413 large inventory plots located in nine countries. The RS maps were compared directly to field plots, and kriging of the field data was used to allow area-based comparisons. Results The two RS carbon maps fail to capture the main gradient in Amazon forest carbon detected using 413 ground plots, from the densely wooded tall forests of the north-east, to the light-wooded, shorter forests of the south-west. The differences between plots and RS maps far exceed the uncertainties given in these studies, with whole regions over- or under-estimated by > 25%, whereas regional uncertainties for the maps were reported to be < 5%. Main conclusions Pantropical biomass maps are widely used by governments and by projects aiming to reduce deforestation using carbon offsets, but may have significant regional biases. Carbon-mapping techniques must be revised to account for the known ecological variation in tree wood density and allometry to create maps suitable for carbon accounting. The use of single relationships between tree canopy height and above-ground biomass inevitably yields large, spatially correlated errors. This presents a significant challenge to both the forest conservation and remote sensing communities

  10. EQUATION OF STATE OF LOW-DENSITY CARBON,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Preliminary experimental attempts to determine the low-pressure, high-temperature equation of state of carbon are reported. Shock waves are used to...raise foamed carbon to very high energy densities, and analysis of the subsequent pressure release wave then yield P, V, E equation - of - state data in the desired region. (Author)

  11. Estimation of carbon storage and carbon density of forest vegetation in Ili River Valley, Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jing, Guo; renping, Zhang; ranghui, Wang; aimaiti, Yusupujiang; tuerdi, Asiyemu; dongya, Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Study on the forest carbon storage, carbon density and spatial distribution characteristic are helpful for improving the accuracy of carbon estimation and providing the practical basis for better policy making. In this research, the compiled data of 'Xinjiang Forest Resources Survey Results' in 2011 was used as a source data, by using the biomass-volume regression model and average biomass method, the carbon storage, carbon density and spatial distribution of forest resources in Ili River Valley region were analyzed. Results show that, the total biomass, carbon storage and average carbon density in Ili River valley were 69.647Tg, 34.823Tg and 41.45Mg/hm2 C respectively. From the aspect of spatial distribution, the northwest region of Ili River Valley has high carbon storage and the southeast region has low carbon storage. The southwest region has low carbon density and the northeast region has high carbon density. The value of forest Carbon storage from high to low was: Arbor > Shrub > Sparse forest > Odd tree > Economic forest > Scattered trees. Mature arbor forest plays an important role in maintaining the balance of carbon dioxide and oxygen in Ili River Valley region.

  12. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Rand, P.B.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  13. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Rand, Peter B.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  14. Density variations and their influence on carbon stocks: case-study on two Biosphere Reserves in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ridder, Maaike; De Haulleville, Thalès; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Beeckman, Hans

    2014-05-01

    It is commonly acknowledged that allometric equations for aboveground biomass and carbon stock estimates are improved significantly if density is included as a variable. However, not much attention is given to this variable in terms of exact, measured values and density profiles from pith to bark. Most published case-studies obtain density values from literature sources or databases, this way using large ranges of density values and possible causing significant errors in carbon stock estimates. The use of one single fixed value for density is also not recommended if carbon stock increments are estimated. Therefore, our objective is to measure and analyze a large number of tree species occurring in two Biosphere Reserves (Luki and Yangambi). Nevertheless, the diversity of tree species in these tropical forests is too high to perform this kind of detailed analysis on all tree species (> 200/ha). Therefore, we focus on the most frequently encountered tree species with high abundance (trees/ha) and dominance (basal area/ha) for this study. Increment cores were scanned with a helical X-ray protocol to obtain density profiles from pith to bark. This way, we aim at dividing the tree species with a distinct type of density profile into separate groups. If, e.g., slopes in density values from pith to bark remain stable over larger samples of one tree species, this slope could also be used to correct for errors in carbon (increment) estimates, caused by density values from simplified density measurements or density values from literature. In summary, this is most likely the first study in the Congo Basin that focuses on density patterns in order to check their influence on carbon stocks and differences in carbon stocking based on species composition (density profiles ~ temperament of tree species).

  15. Development of Low Density, Flexible Carbon Phenolic Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Covington, Alan; Doxtad, Evan; Beck, Robin; Gasch, Matt; Arnold, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the enabling TPS material for the Stardust mission where it was used as a single piece heatshield. PICA has the advantages of low density (approximately 0.27 grams per cubic centimeter) coupled with efficient ablative capability at high heat fluxes. Due to its brittle nature and low strain to failure recent efforts at NASA ARC have focused on alternative architectures to yield flexible and more conformal carbon phenolic materials with comparable densities to PICA. This presentation will discuss flexible alternatives to PICA and include preliminary mechanical and thermal properties as well as recent arc jet and LHMEL screening test results.

  16. Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Chave, Jérôme; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Búrquez, Alberto; Chidumayo, Emmanuel; Colgan, Matthew S; Delitti, Welington B C; Duque, Alvaro; Eid, Tron; Fearnside, Philip M; Goodman, Rosa C; Henry, Matieu; Martínez-Yrízar, Angelina; Mugasha, Wilson A; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Nelson, Bruce W; Ngomanda, Alfred; Nogueira, Euler M; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar; Pélissier, Raphaël; Ploton, Pierre; Ryan, Casey M; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Vieilledent, Ghislain

    2014-10-01

    Terrestrial carbon stock mapping is important for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation policies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric models to infer oven-dry aboveground biomass of trees from census data. The degree of uncertainty associated with previously published pantropical aboveground biomass allometries is large. We analyzed a global database of directly harvested trees at 58 sites, spanning a wide range of climatic conditions and vegetation types (4004 trees ≥ 5 cm trunk diameter). When trunk diameter, total tree height, and wood specific gravity were included in the aboveground biomass model as covariates, a single model was found to hold across tropical vegetation types, with no detectable effect of region or environmental factors. The mean percent bias and variance of this model was only slightly higher than that of locally fitted models. Wood specific gravity was an important predictor of aboveground biomass, especially when including a much broader range of vegetation types than previous studies. The generic tree diameter-height relationship depended linearly on a bioclimatic stress variable E, which compounds indices of temperature variability, precipitation variability, and drought intensity. For cases in which total tree height is unavailable for aboveground biomass estimation, a pantropical model incorporating wood density, trunk diameter, and the variable E outperformed previously published models without height. However, to minimize bias, the development of locally derived diameter-height relationships is advised whenever possible. Both new allometric models should contribute to improve the accuracy of biomass assessment protocols in tropical vegetation types, and to advancing our understanding of architectural and evolutionary constraints on woody plant development.

  17. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  18. Using Moran's I and GIS to study spatial pattern of forest litter carbon density in typical subtropical region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W. J.; Jiang, P. K.; Zhou, G. M.; Zhao, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial variation of forest litter carbon (FLC) density in the typical subtropical forests in southeast China was investigated using Moran's I, geostatistics and a geographical information system (GIS). A total of 839 forest litter samples were collected based on a 12 km (South-North) × 6 km (East-West) grid system in Zhejiang Province. Forest litter carbon density values were very variable, ranging from 10.2 kg ha-1 to 8841.3 kg ha-1, with an average of 1786.7 kg ha-1. The aboveground biomass had the strongest positive correlation with FLC density, followed by forest age and elevation. Global Moran's I revealed that FLC density had significant positive spatial autocorrelation. Clear spatial patterns were observed using Local Moran's I. A spherical model was chosen to fit the experimental semivariogram. The moderate "nugget-to-sill" (0.536) value revealed that both natural and anthropogenic factors played a key role in spatial heterogeneity of FLC density. High FLC density values were mainly distributed in northwestern and western part of Zhejiang province, which were related to adopting long-term policy of forest conservation in these areas. While Hang-Jia-Hu (HJH) Plain, Jin-Qu (JQ) basin and coastal areas had low FLC density due to low forest coverage and intensive management of economic forests. These spatial patterns in distribution map were in line with the spatial-cluster map described by local Moran's I. Therefore, Moran's I, combined with geostatistics and GIS could be used to study spatial patterns of environmental variables related to forest ecosystem.

  19. Density of states of helically symmetric boron carbon nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A C M; Bezerra, C G; Lawlor, J A; Ferreira, M S

    2014-01-08

    Motivated by the existence of helical wrapping patterns in composite nanotube systems, in this work we study the effects of the helical incorporation of carbon atoms in boron nitride nanotubes. We consider the substitutional carbon atoms distributed in stripes forming helical patterns along the nanotube axis. The density of states and energy band gap were calculated adopting Green function formalism by using the Rubio-Sancho technique in order to solve the matrix Dyson equation. We report the effects of the helical atomic distribution of carbon atoms on the behaviour of the density of states and the energy band gap. In particular, we show that the electronic energy band gap displays a non-monotonical dependence on the helical pattern, oscillating as a function of the helical angle θ.

  20. Ecosystem carbon density and allocation across a chronosequence of longleaf pine forests.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Lisa J; Stokes, Thomas A; Butnor, John R; Johnsen, Kurt H; Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A; Martin, Timothy A; Cropper, Wendell P; Anderson, Pete H; Ramirez, Michael R; Lewis, John C

    2017-01-01

    Forests can partially offset greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to climate change mitigation, mainly through increases in live biomass. We quantified carbon (C) density in 20 managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests ranging in age from 5 to 118 years located across the southeastern United States and estimated above- and belowground C trajectories. Ecosystem C stock (all pools including soil C) and aboveground live tree C increased nonlinearly with stand age and the modeled asymptotic maxima were 168 Mg C/ha and 80 Mg C/ha, respectively. Accumulation of ecosystem C with stand age was driven mainly by increases in aboveground live tree C, which ranged from <1 Mg C/ha to 74 Mg C/ha and comprised <1% to 39% of ecosystem C. Live root C (sum of below-stump C, ground penetrating radar measurement of lateral root C, and live fine root C) increased with stand age and represented 4-22% of ecosystem C. Soil C was related to site index, but not to stand age, and made up 39-92% of ecosystem C. Live understory C, forest floor C, downed dead wood C, and standing dead wood C were small fractions of ecosystem C in these frequently burned stands. Stand age and site index accounted for 76% of the variation in ecosystem C among stands. The mean root-to-shoot ratio calculated as the average across all stands (excluding the grass-stage stand) was 0.54 (standard deviation of 0.19) and higher than reports for other conifers. Long-term accumulation of live tree C, combined with the larger role of belowground accumulation of lateral root C than in other forest types, indicates a role of longleaf pine forests in providing disturbance-resistant C storage that can balance the more rapid C accumulation and C removal associated with more intensively managed forests. Although other managed southern pine systems sequester more C over the short-term, we suggest that longleaf pine forests can play a meaningful role in regional forest C management.

  1. A density gradient ultracentrifugation analysis of carbon nanotube soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Nancy S.

    Knowing the absolute amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbonaceous impurities in commercial CNT soot is important for supporting and enabling advances in countless nanotechnology applications involving CNTs. However, the physiochemical characterization of CNTs and carbonaceous impurities in heterogeneous soot samples is very challenging because both components comprise sp2- and sp3-hybridized carbons; in particular, CNTs with open ends and/or defect sides could possess sp3-hybridization. Herein, we present the use of density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to separate and quantify single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nontubular carbon (NTC) impurities in CoMoCAT(TM) soot, and the development of protocols to analyze the DGU fractions. While a complete separation of SWNTs and NTCs could not be obtained, important discoveries were made. Primarily, CoMoCAT(TM) soot contains spherical fullerenes and graphite even though no prior reports have indicated the presence of these species in this material.

  2. Phonon density of states of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    PubMed

    Rols; Benes; Anglaret; Sauvajol; Papanek; Fischer; Coddens; Schober; Dianoux

    2000-12-11

    The vibrational density of states of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) was obtained from inelastic neutron scattering data from 0 to 225 meV. The spectrum is similar to that of graphite above 40 meV, while intratube features are clearly observed at 22 and 36 meV. An unusual energy dependence below 10 meV is assigned to contributions from intertube modes in the 2D triangular lattice of SWNT bundles, and from intertube coupling to intratube excitations. Good agreement between experiment and a calculated density of states for the SWNT lattice is found over the entire energy range.

  3. Density functional theory study of oxygen migration in molten carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xueling; Haines, Kahla; Huang, Kevin; Qin, Changyong

    2016-02-01

    The process of oxygen migration in alkali molten carbonate salts has been examined using density functional theory method. All geometries were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level, while single point energy corrections were performed using MP4 and CCSD(T). At TS, a O-O-O linkage is formed and O-O bond forming and breaking is concerted. A cooperative "cogwheel" mechanism as described in the equation of CO42- + CO32- → CO32- ⋯O ⋯ CO32- → CO32- + CO42- is involved. The energy barrier is calculated to be 103.0, 136.3 and 127.9 kJ/mol through an intra-carbonate pathway in lithium, sodium and potassium carbonate, respectively. The reliability and accuracy of B3LYP/6-31G(d) were confirmed by CCSD(T). The calculated low values of activation energy indicate that the oxygen transfer in molten carbonate salts is fairly easy. In addition, it is found that lithium carbonate is not only a favorable molten carbonate salt for better cathode kinetics, but also it is widely used for reducing the melting point of Li/Na and Li/K eutectic MC mixtures. The current results imply that the process of oxygen reduction in MC modified cathodes is facilitated by the presence of MC, resulting in an enhancement of cell performance at low operating temperatures.

  4. Sorting carbon nanotubes by electronic structure using density differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael S; Green, Alexander A; Hulvat, James F; Stupp, Samuel I; Hersam, Mark C

    2006-10-01

    The heterogeneity of as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) precludes their widespread application in electronics, optics and sensing. We report on the sorting of carbon nanotubes by diameter, bandgap and electronic type using structure-discriminating surfactants to engineer subtle differences in their buoyant densities. Using the scalable technique of density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we have isolated narrow distributions of SWNTs in which >97% are within a 0.02-nm-diameter range. Furthermore, using competing mixtures of surfactants, we have produced bulk quantities of SWNTs of predominantly a single electronic type. These materials were used to fabricate thin-film electrical devices of networked SWNTs characterized by either metallic or semiconducting behaviour.

  5. Spatial Structure of Above-Ground Biomass Limits Accuracy of Carbon Mapping in Rainforest but Large Scale Forest Inventories Can Help to Overcome

    PubMed Central

    Guitet, Stéphane; Hérault, Bruno; Molto, Quentin; Brunaux, Olivier; Couteron, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Precise mapping of above-ground biomass (AGB) is a major challenge for the success of REDD+ processes in tropical rainforest. The usual mapping methods are based on two hypotheses: a large and long-ranged spatial autocorrelation and a strong environment influence at the regional scale. However, there are no studies of the spatial structure of AGB at the landscapes scale to support these assumptions. We studied spatial variation in AGB at various scales using two large forest inventories conducted in French Guiana. The dataset comprised 2507 plots (0.4 to 0.5 ha) of undisturbed rainforest distributed over the whole region. After checking the uncertainties of estimates obtained from these data, we used half of the dataset to develop explicit predictive models including spatial and environmental effects and tested the accuracy of the resulting maps according to their resolution using the rest of the data. Forest inventories provided accurate AGB estimates at the plot scale, for a mean of 325 Mg.ha-1. They revealed high local variability combined with a weak autocorrelation up to distances of no more than10 km. Environmental variables accounted for a minor part of spatial variation. Accuracy of the best model including spatial effects was 90 Mg.ha-1 at plot scale but coarse graining up to 2-km resolution allowed mapping AGB with accuracy lower than 50 Mg.ha-1. Whatever the resolution, no agreement was found with available pan-tropical reference maps at all resolutions. We concluded that the combined weak autocorrelation and weak environmental effect limit AGB maps accuracy in rainforest, and that a trade-off has to be found between spatial resolution and effective accuracy until adequate “wall-to-wall” remote sensing signals provide reliable AGB predictions. Waiting for this, using large forest inventories with low sampling rate (<0.5%) may be an efficient way to increase the global coverage of AGB maps with acceptable accuracy at kilometric resolution. PMID

  6. Spatial Structure of Above-Ground Biomass Limits Accuracy of Carbon Mapping in Rainforest but Large Scale Forest Inventories Can Help to Overcome.

    PubMed

    Guitet, Stéphane; Hérault, Bruno; Molto, Quentin; Brunaux, Olivier; Couteron, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Precise mapping of above-ground biomass (AGB) is a major challenge for the success of REDD+ processes in tropical rainforest. The usual mapping methods are based on two hypotheses: a large and long-ranged spatial autocorrelation and a strong environment influence at the regional scale. However, there are no studies of the spatial structure of AGB at the landscapes scale to support these assumptions. We studied spatial variation in AGB at various scales using two large forest inventories conducted in French Guiana. The dataset comprised 2507 plots (0.4 to 0.5 ha) of undisturbed rainforest distributed over the whole region. After checking the uncertainties of estimates obtained from these data, we used half of the dataset to develop explicit predictive models including spatial and environmental effects and tested the accuracy of the resulting maps according to their resolution using the rest of the data. Forest inventories provided accurate AGB estimates at the plot scale, for a mean of 325 Mg.ha-1. They revealed high local variability combined with a weak autocorrelation up to distances of no more than10 km. Environmental variables accounted for a minor part of spatial variation. Accuracy of the best model including spatial effects was 90 Mg.ha-1 at plot scale but coarse graining up to 2-km resolution allowed mapping AGB with accuracy lower than 50 Mg.ha-1. Whatever the resolution, no agreement was found with available pan-tropical reference maps at all resolutions. We concluded that the combined weak autocorrelation and weak environmental effect limit AGB maps accuracy in rainforest, and that a trade-off has to be found between spatial resolution and effective accuracy until adequate "wall-to-wall" remote sensing signals provide reliable AGB predictions. Waiting for this, using large forest inventories with low sampling rate (<0.5%) may be an efficient way to increase the global coverage of AGB maps with acceptable accuracy at kilometric resolution.

  7. Mapping Aboveground Biomass in the Amazon Basin: Exploring Sensors, Scales, and Strategies for Optimal Data Linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, W. S.; Baccini, A.

    2013-05-01

    Information on the distribution and density of carbon in tropical forests is critical to decision-making on a host of globally significant issues ranging from climate stabilization and biodiversity conservation to poverty reduction and human health. Encouraged by recent progress at both the international and jurisdictional levels on the design of incentive-based policy mechanisms to compensate tropical nations for maintaining their forests intact, governments throughout the tropics are moving with urgency to implement robust national and sub-national forest monitoring systems for operationally tracking and reporting on changes in forest cover and associated carbon stocks. Monitoring systems will be required to produce results that are accurate, consistent, complete, transparent, and comparable at sub-national to pantropical scales, and satellite-based remote sensing supported by field observations is widely-accepted as the most objective and cost-effective solution. The effectiveness of any system for large-area forest monitoring will necessarily depend on the capacity of current and near-future Earth observation satellites to provide information that meets the requirements of developing monitoring protocols. However, important questions remain regarding the role that spatially explicit maps of aboveground biomass and carbon can play in IPCC-compliant forest monitoring systems, with the majority of these questions stemming from doubts about the inherit sensitivity of satellite data to aboveground forest biomass, confusion about the relationship between accuracy and resolution, and a general lack of guidance on optimal strategies for linking field reference and remote sensing data sources. Here we demonstrate the ability of a state-of-the-art satellite radar sensor, the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR, and a venerable optical platform, Landsat 5, to support large-area mapping of aboveground tropical woody biomass across a 153,000-km2 region in the southwestern Amazon

  8. Using Moran's I and GIS to study the spatial pattern of forest litter carbon density in a subtropical region of southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W. J.; Jiang, P. K.; Zhou, G. M.; Zhao, K. L.

    2014-04-01

    Spatial pattern information of carbon density in forest ecosystem including forest litter carbon (FLC) plays an important role in evaluating carbon sequestration potentials. The spatial variation of FLC density in the typical subtropical forests in southeastern China was investigated using Moran's I, geostatistics and a geographical information system (GIS). A total of 839 forest litter samples were collected based on a 12 km (south-north) × 6 km (east-west) grid system in Zhejiang province. Forest litter carbon density values were very variable, ranging from 10.2 kg ha-1 to 8841.3 kg ha-1, with an average of 1786.7 kg ha-1. The aboveground biomass had the strongest positive correlation with FLC density, followed by forest age and elevation. Global Moran's I revealed that FLC density had significant positive spatial autocorrelation. Clear spatial patterns were observed using local Moran's I. A spherical model was chosen to fit the experimental semivariogram. The moderate "nugget-to-sill" (0.536) value revealed that both natural and anthropogenic factors played a key role in spatial heterogeneity of FLC density. High FLC density values were mainly distributed in northwestern and western part of Zhejiang province, which were related to adopting long-term policy of forest conservation in these areas, while Hang-Jia-Hu (HJH) Plain, Jin-Qu (JQ) Basin and coastal areas had low FLC density due to low forest coverage and intensive management of economic forests. These spatial patterns were in line with the spatial-cluster map described by local Moran's I. Therefore, Moran's I, combined with geostatistics and GIS, could be used to study spatial patterns of environmental variables related to forest ecosystem.

  9. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  10. WEAR BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE/HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian B.; Novotny, John E.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube/High Density Polyethylene (CNT/HDPE) composites were manufactured and tested to determine their wear behavior. The nanocomposites were made from untreated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and HDPE pellets. Thin films of the precursor materials were created with varying weight percentages of nanotubes (1%, 3%, and 5%), through a process of mixing and extruding. The precursor composites were then molded and machined to create test specimens for mechanical and wear tests. These included small punch testing to compare stiffness, maximum load and work-to-failure and block-on-ring testing to determine wear behavior. Each of the tests was conducted for the different weight percentages of composite as well as pure HDPE as the baseline. The measured mechanical properties and wear resistance of the composite materials increased with increasing nanotube content in the range studied. PMID:20161101

  11. Low density microcellular carbon or catalytically impregnated carbon foams and process for their prepartion

    DOEpatents

    Hopper, Robert W.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    Machinable and structurally stable, low density microcellular carbon, and catalytically impregnated carbon, foams, and process for their preparation, are provided. Pulverized sodium chloride is classified to improve particle size uniformity, and the classified particles may be further mixed with a catalyst material. The particles are cold pressed into a compact having internal pores, and then sintered. The sintered compact is immersed and then submerged in a phenolic polymer solution to uniformly fill the pores of the compact with phenolic polymer. The compact is then heated to pyrolyze the phenolic polymer into carbon in the form of a foam. Then the sodium chloride of the compact is leached away with water, and the remaining product is freeze dried to provide the carbon, or catalytically impregnated carbon, foam.

  12. Low density microcellular carbon or catalytically impregnated carbon forms and process for their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Hopper, Robert W.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Machinable and structurally stable, low density microcellular carbon, and catalytically impregnated carbon, foams, and process for their preparation, are provided. Pulverized sodium chloride is classified to improve particle size uniformity, and the classified particles may be further mixed with a catalyst material. The particles are cold pressed into a compact having internal pores, and then sintered. The sintered compact is immersed and then submerged in a phenolic polymer solution to uniformly fill the pores of the compact with phenolic polymer. The compact is then heated to pyrolyze the phenolic polymer into carbon in the form of a foam. Then the sodium chloride of the compact is leached away with water, and the remaining product is freeze dried to provide the carbon, or catalytically impregnated carbon, foam.

  13. Low density microcellular carbon or catalytically impregnated carbon foams and process for their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, R.W.; Pekala, R.W.

    1987-04-30

    Machinable and structurally stable, low density microcellular carbon, and catalytically impregnated carbon, foams, and process for their preparation, are provided. Pulverized sodium chloride is classified to improve particle size uniformity, and the classified particles may be further mixed with a catalyst material. The particles are cold pressed into a compact having internal pores, and then sintered. The sintered compact is immersed and then submerged in a phenolic polymer solution to uniformly fill the pores of the compact with phenolic polymer. The compact is then heated to pyrolyze the phenolic polymer into carbon in the form of a foam. Then the sodium chloride of the compact is leached away with water, and the remaining product is freeze dried to provide the carbon, or catalytically impregnated carbon, foam.

  14. Role of surfactants in carbon nanotubes density gradient separation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Elton J F; dos Santos, Maria Cristina

    2010-02-23

    Several strategies aimed at sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) by diameter and/or electronic structure have been developed in recent years. A nondestructive sorting method was recently proposed in which nanotube bundles are dispersed in water-surfactant solutions and submitted to ultracentrifugation in a density gradient. By this method, SWNTs of different diameters are distributed according to their densities along the centrifuge tube. A mixture of two anionic amphiphiles, namely sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium cholate (SC), presented the best performance in discriminating nanotubes by diameter. We present molecular dynamics studies of the water-surfactant-SWNT system. The simulations revealed one aspect of the discriminating power of surfactants: they can actually be attracted toward the interior of the nanotube cage. The binding energies of SDS and SC on the outer nanotube surface are very similar and depend weakly on diameter. The binding inside the tubes, on the contrary, is strongly diameter dependent: SDS fits best inside tubes with diameters ranging from 8 to 9 A, while SC is best accommodated in larger tubes, with diameters in the range 10.5-12 A. The dynamics at room temperature showed that, as the amphiphile moves to the hollow cage, water molecules are dragged together, thereby promoting the nanotube filling. The resulting densities of filled SWNT are in agreement with measured densities.

  15. Development of Low Density Flexible Carbon Phenolic Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Agrawal, Parul; Doxtad, Evan; Gasch, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the enabling TPS material for the Stardust mission where it was used as a single piece heatshield. PICA has the advantages of low density (0.27g/cm3) coupled with efficient ablative capability at high heat fluxes. Under the Orion program, PICA was also shown to be capable of both ISS and lunar return missions however some unresolved issues remain for its application in a tiled configuration for the Orion-specific design. In particular, the problem of developing an appropriate gap filler resulted in the Orion program selecting AVCOAT as the primary heatshield material over PICA. We are currently looking at alternative architectures to yield flexible and more conformal carbon phenolic materials with comparable densities to PICA that will address some of the design issues faced in the application of a tiled PICA heat shield. These new materials are viable TPS candidates for upcoming NASA missions and as material candidates for private sector Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS). This presentation will discuss flexible alternatives to PICA and include preliminary mechanical and thermal properties as well as arc jet and LHMEL screening test results.

  16. Carbon density and distribution of six Chinese temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, QuanZhi; Wang, ChuanKuan

    2010-07-01

    Quantifying forest carbon (C) storage and distribution is important for forest C cycling studies and terrestrial ecosystem modeling. Forest inventory and allometric approaches were used to measure C density and allocation in six representative temperate forests of similar stand age (42-59 years old) and growing under the same climate in northeastern China. The forests were an aspen-birch forest, a hardwood forest, a Korean pine plantation, a Dahurian larch plantation, a mixed deciduous forest, and a Mongolian oak forest. There were no significant differences in the C densities of ecosystem components (except for detritus) although the six forests had varying vegetation compositions and site conditions. However, the differences were significant when the C pools were normalized against stand basal area. The total ecosystem C density varied from 186.9 tC hm(-2) to 349.2 tC hm(-2) across the forests. The C densities of vegetation, detritus, and soil ranged from 86.3-122.7 tC hm(-2), 6.5-10.5 tC hm(-2), and 93.7-220.1 tC hm(-2), respectively, which accounted for 39.7% +/- 7.1% (mean +/- SD), 3.3% +/- 1.1%, and 57.0% +/- 7.9% of the total C densities, respectively. The overstory C pool accounted for > 99% of the total vegetation C pool. The foliage biomass, small root (diameter < 5mm) biomass, root-shoot ratio, and small root to foliage biomass ratio varied from 2.08-4.72 tC hm(-2), 0.95-3.24 tC hm(-2), 22.0%-28.3%, and 34.5%-122.2%, respectively. The Korean pine plantation had the lowest foliage production efficiency (total biomass/foliage biomass: 22.6 g g(-1)) among the six forests, while the Dahurian larch plantation had the highest small root production efficiency (total biomass/small root biomass: 124.7 g g(-1)). The small root C density decreased with soil depth for all forests except for the Mongolian oak forest, in which the small roots tended to be vertically distributed downwards. The C density of coarse woody debris was significantly less in the two

  17. Density functional theory study of hexagonal carbon phases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibin; Gao, Faming; Li, Na; Qu, Nianrui; Gou, Huiyang; Hao, Xianfeng

    2009-06-10

    It is reported frequently that the new carbon phases may be harder than diamond (Wang et al 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 101 13699 and Mao et al 2003 Science 302 425). However, the mechanism is still unclear. In this paper we systematically investigate the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of the diamond polytypes using first-principles density functional calculations. The results show that the bulk modulus and shear modulus for the hexagonal form of diamond approach those of diamond, suggesting they might be hard and low compressibility materials. According to the semiempirical method for hardness based on the Mulliken overlap population, the hardnesses for hexagonal forms have been evaluated and compared to diamond. The results indicate that these phases are superhard. More importantly, the bonds in some specific directions of the hexagonal phases are harder than those in diamond, which may lead to the noticeable indentation marks on the diamond anvils observed in experiments.

  18. Tracking changes of forest carbon density following mega-fires: comparison studies in the Yellowstone National Park and Boreal Forests of Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feng; Huang, Chengquan; Huang, Chao; He, Hong; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires and post-fire management directly change C stored in biomass and soil pools, and can have indirect impacts on long-term C balance. Two mega fires occurred in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and the boreal forests of Northeast China in 1988 and 1987, respectively, making them ideal sites to examine and compare the effects of management and disturbances on regional carbon dynamics. In this study, we quantified effects of the 1988 Yellowstone fires on YNP carbon storages and fluxes. And then we tracked and modeled post-1988 forest carbon stocks change in YNP, and compared with simulation results of carbon stock changes in post-1987 fire boreal forests of Northeast China. Preliminary results show that in YNP, the mega fires in 1988 were responsible for an immediate loss of 900 g/m2 ecosystem average C density and it would take about a decade before the YNP ecosystem recover to the pre-fire average C condition. In boreal forests of Northeast China, fire reduced aboveground and belowground carbon by 230±60 g/m2 and 460±340 g/m2, respectively.

  19. [Effects of shading on the aboveground biomass and stiochiometry characteristics of Medicago sativa].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-Liang; Yang, Wan-Qin; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Gao, Shun

    2014-11-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for inter-planting alfalfa in abandoned farmland, a shading experiment was conducted to simulate the effects of different light intensities on the aboveground biomass, the contents of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, and the stoichiometric characteristics of alfalfa under the plantation. The results showed that the aboveground biomass of alfalfa correlated significantly with the light intensity, and shading treatment reduced the aboveground biomass of alfalfa significantly. The aboveground alfalfa tissues under the 62% shading treatment had the highest contents of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which was 373.73, 34.38 and 5.47 g · kg(-1), respectively, and significantly higher than those of the control. However, shading treatments had no significant effect on the potassium content of aboveground part. The C/N ratio in aboveground tissues under the 72% shading treatment was significantly higher than that of the control, but no significant differences among other treatments were found. The ratios of N/P and C/P in aboveground tissues showed a tendency that decreased firstly and then increased with the increase of light intensity.

  20. ABOVEGROUND NITROGEN USE EFFICIENCY AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Long-term nitrogen (N) fertilization studies suggest shifting dominance from Spartina alterniflora to Distichlis spicata, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. A limitation on our ability to predict changes is a poor understanding of resource use under ambient conditions. The present project compares growth rates and N use dynamics between two emerging salt marsh dominants, S. alterniflora and D. spicata. We hypothesize that under ambient Narragansett Bay nutrient conditions, S. alterniflora is a more efficient user of N than D. spicata. Spartina alterniflora and D. spicata cores were collected from the field and raised in a greenhouse. Heights of all stems were measured weekly to determine growth rates. To understand N movement, a pulse of 15N was added and three cores were sacrificed each subsequent week. Live aboveground biomass was separated into stems and leaves, with leaves categorized based on their position from the top of the stem. Samples were analyzed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry to trace N accumulation in different pools over time. One week after the 15N pulse, most of the aboveground 15N was bound in the stems and the youngest leaves. Efficient nutrient transfer in photosynthetic material likely provides a stronger competitive advantage for taller plants, which are able to compete better for light. Growth rates of S. alterniflora proved to be more variable over time than that of D. spicata. A better understanding of N dynamics under am

  1. Landscape-scale GPP and carbon density inform patterns and impacts of an invasive tree across wet forests of Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Jomar M; Asner, Gregory P; Hughes, R Flint; Johnson, M Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Plant invasion typically occurs within a landscape-scale framework of abiotic and biotic conditions, often resulting in emergent feedbacks among environment, ecosystem functions, and the dominance of invasive species. Understanding the mechanisms underlying successful invasions is an important component of conservation and management efforts, but this has been poorly investigated in a spatially explicit manner. Knowing where and why invasion patterns change throughout the landscape enables managers to use context-specific controls on the spread of invasive species. Using high-resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy, we studied plant performance in growth within and across landscapes to examine the dominance and spatial distribution of an invasive tree, Psidium cattleianum (strawberry guava), in heterogeneous environmental conditions of a submontane Hawaiian tropical forest. We assessed invader performance using the GPP ratio index, which is the relative difference in remotely sensed estimates of gross primary productivity between canopies of guava and canopies of the invaded plant community. In addition, we used airborne LiDAR data to evaluate the impacts of guava invasion on the forest aboveground carbon density in different environments. Structural equation modeling revealed that substrate type and elevation above sea level interact and amplify landscape-scale differences in productivity between the invasive species and the host plant community (GPP ratio); differences that ultimately control levels of dominance of guava. We found shifts in patterns of forest carbon storage based on both gradual increase of invader dominance and changes in environmental conditions. Overall, our results demonstrate that the remotely sensed index defined as the GPP ratio provided an innovative spatially explicit approach to track and predict the success of invasive plants based in their canopy productivity, particularly within a landscape-scale framework of varying environmental

  2. Low/Medium Density Biomass, Coastal and Ocean Carbon: A Carbon Cycle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Gervin, Jan; Kirchman, Frank; Middleton, Elizabeth; Knox, Robert; Gregg, Watson; Mannino, Antonio; McClain, Charles; Herman, Jay; Hall, Forrest

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Global Carbon Cycle research effort, an agency-wide planning initiative was organized between October 2000 and June 2001 by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the behest of the Associate Administrator for Earth Science. The goal was to define future research and technology development activities needed for implementing a cohesive scientific observation plan. A timeline for development of missions necessary to acquire the selected new measurements was laid out, and included missions for low - medium density terrestrial biomass / coastal ocean / and ocean carbon. This paper will begin with the scientific justification and measurement requirements for these specific activities, explore the options for having separate or combined missions, and follow-up with an implementation study centered on a hyperspectral imager at geosynchronous altitudes.

  3. Influence of Tree Species Composition and Community Structure on Carbon Density in a Subtropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanqiu; Su, Zhiyao; Li, Wenbin; Li, Jingpeng; Ke, Xiandong

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the impact of species composition and stand structure on the spatial variation of forest carbon density using data collected from a 4-ha plot in a subtropical forest in southern China. We found that 1) forest biomass carbon density significantly differed among communities, reflecting a significant effect of community structure and species composition on carbon accumulation; 2) soil organic carbon density increased whereas stand biomass carbon density decreased across communities, indicating that different mechanisms might account for the accumulation of stand biomass carbon and soil organic carbon in the subtropical forest; and 3) a small number of tree individuals of the medium- and large-diameter class contributed predominantly to biomass carbon accumulation in the community, whereas a large number of seedlings and saplings were responsible for a small proportion of the total forest carbon stock. These findings demonstrate that both biomass carbon and soil carbon density in the subtropical forest are sensitive to species composition and community structure, and that heterogeneity in species composition and stand structure should be taken into account to ensure accurate forest carbon accounting. PMID:26317523

  4. Assembling carbon quantum dots to a layered carbon for high-density supercapacitor electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanxiong; Wu, Shuilin; Hui, Liwei; Zhao, Yuan; Ye, Jianglin; Tan, Ziqi; Zeng, Wencong; Tao, Zhuchen; Yang, Lihua; Zhu, Yanwu

    2016-01-01

    It is found that carbon quantum dots (CQDs) self-assemble to a layer structure at ice crystals-water interface with freeze- drying. Such layers interconnect with each other, forming a free-standing CQD assembly, which has an interlayer distance of about 0.366 nm, due to the existence of curved carbon rings other than hexagons in the assembly. CQDs are fabricated by rupturing C60 by KOH activation with a production yield of ~15 wt.%. The CQDs obtained have an average height of 1.14 nm and an average lateral size of 7.48 nm, and are highly soluble in water. By packaging annealed CQD assembly to high density (1.23 g cm−3) electrodes in supercapacitors, a high volumetric capacitance of 157.4 F cm−3 and a high areal capacitance of 0.66 F cm−2 (normalized to the loading area of electrodes) are demonstrated in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte with a good rate capability. PMID:26754463

  5. Fundamental properties of high-quality carbon nanofoam: from low to high density

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Natalie; Taylor Mitchell, Shelby; Neumann, Christof; Bowers, Amanda; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Highly uniform samples of carbon nanofoam from hydrothermal sucrose carbonization were studied by helium ion microscopy (HIM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Foams with different densities were produced by changing the process temperature in the autoclave reactor. This work illustrates how the geometrical structure, electron core levels, and the vibrational signatures change when the density of the foams is varied. We find that the low-density foams have very uniform structure consisting of micropearls with ≈2–3 μm average diameter. Higher density foams contain larger-sized micropearls (≈6–9 μm diameter) which often coalesced to form nonspherical μm-sized units. Both, low- and high-density foams are comprised of predominantly sp2-type carbon. The higher density foams, however, show an advanced graphitization degree and a stronger sp3-type electronic contribution, related to the inclusion of sp3 connections in their surface network. PMID:28144554

  6. Fundamental properties of high-quality carbon nanofoam: from low to high density.

    PubMed

    Frese, Natalie; Taylor Mitchell, Shelby; Neumann, Christof; Bowers, Amanda; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Sattler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Highly uniform samples of carbon nanofoam from hydrothermal sucrose carbonization were studied by helium ion microscopy (HIM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Foams with different densities were produced by changing the process temperature in the autoclave reactor. This work illustrates how the geometrical structure, electron core levels, and the vibrational signatures change when the density of the foams is varied. We find that the low-density foams have very uniform structure consisting of micropearls with ≈2-3 μm average diameter. Higher density foams contain larger-sized micropearls (≈6-9 μm diameter) which often coalesced to form nonspherical μm-sized units. Both, low- and high-density foams are comprised of predominantly sp(2)-type carbon. The higher density foams, however, show an advanced graphitization degree and a stronger sp(3)-type electronic contribution, related to the inclusion of sp(3) connections in their surface network.

  7. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr, Joe H.

    2016-07-05

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  8. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-04-01

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Spaceframes for Low-Density Aerospace Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-26

    Functionalization Methods Chemically sculpting carbon nanotubes into nano-objects of the type needed for synthesizing CNT spaceframe materials require two...distinct functionalization chemistries that produce distinct functional structures at the ends of the nanotubes and on the sidewalls of the nanotubes ...which are applied to the nanotubes . In this project, oxidative etching techniques were explored for end selective functionalization . Selective

  10. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  11. Carbon storage potential in size-density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths.

    PubMed

    Breulmann, Marc; Boettger, Tatjana; Buscot, François; Gruendling, Ralf; Schulz, Elke

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0-10, 10-20, 20-30 30-50 50-80 and 80+cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm(-3) (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, <1 μm; and CF2, 1-2 μm) and two light fractions (LF1, <1.8 g cm(-3); and LF2, 1.8-2.0 g cm(-3)) were separated. The stability of these fractions was characterised by their carbon hot water extractability (CHWE) and stable carbon isotope composition. In the semi-natural grasslands studied, most OC was stored in the top 30 cm, where turnover is rapid. Effects of low productivity grasslands became only significantly apparent when fractional OC contributions of total SOM was considered (CF1 and LF1). In deeper soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ(13)C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ(13)C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Ice Structure and Density in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, Thomas; Murray, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    CO2 ice has been grown experimentally via deposition in order to mimic ice formation in Martian mesospheric CO2 clouds. This is achieved through the use of a low temperature and low pressure controlled stage mounted within an X-ray diffractomer (XRD). XRD patterns of CO2 deposited at temperatures of 80 - 130 K and pressures below 1 mbar were analysed using a Rietveld refinement method and fitted to a crystalline cubic structure (space group Pa3). This crystal structure is consistent with XRD patterns also taken of dry ice. CO2 ice densities were then determined from the refined lattice parameters across the 80 - 130 K range and extrapolated using literature values resulting in a temperature dependent density parameter valid over 80 - 195 K. This temperature dependent parameter for CO2 ice density was applied to nucleation, sedimentation and growth rates of CO2 ice particles under conditions relevant to the Martian mesosphere. The results were then compared to commonly used literature values, illustrating the need for the use of temperature dependent CO2 ice densities.

  13. Method and device for secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon

    DOEpatents

    Wertsching, Alan Kevin; Trantor, Troy Joseph; Ebner, Matthias Anthony; Norby, Brad Curtis

    2016-04-05

    A method and device for producing secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon. A substrate comprising carbon is provided. A precursor is intercalated between carbon in the substrate. The precursor intercalated in the substrate is irradiated until at least a portion of the precursor, preferably a majority of the precursor, is transmutated into tritium and bonds with carbon of the substrate forming bonded tritium. The resulting bonded tritium, tritium bonded with carbon, produces electrons via beta decay. The substrate is preferably a substrate from the list of substrates consisting of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite, carbon fibers, carbon nanotunes, buckministerfullerenes, and combinations thereof. The precursor is preferably boron-10, more preferably lithium-6. Preferably, thermal neutrons are used to irradiate the precursor. The resulting bonded tritium is preferably used to generate electricity either directly or indirectly.

  14. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-02-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  15. Density and viscosity of some partially carbonated aqueous alkanolamine solutions and their blends

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.; Browning, G.J.

    1998-05-01

    Very little information is available concerning the effect of acid gas loading on the physical properties of amine-treating solutions flowing through the absorption and regeneration columns used in gas processing. The densities and viscosities of partially carbonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured at 298 K. With increasing carbon dioxide loadings, significant increases in both density and viscosity were observed. These results were combined with literature data to produce correlations for alkanolamine solution density and viscosity as a function of amine concentration, carbon dioxide loading, and temperature. The resulting single-amine correlations were used to predict the densities and viscosities of DEA + MDEA and MEA + MDEA blends. Predictions are compared with data measured for these blends.

  16. Observation of the urbach tail in the effective density of States in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jones, David A; Lee, Ji Ung

    2011-10-12

    While a number of studies have reported evidence of localized states in carbon nanotube devices, the density distribution of these states has not been reported until now. By measuring trap emission current in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, we observe a prominent exponential tail in the density of states near the band edge. Since continuous distributions of localized states are typically associated with highly disordered systems, this observation was quite unexpected in carbon nanotubes, which are nearly ideal crystals. This continuum of localized states may explain a variety of phenomena in carbon nanotube systems, including the nearly universal lack of n-type conduction in strongly gated field-effect transistors. While our focus is on carbon nanotubes, this phenomenon may be ubiquitous to low-dimensional semiconductors in nonvacated environments.

  17. Controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes via growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Kaatz, F. H.

    2004-06-01

    We present two complementary methods for controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly as a function of growth conditions from 1011to107CNTs/cm2. Several potential applications require significant spacing between individual CNTs. The first method shows that the site density varies with the heat of formation of the hydrocarbon gas used during CNT growth by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The second method demonstrates that the site density decreases with increasing residual stress of the metal catalyst/diffusion barrier layers. These methods are combined for wide-range control of CNT site density.

  18. INFLUENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON INSECT DENSITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    DELUCIA, E.; DERMODY, O.; O'NEILL, B.; ALDEA, M.; HAMILTON, J.; ZANGERL, A.; ROGER, A.; BERENBAUM, M.

    2005-01-05

    The combustion of fossil fuels is profoundly altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from approximately 280 to 370 {micro}l l{sup -1} in 2004, and it is expected to exceed 550 {micro}l l{sup -1} by 2050. Tropospheric ozone has risen even more rapidly than CO{sub 2} and average summer concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere are expected to continue to increase by 0.5-2.5% per year over the next 30 years. Although elevated CO{sub 2} stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, ozone (O{sub 3}) is deleterious. In addition to directly affecting the physiology and productivity of crops, increased concentrations of tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are predicted to lower the nutritional quality of leaves, which has the potential to increase herbivory as insects eat more to meet their nutritional demands. We tested the hypothesis that changes in tropospheric chemistry affect the relationship between plants and insect herbivores by changing leaf quality. The susceptibility to herbivory of soybean grown in elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} was examined using free air gas concentration enrichment (SoyFACE). FACE technology has the advantage that plants are cultivated under realistic field conditions with no unwanted alteration of microclimate or artificial constraints on the insect community.

  19. A study on estimation of aboveground wet biomass based on the microwave vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation biomass is an important parameter in the carbon cycle study. In this paper, a new technique to estimate aboveground vegetation wet biomass based on the Microwave Vegetation Indices (MVIs), which are computed through the observed brightness temperature of AMSR-E/Aqua under two adjacent fre...

  20. Aboveground total and green biomass of dryland shrub derived from terrestrial laser scanning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution of many dryland vegetation species are expected to shift based on predictions of future increases in global temperatures. Quantifying aboveground biomass in dryland systems is important for assessing global carbon storage and monitoring the presence and distribution of these rapidl...

  1. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  2. Structure and hydrogen adsorption properties in low density nanoporous carbons from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Morris, James R

    2012-01-01

    We systematically model the hydrogen adsorption in nanoporous carbons over a wide range of carbon bulk densities (0.6 - 2.4 g/cm3) by using tight binding molecular dynamics simulations for the carbon structures and thermodynamics calculations of the hydrogen adsorption. The resulting structures are in good agreement with the experimental data of ultra-microporous carbon (UMC), a wood-based activated carbon, as indicated by comparisons of the microstructure at atomic level, pair distribution function, and pore size distribution. The hydrogen adsorption calculations in carbon structures demonstrate both a promising hydrogen storage capacity (excess uptake of 1.33 wt% at 298K and 5 MPa, for carbon structures at the lower range of densities) and a reasonable heat of adsorption (12-22 kJ/mol). This work demonstrates that increasing the heat of adsorption does not necessarily increase the hydrogen uptake. In fact, the available adsorption volume is as important as the isosteric heat of adsorption for hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbons.

  3. Aboveground biomass variability across intact and degraded forests in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Marcos; Keller, Michael; dos-Santos, Maiza N.; Leitold, Veronika; Pinagé, Ekena R.; Baccini, Alessandro; Saatchi, Sassan; Nogueira, Euler M.; Batistella, Mateus; Morton, Douglas C.

    2016-11-01

    Deforestation rates have declined in the Brazilian Amazon since 2005, yet degradation from logging, fire, and fragmentation has continued in frontier forests. In this study we quantified the aboveground carbon density (ACD) in intact and degraded forests using the largest data set of integrated forest inventory plots (n = 359) and airborne lidar data (18,000 ha) assembled to date for the Brazilian Amazon. We developed statistical models relating inventory ACD estimates to lidar metrics that explained 70% of the variance across forest types. Airborne lidar-ACD estimates for intact forests ranged between 5.0 ± 2.5 and 31.9 ± 10.8 kg C m-2. Degradation carbon losses were large and persistent. Sites that burned multiple times within a decade lost up to 15.0 ± 0.7 kg C m-2 (94%) of ACD. Forests that burned nearly 15 years ago had between 4.1 ± 0.5 and 6.8 ± 0.3 kg C m-2 (22-40%) less ACD than intact forests. Even for low-impact logging disturbances, ACD was between 0.7 ± 0.3 and 4.4 ± 0.4 kg C m-2 (4-21%) lower than unlogged forests. Comparing biomass estimates from airborne lidar to existing biomass maps, we found that regional and pantropical products consistently overestimated ACD in degraded forests, underestimated ACD in intact forests, and showed little sensitivity to fires and logging. Fine-scale heterogeneity in ACD across intact and degraded forests highlights the benefits of airborne lidar for carbon mapping. Differences between airborne lidar and regional biomass maps underscore the need to improve and update biomass estimates for dynamic land use frontiers, to better characterize deforestation and degradation carbon emissions for regional carbon budgets and Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+).

  4. Mechanism of density decrease in heat-treated glass-like carbon (GC)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, B.N.; Bragg, R.H.; Rao, A.S.

    1981-03-01

    Measurements were made of the density decrease (pycnometric), mass loss, hydrogen loss, dimensional increase and thermal expansion (dilatomeric) of glassy carbon heated in the range 1000/sup 0/C to 2800/sup 0/C or stressed (hydrostatic pressures) to 250,000 psi. The irreversibility density decrease is attributed to thermal expansion mismatch (..cap alpha../sub c/ >> ..cap alpha../sub a/) and microscopic fracture.

  5. Reference electrodes for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ansuini, F.J.; Dimond, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses several factors affecting the reference potential established by copper/copper sulfate and silver/silver chloride reference electrodes. Guidelines for using references in aboveground storage tank applications are presented and some causes of misleading readings are discussed.

  6. Aboveground storage tanks -- Better safe than sorry

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the 1988 promulgation of the comprehensive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for underground storage of petroleum and hazardous substances, many existing underground storage tank (UST) owners have been considering making the move to aboveground storage. While on the surface, this may appear to be the cure-all to avoiding the underground leakage dilemma, there are many other new and different issues to consider with aboveground storage. The greatest misconception is that by storing materials above ground, there is no risk of subsurface environmental problems. It should be noted that with aboveground storage tank (AGST) systems, there is still considerable risk of environmental contamination, either by the failure of onground tank bottoms or the spillage of product onto the ground surface where it subsequently finds its way to the ground water. In addition, there are added safety concerns that must be addressed. So what are the other specific areas of concern besides environmental to be addressed when making the decision between underground and aboveground tanks? The primary issues that will be addressed in this presentation are: safety; product losses; cost comparison of UST vs AGSTs; space availability/accessibility; precipitation handling; aesthetics and security; and existing and pending regulations.

  7. Density and localized states' impact on amorphous carbon electron transport mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo-Dávila, S.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Velasco-Medina, J.; Avila, A.

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses the electron transport mechanisms that we obtained as a function of the density of amorphous carbon (a-C) ultra-thin films. We calculated the density of states (total and projected), degree of electronic states' localization, and transmission function using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. We generated 25 sample a-C structures using ab-initio molecular dynamics within the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We identified three transport regimes as a function of the density, varying from semimetallic in low-density samples ( ≤2.4 g/cm3) to thermally activated in high-density ( ≥2.9 g/cm3) tetrahedral a-C. The middle-range densities (2.4 g/cm3 ≤ρ≤ 2.9 g/cm3) are characterized by resonant tunneling and hopping transport. Our findings offer a different perspective from the tight-binding model proposed by Katkov and Bhattacharyya [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 183712 (2013)], and agree with experimental observations in low-dimensional carbon systems [see S. Bhattacharyya, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 21 (2007)]. Identifying transport regimes is crucial to the process of understanding and applying a-C thin film in electronic devices and electrode coating in biosensors.

  8. Neutron irradiation studies on low density pan fiber based carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Acharya, R.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2010-09-01

    Carbon has been extensively used in nuclear reactors and there has been growing interest to develop carbon-based materials for high-temperature nuclear and fusion reactors. Carbon-carbon composite materials as against conventional graphite material are now being looked into as the promising materials for the high temperature reactor due their ability to have high thermal conductivity and high thermal resistance. Research on the development of such materials and their irradiation stability studies are scant. In the present investigations carbon-carbon composite has been developed using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber. Two samples denoted as Sample-1 and Sample-2 have been prepared by impregnation using phenolic resin at pressure of 30 bar for time duration 10 h and 20 h respectively, and they have been irradiated by neutrons. The samples were irradiated in a flux of 10 12 n/cm 2/s at temperature of 40 °C. The fluence was 2.52 × 10 16 n/cm 2. These samples have been characterized by XRD and Raman spectroscopy before and after neutron irradiation. DSC studies have also been carried out to quantify the stored energy release behavior due to irradiation. The XRD analysis of the irradiated and unirradiated samples indicates that the irradiated samples show the tendency to get ordered structure, which was inferred from the Raman spectroscopy. The stored energy with respect to the fluence level was obtained from the DSC. The stored energy from these carbon composites is very less compared to irradiated graphite under ambient conditions.

  9. High-density carbon nanotube buckypapers with superior transport and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Guang; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2012-09-12

    High-density buckypapers were obtained by using well-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The density of the buckypapers was as high as 1.39 g cm(-3), which is close to the ultimate density of ideal buckypapers. Then we measured the transport and mechanical properties of the buckypapers. Our results demonstrated that its electrical and thermal conductivities could be almost linearly improved by increasing its density. In particular, its superior thermal conductivity is nearly twice that of common metals, which enables it a lightweight and more efficient heat-transfer materials. The Young's modulus of the buckypapers could reach a magnitude over 2 GPa, which is greatly improved compared with previous reported results. In view of this, our work provided a simple and convenient method to prepare high-density buckypapers with excellent transport and mechanical properties.

  10. Control of Carbon Nanotube Density and Tower Height in an Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for controlling density or tower height of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays grown in spaced apart first and second regions on a substrate. CNTs having a first density range (or first tower height range) are grown in the first region using a first source temperature range for growth. Subsequently or simultaneously, CNTs having a second density range (or second tower height range), having an average density (or average tower height) in the second region different from the average density (or average tower height) for the first region, are grown in the second region, using supplemental localized hearing for the second region. Application for thermal dissipation and/or dissipation of electrical charge or voltage in an electronic device are discussed.

  11. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  12. Boosting the Energy Density of Carbon-Based Aqueous Supercapacitors by Optimizing the Surface Charge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minghao; Lin, Dun; Feng, Haobin; Zeng, Yinxiang; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong

    2017-03-27

    The voltage of carbon-based aqueous supercapacitors is limited by the water splitting reaction occurring in one electrode, generally resulting in the promising but unused potential range of the other electrode. Exploiting this unused potential range provides the possibility for further boosting their energy density. An efficient surface charge control strategy was developed to remarkably enhance the energy density of multiscale porous carbon (MSPC) based aqueous symmetric supercapacitors (SSCs) by controllably tuning the operating potential range of MSPC electrodes. The operating voltage of the SSCs with neutral electrolyte was significantly expanded from 1.4 V to 1.8 V after simple adjustment, enabling the energy density of the optimized SSCs reached twice as much as the original. Such a facile strategy was also demonstrated for the aqueous SSCs with acidic and alkaline electrolytes, and is believed to bring insight in the design of aqueous supercapacitors.

  13. Sediment carbon sink in low-density temperate eelgrass meadows (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowska, Emilia; Michel, Loïc. N.; Zaborska, Agata; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Seagrass meadows are highly productive habitats that can act as "blue carbon sinks" in coastal ecosystems by facilitating sedimentation and trapping particles. However, the magnitude and occurrence of these effects may be species and density dependent. The present study is the first estimation of seagrass sediment carbon sink in the temperate Zostera marina beds in the Baltic Sea. Several descriptors of organic matter characteristics, along with possible organic matter sources in the sediment were compared at vegetated and unvegetated bottoms. The 210Pb dating of the sediment has been used for accumulation rate assessment. The photopigments and POC concentrations in sediments were higher in vegetated bottoms. The SIAR (Stable Isotopes in R) mixing model based on nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values, indicated that higher percentages of organic matter originated from seagrass production in vegetated sediments (40-45%) compared to unvegetated ones (5-21%). The carbon stock in the upper 10 cm of the vegetated sediments ranged from 50.2 ± 2.2 to 228.0 ± 11.6 (g m-2), whereas the annual C accumulation amount from 0.84 ± 0.2 to 3.85 ± 1.2 (g m-2 yr-1). Our study shows that even the relatively weakly developed vegetation of the small temperate seagrass species enhance organic carbon concentration in the sediments. Estimated carbon stock was much lower than those reported for most of the seagrass meadows elsewhere, and the carbon burial rate was the lowest ever reported. Evidently, the global calculations of sediment carbon stock should be reconsidered by taking into account density and species-related variability.

  14. Partitioning of organic carbon among density fractions in surface sediments of Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xingqian; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Hutchings, Jack A.; Savage, Candida; Curtis, Jason H.

    2016-03-01

    Transport of particles plays a major role in redistributing organic carbon (OC) along coastal regions. In particular, the global importance of fjords as sites of carbon burial has recently been shown to be even more important than previously thought. In this study, we used six surface sediments from Fiordland, New Zealand, to investigate the transport of particles and OC based on density fractionation. Bulk, biomarker, and principle component analysis were applied to density fractions with ranges of <1.6, 1.6-2.0, 2.0-2.5, and >2.5 g cm-3. Our results found various patterns of OC partitioning at different locations along fjords, likely due to selective transport of higher density but smaller size particles along fjord head-to-mouth transects. We also found preferential leaching of certain biomarkers (e.g., lignin) over others (e.g., fatty acids) during the density fractionation procedure, which altered lignin-based degradation indices. Finally, our results indicated various patterns of OC partitioning on density fractions among different coastal systems. We further propose that a combination of particle size-density fractionation is needed to better understand transport and distribution of particles and OC.

  15. Murchison presolar carbon grains of different density fractions: A Raman spectroscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wopenka, B.; Xu, Y. C.; Zinner, E.; Amari, S.

    2013-04-01

    Raman analyses are reported of μm-sized areas of 103 individual carbonaceous presolar grains ("graphite grains") from three different density fractions of the Murchison meteorite. Few of the grains (2 or 3 of each density fraction) have Raman spectra typical for non-crystalline sp2-bonded carbon (i.e., "organic carbon") with extremely wide 1st-order and no (or very subdued) 2nd-order peaks, similar to the ones found for terrestrial kerogens. Based on depth profiles of isotopic ratios measured with the NanoSIMS, it is unlikely that such kerogen-type Raman signatures are caused by contamination of the presolar grains with insoluble organic material from the Murchison matrix that stuck to the surfaces of the grains. Rather, the kerogen-type grains are considered to be a new type of presolar carbon grains, which are made up of organic (PAH-like) sp2-bonded carbon. However, most of the other studied presolar carbon grains (95 of 103) have spectra with very narrow 1st-order peaks (called D and G peaks) and very strong 2nd-order peaks typical for inorganic sp2-bonded carbon. Based on their D/G intensity ratios, those grains were grouped into the following Raman types: (fairly well ordered) "graphite" (D/G < 0.5), "disordered graphite" (0.5 < D/G < 1.1), "glassy carbon" (D/G > 1.1), and "unusual sp2-bonded graphitic carbon" (with extremely intense 2nd-order peaks relative to the 1st-order peaks). Grains from the low-density fraction KFA1 (2.05-2.10 g/cm3) have predominantly "cauliflower" morphology and Raman spectra characteristic of either very disordered graphite or "glassy carbon" (i.e., the latter is amorphous from the Raman spectroscopic perspective), whereas most grains from the high-density fraction KFC1 (2.15-2.20 g/cm3) have "onion" morphology and Raman spectra characteristic of well-crystalline graphite. The KFB1 grains with intermediate density (2.10-2.15 g/cm3) are mixed, both in terms of their morphology and their Raman spectra but are closer to KFC1 than to

  16. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles.

  17. Cathodic protection design for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.; Quincy, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    The application of cathodic protection for aboveground storage tank (AST) bottoms has been accomplished in a variety of approaches, with varying degrees of success. Recent State regulations, requiring corrosion protection for new tanks and secondary containment for double bottom tanks, have prompted new application techniques to be developed for AST cathodic protection. Improved design applications are now available to todays` tank owners and operators to provide effective long term cathodic protection.

  18. Cathodic protection maintenance for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.

    1995-12-31

    Cathodic protection systems are utilized to mitigate corrosion on the external bottom surfaces of aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). Cathodic protection systems should be part of a preventative maintenance program to minimize in-service failures. A good maintenance program will permit determination of continuous adequate cathodic protection of ASTs, through sustained operation and also provide the opportunity to detect cathodic protection system malfunctions, through periodic observations and testing.

  19. Density functional simulation of carbon at the titanium site in perovskite barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Hadidi, Meaad S.; Goss, J. P.; Briddon, P. R.; Al-Hamadany, Raied A.; Ahmed, Mariam E.; Rayson, M. J.

    2015-04-01

    The perovskite family includes many titanates which have been used in various applications. BaTiO3 is interesting due to its room-temperature ferroelectric properties and relative low toxicity. Organic precursors present during growth make carbon a potentially key impurity, which would subsequently impact upon the BaTiO3 properties. This paper presents a density function study of the structural and electronic properties of carbon substituting for Ti in rhombohedral BaTiO3. The local vibrational modes of the defect centre has been calculated and suggested as a possible route to experimental identification.

  20. Topographic variation in aboveground biomass in a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dunmei; Lai, Jiangshan; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Mi, Xiangcheng; Ma, Keping

    2012-01-01

    The subtropical forest biome occupies about 25% of China, with species diversity only next to tropical forests. Despite the recognized importance of subtropical forest in regional carbon storage and cycling, uncertainties remain regarding the carbon storage of subtropical forests, and few studies have quantified within-site variation of biomass, making it difficult to evaluate the role of these forests in the global and regional carbon cycles. Using data for a 24-ha census plot in east China, we quantify aboveground biomass, characterize its spatial variation among different habitats, and analyse species relative contribution to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats. The average aboveground biomass was 223.0 Mg ha(-1) (bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals [217.6, 228.5]) and varied substantially among four topographically defined habitats, from 180.6 Mg ha(-1) (bootstrapped 95% CI [167.1, 195.0]) in the upper ridge to 245.9 Mg ha(-1) (bootstrapped 95% CI [238.3, 253.8]) in the lower ridge, with upper and lower valley intermediate. In consistent with our expectation, individual species contributed differently to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats, reflecting significant species habitat associations. Different species show differently in habitat preference in terms of biomass contribution. These patterns may be the consequences of ecological strategies difference among different species. Results from this study enhance our ability to evaluate the role of subtropical forests in the regional carbon cycle and provide valuable information to guide the protection and management of subtropical broad-leaved forest for carbon sequestration and carbon storage.

  1. Topographic Variation in Aboveground Biomass in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dunmei; Lai, Jiangshan; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Mi, Xiangcheng; Ma, Keping

    2012-01-01

    The subtropical forest biome occupies about 25% of China, with species diversity only next to tropical forests. Despite the recognized importance of subtropical forest in regional carbon storage and cycling, uncertainties remain regarding the carbon storage of subtropical forests, and few studies have quantified within-site variation of biomass, making it difficult to evaluate the role of these forests in the global and regional carbon cycles. Using data for a 24-ha census plot in east China, we quantify aboveground biomass, characterize its spatial variation among different habitats, and analyse species relative contribution to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats. The average aboveground biomass was 223.0 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals [217.6, 228.5]) and varied substantially among four topographically defined habitats, from 180.6 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [167.1, 195.0]) in the upper ridge to 245.9 Mg ha−1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [238.3, 253.8]) in the lower ridge, with upper and lower valley intermediate. In consistent with our expectation, individual species contributed differently to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats, reflecting significant species habitat associations. Different species show differently in habitat preference in terms of biomass contribution. These patterns may be the consequences of ecological strategies difference among different species. Results from this study enhance our ability to evaluate the role of subtropical forests in the regional carbon cycle and provide valuable information to guide the protection and management of subtropical broad-leaved forest for carbon sequestration and carbon storage. PMID:23118961

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  3. Measuring the Grafting Density of Nanoparticles in Solution by Analytical Ultracentrifugation and Total Organic Carbon Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Denise N.; Zhu, Huiguang; Lilierose, Michael H.; Verm, Raymond A.; Ali, Naushaba; Morrison, Adam N.; Fortner, John D.; Avendano, Carolina; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2012-01-01

    Many of the solution phase properties of nanoparticles, such as their colloidal stability and hydrodynamic diameter, are governed by the number of stabilizing groups bound to the particle surface (i.e., grafting density). Here we show how two techniques, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and total organic carbon analysis (TOC), can be applied separately to the measurement of this parameter. AUC directly measures the density of nanoparticle–polymer conjugates while TOC provides the total carbon content of its aqueous dispersions. When these techniques are applied to model gold nanoparticles capped with thiolated poly(ethylene glycol), the measured grafting densities across a range of polymer chain lengths, polymer concentrations, and nanoparticle diameters agree to within 20%. Moreover, the measured grafting densities correlate well with the polymer content determined by thermogravimetric analysis of solid conjugate samples. Using these tools, we examine the particle core diameter, polymer chain length, and polymer solution concentration dependence of nanoparticle grafting densities in a gold nanoparticle–poly(ethylene glycol) conjugate system. PMID:22967239

  4. Metal-Catalyzed Alkynylation of Brominated Polyphenylenes. Thermoset Precursors of High Density Monolithic Glassy Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-22

    melting events at 152 and 1750C on the first heating scan to 2300C. While the char yield for 4a was only 50% by TGA analysis , the charred material was...after TGA analysis was also a black powder, again indicating that no flow had occurred. The char had a density of 1.59 g/cc. 1 I Polymers 16b and 16c had...material appeared as shiny black droplets after TGA analysis . The charred carbon material from 19a had a density of 1.56 g/cc. Polymers 19b and 19c

  5. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission.

  6. Optimization of the sintering atmosphere for high-density hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    White, Ashley A; Kinloch, Ian A; Windle, Alan H; Best, Serena M

    2010-10-06

    Hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT) composites have the potential for improved mechanical properties over HA for use in bone graft applications. Finding an appropriate sintering atmosphere for this composite presents a dilemma, as HA requires water in the sintering atmosphere to remain phase pure and well hydroxylated, yet CNTs oxidize at the high temperatures required for sintering. The purpose of this study was to optimize the atmosphere for sintering these composites. While the reaction between carbon and water to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high temperatures (known as the 'water-gas reaction') would seem to present a problem for sintering these composites, Le Chatelier's principle suggests this reaction can be suppressed by increasing the concentration of carbon monoxide and hydrogen relative to the concentration of carbon and water, so as to retain the CNTs and keep the HA's structure intact. Eight sintering atmospheres were investigated, including standard atmospheres (such as air and wet Ar), as well as atmospheres based on the water-gas reaction. It was found that sintering in an atmosphere of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with a small amount of water added, resulted in an optimal combination of phase purity, hydroxylation, CNT retention and density.

  7. Interrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free-living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivores.

    PubMed

    Khaitov, Botir; Patiño-Ruiz, José David; Pina, Tatiana; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Aboveground plant performance is strongly influenced by belowground microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic and have negative effects, while others, such as nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, usually have positive effects. Recent research revealed that belowground interactions between plants and functionally distinct groups of microorganisms cascade up to aboveground plant associates such as herbivores and their natural enemies. However, while functionally distinct belowground microorganisms commonly co-occur in the rhizosphere, their combined effects, and relative contributions, respectively, on performance of aboveground plant-associated organisms are virtually unexplored. Here, we scrutinized and disentangled the effects of free-living nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (DB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae (AMF) on host plant choice and reproduction of the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris. Additionally, we assessed plant growth, and AMF and DB occurrence and density as affected by each other. Both AMF alone and DB alone increased spider mite reproduction to similar levels, as compared to the control, and exerted additive effects under co-occurrence. These effects were similarly apparent in host plant choice, that is, the mites preferred leaves from plants with both AMF and DB to plants with AMF or DB to plants grown without AMF and DB. DB, which also act as AMF helper bacteria, enhanced root colonization by AMF, whereas AMF did not affect DB abundance. AMF but not DB increased growth of reproductive plant tissue and seed production, respectively. Both AMF and DB increased the biomass of vegetative aboveground plant tissue. Our study breaks new ground in multitrophic belowground-aboveground research by providing first insights into the fitness implications of plant-mediated interactions between interrelated belowground fungi

  8. Interrelated effects of mycorrhiza and free-living nitrogen fixers cascade up to aboveground herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Khaitov, Botir; Patiño-Ruiz, José David; Pina, Tatiana; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aboveground plant performance is strongly influenced by belowground microorganisms, some of which are pathogenic and have negative effects, while others, such as nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, usually have positive effects. Recent research revealed that belowground interactions between plants and functionally distinct groups of microorganisms cascade up to aboveground plant associates such as herbivores and their natural enemies. However, while functionally distinct belowground microorganisms commonly co-occur in the rhizosphere, their combined effects, and relative contributions, respectively, on performance of aboveground plant-associated organisms are virtually unexplored. Here, we scrutinized and disentangled the effects of free-living nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum (DB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae (AMF) on host plant choice and reproduction of the herbivorous two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae on common bean plants Phaseolus vulgaris. Additionally, we assessed plant growth, and AMF and DB occurrence and density as affected by each other. Both AMF alone and DB alone increased spider mite reproduction to similar levels, as compared to the control, and exerted additive effects under co-occurrence. These effects were similarly apparent in host plant choice, that is, the mites preferred leaves from plants with both AMF and DB to plants with AMF or DB to plants grown without AMF and DB. DB, which also act as AMF helper bacteria, enhanced root colonization by AMF, whereas AMF did not affect DB abundance. AMF but not DB increased growth of reproductive plant tissue and seed production, respectively. Both AMF and DB increased the biomass of vegetative aboveground plant tissue. Our study breaks new ground in multitrophic belowground–aboveground research by providing first insights into the fitness implications of plant-mediated interactions between interrelated belowground fungi

  9. [Effects of topographical condition and sampling number on the interpolation precision of forest litter carbon density].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-jia; Fu, Wei-jun; Du, Qun; Zhang, Guo-jiang; Jiang, Pei-kun

    2013-08-01

    The territory of Zhejiang Province, East China was grouped into 3 topographical units (plain-coastal area, hill-basin area, and mountain area) to investigate the effects of topographical condition and sampling number on the Kriging interpolation precision of forest litter carbon density in the Province. The forest litter carbon density in the 3 topographical units showed a medium spatial correlation pattern, with the semi-variance nugget/sill ratio value ranged from 28.3% to 72.4%. The Kriging interpolation precision was in the order of plain-coastal area > hill-basin area > mountain area, indicating that the Kriging interpolation precision decreased with the increase of terrain complexity degree. Within the same topographical units, the Kriging interpolation precision improved with increasing sampling number, being most obvious in the mountain area. Therefore, under complicated topographical conditions, greater sampling number was required to achieve a high precision of Kriging interpolation.

  10. Aboveground Biomass Modeling from Field and LiDAR Data in Brazilian Amazon Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A.; Hudak, A. T.; Vierling, L. A.; Keller, M. M.; Klauberg Silva, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests are an important component of global carbon stocks, but tropical forest responses to climate change are not sufficiently studied or understood. Among remote sensing technologies, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) may be best suited for quantifying tropical forest carbon stocks. Our objective was to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) using airborne LiDAR and field plot data in Brazilian tropical rain forest. Forest attributes such as tree density, diameter at breast height, and heights were measured at a combination of square plots and linear transects (n=82) distributed across six different geographic zones in the Amazon. Using previously published allometric equations, tree AGB was computed and then summed to calculate total AGB at each sample plot. LiDAR-derived canopy structure metrics were also computed at each sample plot, and random forest regression modelling was applied to predict AGB from selected LiDAR metrics. The LiDAR-derived AGB model was assessed using the random forest explained variation, adjusted coefficient of determination (Adj. R²), root mean square error (RMSE, both absolute and relative) and BIAS (both absolute and relative). Our findings showed that the 99th percentile of height and height skewness were the best LiDAR metrics for AGB prediction. The AGB model using these two best predictors explained 59.59% of AGB variation, with an Adj. R² of 0.92, RMSE of 33.37 Mg/ha (20.28%), and bias of -0.69 (-0.42%). This study showed that LiDAR canopy structure metrics can be used to predict AGC stocks in Tropical Forest with acceptable precision and accuracy. Therefore, we conclude that there is good potential to monitor carbon sequestration in Brazilian Tropical Rain Forest using airborne LiDAR data, large field plots, and the random forest algorithm.

  11. Growth and characterization of high-density mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Telg, H.; Thomsen, C.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2008-10-20

    We grow high-density, aligned single wall carbon nanotube mats for use as interconnects in integrated circuits by remote plasma chemical vapor deposition from a Fe-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film catalyst. We carry out extensive Raman characterization of the resulting mats, and find that this catalyst system gives rise to a broad range of nanotube diameters, with no preferential selectivity of semiconducting tubes, but with at least 1/3 of metallic tubes.

  12. Structures with high number density of carbon nanotubes and 3-dimensional distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zheng (Inventor); Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A composite is described having a three dimensional distribution of carbon nanotubes. The critical aspect of such composites is a nonwoven network of randomly oriented fibers connected at their junctions to afford macropores in the spaces between the fibers. A variety of fibers may be employed, including metallic fibers, and especially nickel fibers. The composite has quite desirable properties for cold field electron emission applications, such as a relatively low turn-on electric field, high electric field enhancement factors, and high current densities. The composites of this invention also show favorable properties for other an electrode applications. Several methods, which also have general application in carbon nanotube production, of preparing these composites are described and employ a liquid feedstock of oxyhydrocarbons as carbon nanotube precursors.

  13. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites. [aircraft and submarine compartment safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for constructing for a composite laminate structure which exhibits a high resistance to heat and flame provides safer interior structures for aircraft and submarine compartments. Composite laminate structures are prepared by the bismaleimide resin preimpregnation of a fiberglass cloth to form a face sheet which is bonded with a bismaleimide hot melt adhesive to a porous core structure selected from the group consisting of polyamide paper and bismaleimide-glass fabric which is filled with carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic micro-balloons in the presence of nitrogen. A slurry of the carbon microballoons is prepared to fill the porous core structure. The porous core structure and face sheet are bonded to provide panel structures exhibiting increased mechanical capacities and lower oxygen limit values and smoke density values.

  14. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [chemical analysis of carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Beebe, R. F.; Sneden, C.

    1974-01-01

    From an examination of predicted column densities, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The SiO ought to be visible in carbon stars which were generated from triple alpha burning, but absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle. (2) Variation in the observed relative strengths of TiO and ZrO is indicative of real differences in the ratio Ti/Zr. (3) The TiO/ZrO ratio shows a small variation as C/O and effective temperature is changed. (4) Column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities. (5) Unexpectedly, SiC2 is anti-correlated with C2. (6) The presence of SiC2 in a carbon star eliminates the possibility of these stars having temperatures greater than or equal to 3000 K, or being produced through the CNO bi-cycle.

  15. Regional contingencies in the relationship between aboveground Bbomass and litter in the world’s grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O’Halloran, Lydia R.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Cleland, Elsa E.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Hobbie, Sarah; Harpole, W. Stan; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Davies, Kendi F.; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Li, Wei; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Stevens, Carly J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on regional-scale studies, aboveground production and litter decomposition are thought to positively covary, because they are driven by shared biotic and climatic factors. Until now we have been unable to test whether production and decomposition are generally coupled across climatically dissimilar regions, because we lacked replicated data collected within a single vegetation type across multiple regions, obfuscating the drivers and generality of the association between production and decomposition. Furthermore, our understanding of the relationships between production and decomposition rests heavily on separate meta-analyses of each response, because no studies have simultaneously measured production and the accumulation or decomposition of litter using consistent methods at globally relevant scales. Here, we use a multi-country grassland dataset collected using a standardized protocol to show that live plant biomass (an estimate of aboveground net primary production) and litter disappearance (represented by mass loss of aboveground litter) do not strongly covary. Live biomass and litter disappearance varied at different spatial scales. There was substantial variation in live biomass among continents, sites and plots whereas among continent differences accounted for most of the variation in litter disappearance rates. Although there were strong associations among aboveground biomass, litter disappearance and climatic factors in some regions (e.g. U.S. Great Plains), these relationships were inconsistent within and among the regions represented by this study. These results highlight the importance of replication among regions and continents when characterizing the correlations between ecosystem processes and interpreting their global-scale implications for carbon flux. We must exercise caution in parameterizing litter decomposition and aboveground production in future regional and global carbon models as their relationship is complex.

  16. Activated Microporous Carbon Derived from Almond Shells for High Energy Density Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Yang, Shaoran; Cai, Junjie; Zhang, Qiaobao; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Kaili

    2016-06-22

    Via the activation treatment of carbonized almond shells with HNO3 and KOH, activated microporous carbon (AMC-3 and AMC-2) was successfully synthesized. These two AMC electrodes demonstrate remarkable electrochemical behaviors such as high rate capability, high specific capacitance, and excellent cycle stability when serving as electrodes for supercapacitors. More importantly, through the use of a Zn-Ni-Co ternary oxide (ZNCO) positive electrode and the AMC negative electrode, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC) were assembled that deliver superior energy density (53.3 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1126.1 W kg(-1) for ASC-2 and 53.6 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 1124.5 W kg(-1) for ASC-3) and excellent stability (82.7% and 83.4% specific capacitance retention for ZNCO//AMC ASC-2 and ZNCO//AMC ASC-3, respectively, after 5000 cycles). Through these two methods, low-cost, renewable, and environmentally friendly electrode materials can be provided for high energy density supercapacitors.

  17. Wood chemistry and density: an analog for response to the change of carbon sequestration in mangroves.

    PubMed

    Ray, R; Majumder, N; Chowdhury, C; Jana, T K

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to resolve the variations of physical and chemical properties of wood records measured in different mangroves with their annual carbon sequestration. The methods of investigation used were to examine growth rate by monitoring breast height diameter, wood chemistry and density, FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. Carbon sequestration rate showing an increase with density varied between 0.088 and 0.171 μg C kg(-1) AGB s(-1), and Avicennia marina showed the maximum value and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the minimum. The changes in FTIR bands at 4000-2500 cm(-1) and 1700-800 cm(-1) were correlated to the variations in cellulose in mangrove woods and lignin to cellulose ratio ranged between 0.21 and 1.75. Thermal analyses of mangrove wood suggested that the fuel value index (985-3922) exhibited an increase with the decrease in maximum decomposition temperature and density. The seasonal variation of temperature and CO2 were likely to affect chemical properties through changes in wood density.

  18. Low temperature growth of ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests on conductive supports

    SciTech Connect

    Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Yang, Junwei; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Robertson, John; Oliver, Rachel A.; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2013-08-12

    We grow ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests at 450 °C on Ti-coated Cu supports using Co-Mo co-catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows Mo strongly interacts with Ti and Co, suppressing both aggregation and lifting off of Co particles and, thus, promoting the root growth mechanism. The forests average a height of 0.38 μm and a mass density of 1.6 g cm{sup −3}. This mass density is the highest reported so far, even at higher temperatures or on insulators. The forests and Cu supports show ohmic conductivity (lowest resistance ∼22 kΩ), suggesting Co-Mo is useful for applications requiring forest growth on conductors.

  19. Density function theory study of the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide on tungsten nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meng-Hsiung; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chen, Hsin-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lu, Jian-Ming; Lin, Ken-Huang; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption and dissociation properties of carbon monoxide (CO) molecule on tungsten W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles have been investigated by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The lowest-energy structures for W(n) (n = 10-15) nanoparticles are found by the basin-hopping method and big-bang method with the modified tight-binding many-body potential. We calculated the corresponding adsorption energies, C-O bond lengths and dissociation barriers for adsorption of CO on nanoparticles. The electronic properties of CO on nanoparticles are studied by the analysis of density of state and charge density. The characteristic of CO on W(n) nanoparticles are also compared with that of W bulk.

  20. Controlling the density and site of attachment of gold nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Kaur, Inderpreet; Dharamvir, Keya; Bharadwaj, Lalit M

    2012-03-01

    A facile method for controlling the density and site of attachment of gold nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes is demonstrated. Nitric acid based oxidation was carried out to create carboxylic groups exclusively at the ends of carbon nanotubes, whereas oxidation using a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid with varied reaction time was carried out to control the population of carboxylic groups on the side walls of nanotubes. In turn, 4-aminothiophenol modified gold nanoparticles were covalently interfaced to these carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a zero length cross-linker, 1-ethylene-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. Raman spectroscopic results showed increase in height of disorder band with each of these successive steps, indicating the increase in degree of functionalization of the carbon nanotubes. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic analysis affirmed the functionalization of nanostructures and the formation of nanohybrid. Transmission electron and field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis ascertained the attachment of gold nanoparticles to the ends and side walls of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The new hybrid nanostructures may find applications in electronic, optoelectronic, and sensing devices.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes with Tailored Density of Electronic States for Electrochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingpan; Hu, Huifang; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2015-11-25

    The density of electronic states (DOS) is an intrinsic electronic property that works conclusively in the electrochemistry of carbon materials. However, seldom has it been reported how the DOS at the Fermi level influences the electrochemical activity. In this work, we synthesized partially and fully unzipped carbon nanotubes by longitudinally unzipping pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We then studied the electrochemical activity and biosensitivity of carbon materials by means of the CNTs and their derivatives to elucidate the effect of the DOS on their electrochemical performances. Tailoring of the DOS for the CNT derivatives could be conveniently realized by varying the sp(2)/sp(3) ratio (i.e., graphite concentration) through manipulating the oxidative unzipping degree. Despite the diverse electron transfer mechanisms and influence factors of the four investigated redox probes (IrCl6(2-), [Fe(CN)6](3-), Fe(3+), and ascorbic acid), the CNT derivatives exhibited consistent kinetic behaviors, wherein CNTs with a high DOS showed superior electrochemical response compared with partially and fully unzipped carbon nanotubes. For biological detection, the CNTs could simultaneously distinguish ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid, while the three CNT derivatives could all differentiate phenethylamine and epinephrine existed in the newborn calf serum. Moreover, the three CNT derivatives all presented wide linear detection ranges with high sensitivities for dopamine, phenethylamine, and epinephrine.

  2. Aboveground pipeline response to random ground motion

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, P.; Ghosh, A.

    1995-12-31

    Response of two types of aboveground pipelines--rigid, segmented pipelines, and flexible, continuous pipelines--to random ground motion are studied in this paper. The emphasis is on studying the effect of pipeline system parameters on its response. It is seen that pipe parameters, except for the pipe span, affect system response negligibly. Pier height and flexibility, and foundation-soil flexibility, however, affect response significantly. Furthermore, for practical situations, pipe and pier responses are decoupled, and the pier, therefore, behaves essentially as a point structure that is not affected by spatial variation of ground motion.

  3. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  4. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  5. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-17

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  6. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (P<0.05) positive correlation between the densities of SOC and total nitrogen (N) in the open soils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  7. Separation of Bacteria, Protozoa and Carbon Nanotubes by Density Gradient Centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Monika; Petersen, Elijah J.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production and use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-enabled materials require efficient assessment of CNT environmental hazards, including the potential for CNT bioaccumulation and biomagnification in environmental receptors. Microbes, as abundant organisms responsible for nutrient cycling in soil and water, are important ecological receptors for studying the effects of CNTs. Quantification of CNT association with microbial cells requires efficient separation of CNT-associated cells from individually dispersed CNTs and CNT agglomerates. Here, we designed, optimized, and demonstrated procedures for separating bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) from unbound multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT agglomerates using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. We demonstrate separation of protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila) from MWCNTs, bacterial agglomerates, and protozoan fecal pellets by centrifugation in an iodixanol solution. The presence of MWCNTs in the density gradients after centrifugation was determined by quantification of 14C-labeled MWCNTs; the recovery of microbes from the density gradient media was confirmed by optical microscopy. Protozoan intracellular contents of MWCNTs and of bacteria were also unaffected by the designed separation process. The optimized methods contribute to improved efficiency and accuracy in quantifying MWCNT association with bacteria and MWCNT accumulation in protozoan cells, thus supporting improved assessment of CNT bioaccumulation. PMID:27917301

  8. A comparison of two above-ground biomass estimation techniques integrating satellite-based remotely sensed data and ground data for tropical and semiarid forests in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iiames, J. S.; Riegel, J.; Lunetta, R.

    2013-12-01

    Two above-ground forest biomass estimation techniques were evaluated for the United States Territory of Puerto Rico using predictor variables acquired from satellite based remotely sensed data and ground data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated above-ground forest biomass implementing methodology first posited by the Woods Hole Research Center developed for conterminous United States (National Biomass and Carbon Dataset [NBCD2000]). For EPA's effort, spatial predictor layers for above-ground biomass estimation included derived products from the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (NLCD) (landcover and canopy density), the USGS Gap Analysis Program (forest type classification), the USGS National Elevation Dataset, and the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (tree heights). In contrast, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) biomass product integrated FIA ground-based data with a suite of geospatial predictor variables including: (1) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)-derived image composites and percent tree cover; (2) NLCD land cover proportions; (3) topographic variables; (4) monthly and annual climate parameters; and (5) other ancillary variables. Correlations between both data sets were made at variable watershed scales to test level of agreement. Notice: This work is done in support of EPA's Sustainable Healthy Communities Research Program. The U.S EPA funded and conducted the research described in this paper. Although this work was reviewed by the EPA and has been approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Mention of any trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  9. Density-functional calculations of carbon doping in III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, C. D.; Jones, R.; Öberg, S.; Briddon, P. R.

    2001-04-01

    This article reports the results of investigations based on local-density-functional theory into the relative formation energies for single substitutional carbon atoms in nine III-V compound semiconductors. The calculations are performed using a supercell formalism derived from the AIMPRO real-space cluster method. Only a very slight trend is discernible down the periodic table. When a metal atom is replaced with carbon, it is energetically least favorable in the phosphides, very marginally lower energy in the arsenides, and ~0.5-0.7 eV lower in the antimonides. The situation is approximately reversed when a P, As, or Sb atom is substituted by a C atom: for the In compounds the energy is ~0.4-0.8 eV higher than for the Al and Ga compounds.

  10. Process for the manufacture of low density bis-maleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A process for the preparation of composite laminate structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide-glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477.degree. K. and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 kN/m.sup.2 pressure at 450.degree. K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527.degree. K. to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  11. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Rothwell, Andrew J.

    2013-10-08

    We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

  12. Properties and processing characteristics of low density carbon cloth phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Ply-lift and pocketing are two critical anomalies of carbon cloth phenolic composites (CCPC) in rocket nozzle applications. Ply lift occurs at low temperatures when the A/P and in-plane permeabilities of the composite materials are still very low and in-plane porous paths are blocked. Pocketing occurs at elevated temperatures when in-plane permeability is reduced by the A/P compressive stress. The thermostructural response of CCPC in a rapid heating environment involves simultaneous heat, mass, and momentum transfer along with the degradation of phenolic resin in a multiphase system with temperature- and time-dependent material properties as well as dynamic processing conditions. Three temperature regions represent the consequent chemical reactions, material transformations, and property transitions, and provide a quick qualitative method for characterizing the thermostructural behavior of a CCPC. In order to optimize the FM5939 LDCCP (low density carbon cloth phenolic) for the nozzle performance required in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program, a fundamental study on LDCCP materials was conducted. The cured composite has a density of 1.0 +/- 0.5 gm/cc which includes 10 to 25 percent void volume. The weight percent of carbon microballoon is low (7-15 percent). However, they account for approximately one third of the volume and historically their percentages have not been controlled very tightly. In addition, the composite properties show no correlation with microballoon weight percent or fiber properties (e.g. fiber density or fiber moisture adsorption capacity). Test results concerning the ply-lift anomaly in the MNASA motor firings were: (1) Steeper ply angle (shorter path lenght) designs minimized/eliminated by lifting, (2) material with higher void volume ply lifted less frequently, (3) materials with high (greater than 9 percent) microballoon content had a higher rate of ply lifting, and (4) LDCCP materials failed at microballoon-resin interfaces

  13. Thermal conduction in aligned carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites with high packing density.

    PubMed

    Marconnet, Amy M; Yamamoto, Namiko; Panzer, Matthew A; Wardle, Brian L; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2011-06-28

    Nanostructured composites containing aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are very promising as interface materials for electronic systems and thermoelectric power generators. We report the first data for the thermal conductivity of densified, aligned multiwall CNT nanocomposite films for a range of CNT volume fractions. A 1 vol % CNT composite more than doubles the thermal conductivity of the base polymer. Denser arrays (17 vol % CNTs) enhance the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of 18 and there is a nonlinear trend with CNT volume fraction. This article discusses the impact of CNT density on thermal conduction considering boundary resistances, increased defect concentrations, and the possibility of suppressed phonon modes in the CNTs.

  14. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    PubMed

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  15. Density-functional theory for polymer-carbon dioxide mixtures: A perturbed-chain SAFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaofei; Cristancho, Diego E.; Costeux, Stéphane; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2012-08-01

    We propose a density-functional theory (DFT) describing inhomogeneous polymer-carbon dioxide mixtures based on a perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory equation of state (PC-SAFT EOS). The weight density functions from fundamental measure theory are used to extend the bulk excess Helmholtz free energy to the inhomogeneous case. The additional long-range dispersion contributions are included using a mean-field approach. We apply our DFT to the interfacial properties of polystyrene-CO2 and poly(methyl methacrylate) CO2 systems. Calculated values for both solubility and interfacial tension are in good agreement with experimental data. In comparison with our earlier DFT based on the Peng-Robinson-SAFT EOS, the current DFT produces quantitatively superior agreement with experimental data and is free of the unphysical behavior at high pressures (>35 MPa) in the earlier theory.

  16. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-14

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm(-3). Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  17. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  18. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Temuulen; Shrestha, Rupesh; Sankey, Joel B.; Hardegree, Stuart; Strand, Eva

    2013-07-01

    encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that contributes to the global carbon sink. The magnitude of this contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates, and guide regional policy and management in balancing restoration activities, including removal of woody plants, with greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The objective of this study was to estimate carbon stored in various successional phases of woody encroachment. Using lidar measurements of individual trees, we present high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon storage in juniper woodlands. Segmentation analysis of lidar point cloud data identified a total of 60,628 juniper tree crowns across four watersheds. Tree heights, canopy cover, and density derived from lidar were strongly correlated with field measurements of 2613 juniper stems measured in 85 plots (30 × 30 m). Aboveground total biomass of individual trees was estimated using a regression model with lidar-derived height and crown area as predictors (Adj. R2 = 0.76, p < 0.001, RMSE = 0.58 kg). The predicted mean aboveground woody carbon storage for the study area was 677 g/m2. Uncertainty in carbon storage estimates was examined with a Monte Carlo approach that addressed major error sources. Ranges predicted with uncertainty analysis in the mean, individual tree, aboveground woody C, and associated standard deviation were 0.35 - 143.6 kg and 0.5 - 1.25 kg, respectively. Later successional phases of woody encroachment had, on average, twice the aboveground carbon relative to earlier phases. Woody encroachment might be more successfully managed and balanced with carbon storage goals by identifying priority areas in earlier phases of encroachment where intensive treatments are most effective.

  19. Carbon emissions and sequestration potential of Central African ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Justice, C O

    2001-09-01

    Joint Implementation under the Climate Change Convention and Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol require a scientific understanding of current carbon stocks, fluxes, and sequestration potential, especially in tropical ecosystems where there are large carbon reservoirs, significant carbon emissions, and large land areas available for reforestation. Central Africa contains 10% of the world's remaining tropical moist forests and has received little attention in carbon studies. In 1980, above-ground carbon stocks in the central African ecosystem were 28.92 Pg and were reduced to 24.79 Pg by 1990. Improved forest management aimed at increasing biomass density could sequester 18.32 Pg of carbon, and over 500,000 km2 formerly forested land will be available by 2050 for reforestation with a capacity to offset 10 Pg carbon. Understanding the spatial distribution of biomass carbon and sequestration potential will be essential for carbon trading initiatives through Joint Implementation and Clean Development Mechanism.

  20. Relations between sinkhole density and anthropogenic contaminants in selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Katz, Brian G.; Berndt, Marian P.; Ardis, Ann F.; Skach, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between sinkhole density and water quality was investigated in seven selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States. Sinkhole density for these aquifers was grouped into high (>25 sinkholes/100 km2), medium (1–25 sinkholes/100 km2), or low (2) categories using a geographical information system that included four independent databases covering parts of Alabama, Florida, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Field measurements and concentrations of major ions, nitrate, and selected pesticides in samples from 451 wells and 70 springs were included in the water-quality database. Data were collected as a part of the US Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Areas with high and medium sinkhole density had the greatest well depths and depths to water, the lowest concentrations of total dissolved solids and bicarbonate, the highest concentrations of dissolved oxygen, and the lowest partial pressure of CO2 compared to areas with low sinkhole density. These chemical indicators are consistent conceptually with a conduit-flow-dominated system in areas with a high density of sinkholes and a diffuse-flow-dominated system in areas with a low density of sinkholes. Higher cave density and spring discharge in Pennsylvania also support the concept that the high sinkhole density areas are dominated by conduit-flow systems. Concentrations of nitrate-N were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in areas with high and medium sinkhole density than in low sinkhole-density areas; when accounting for the variations in land use near the sampling sites, the high sinkhole-density area still had higher concentrations of nitrate-N than the low sinkhole-density area. Detection frequencies of atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, prometon, and the atrazine degradate deethylatrazine indicated a pattern similar to nitrate; highest pesticide detections were associated with high sinkhole-density areas. These patterns generally persisted when analyzing

  1. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  2. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  3. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  4. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  5. 49 CFR 195.307 - Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3). (d) For aboveground atmospheric pressure breakout tanks constructed of... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure testing aboveground breakout tanks. 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Pressure Testing § 195.307 Pressure...

  6. Deer browsing delays succession by altering aboveground vegetation and belowground seed banks.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Antonio; Morris, Scott H; Parker, John D; Cone, Caitlin L; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-01-01

    Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15 × 15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently followed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005-2010), we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005-2008) and tree density (2005-2012). The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity), reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials), and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually recruit from an

  7. Standing crop and aboveground biomass partitioning of a dwarf mangrove forest in Taylor River Slough, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coronado-Molina, C.; Day, J.W.; Reyes, E.; Perez, B.C.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and standing crop biomass of a dwarf mangrove forest, located in the salinity transition zone ofTaylor River Slough in the Everglades National Park, were studied. Although the four mangrove species reported for Florida occurred at the study site, dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees dominated the forest. The structural characteristics of the mangrove forest were relatively simple: tree height varied from 0.9 to 1.2 meters, and tree density ranged from 7062 to 23 778 stems haa??1. An allometric relationship was developed to estimate leaf, branch, prop root, and total aboveground biomass of dwarf Rhizophora mangle trees. Total aboveground biomass and their components were best estimated as a power function of the crown area times number of prop roots as an independent variable (Y = B ?? Xa??0.5083). The allometric equation for each tree component was highly significant (p<0.0001), with all r2 values greater than 0.90. The allometric relationship was used to estimate total aboveground biomass that ranged from 7.9 to 23.2 ton haa??1. Rhizophora mangle contributed 85% of total standing crop biomass. Conocarpus erectus, Laguncularia racemosa, and Avicennia germinans contributed the remaining biomass. Average aboveground biomass allocation was 69% for prop roots, 25% for stem and branches, and 6% for leaves. This aboveground biomass partitioning pattern, which gives a major role to prop roots that have the potential to produce an extensive root system, may be an important biological strategy in response to low phosphorus availability and relatively reduced soils that characterize mangrove forests in South Florida.

  8. Deer Browsing Delays Succession by Altering Aboveground Vegetation and Belowground Seed Banks

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Antonio; Morris, Scott H.; Parker, John D.; Cone, Caitlin L.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15×15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently fallowed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005–2010), we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005–2008) and tree density (2005–2012). The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity), reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials), and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually recruit

  9. Differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types in a temperate forest ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    You, Ye-Ming; Wang, Juan; Sun, Xiao-Lu; Tang, Zuo-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the controls on soil carbon dynamics is crucial for modeling responses of ecosystem carbon balance to global change, yet few studies provide explicit knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of forest stands on soil carbon via microbial processes. We investigated tree species, soil, and site factors in relation to soil carbon density and mineralization in a temperate forest of central China. We found that soil microbial biomass and community structure, extracellular enzyme activities, and most of the site factors studied varied significantly across contrasting forest types, and that the associations between activities of soil extracellular enzymes and microbial community structure appeared to be weak and inconsistent across forest types, implicating complex mechanisms in the microbial regulation of soil carbon metabolism in relation to tree species. Overall, variations in soil carbon density and mineralization are predominantly accounted for by shared effects of tree species, soil, microclimate, and microbial traits rather than the individual effects of the four categories of factors. Our findings point to differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types and highlight the challenge to incorporate microbial processes for constraining soil carbon dynamics in global carbon cycle models. PMID:26925871

  10. Aboveground storage tank double bottom cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Surkein, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    Cathodic protection is typically used to achieve corrosion control between bottoms of aboveground storage tanks with double bottoms. To determine the proper design of such systems, an investigation was conducted on the performance of two different cathodic protection system designs utilizing zinc ribbon anodes. A full scale field test on a 35 meter (115 feet) diameter tank was conducted to determine cathodic protection system performance. The test included periodic measurement of tank bottom steel potentials including on, instant off and polarization decay, anode current output and tank product level measurements.Results showed that zinc ribbon anode spacing in a chord fashion of 1.2 meter (4 feet) or less can be effective to achieve cathodic protection according to industry accepted standards. Utilizing the design information gained by the study, a standard sacrificial anode and impressed current anode cathodic protection system has been developed.

  11. Density control and wettability enhancement by functionalizing carbon nanotubes with nickel oxide in aluminum-carbon nanotube system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Min-Ho; Song, Kwan-Woo; Bae, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Wook; Lee, Choong Do; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2013-11-01

    Excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideal reinforcements for synthesizing light weight, high strength metal matrix composite. Aluminum is attractive matrix due to its light weight and Al/CNT composites are promising materials for various industrial applications. Powder metallurgy and casting techniques are normally used for bulk fabrications of composites. Casting process which can mass-produce delicate product is more suitable than existing powder metallurgy in view point of application in industries. In CNT-metal matrix composites, however, composite bulk fabrication has been limited because of the large density gap and poor wettability between the metal and CNTs. This study suggests a method for alleviating such problems. It was found that the wettability between aluminum and CNT could be enhanced by functionalizing the CNTs with nickel oxide. This functionalization of CNTs with heavier element also reduces the density gap between the matrix and reinforcements. It is suggested that this method could possibly be used in a casting process to enable mass fabrication of CNT-metal matrix composites.

  12. Ignition relevant ablator response of boron carbide and high-density carbon driven by multiple shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.; Baker, Kevin; Celliers, Peter; Dittrich, Tom; Moore, Alastair; Wu, Kuang Jen; Kervin, Peggy; Hurricane, Omar

    2013-10-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The current ablation material, a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile. In an effort to evaluate the performance of other possible ablators that could be suitable for achieving self-propagating fusion burn we have inferred the ablation performance of two possible ablators, boron carbide and high-density carbon, by measuring the shock speed of induced shocks while subjecting the ablators to a multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. We present the platform used, velocity measurements used to infer the ablation response, and matching simulations to show the relative performance of boron carbide and high-density carbon with a general comparison to current performance of the currently used glow-discharge polymer ablator. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-640519.

  13. Topographically mediated controls on aboveground biomass across a mediterranean-type landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, K.; Asner, G. P.; Field, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aboveground biomass accumulation is a useful metric for evaluating habitat restoration and ecosystem services projects, in addition to being a robust measure of carbon sequestration. However, at the landscape scale non-anthropogenic controls on biomass accumulation are poorly understood. In this study we combined field measurements, high resolution data from the NASA JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) system to create a comprehensive map of aboveground biomass across a patchy mediterranean-type landscape (Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford, CA). Candidate explanatory variables (e.g. slope, elevation, incident solar radiation) were developed using a geologic map and a digital elevation model derived from the lidar data. Finally, candidate variables were tested, and a model was produced to predict aboveground biomass from environmental data. Though many of the explanatory variables have only indirect effects on plant growth, the model permits inferences to be made about the relative importance of light, water, temperature, and edaphic characteristics on carbon accumulation in mediterranean-type systems.

  14. [Vegetation above-ground biomass and its affecting factors in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-guo; Fan, Jun; Wang, Quan-jiu; Wang, Li

    2011-03-01

    Field investigations were conducted in Liudaogou small watershed in late September 2009 to study the differences of vegetation above-ground biomass, soil moisture content, and soil nutrient contents under different land use patterns, aimed to approach the vegetation above-ground biomass level and related affecting factors in typical small watershed in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau. The above-ground dry biomass of the main vegetations in Liudaogou was 177-2207 g x m(-2), and that in corn field, millet field, abandoned farmland, artificial grassland, natural grassland, and shrub land was 2097-2207, 518-775, 248-578, 280-545, 177-396, and 372-680 g x m(-2), respectively. The mean soil moisture content in 0-100 layer was the highest (14.2%) in farmlands and the lowest (10.9%) in shrub land. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture content was the greatest (26. 7% ) in abandoned farmland, indicating the strong spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture in this kind of farmland. The mean soil water storage was in the order of farmland > artificial grassland > natural grassland > shrub land. Soil dry layer was observed in alfalfa and caragana lands. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.639, P < 0.05) between above-ground dry biomass and 0-100 cm soil water storage, and also, a very significant positive correlation between above-ground fresh biomass and vegetation height. The above-ground biomass of the higher vegetations could potentially better control the wind and water erosion in the water/wind erosion crisscross region. Vegetation above-ground biomass was highly correlated with soil moisture and nutrient contents, but had no significant correlations with elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, and soil bulk density.

  15. Carbon - Bulk Density Relationships for Highly Weathered Soils of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Soils are dynamic natural bodies composed of mineral and organic materials. As a result of this mixed composition, essential properties of soils such as their apparent density, organic and mineral contents are typically correlated. Negative relationships between bulk density (Db) and organic matter concentration provide well-known examples across a broad range of soils, and such quantitative relationships among soil properties are useful for a variety of applications. First, gap-filling or data interpolation often are necessary to develop large soil carbon (C) datasets; furthermore, limitations of access to analytical instruments may preclude C determinations for every soil sample. In such cases, equations to derive soil C concentrations from basic measures of soil mass, volume, and density offer significant potential for purposes of soil C stock estimation. To facilitate estimation of soil C stocks on highly weathered soils of the Americas, I used observations from the International Soil Carbon Network (ISCN) database to develop carbon - bulk density prediction equations for Oxisols and Ultisols. Within a small sample set of georeferenced Oxisols (n=89), 29% of the variation in A horizon C concentrations can be predicted from Db. Including the A-horizon sand content improves predictive capacity to 35%. B horizon C concentrations (n=285) were best predicted by Db and clay content, but were more variable than A-horizons (only 10% of variation explained by linear regression). Among Ultisols, a larger sample set allowed investigation of specific horizons of interest. For example, C concentrations of plowed A (Ap) horizons are predictable based on Db, sand and silt contents (n=804, r2=0.38); gleyed argillic (Btg) horizon concentrations are predictable from Db, sand and clay contents (n=190, r2=0.23). Because soil C stock estimates are more sensitive to variation in soil mass and volume determinations than to variation in C concentration, prediction equations such as

  16. Accuracy of density functional theory in the prediction of carbon dioxide adsorbent materials.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Claudio; Shevlin, Stephen A

    2013-04-07

    Density functional theory (DFT) has become the computational method of choice for modeling and characterization of carbon dioxide adsorbents, a broad family of materials which at present are urgently sought after for environmental applications. The description of polar carbon dioxide (CO(2)) molecules in low-coordinated environments like surfaces and porous materials, however, may be challenging for local and semi-local DFT approximations. Here, we present a thorough computational study in which the accuracy of DFT methods in describing the interactions of CO(2) with model alkali-earth-metal (AEM, Ca and Li) decorated carbon structures, namely anthracene (C(14)H(10)) molecules, is assessed. We find that gas-adsorption energies and equilibrium structures obtained with standard (i.e. LDA and GGA), hybrid (i.e. PBE0 and B3LYP) and van der Waals exchange-correlation functionals of DFT dramatically differ from the results obtained with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), an accurate computational quantum chemistry method. The major disagreements found can be mostly rationalized in terms of electron correlation errors that lead to wrong charge-transfer and electrostatic Coulomb interactions between CO(2) and AEM-decorated anthracene molecules. Nevertheless, we show that when the concentration of AEM atoms in anthracene is tuned to resemble as closely as possible the electronic structure of AEM-decorated graphene (i.e. an extended two-dimensional material), hybrid exchange-correlation DFT and MP2 methods quantitatively provide similar results.

  17. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  18. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J. Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  19. Spatial effects of aboveground biomass on soil ecological parameters and trace gas fluxes in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation in this area consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. Canopy structure is known to affect microclimate, throughfall and evapotranspiration and thereby controls soil moisture conditions. Consequently, the canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their spatial variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. Distances were calculated in relation to the crown radius. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass carbon C and N, soil respiration as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Each tree was characterized by crown spread, leaf area index and basal area. Preliminary results show that C and N stocks decreased about 50% with depth independently of distance to the tree. Soil water content under the tree crown increased with depth while it decreased under grass cover. Microbial

  20. [Aboveground biomass of Tamarix on piedmont plain of Tianshan Mountains south slope].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenyong; Wang, Ranghui; Zhang, Huizhi; Wang, Lei

    2006-09-01

    Based on the geo-morphological and hydro-geological characteristics, the piedmont plain of Tianshan Mountains south slope was classified into 4 geo-morphological belts, i.e., flood erosion belt, groundwater spill belt, delta belt, and the joining belt of piedmont plain and Tarim floodplain. A field investigation on the Tamarix shrub in this region showed that there was a significant difference in its aboveground biomass among the four belts, ranged from 1428.53 kg x hm(-2) at groundwater spill belt to 111.18 kg x hm(-2) at the joining belt of piedmont plain and Tarim floodplain. The main reason for such a big difference might be the different density of Tamarix shrub on different belts. Both the Tamarix aboveground biomass and the topsoil's salinity were decreased with increasing groundwater level. Groundwater level was the main factor limiting Tamarix growth, while soil salinity was not.

  1. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  2. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  3. CF₃I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingjie; Wu, Taiping; Liu, Weizhou; Zhang, Liyang; Pan, Renming

    2014-03-13

    A revised reaction mechanism of CF3I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon is investigated with quantum chemistry methods using density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption configurations of possible intermediates are carefully examined. The reaction pathway and related transition states are also analyzed. According to our calculations, first, the dehydrofluorination of CHF3 is catalyzed by -COOH groups, which possesses the highest barrier and is accordingly identified as the rate-determining step. Second, the difluorocarbene disproportionation over graphite (001) surface proceeds instead of dimerization. The next reaction steps involving the association of fluoromethine and trifluoromethyl, the fluorine abstractions between intermediates and the iodine abstractions by the desorbed CF3 and CF2CF3 from molecular iodine are also feasible over graphite (001) surfaces. It is also found that the coke deposition in experiments is due to the fluorine abstraction from fluoromethine. This revised mechanism is in agreement with available experimental data and our theoretical computations.

  4. High-density carbon capsule experiments on the national ignition facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J. S.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Döppner, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Robey, H. F.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Divol, L.; Le Pape, S.; Hopkins, L. Berzak; Celliers, P. M.; Landen, O.; Meezan, N. B.; Mackinnon, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    Indirect-drive implosions with a high-density carbon (HDC) capsule were conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to test HDC properties as an ablator material for inertial confinement fusion. A series of five experiments were completed with 76 -μ m -thick HDC capsules using a four-shock laser pulse optimized for HDC. The pulse delivered a total energy of 1.3 MJ with a peak power of 360 TW. The experiment demonstrated good laser to target coupling (˜90 % ) and excellent nuclear performance. A deuterium and tritium gas-filled HDC capsule implosion produced a neutron yield of 1.6 ×1015±3 ×1013 , a yield over simulated in one dimension of 70 % .

  5. Efficient implementation of a van der Waals density functional: application to double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Román-Pérez, Guillermo; Soler, José M

    2009-08-28

    We present an efficient implementation of the van der Waals density functional of Dion et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], which expresses the nonlocal correlation energy as a double spatial integral. We factorize the integration kernel and use fast Fourier transforms to evaluate the self-consistent potential, total energy, and atomic forces, in O(NlogN) operations. The resulting overhead, for medium and large systems, is a small fraction of the total computational cost, representing a dramatic speedup over the O(N(2)) evaluation of the double integral. This opens the realm of first-principles simulations to the large systems of interest in soft matter and biomolecular problems. We apply the method to calculate the binding energies and the barriers for relative translation and rotation in double-wall carbon nanotubes.

  6. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Wood, Weston; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-12-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials.

  7. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, Joseph C.; Hong, Eunice K.; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian K.; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  8. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; ...

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilationmore » lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.« less

  9. High-density carbon capsule experiments on the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Ho, D; Milovich, J; Döppner, T; McNaney, J; MacPhee, A G; Hamza, A; Biener, J; Robey, H F; Dewald, E L; Tommasini, R; Divol, L; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Celliers, P M; Landen, O; Meezan, N B; Mackinnon, A J

    2015-02-01

    Indirect-drive implosions with a high-density carbon (HDC) capsule were conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to test HDC properties as an ablator material for inertial confinement fusion. A series of five experiments were completed with 76-μm-thick HDC capsules using a four-shock laser pulse optimized for HDC. The pulse delivered a total energy of 1.3 MJ with a peak power of 360 TW. The experiment demonstrated good laser to target coupling (∼90%) and excellent nuclear performance. A deuterium and tritium gas-filled HDC capsule implosion produced a neutron yield of 1.6×10^{15}±3×10(13), a yield over simulated in one dimension of 70%.

  10. 2D quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon nanohybrids for high energy density supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Kan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Jiang, Baojiang; Shi, Keying; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are intercalated into the interlayers of the expanded EG with the assistance of a vacuum. Subsequently, the intercalated aniline monomers could assemble on the interlayer surface of the expanded EG, accompanied by the in situ polymerization from aniline monomers to polyaniline. Meanwhile, the expanded EG could be exfoliated to graphite nanosheets. By subsequent pyrolysis and activation processes, the QNPC nanohybrids could be prepared. As supercapacitor electrodes, a typical QNPC12-700 sample derived from the precursor containing an EG content of 12%, with a high level of nitrogen doping of 5.22 at%, offers a high specific capacitance of 305.7 F g-1 (1 A g-1), excellent rate-capability and long-term stability. Notably, an extremely high energy density of 95.7 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 449.7 W kg-1 in an ionic liquid electrolyte can be achieved. The unique structural features and moderate heteroatom doping of the QNPC nanohybrids combines electrochemical double layer and faradaic capacitance contributions, which make these nanohybrids ideal candidates as electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices.Two-dimensional (2D) quasi-ordered nitrogen-enriched porous carbon (QNPC) nanohybrids, with the characteristics of an ultrathin graphite nanosheet framework and thick quasi-ordered nitrogen-doped carbon cladding with a porous texture, have been synthesized via an in situ polymerization assembly method. In the synthesis, the expandable graphite (EG) is enlarged by an intermittent microwave method, and then aniline monomers are

  11. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials. PMID:27502631

  12. Low-density carbonized composite foams for direct-drive laser ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Fung-Ming

    1989-03-01

    The design for a direct-drive, high-gain laser inertial confinement fusion target calls for the use of a low-density, low-atomic-number foam to confine and stabilize liquid deuterium-tritium (DT) in a spherical-shell configuration. Over the past two years, we have successfully developed polystyrene foams (PS) and carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams (CRF) for that purpose. Both candidates are promising materials with unique characteristics. PS has superior mechanical strength and machinability, but its relatively large thermal contraction is a significant disadvantage. CRF has outstanding wettability and dimensional stability in liquid DT; yet it is much more fragile than PS. To combine the strengths of both materials, we have recently developed a polymer composite foam which exceeds PS in mechanical strength, but retains the wettability and dimension stability of CRF. This paper will discuss the preparation, structure, and properties of the polymer composite foams. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of Cross-Link Density on Carbon Dioxide Separation in Polydimethylsiloxane-Norbornene Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, J Casey; Hong, Eunice; Mahurin, Shannon; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-01

    The development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability≈6800 Barrer; CO2 /N2 selectivity≈14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  14. Fabrication of very-low-density, high-stiffness carbon fiber/aluminum hybridized composite with ultra-low density and high stiffness (M-11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Tomoo

    1993-01-01

    Fabrication of a composite material with ultra-low density and high stiffness in microgravity is the objective of the investigation. The composite structure to be obtained is a random three-dimensional array of high modulus, short carbon fibers bonded at contact points by an aluminum alloy coated on the fibers. The material is highly porous and thus has a very low density. The motivation toward the investigation, simulation experiments, choice of the component materials, and on-flight experiment during ballistic trajectory of a NASDA rocket, are described.

  15. Density Functional Studies of the 13C NMR Chemical Shifts in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    Density functional theory has been used to compute the electronic structure and 13C NMR chemical shifts of finite (9,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) capped with fullerene hemispheres and with hydrogen atoms. The chemical shifts and HOMO-LUMO gaps were found to be dependent upon the mode of capping. The shifts of semiconducting and metallic tubes were estimated as being around 130 ppm and 141 ppm, respectively. Periodic boundary calculations on infinite zigzag (n,0) SWNTs with 7⩽n⩽17 were performed. These entities can be characterized by a family index, λ = mod(n,3), and the chemical shifts can be fitted well by a function inversely proportional to the diameter of the tube and proportional to a constant which depends on the nanotube family. Direct comparison of the molecular and periodic approaches can be made if benzene is used as the internal reference. Such a comparison indicates that capping may have a strong effect on the computed properties. Calculations on infinite zigzag (7⩽n⩽10) amine functionalized SWNTs have been performed. The functional group may react with a C-C bond which is parallel or diagonal to the tube axis and both sites have been considered. The shifts of the carbons directly attached to the group are sensitive to the bond which has been functionalized and may therefore be used to discriminate between the two products. Functionalization induces a significant line broadening of the NMR signals but it does not dramatically change the average shift of the unfunctionalized SWNT carbons.

  16. Carbon dioxide activation and dissociation on ceria (110): a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Sherman, Brent J; Lo, Cynthia S

    2013-01-07

    Ceria (CeO(2)) is a promising catalyst for the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to liquid fuels and commodity chemicals, in part because of its high oxygen storage capacity, yet the fundamentals of CO(2) adsorption, activation, and reduction on ceria surfaces remain largely unknown. We use density functional theory, corrected for onsite Coulombic interactions (GGA+U), to explore various adsorption sites and configurations for CO(2) on stoichiometric and reduced ceria (110), the latter with either an in-plane oxygen vacancy or a split oxygen vacancy. We find that CO(2) adsorption on both reduced ceria (110) surfaces is thermodynamically favored over the corresponding adsorption on stoichiometric ceria (110), but the most stable adsorption configuration consists of CO(2) adsorbed parallel to the reduced ceria (110) surface at a split oxygen vacancy. Structural changes in the CO(2) molecule are also observed upon adsorption. At the split vacancy, the molecule bends out of plane to form a unidentate carbonate with the remaining oxygen anion at the surface; this is in stark contrast to the bridged carbonate observed for CO(2) adsorption at the in-plane vacancy. Also, we analyze the pathways for CO(2) conversion to CO on reduced ceria (110). The subtle difference in the energies of activation for the elementary steps suggest that CO(2) dissociation is favored on the split vacancy, while the reverse process of CO oxidation may favor the formation of the in-plane vacancy. We thus show how the structure and properties of the ceria catalyst govern the mechanism of CO(2) activation and reduction.

  17. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Khan, S. F.; Pak, A. E.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; Ma, T.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Field, J. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Hamza, A. V.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations <10 ns. A series of experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.5 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This talk describes these experiments and comparisons with the design code HYDRA. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape; however, other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. The streak camera-based SPIDER diagnostic showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of a low-temperature hot spot. Changes to the laser pulse-shape and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot-spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1 . 8 ×1015 neutrons. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Dibenzothiophene adsorption at boron doped carbon nanoribbons studied within density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Albarrán, P.; Navarro-Santos, P.; Garcia-Ramirez, M. A.; Ricardo-Chávez, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    The adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on bare and boron-doped armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) is being investigated in the framework of the density functional theory by implementing periodic boundary conditions that include corrections from dispersion interactions. The reactivity of the ACNRs is characterized by using the Fukui functions as well as the electrostatic potential as local descriptors. Non-covalent adsorption mechanism is found when using the local Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof functional, regardless of the DBT orientation and adsorption location. The dispersion interactions addition is a milestone to describe the adsorption process. The charge defects introduced in small number (i.e., by doping with B atoms), within the ACNRs increases the selectivity towards sulfur mainly due to the charge depletion at B sites. The DBT magnitude in the adsorption energy shows non-covalent interactions. As a consequence, the configurations where the DBT is adsorbed on a BC3 island increase the adsorption energy compared to random B arrangements. The stability of these configurations can be explained satisfactorily in terms of dipole interactions. Nevertheless, from the charge-density difference analysis and the weak Bader charge-distribution interactions cannot be ruled out completely. This is why the electronic properties of the ribbons are analyzed in order to elucidate the key role played by the B and DBT states in the adsorbed configurations.

  19. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  20. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  1. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2.3 μm. Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  2. Dibenzothiophene adsorption at boron doped carbon nanoribbons studied within density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    López-Albarrán, P.; Navarro-Santos, P.; Garcia-Ramirez, M. A.; Ricardo-Chávez, J. L.

    2015-06-21

    The adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on bare and boron-doped armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) is being investigated in the framework of the density functional theory by implementing periodic boundary conditions that include corrections from dispersion interactions. The reactivity of the ACNRs is characterized by using the Fukui functions as well as the electrostatic potential as local descriptors. Non-covalent adsorption mechanism is found when using the local Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof functional, regardless of the DBT orientation and adsorption location. The dispersion interactions addition is a milestone to describe the adsorption process. The charge defects introduced in small number (i.e., by doping with B atoms), within the ACNRs increases the selectivity towards sulfur mainly due to the charge depletion at B sites. The DBT magnitude in the adsorption energy shows non-covalent interactions. As a consequence, the configurations where the DBT is adsorbed on a BC{sub 3} island increase the adsorption energy compared to random B arrangements. The stability of these configurations can be explained satisfactorily in terms of dipole interactions. Nevertheless, from the charge-density difference analysis and the weak Bader charge-distribution interactions cannot be ruled out completely. This is why the electronic properties of the ribbons are analyzed in order to elucidate the key role played by the B and DBT states in the adsorbed configurations.

  3. Interaction between a single Pt atom and a carbon nanotube studied by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Kawazoe, Y.

    2006-03-01

    Using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation, we have studied the interaction between a single Pt atom and a carbon nanotube. The bridge adsorption site on the outer wall of nanotube is favorable. The curvature affects the binding strength. Compared to the larger nanotube, Pt could bind stronger to the outer wall of a small radius nanotube. For zigzag nanotube, the most stable site on the outer wall is the bridge site with the underlying C-C bond being parallel to the axis of the nanotube, while for the armchair nanotube it is the bridge site with the underlying C-C bond being tilted to the axis of the nanotube. The energy in average differs by ˜1.5eV for adsorbing on both sidewalls of small radius nanotube, while it decreases much for the larger nanotube. Either by penetrating the wall or by substituting one C atom on the wall, the Pt atom is found to be hard to diffuse from the outside to the inside. The studied charge density suggests the weak covalentlike bonding between Pt and C atoms.

  4. Dynamics of Aboveground Phytomass of the Circumpolar Arctic Tundra During the Past Three Decades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Howard E.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Walker, Donald A.; Bhatt, Uma S.; Tucker, Compton J.; Pinzon, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the dynamics of Arctic tundra vegetation throughout the past few decades, using remotely sensed proxies of vegetation, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). While extremely useful, these coarse-scale satellite-derived measurements give us minimal information with regard to how these changes are being expressed on the ground, in terms of tundra structure and function. In this analysis, we used a strong regression model between NDVI and aboveground tundra phytomass, developed from extensive field-harvested measurements of vegetation biomass, to estimate the biomass dynamics of the circumpolar Arctic tundra over the period of continuous satellite records (1982-2010). We found that the southernmost tundra subzones (C-E) dominate the increases in biomass, ranging from 20 to 26%, although there was a high degree of heterogeneity across regions, floristic provinces, and vegetation types. The estimated increase in carbon of the aboveground live vegetation of 0.40 Pg C over the past three decades is substantial, although quite small relative to anthropogenic C emissions. However, a 19.8% average increase in aboveground biomass has major implications for nearly all aspects of tundra ecosystems including hydrology, active layer depths, permafrost regimes, wildlife and human use of Arctic landscapes. While spatially extensive on-the-ground measurements of tundra biomass were conducted in the development of this analysis, validation is still impossible without more repeated, long-term monitoring of Arctic tundra biomass in the field.

  5. Distribution of Aboveground Live Biomass in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Houghton, R. A.; DosSantos Alvala, R. C.; Soares, J. V.; Yu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The amount and spatial distribution of forest biomass in the Amazon basin is a major source of uncertainty in estimating the flux of carbon released from land-cover and land-use change. Direct measurements of aboveground live biomass (AGLB) are limited to small areas of forest inventory plots and site-specific allometric equations that cannot be readily generalized for the entire basin. Furthermore, there is no spaceborne remote sensing instrument that can measure tropical forest biomass directly. To determine the spatial distribution of forest biomass of the Amazon basin, we report a method based on remote sensing metrics representing various forest structural parameters and environmental variables, and more than 500 plot measurements of forest biomass distributed over the basin. A decision tree approach was used to develop the spatial distribution of AGLB for seven distinct biomass classes of lowland old-growth forests with more than 80% accuracy. AGLB for other vegetation types, such as the woody and herbaceous savanna and secondary forests, was directly estimated with a regression based on satellite data. Results show that AGLB is highest in Central Amazonia and in regions to the east and north, including the Guyanas. Biomass is generally above 300Mgha(sup 1) here except in areas of intense logging or open floodplains. In Western Amazonia, from the lowlands of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia to the Andean mountains, biomass ranges from 150 to 300Mgha(sup 1). Most transitional and seasonal forests at the southern and northwestern edges of the basin have biomass ranging from 100 to 200Mgha(sup 1). The AGLB distribution has a significant correlation with the length of the dry season. We estimate that the total carbon in forest biomass of the Amazon basin, including the dead and below ground biomass, is 86 PgC with +/- 20% uncertainty.

  6. Paleoseawater density reconstruction and its implication for cold-water coral carbonate mounds in the northeast Atlantic through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Flögel, Sascha; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Raddatz, Jacek; Liebetrau, Volker

    2016-03-01

    Carbonate buildups and mounds are impressive biogenic structures throughout Earth history. In the recent NE Atlantic, cold-water coral (CWC) reefs form giant carbonate mounds of up to 300 m of elevation. The expansion of these coral carbonate mounds is paced by climatic changes during the past 2.7 Myr. Environmental control on their development is directly linked to controls on its main constructors, the reef-building CWCs. Seawater density has been identified as one of the main controlling parameter of CWC growth in the NE Atlantic. One possibility is the formation of a pycnocline above the carbonate mounds, which is increasing the hydrodynamic regime, supporting elevated food supply, and possibly facilitating the distribution of coral larvae. The potential to reconstruct past seawater densities from stable oxygen isotopes of benthic foraminifera has been further developed: a regional equation gives reliable results for three different settings, peak interglacials (e.g., Holocene), peak glacials (e.g., Last Glacial Maximum), and intermediate setting (between the two extremes). Seawater densities are reconstructed for two different NE Atlantic CWC carbonate mounds in the Porcupine Seabight indicating that the development of carbonate mounds is predominantly found at a seawater density range between 27.3 and 27.7 kg m-3 (σΘ notation). Comparable to recent conditions, we interpret the reconstructed density range as a pycnocline serving as boundary layer, on which currents develop, carrying nutrition and possibly coral larvae. The close correlation of CWC reef growth with reconstructed seawater densities through the Pleistocene highlights the importance of pycnoclines and intermediate water mass dynamics.

  7. Greater cardiomyocyte density on aligned compared with random carbon nanofibers in polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Asiri, Abdullah M; Marwani, Hadi M; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) randomly embedded in poly (lactic-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) composites have recently been shown to promote cardiomyocyte growth when compared with conventional PLGA without CNFs. It was shown then that PLGA:CNF composites were conductive and that conductivity increased as greater amounts of CNFs were added to pure PLGA. Moreover, tensile tests showed that addition of CNFs increased the tensile strength of the PLGA composite to mimic that of natural heart tissue. Most importantly, throughout all cytocompatibility experiments, cardiomyocytes were viable and expressed important biomarkers that were greatest on 50:50 wt% CNF:PLGA composites. The increased selective adsorption of fibronectin and vitronectin (critical proteins that mediate cardiomyocyte function) onto such composites proved to be the mechanism of action. However, the natural myocardium is anisotropic in terms of mechanical and electrical properties, which was not emulated in these prior PLGA:CNF composites. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to create and characterize CNFs aligned in PLGA composites (at 50:50 wt%, including their mechanical and electrical properties and cardiomyocyte density), comparing such results with randomly oriented CNFs in PLGA. Specifically, CNFs were added to soluble biodegradable PLGA (50:50 PGA:PLA weight ratio) and aligned by applying a voltage and then allowing the polymer to cure. CNF surface micron patterns (20 μm wide) on PLGA were then fabricated through a mold method to further mimic myocardium anisotropy. The results demonstrated anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties and significantly improved cardiomyocyte density for up to 5 days on CNFs aligned in PLGA compared with being randomly oriented in PLGA. These results indicate that CNFs aligned in PLGA should be further explored for improving cardiomyocyte density, which is necessary in numerous cardiovascular applications. PMID:25489241

  8. NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVEGROUND PORTION IS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVEGROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW WITH ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IN THE FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Elicitors aboveground: an alternative for control of a belowground pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defense pathways mediate multitrophic interactions above and belowground. Understanding the effects of these pathways on pests and natural enemies above and belowground holds great potential for designing effective control strategies. Here we investigate the effects of aboveground stimulation ...

  11. Eliciting maize defense pathways aboveground attracts belowground biocontrol agents

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Pereira, Ramom Vasconcelos; Moino Junior, Alcides; Pareja, Martin; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways mediate multitrophic interactions above and belowground. Understanding the effects of these pathways on pests and natural enemies above and belowground holds great potential for designing effective control strategies. Here we investigate the effects of aboveground stimulation of plant defense pathways on the interactions between corn, the aboveground herbivore adult Diabrotica speciosa, the belowground herbivore larval D. speciosa, and the subterranean ento-mopathogenic nematode natural enemy Heterorhabditis amazonensis. We show that adult D. speciosa recruit to aboveground herbivory and methyl salicylate treatment, that larval D. speciosa are relatively indiscriminate, and that H. amazonensis en-tomopathogenic nematodes recruit to corn fed upon by adult D. speciosa. These results suggest that entomopathogenicnematodes belowground can be highly attuned to changes in the aboveground parts of plants and that biological control can be enhanced with induced plant defense in this and similar systems. PMID:27811992

  12. Proven Alternatives for Aboveground Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper, developed for EPA's Engineering Forum, identifies and summarizes experiences with proven aboveground treatment alternatives for arsenic in groundwater, and provides information on their relative effectiveness and cost.

  13. Application of hybrid supercapacitor using granule Li4Ti5O12/activated carbon with variation of current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Gwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2017-03-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors composed of granule Li4Ti5O12 as an anode and activated carbon as a cathode with different current densities. It is demonstrated that the hybrid supercapacitors show good initial discharge capacities were ranged from 39.8 to 46.4 F g-1 in the current densities range of 0.3-1 A g-1. The performance degradation is proportional to the current density due to quick gassing, resulting from H2O and HF formation. In particular, the hybrid supercapacitors show the pretty good cycling stability of 97.4%, even at the high current density of 0.8 A g-1, which are among most important performance in the real application for energy storage devices. Therefore, we believe that hybrid supercapacitors using granule Li4Ti5O12/activated carbon are eligible for the promising next generation energy devices.

  14. Realizing both high energy and high power densities by twisting three carbon-nanotube-based hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Yang; Cheng, Xunliang; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Fang, Xin; Jiang, Yishu; Chen, Peining; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-09-14

    Energy storage devices, such as lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors, are required for the modern electronics. However, the intrinsic characteristics of low power densities in batteries and low energy densities in supercapacitors have limited their applications. How to simultaneously realize high energy and power densities in one device remains a challenge. Herein a fiber-shaped hybrid energy-storage device (FESD) formed by twisting three carbon nanotube hybrid fibers demonstrates both high energy and power densities. For the FESD, the energy density (50 mWh cm(-3) or 90 Wh kg(-1) ) many times higher than for other forms of supercapacitors and approximately 3 times that of thin-film batteries; the power density (1 W cm(-3) or 5970 W kg(-1) ) is approximately 140 times of thin-film lithium-ion battery. The FESD is flexible, weaveable and wearable, which offers promising advantages in the modern electronics.

  15. Aboveground and belowground competition between willow Salix caprea its understory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, Markéta; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effects of aboveground and belowground competition with the willow S. caprea on its understory plant community were studied in unreclaimed post-mining sites. Belowground competition was evaluated by comparing (i) frames inserted into the soil that excluded woody roots (frame treatment), (ii) frames that initially excluded woody root growth but then allowed regrowth of the roots (open-frame treatment), and (iii) undisturbed soil (no-frame treatment). These treatments were combined with S. caprea thinning to assess the effect of aboveground competition. Three years after the start of the experiment, aboveground competition from S. caprea (as modified by thinning of the S. caprea canopy) had not affected understory biomass or species number but had affected species composition. In contrast, belowground competition significantly affected both the aboveground and belowground biomass of the understory. The aboveground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame treatment (which excluded woody roots) than in the other two treatments. The belowground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame than in the open-frame treatment. Unlike aboveground competition (light availability), belowground competition did not affect understory species composition. Our results suggest that S. caprea is an important component during plant succession on post-mining sites because it considerably modifies its understory plant community. Belowground competition is a major reason for the low cover and biomass of the herbaceous understory in S. caprea stands on post-mining sites.

  16. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Vu Thanh; van Kuijk, Marijke; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB) and root biomass (RB) based on 300 (of 45 species) and 40 (of 25 species) sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H), wood density (WD) was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam. PMID:27309718

  17. Evidence of low-density and high-density liquid phases and isochore end point for water confined to carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kentaro; Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Francisco, Joseph S; Yasuoka, Kenji; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-04-03

    Possible transition between two phases of supercooled liquid water, namely the low- and high-density liquid water, has been only predicted to occur below 230 K from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. However, such a phase transition cannot be detected in the laboratory because of the so-called "no-man's land" under deeply supercooled condition, where only crystalline ices have been observed. Here, we show MD simulation evidence that, inside an isolated carbon nanotube (CNT) with a diameter of 1.25 nm, both low- and high-density liquid water states can be detected near ambient temperature and above ambient pressure. In the temperature-pressure phase diagram, the low- and high-density liquid water phases are separated by the hexagonal ice nanotube (hINT) phase, and the melting line terminates at the isochore end point near 292 K because of the retracting melting line from 292 to 278 K. Beyond the isochore end point (292 K), low- and high-density liquid becomes indistinguishable. When the pressure is increased from 10 to 600 MPa along the 280-K isotherm, we observe that water inside the 1.25-nm-diameter CNT can undergo low-density liquid to hINT to high-density liquid reentrant first-order transitions.

  18. The role of amine surface density in carbon dioxide adsorption on functionalized mixed oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Young, Pria D; Notestein, Justin M

    2011-11-18

    Supported amines are considered as adsorbents to replace aqueous amines for carbon capture and for CO(2) capture/conversion into chemicals. Here, amines are grafted to SiO(2) or Ti-SiO(2) by using aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) or (3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tert-butylcarbamate (TESPtBC) and then removing the carbamate group introduced by the latter by mild heating to 'deprotect' the amine. Structures are verified by using (13) C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy, acid titration, thermogravimetric analysis, and elemental analysis. Diffuse reflectance UV/Visible spectroscopy shows that amines from APTES coordinate directly to Ti cations, whereas Ti cations remain coordinatively unsaturated after grafting of TESPtBC and deprotection. CO(2) chemisorption is studied as a function of amine precursor, average surface density, and the presence of Ti. CO(2) uptake increases from <0.02 CO(2) per amine for as-synthesized TESPtBC materials to only approximately 0.05 CO(2) per amine for the isolated amines present after deprotection. In contrast, clustered amines from APTES chemisorb up to approximately 0.35 CO(2) per amine. Cooperative ammonium carbamates form preferentially above an apparent local density of 0.6 amines per nm(2) from APTES, but do not form even up to 0.9 amines per nm(2) for TESPtBC-derived materials. This suggests that the true local surface density form APTES is underestimated by as much as 150 %. CO(2) uptake falls to <0.01 CO(2) per amine for ATPES on TiSiO(2), but uptake is less affected for the 'protected' TESPtBC precursor. These results show that TESPtBC may be a viable precursor for applications in acid-base cooperative CO(2) conversion catalysts, and that variation in the local amine surface density and the chemistry of the underlying support may account for some of the large variability in reported CO(2) capacities of supported amine materials in literature.

  19. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  20. Effects of exposure to carbon disulphide on low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and diastolic blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Egeland, G M; Burkhart, G A; Schnorr, T M; Hornung, R W; Fajen, J M; Lee, S T

    1992-01-01

    The relation of carbon disulphide (CS2) exposure to risk factors for ischaemic heart disease was recently examined using data from a 1979 cross sectional study of 410 male textile workers, of whom 165 were exposed and 245 were unexposed to CS2. Average eight hour CS2 exposure concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 11.8 ppm by job title category among the exposed workers. A significant and positive linear trend in low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (LDLc) and diastolic blood pressure with increasing CS2 exposure was found after adjustment for potential confounders. When exposure was examined as a categorical variable (none, low, moderate, and high), the high exposure group had an adjusted mean LDLc that was 0.32 mmol/l greater than the non-exposed group (p = 0.02), and an adjusted mean diastolic blood pressure that was 3.16 mm Hg greater than the non-exposed group (p = 0.09). The effect of CS2 on diastolic blood pressure was strengthened in analyses limited to exposed workers: the high exposure group had an adjusted mean diastolic blood pressure that was 5 mm Hg greater than that of the low exposed group (p = 0.03). Triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting glucose concentration, and systolic blood pressure were not affected by exposure. Blood lead concentration was positively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The results indicate that relatively modest exposure to CS2 may raise LDLc concentration and diastolic blood pressure and suggest mechanisms by which exposure to CS2 may influence risk of ischaemic heart disease. Also the results provide further support for the hypothesis of a possible association between blood lead concentration and blood pressure. PMID:1571299

  1. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  2. Insights on Coral Adaptation from Polyp and Colony Morphology, Skeletal Density Banding and Carbonate Depositional Facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Hill, C. A.; Piggot, A. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    densities were measured in vertical cross-sections of each whole corallum using standard X-ray techniques utilizing a calibrated step wedge to portray banding and overall density. The combination of the stereoscope and X-ray analyses across spatial and temporal gradients provide insight into how coral reef carbonate depositional facies are affected by changes in key environmental parameters, such as increased pollution, or changing photosynthetic activity with depth or sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  3. Near-vacuum hohlraums with uranium walls for driving high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. V.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Ho, D. D.; Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental results for unlined uranium near-vacuum hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility. X-ray wall losses are lower in uranium than in gold at radiation temperatures near 300 eV. In addition, the intensity of x-rays with energy hν > 1 . 8 keV is lower for uranium hohlraums. The softer uranium spectrum allows the use of ablators with lower levels of dopants that reduce rocket efficiency and increase the risk of polluting the hot-spot with emissive material. Experiments in the ViewFactor platform measured 5% higher total x-ray intensity and 30% lower intensity of hν > 1 . 8 keV for uranium relative to gold. Back-lit implosions using undoped high-density carbon (HDC, or diamond) capsules achieved a velocity of 400 +/- 20 km/s compared to 360 +/- 20 km/s for gold. These results have led the NIF HDC campaign to baseline uranium hohlraums for upcoming experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablatorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Milovich, J. L.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Casey, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Pak, A.; Peterson, J. L.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] have explored driving high-density carbon ablators with near-vacuum hohlraums, which use a minimal amount of helium gas fill. These hohlraums show improved efficiency relative to conventional gas-filled hohlraums in terms of minimal backscatter, minimal generation of suprathermal electrons, and increased hohlraum-capsule coupling. Given these advantages, near-vacuum hohlraums are a promising choice for pursuing high neutron yield implosions. Long pulse symmetry control, though, remains a challenge, as the hohlraum volume fills with material. Two mitigation methodologies have been explored, dynamic beam phasing and increased case-to-capsule ratio (larger hohlraum size relative to capsule). Unexpectedly, experiments have demonstrated that the inner laser beam propagation is better than predicted by nominal simulations, and an enhanced beam propagation model is required to match measured hot spot symmetry. Ongoing work is focused on developing a physical model which captures this enhanced propagation and on utilizing the enhanced propagation to drive longer laser pulses than originally predicted in order to reach alpha-heating dominated neutron yields.

  5. Comparison of high-density carbon implosions in unlined uranium versus gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Meezan, Nathan; Tommasini, Riccardo; Khan, Shahab; MacKinnon, Andrew; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Divol, Laurent; Lepape, Sebastien; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn; Pak, Arthur; Nikroo, Abbas; Landen, Otto

    2016-10-01

    In Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions, laser energy is converted to x-ray radiation in hohlraums with High-Z walls. At radiation temperatures near 300 eV relevant for ICF experiments, the radiative losses in heating the wall are lower for U than for Au hohlraums. Furthermore, the intensity of the ``M-band'' x-rays with photon energies h ν >1.8 keV is lower for uranium, allowing for reduced capsule dopant concentrations employed to minimize inner ablator preheat and hence keep favorable fuel/ablator interface Atwood numbers. This in turn improves the ablator rocket efficiency and reduces the risk of polluting the hot-spot with emissive dopant material. The first uranium vacuum hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with undoped high-density carbon (HDC, or diamond) capsules have demonstrated 30% lower ``M-band'' intensity relative to Au, resulting in lower inflight ablator thickness due to reduced preheat. In addition, fusion neutron yields are 2x higher in U than in Au hohlraums for D2-gas filled capsule implosions at ICF relevant velocities of 380 +/-20 km/s. These results have led the NIF ICF implosions to routinely employ U hohlraums. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Enhanced electrical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube-epoxy nanocomposites with high packing density

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    During their synthesis, multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be aligned and impregnated in a polymer matrix to form an electrically conductive and flexible nanocomposite with high backing density. The material exhibits the highest reported electrical conductivity of CNT-epoxy composites (350 S/m). Here, we show how conductive atomic force microscopy can be used to study the electrical transport mechanism in order to explain the enhanced electrical properties of the composite. The high spatial resolution and versatility of the technique allows us to further decouple the two main contributions to the electrical transport: (1) the intrinsic resistance of the tube and (2) the tunneling resistance due to nanoscale gaps occurring between the epoxy-coated tubes along the composite. The results show that the material behaves as a conductive polymer, and the electrical transport is governed by electron tunneling at interconnecting CNT-polymer junctions. We also point out the theoretical formulation of the nanoscale electrical transport between the AFM tip and the sample in order to derive both the composite conductivity and the CNT intrinsic properties. The enhanced electrical properties of the composite are attributed to high degree of alignment, the CNT purity, and the large tube diameter which lead to low junction resistance. By controlling the tube diameter and using other polymers, the nanocomposite electrical conductivity can be improved. PMID:23158381

  7. Hydrogen isotope separation in carbon nanotubes: calculation of coupled rotational and translational States at high densities.

    PubMed

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Johnson, J Karl

    2010-03-23

    The effect of the quantized rotational degrees of freedom of hydrogen on the adsorption and sieving properties in carbon nanotubes is studied using computer simulations. We have developed a highly efficient multiple timestep algorithm for hybrid Monte Carlo sampling of quantized rotor configurations and extended the grand canonical Boltzmann bias method to rigid linear molecules. These new computational tools allow us to calculate accurately the quantum sieving selectivities for cases of extreme two-dimensional confinement as a function of pressure. The para-T2/para-H2 selectivity at 20 K is analyzed as a function of the tube diameter and the density of adsorbed hydrogen. Extraordinarily high selectivities, up to 2.6 x 10(8), are observed in the narrowest nanotube. The quantized nature of the rotational degrees of freedom is found to dramatically affect adsorption and selectivity for hydrogen isotopes adsorbed in very narrow nanotubes. The T2/H2 zero-pressure selectivity increases from 2.4 x 10(4) to 1.7 x 10(8) in the (3,6) nanotube at 20 K when quantum rotations are accounted for. The isotopic selectivity is found to increase with pressure, tending to a constant value at saturation. A simplified mean-field model is used to discuss the origin of this behavior.

  8. CH spectroscopy for carbon chemical erosion analysis in high density low temperature hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Westerhout, J.; Rooij, G. J. van; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Rapp, J.

    2009-10-12

    The CH A-X molecular band is measured upon seeding the hydrogen plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI [electron temperature T{sub e}=0.1-2.5 eV and electron density n{sub e}=(0.5-5)x10{sup 20} m{sup -3}] with methane. Calculated inverse photon efficiencies for these conditions range from 3 up to >10{sup 6} due to a steeply decreasing electron excitation cross section. The experiments contradict the calculations and show a constant effective inverse photon efficiency of {approx}100 for T{sub e}<1 eV. The discrepancy is explained as the CH A level is populated through dissociative recombination of the molecular ions formed by charge exchange. Collisional de-excitation is observed for n{sub e}>5x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} and 0.1 eVcarbon erosion measurements in future fusion reactors such as ITER.

  9. Spin-orbit coupling in nearly metallic chiral carbon nanotubes: a density-functional based study.

    PubMed

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2017-03-29

    Spin-orbit interaction in carbon nanotubes has been under debate for several years and a variety of theoretical calculations and experimental results have been published. Here, we present an accurate implementation of spin-orbit interactions in a density-functional theory framework including both core and valence orbital contributions, thus using the full potential of the system. We find that the spin-splitting of the frontier bands of armchair nanotubes is of the order of several μeV and does not strongly depend on the diameter of the nanotube. We also provide a systematic analysis of the band splitting in chiral nanotubes as a function of the diameter and the chiral angle. Very good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental results is overall found. In particular, our approach can be of great relevance in view of the recently discovered chirality-induced spin selectivity, since it allows us to include not only atomic contributions to the spin-orbit interaction, but more importantly, global contributions to the potential arising from the geometric structure (topology) of the system. Our methodology can thus encode effects such as helical symmetry in a straightforward way.

  10. Enhanced chondrocyte densities on carbon nanotube composites: the combined role of nanosurface roughness and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Khang, Dongwoo; Park, Grace E; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-07-01

    Simultaneous incorporation of intrinsic nanosurface roughness and external electrical stimulation may maximize the regeneration of articular cartilage tissue more than on nanosmooth, electrically nonstimulated biomaterials. Here, we report enhanced functions of chondrocytes (cartilage synthesizing cells) on electrically and nonelectrically stimulated highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNT) in polycarbonate urethane (PCU) compared to, respectively, stimulated pure PCU. Specifically, compared to conventional longitudinal (or vertical) electrical stimulation of chondrocytes on conducting surfaces which require high voltage, we developed a lateral electrical stimulation across CNT/PCU composite films of low voltage that enhanced chondrocyte functions. Chondrocyte adhesion and long-term cell densities (up to 2 days) were enhanced (more than 50%) on CNT/PCU composites compared to PCU alone without electrical stimulation. This study further explained why by measuring greater amounts of initial fibronectin adsorption (a key protein that mediates chondrocyte adhesion) on CNT/PCU composites which were more hydrophilic (than pure PCU) due to greater nanometer roughness. Importantly, the same trend was observed and was even significantly enhanced when chondrocytes were subjected to electrical stimulation (more than 200%) compared to nonstimulated CNT/PCU. For this reason, this study provided direct evidence of the positive role that conductive CNT/PCU films can play in promoting functions of chondrocytes for cartilage regeneration.

  11. Characterizing uncertainties of the national-scale forest gross aboveground biomass (AGB) loss estimate: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S.; Potapov, P.; Turubanova, S.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern remote sensing techniques enable the mapping and monitoring of aboveground biomass (AGB) carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where a national forest inventory (NFI) has yet to be established due to a lack of infrastructure and political instability. We demonstrate a method for producing national-scale gross AGB loss estimates and quantifying uncertainty of the estimates using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Forest cover type and loss were characterized using published Landsat-based data sets and related to LIDAR-derived biomass data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). We produced two gross AGB loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a conservative estimate accounting for classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a maximal estimate that also took into consideration omitted change at the 30m spatial resolution. Omitted disturbances were largely related to smallholder agriculture, the detection of which is scale-dependent. The use of LIDAR data as a substitute for NFI data to estimate AGB loss based on Landsat-derived activity data was demonstrated. Comparisons of our forest cover loss and AGB estimates with published studies raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and its impact on carbon stock change estimation using remotely sensed data.

  12. [Soil seed bank and its correlations with aboveground vegetation and environmental factors in water level fluctuating zone of Danjiangkou Reservoir, Central China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Xue; Zhan, Juan; Shi, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Long-qing

    2013-03-01

    Taking the water level fluctuating zone of the Danjiangkou Reservoir as a case, and by the method of hierarchical cluster analysis, the soil seed banks at 37 sampling plots within the areas of 140-145 m elevation were divided into 6 groups, and the species composition, density, and diversity of the soil seed banks among the groups were compared. The differences between the soil seed banks and the aboveground vegetations were analyzed by S0rensen similarity coefficient, and the correlations among the soil seed banks, aboveground vegetations, and environmental factors were explored by principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariable regression analysis. At the same altitudes of the water level fluctuating zone, the species composition of the soil seed banks had obvious heterogeneity, and the density and diversity indices of the soil seed banks among different groups were great. The similarity coefficient between the soil seed banks and aboveground vegetations was low, and the species number in the soil seed banks was obviously lesser than that in the aboveground vegetations. The density of the soil seed banks was highly positively correlated with the aboveground vegetations coverage and species number and the soil texture, but highly negatively correlated with the soil water-holding capacity and soil porosity.

  13. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed here is a device comprising a porous carbon aerogel or composite thereof as an energy storage material, catalyst support, sensor or adsorbent, wherein the porous carbon aerogel comprises a network of interconnected struts comprising carbon nanotube bundles covalently crosslinked by graphitic carbon nanoparticles, wherein the carbon nanotubes account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel and the graphitic carbon nanoparticles account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel, and wherein the aerogel has an electrical conductivity of at least 10 S/m and is capable of withstanding strains of more than 10% before fracture.

  14. Strings of Porous Carbon Polyhedrons as Self-Standing Cathode Host for High-Energy-Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yazhi; Li, Gaoran; Fu, Jing; Chen, Zhongwei; Peng, Xinsheng

    2017-03-22

    Rational design of cathode hosts with high electrical conductivity and strong sulfur confinement is a great need for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein, we report a self-standing, hybrid-nanostructured cathode host comprised of metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived porous carbon polyhedrons and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the significant improvement of both the electrode cyclability and energy density. The strong coupling of the intertwined CNTs and strung porous carbon polyhedrons as a binder-free thin film significantly enhances the long-range electronic conductivity and provides abundant active interfaces as well as robust electrode integrity for sulfur electrochemistry. Attributed to the synergistic combination of the CNTs and carbon polyhedrons, the obtained sulfur electrodes exhibit outstanding cyclability, an excellent high-rate response up to 10 C, and an ultra-high volumetric capacity of 960 Ah L(-1) .

  15. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS IN OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon isotope ratios ( 13C) of tree rings are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstruction and for inferring canopy water-use efficiency (WUE). However, the responsiveness of carbon isotope discrimination ( ) to site disturbance and resource availability has only rarely been ...

  16. Variability of aboveground litter inputs alters soil physicochemical and biological processes: a meta-analysis of litterfall-manipulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, L.; Sayer, E. J.

    2013-03-01

    Global change has been shown to greatly alter the amount of aboveground litter inputs to soil, which could cause substantial cascading effects on belowground biogeochemical cyling. Although having been studied extensively, there is uncertainty about how changes in aboveground litter inputs affect soil carbon and nutrient turnover and transformation. Here, we conducted a comprehensive compilation of 68 studies on litter addition or removal experiments, and used meta-analysis to assess the responses of soil physicochemical properties and carbon and nutrient cycling under changed aboveground litter inputs. Our results suggested that litter addition or removal could significantly alter soil temperature and moisture, but not soil pH. Litter inputs were more crucial in buffering soil temperature and moisture fluctuations in grassland than in forest. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon and total carbon in the mineral soil increased with increasing litter inputs, suggesting that soil acted as a~net carbon sink although carbon loss and transformation increased with increasing litter inputs. Total nitrogen and the C : N ratio in the mineral soil increased with increased litter inputs. However, there was no correlation between litter inputs and extractable inorganic nitrogen in the mineral soil. Compared to other ecosystems, tropical and subtropical forests are more sensitive to variation in litter inputs. Increased or decreased litter inputs altered the turnover and accumulation of soil carbon and nutrient in tropical and subtropical forests more substantially over a shorter time period compared to other ecosystems. Overall, our study suggested that, although the magnitude of responses differed greatly among ecosystems, increased litter inputs generally accelerated the decomposition and accumulation of carbon and nutrients in soil, and decreased litter inputs reduced them.

  17. High power density supercapacitors based on the carbon dioxide activated D-glucose derived carbon electrodes and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooming, T.; Thomberg, T.; Kurig, H.; Jänes, A.; Lust, E.

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, constant current charge/discharge and the constant power discharge methods have been applied to establish the electrochemical characteristics of the electrical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) consisting of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMImBF4) ionic liquid and microporous carbon electrodes. Microporous carbon material used for preparation of electrodes (GDAC - glucose derived activated carbon), has been synthesised from D-(+)-glucose by the hydrothermal carbonization method, including subsequent pyrolysis, carbon dioxide activation and surface cleaning step with hydrogen. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area (SBET = 1540 m2 g-1), specific surface area calculated using the non-local density functional theory in conjunction with stable adsorption integral equation using splines (SAIEUS) model SSAIEUS = 1820 m2 g-1, micropore surface area (Smicro = 1535 m2 g-1), total pore volume (Vtot = 0.695 cm3 g-1) and the pore size distribution were obtained from the N2 sorption data. The SBET, Smicro and Vtot values have been correlated with the electrochemical characteristics strongly dependent on the carbon activation conditions applied for EDLCs. Wide region of ideal polarizability (ΔV ≤ 3.2 V), very short charging/discharging time constant (2.7 s), and high specific series capacitance (158 F g-1) have been calculated for the optimized carbon material GDAC-10h (activation of GDAC with CO2 during 10 h) in EMImBF4 demonstrating that this system can be used for completing the EDLC with high energy- and power densities.

  18. Spatial distribution of U.S. household carbon footprints reveals suburbanization undermines greenhouse gas benefits of urban population density.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher; Kammen, Daniel M

    2014-01-21

    Which municipalities and locations within the United States contribute the most to household greenhouse gas emissions, and what is the effect of population density and suburbanization on emissions? Using national household surveys, we developed econometric models of demand for energy, transportation, food, goods, and services that were used to derive average household carbon footprints (HCF) for U.S. zip codes, cities, counties, and metropolitan areas. We find consistently lower HCF in urban core cities (∼ 40 tCO2e) and higher carbon footprints in outlying suburbs (∼ 50 tCO2e), with a range from ∼ 25 to >80 tCO2e in the 50 largest metropolitan areas. Population density exhibits a weak but positive correlation with HCF until a density threshold is met, after which range, mean, and standard deviation of HCF decline. While population density contributes to relatively low HCF in the central cities of large metropolitan areas, the more extensive suburbanization in these regions contributes to an overall net increase in HCF compared to smaller metropolitan areas. Suburbs alone account for ∼ 50% of total U.S. HCF. Differences in the size, composition, and location of household carbon footprints suggest the need for tailoring of greenhouse gas mitigation efforts to different populations.

  19. Carbon nanofibers with radially grown graphene sheets derived from electrospinning for aqueous supercapacitors with high working voltage and energy density.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie; Deng, Xianyu; Dai, Chenglong; Bai, Xuedong

    2013-06-07

    Improvement of energy density is an urgent task for developing advanced supercapacitors. In this paper, aqueous supercapacitors with high voltage of 1.8 V and energy density of 29.1 W h kg(-1) were fabricated based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Na2SO4 electrolyte. The CNFs with radially grown graphene sheets (GSs) and small average diameter down to 11 nm were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization in NH3. The radially grown GSs contain between 1 and a few atomic layers with their edges exposed on the surface. The CNFs are doped with nitrogen and oxygen with different concentrations depending on the carbonizing temperature. The supercapacitors exhibit excellent cycling performance with the capacity retention over 93.7% after 5000 charging-discharging cycles. The unique structure, possessing radially grown GSs, small diameter, and heteroatom doping of the CNFs, and application of neutral electrolyte account for the high voltage and energy density of the present supercapacitors. The present supercapacitors are of high promise for practical application due to the high energy density and the advantages of neutral electrolyte including low cost, safety, low corrosivity, and convenient assembly in air.

  20. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires reaching fast implosion velocities, which highlights the need for a highly efficient hohlraum to drive indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. Gas-filled hohlraums are typically utilized due to the pulse length (15-20 ns) needed to drive plastic (CH) capsules. With the recent use of 3× denser high-density carbon (HDC) capsules, ignition pulses can be less than 10 ns in duration, providing the opportunity to utilize near-vacuum hohlraums (NVH) to drive ignition-relevant implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with minimal laser-plasma instabilities which complicate standard gas-filled hohlraums. Initial NVH implosions on the NIF have demonstrated coupling efficiency significantly higher than observed in gas-filled hohlraums - backscatter losses less than 2% and virtually no suprathermal electron generation. A major design challenge for the NVH is symmetry control. Without tamping gas, the hohlraum wall quickly expands filling the volume with gold plasma. However, results to-date indicate that the inner-cone beams propagate freely to the hohlraum wall for at least 6.5 ns. With minimal predicted cross-beam power transfer, this propagation enables symmetry control via dynamic beam phasing - time-dependent direct adjustment of the inner- and outer-cone laser pulses. A series of experiments with an HDC ablator and NVH culminated in a 6 ns, 1.2 MJ cryogenic DT layered implosion yielding 1.8 × 1015 neutrons--significantly higher yield than any CH implosion at comparable energy. This implosion reached an ignition-relevant velocity -350 km/s - with no observed ablator mix in the hot spot. Recent experiments have explored two-shock designs in a larger, 6.72 mm hohlraum, and upcoming experiments will incrementally extend the pulse duration toward a 9 ns long, three-shock ignition design. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Organoclay dispersion in linear low-density polyethylene and maleated linear low-density polyethylene via supercritical carbon dioxide processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Matthew John

    Research into polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCN’s) has been ongoing for decades as a result of the property enhancements offered by clay. To fully exploit these property enhancements, organically modified clays (organoclays) are utilized to promote clay delamination by reducing the disparity between the hydrophilicity of the clay and the hydrophobicity of the highly used polyolefin polymer. Since the organic modification of organoclays can degrade at temperatures typical to many polymers during melt-mix processing, this work utilizes the low-temperature processing fluid supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ) to disperse an organoclay into the highly used polymer LLDPE and ascertains the associated processing conditions for achieving this goal. Investigations into the LLDPE resin size, scCO2 processing time, scCO2 capability and the processing component compatibility were undertaken to better understand the important parameters to achieving organoclay dispersion, in terms of infusion and intercalation/exfoliation behavior. A LLDPE pellet resin showed improved dispersion and obtainable information over that of a granule resin, securing the choice of resin for subsequent experiments. Experiments undertaken with pellet resin exhibited that a 1-hr processing time was insufficient for organoclay infusion into LLDPE, however when infusion occurs, intercalation/exfoliation can be affected by scCO 2. Increasing the compatibility of LLDPE with clay and the processing fluid revealed that the increased compatibility had altered the effect of scCO2. Further analysis with the 93A-infused samples was conducted in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of scCO2 processing, such as the quantity and size of clay particles dispersed and changes to the polymer incurred by processing.

  2. Aboveground and belowground plant traits as drivers of microbial abundance and activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxendale, Catherine; Lavorel, Sandra; Grigulis, Karl; Legay, Nicolas; Krainer, Ute; Bahn, Michael; Kastl, Eva; Pommier, Thomas; Bardgett, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Although there is growing awareness of the roles that plant-soil interactions play in regulating ecosystem processes, our understanding of the role that specific aboveground and belowground plant traits play in defining them is limited. In this study, we aimed to develop a conceptual model linking plant functional trait impacts on soil microbial functional diversity and their coupled effects on ecosystem processes. This was done by replicating three mesocosm studies, based on model sub-alpine grasslands, across three sites in different parts of Europe as part of the pan-European project, VITAL. We manipulated community plant traits by planting communities of varying abundance and dominance of 4 common grassland species. After 1.5 years, we then measured aboveground traits (specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf nitrogen and carbon content and leaf C:N ratio), belowground traits (specific root length, average diameter, root dry matter content, root nitrogen and carbon content and root C:N ratio) microbial community abundance (using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and gene abundance of nitrifier and denitrifier communities), and microbial activity (via potential nitrification and denitrification rates). We present links between manipulated community traits, microbial properties and ecosystem processes, supporting the role of plant traits in driving microbial properties.

  3. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Yuan, Mengting M.; Xie, Jianping; Li, Dejun; Qin, Yujia; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass) is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened. PMID:27677789

  4. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Yuan, Mengting M; Xie, Jianping; Li, Dejun; Qin, Yujia; Hale, Lauren E; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-09-27

    Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass) is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened.

  5. Reducing Uncertainties in Satellite-derived Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimates using a High Resolution Forest Cover Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Milesi, C.; Basu, S.; Kumar, U.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). The uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties for AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully developed an approach using a machine learning algorithm and High-Performance-Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. The generated 1-m forest cover map will be aggregated to the Landsat spatial grid to demonstrate differences in AGB estimates (pixel-level AGB density, total AGB at aggregated scales like ecoregions and counties) when using a native 30-m forest cover map versus a 30-m map derived from a higher resolution dataset. The process will also be complemented with a LiDAR derived AGB estimate at the 30-m scale to aid in true validation.

  6. Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemilentsau, A.; Ya Slepyan, G.; Maksimenko, S. A.

    2009-07-01

    Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated theoretically in this paper. The analysis is based on the fluctuation-dissipative theorem in the Callen-Welton form. The Dyson equation for the Green dyadic of the electromagnetic field in the presence of CNT is formulated and a method for its numerical solution is elaborated. We show that the photonic density of states spectrum has a nontrivial resonant structure in the terahertz range in the vicinity of the metallic single-wall CNT. The origin of these resonances is the surface plasmon resonances on the CNT's edges.

  7. Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle: Estimating state and change in biomass density. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1996-07-01

    This chapter discusses estimating the biomass density of forest vegetation. Data from inventories of tropical Asia and America were used to estimate biomass densities. Efforts to quantify forest disturbance suggest that population density, at subnational scales, can be used as a surrogate index to encompass all the anthropogenic activities (logging, slash-and-burn agriculture, grazing) that lead to degradation of tropical forest biomass density.

  8. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M P

    2013-10-21

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg⁻¹ and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li₄Ti₅O₁₂ anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  9. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg−1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors. PMID:24141527

  10. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-10-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg-1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  11. The nature of organic carbon in density-fractionated sediments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, S. G.; Canuel, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Rivers are the primary means by which sediments and carbon are transported from the terrestrial biosphere to the oceans but gaps remain in our understanding of carbon associations from source to sink. Bed sediments from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (CA) were fractionated according to density and analyzed for sediment mass distribution, elemental (C and N) composition, mineral surface area, and stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC) and fatty acids to evaluate the nature of organic carbon in river sediments. OC was unevenly distributed among density fractions. Mass and TOC were in general concentrated in mesodensity (1.6-2.0 and 2.0-2.5 g cm-3) fractions, comprising 84.0 ± 1.3 % of total sediment mass and 80.8 ± 13.3 % of total OC (TOC). Low density (< 1.6 g cm-3) material, although rich in OC (34.0 ± 2.0 % OC) due to woody debris, constituted only 17.3 ± 12.8 % of TOC. High density (> 2.5 g cm-3) organic-poor, mineral material made-up 13.7 ± 1.4 % of sediment mass and 2.0 ± 0.9 % of TOC. Stable carbon isotope compositions of sedimentary OC were relatively uniform across bulk and density fractions (δ13C -27.4 ± 0.5 ‰). Radiocarbon content varied from Δ14C values of -382 (radiocarbon age 3800 yr BP) to +94 ‰ (modern) indicating a~mix of young and pre-aged OC. Fatty acids were used to further constrain the origins of sedimentary OC. Short-chain n-C14-n-C18 fatty acids of algal origin were depleted in δ13C (δ13C -37.5 to -35.2 ‰) but were enriched in 14C (Δ14C > 0) compared to long-chain n-C24-n-C28 acids of vascular plant origins with higher δ13C (-33.0 to -31.0 ‰) but variable Δ14C values (-180 and 61 ‰). These data demonstrate the potentially complex source and age distributions found within river sediments and provide insights about sediment and organic matter supply to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.

  12. The nature of organic carbon in density-fractionated sediments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, S. G.; Canuel, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Rivers are the primary means by which sediments and carbon are transported from the terrestrial biosphere to the oceans but gaps remain in our understanding of carbon associations from source to sink. Bed sediments from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (CA) were fractionated according to density and analyzed for sediment mass distribution, elemental (C and N) composition, mineral surface area, and stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC) and fatty acids to evaluate the nature of organic carbon in river sediments. OC was unevenly distributed among density fractions. Mass and OC were in general concentrated in mesodensity (1.6-2.0 and 2.0-2.5 g cm-3) fractions, comprising 84.0 ± 1.3 % of total sediment mass and 80.8 ± 13.3 % of total OC (TOC). Low-density (< 1.6 g cm-3) material, although rich in OC (34.0 ± 2.0 % OC) due to woody debris, constituted only 17.3 ± 12.8 % of TOC. High-density (> 2.5 g cm-3) organic-poor, mineral-rich material made-up 13.7 ± 1.4 % of sediment mass and 2.0 ± 0.9 % of TOC. Stable carbon isotope compositions of sedimentary OC were relatively uniform across bulk and density fractions (δ13C -27.4 ± 0.5 ‰). Radiocarbon content varied from Δ14C values of -382 (radiocarbon age 3800 yr BP) to +94 ‰ (modern) indicating a mix of young and old OC. Fatty acids were used to further constrain the origins of sedimentary OC. Short-chain n-C14-n-C18 fatty acids of algal origin were depleted in 13C (δ13C -37.5 to -35.2 ‰) but were enriched in 14C (Δ14C > 0) compared to long-chain n-C24-n-C28 acids of vascular plant origins with higher δ13C (-33.0 to -31.0 ‰) but variable Δ14C values (-180 and 61 ‰). These data demonstrate the potentially complex source and age distributions found within river sediments and provide insights about sediment and organic matter supply to the Delta.

  13. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Temuulen; Shrestha, Rupesh; Sankey, Joel B.; Hardgree, Stuart; Strand, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Woody encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that contributes to the global carbon sink. The magnitude of this contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates, and guide regional policy and management in balancing restoration activities, including removal of woody plants, with greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The objective of this study was to estimate carbon stored in various successional phases of woody encroachment. Using lidar measurements of individual trees, we present high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon storage in juniper woodlands. Segmentation analysis of lidar point cloud data identified a total of 60,628 juniper tree crowns across four watersheds. Tree heights, canopy cover, and density derived from lidar were strongly correlated with field measurements of 2613 juniper stems measured in 85 plots (30 × 30 m). Aboveground total biomass of individual trees was estimated using a regression model with lidar-derived height and crown area as predictors (Adj. R2 = 0.76, p 2. Uncertainty in carbon storage estimates was examined with a Monte Carlo approach that addressed major error sources. Ranges predicted with uncertainty analysis in the mean, individual tree, aboveground woody C, and associated standard deviation were 0.35 – 143.6 kg and 0.5 – 1.25 kg, respectively. Later successional phases of woody encroachment had, on average, twice the aboveground carbon relative to earlier phases. Woody encroachment might be more successfully managed and balanced with carbon storage goals by identifying priority areas in earlier phases of encroachment where intensive treatments are most effective.

  14. Degradation of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide using palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei-Zen; Chen, GuanYu; Yak, HwaKwang; Liao, Weisheng; Chiu, KongHwa; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Palladium nanoparticles stabilized in microcellular high-density polyethylene prepared through supercritical foaming, supercritical impregnation, and H2 reduction are used for the hydrodechlorination of lindane and hexachlorobenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide below 100 °C. Both lindane and hexachlorobenzene can be almost 100% transformed to cyclohexane in 1 h. Reaction intermediates, such as lower chlorinated products or benzene, are not observed or exist in trace amount indicating that most of them may undergo reactions without leaving the metal surface.

  15. From Rice Bran to High Energy Density Supercapacitors: A New Route to Control Porous Structure of 3D Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianhua; Cao, Chuanbao; Ma, Xilan; Idrees, Faryal; Xu, Bin; Hao, Xin; Lin, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Controlled micro/mesopores interconnected structures of three-dimensional (3D) carbon with high specific surface areas (SSA) are successfully prepared by carbonization and activation of biomass (raw rice brans) through KOH. The highest SSA of 2475 m2 g−1 with optimized pore volume of 1.21 cm3 g−1 (40% for mesopores) is achieved for KOH/RBC = 4 mass ratio, than others. The as-prepared 3D porous carbon-based electrode materials for supercapacitors exhibit high specific capacitance specifically at large current densities of 10 A g−1 and 100 A g−1 i.e., 265 F g−1 and 182 F g−1 in 6 M KOH electrolyte, respectively. Moreover, a high power density ca. 1223 W kg−1 (550 W L−1) and energy density 70 W h kg−1 (32 W h L−1) are achieved on the base of active material loading (~10 mg cm2) in the ionic liquid. The findings can open a new avenue to use abundant agricultural by-products as ideal materials with promising applications in high-performance energy-storage devices. PMID:25434348

  16. The van der Waals coefficients between carbon nanostructures and small molecules: A time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Kamal, C; Ghanty, T K; Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2009-10-28

    We employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory based method to calculate the long-range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient, namely, the van der Waals (vdW) coefficient (C(6)) between fullerenes and finite-length carbon nanotubes as well as between these structures and different small molecules. Our aim is to accurately estimate the strength of the long-range vdW interaction in terms of the C(6) coefficients between these systems and also compare these values as a function of shape and size. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation. The calculations are carried out with the asymptotically correct exchange-correlation potential-the statistical average of orbital potential. It is observed from our calculations that the C(6) coefficients of the carbon nanotubes increase nonlinearly with length, which implies a much stronger vdW interaction between the longer carbon nanostructures compared with the shorter ones. Additionally, it is found that the values of C(6) and polarizability are about 40%-50% lower for the carbon cages when compared with the results corresponding to the quasi-one-dimensional nanotubes with equivalent number of atoms. From our calculations of the vdW coefficients between the small molecules and the carbon nanostructures, it is observed that for H(2), the C(6) value is much larger compared with that of He. It is found that the rare gas atoms have very low values of vdW coefficient with the carbon nanostructures. In contrast, it is found that other gas molecules, including the ones that are environmentally important, possess much higher C(6) values. Carbon tetrachloride as well as chlorine molecule show very high C(6) values with themselves as well as with the carbon nanostructures. This is due to the presence of the weakly bound seven electrons in the valence state for the halogen atoms, which makes these compounds much more polarizable compared with the others.

  17. Activated Carbon Fiber Paper Based Electrodes with High Electrocatalytic Activity for Vanadium Flow Batteries with Improved Power Density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Xianfeng; Xu, Chi; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-02-08

    Vanadium flow batteries (VFBs) have received high attention for large-scale energy storage due to their advantages of flexibility design, long cycle life, high efficiency, and high safety. However, commercial progress of VFBs has so far been limited by its high cost induced by its low power density. Ultrathin carbon paper is believed to be a very promising electrode for VFB because it illustrates super-low ohmic polarization, however, is limited by its low electrocatalytic activity. In this paper, a kind of carbon paper (CP) with super-high electrocatalytic activity was fabricated via a universal and simple CO2 activation method. The porosity and oxygen functional groups can be easily tuned via this method. The charge transfer resistance (denoting the electrochemical polarization) of a VFB with CP electrode after CO2 activation decreased dramatically from 970 to 120 mΩcm(2). Accordingly, the energy efficiency of a VFB with activated carbon paper as the electrode increased by 13% as compared to one without activation and reaches nearly 80% when the current density is 140 mAcm(-2). This paper provides an effective way to prepare high-performance porous carbon electrodes for VFBs and even for other battery systems.

  18. When bulk density methods matter: Implications for estimating soil organic carbon pools in rocky soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resolving uncertainty in the carbon cycle is paramount to refining climate predictions. Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a major component of terrestrial C pools, and accuracy of SOC estimates are only as good as the measurements and assumptions used to obtain them. Dryland soils account for a substanti...

  19. Belowground herbivory by insects: influence on plants and aboveground herbivores.

    PubMed

    Blossey, Bernd; Hunt-Joshi, Tamaru R

    2003-01-01

    Investigations of plant-herbivore interactions continue to be popular; however, a bias neglecting root feeders may limit our ability to understand how herbivores shape plant life histories. Root feeders can cause dramatic plant population declines, often associated with secondary stress factors such as drought or grazing. These severe impacts resulted in substantial interest in root feeders as agricultural pests and increasingly as biological weed control agents, particularly in North America. Despite logistical difficulties, establishment rates in biocontrol programs are equal or exceed those of aboveground herbivores (67.2% for aboveground herbivores, 77.5% for belowground herbivores) and root feeders are more likely to contribute to control (53.7% versus 33.6%). Models predicting root feeders would be negatively affected by competitively superior aboveground herbivores may be limited to early successional habitats or generalist root feeders attacking annual plants. In later successional habitats, root feeders become more abundant and appear to be the more potent force in driving plant performance and plant community composition. Aboveground herbivores, even at high population levels, were unable to prevent buildup of root herbivore populations and the resulting population collapse of their host plants. Significant information gaps exist about the impact of root feeders on plant physiology and secondary chemistry and their importance in natural areas, particularly in the tropics.

  20. WEAPONS STORAGE AREA. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, ABOVEGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEAPONS STORAGE AREA. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, ABOVEGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINE (BUILDING 3568), SPARES INERT STORAGE BUILDING (BUILDING 3570), MISSILE ASSEMBLY SHOP (BUILDING 3578) AND SEGREGATED MAGAZINE STORAGE BUILDING (BUILDING 3572). VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, U.S. Route 9, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  1. Forecasting annual aboveground net primary production in the intermountain west

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many land manager’s annual aboveground net primary production, or plant growth, is a key factor affecting business success, profitability and each land manager's ability to successfully meet land management objectives. The strategy often utilized for forecasting plant growth is to assume every y...

  2. Inventory of Tank Farm equipment stored or abandoned aboveground

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, S.C.; Lakes, M.E.

    1994-10-12

    This document provides an inventory of Tank Farm equipment stored or abandoned aboveground and potentially subject to regulation. This inventory was conducted in part to ensure that Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) does not violate dangerous waste laws concerning storage of potentially contaminated equipment/debris that has been in contact with dangerous waste. The report identifies areas inventoried and provides photographs of equipment.

  3. Covalent-organic framework as a template to assemble carbon nanotubes into a high-density membrane: computational demonstration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongqiao; Jiang, Jianwen

    2014-01-21

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes have a wide range of important technological applications; however, the fabrication of high-density CNT membranes is challenging. Using molecular simulation, we demonstrate that a covalent-organic framework (COF-8) can act as a template promoting (9, 9) CNTs to assemble into a homogeneous high-density membrane. Surprisingly, the templated assembly is unique for (9, 9) CNTs and not observed for smaller or larger CNTs. The microscopic analysis based on the potential of mean force reveals that the highly selective assembly of (9, 9) CNTs into COF-8 is thermodynamically favorable, in contrast to other CNTs. This proof-of-concept computational study proposes a bottom-up strategy to produce high-density CNT membranes, and has a significant implication in CNT applications.

  4. [Aboveground architecture and biomass distribution of Quercus variabilis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bi-yun; Zhang, Wen-hui; Hu, Xiao-jing; Shen, Jia-peng; Zhen, Xue-yuan; Yang, Xiao-zhou

    2015-08-01

    The aboveground architecture, biomass and its allocation, and the relationship between architecture and biomass of Quercus variabilis of different diameter classes in Shangluo, south slope of Qinling Mountains were researched. The results showed that differences existed in the aboveground architecture and biomass allocation of Q. variabilis of different diameter classes. With the increase of diameter class, tree height, DBH, and crown width increased gradually. The average decline rate of each diameter class increased firstly then decreased. Q. variabilis overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio increased then declined. The specific leaf areas of Q. variabilis of all different diameter classes at vertical direction were 0.02-0.03, and the larger values of leaf mass ratio, LAI and leaf area ratio at vertical direction in diameter level I , II, III appeared in the middle and upper trunk, while in diameter level IV, V, VI, they appeared in the central trunk, with the increase of diameter class, there appeared two peaks in vertical direction, which located in the lower and upper trunk. The trunk biomass accounted for 71.8%-88.4% of Q. variabilis aboveground biomass, while the branch biomass accounted for 5.8%-19.6%, and the leaf biomass accounted for 4.2%-8.6%. With the increase of diameter class, stem biomass proportion of Q. variabilis decreased firstly then increased, while the branch and leaf biomass proportion showed a trend that increased at first then decreased, and then increased again. The aboveground biomass of Q. variabilis was significantly positively correlated to tree height, DBH, crown width and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R2:1), and positively related to the overall bifurcation ratio and stepwise bifurcation ratio (R3:2), but there was no significant correlation. Trunk biomass and total biomass aboveground were negatively related to the trunk decline rate, while branch biomass and leaf biomass were positively related to trunk decline

  5. Covalent-organic framework as a template to assemble carbon nanotubes into a high-density membrane: computational demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongqiao; Jiang, Jianwen

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes have a wide range of important technological applications; however, the fabrication of high-density CNT membranes is challenging. Using molecular simulation, we demonstrate that a covalent-organic framework (COF-8) can act as a template promoting (9, 9) CNTs to assemble into a homogeneous high-density membrane. Surprisingly, the templated assembly is unique for (9, 9) CNTs and not observed for smaller or larger CNTs. The microscopic analysis based on the potential of mean force reveals that the highly selective assembly of (9, 9) CNTs into COF-8 is thermodynamically favorable, in contrast to other CNTs. This proof-of-concept computational study proposes a bottom-up strategy to produce high-density CNT membranes, and has a significant implication in CNT applications.Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes have a wide range of important technological applications; however, the fabrication of high-density CNT membranes is challenging. Using molecular simulation, we demonstrate that a covalent-organic framework (COF-8) can act as a template promoting (9, 9) CNTs to assemble into a homogeneous high-density membrane. Surprisingly, the templated assembly is unique for (9, 9) CNTs and not observed for smaller or larger CNTs. The microscopic analysis based on the potential of mean force reveals that the highly selective assembly of (9, 9) CNTs into COF-8 is thermodynamically favorable, in contrast to other CNTs. This proof-of-concept computational study proposes a bottom-up strategy to produce high-density CNT membranes, and has a significant implication in CNT applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03964a

  6. Testing the generality of above-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types at the continent scale.

    PubMed

    Paul, Keryn I; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Chave, Jerome; England, Jacqueline R; Zerihun, Ayalsew; Specht, Alison; Lewis, Tom; Bennett, Lauren T; Baker, Thomas G; Adams, Mark A; Huxtable, Dan; Montagu, Kelvin D; Falster, Daniel S; Feller, Mike; Sochacki, Stan; Ritson, Peter; Bastin, Gary; Bartle, John; Wildy, Dan; Hobbs, Trevor; Larmour, John; Waterworth, Rob; Stewart, Hugh T L; Jonson, Justin; Forrester, David I; Applegate, Grahame; Mendham, Daniel; Bradford, Matt; O'Grady, Anthony; Green, Daryl; Sudmeyer, Rob; Rance, Stan J; Turner, John; Barton, Craig; Wenk, Elizabeth H; Grove, Tim; Attiwill, Peter M; Pinkard, Elizabeth; Butler, Don; Brooksbank, Kim; Spencer, Beren; Snowdon, Peter; O'Brien, Nick; Battaglia, Michael; Cameron, David M; Hamilton, Steve; McAuthur, Geoff; Sinclair, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground-based estimation of the carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems is critical to quantifying the global carbon budget. Allometric models provide cost-effective methods for biomass prediction. But do such models vary with ecoregion or plant functional type? We compiled 15 054 measurements of individual tree or shrub biomass from across Australia to examine the generality of allometric models for above-ground biomass prediction. This provided a robust case study because Australia includes ecoregions ranging from arid shrublands to tropical rainforests, and has a rich history of biomass research, particularly in planted forests. Regardless of ecoregion, for five broad categories of plant functional type (shrubs; multistemmed trees; trees of the genus Eucalyptus and closely related genera; other trees of high wood density; and other trees of low wood density), relationships between biomass and stem diameter were generic. Simple power-law models explained 84-95% of the variation in biomass, with little improvement in model performance when other plant variables (height, bole wood density), or site characteristics (climate, age, management) were included. Predictions of stand-based biomass from allometric models of varying levels of generalization (species-specific, plant functional type) were validated using whole-plot harvest data from 17 contrasting stands (range: 9-356 Mg ha(-1) ). Losses in efficiency of prediction were <1% if generalized models were used in place of species-specific models. Furthermore, application of generalized multispecies models did not introduce significant bias in biomass prediction in 92% of the 53 species tested. Further, overall efficiency of stand-level biomass prediction was 99%, with a mean absolute prediction error of only 13%. Hence, for cost-effective prediction of biomass across a wide range of stands, we recommend use of generic allometric models based on plant functional types. Development of new species

  7. Electrospun FeS2@Carbon Fiber Electrode as a High Energy Density Cathode for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yujie; Fan, Xiulin; Suo, Liumin; Luo, Chao; Gao, Tao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-26

    In this study, an FeS2@carbon fiber electrode is developed with FeS2 nanoparticles either embedded in or attached to carbon fibers by using an electrospinning method. By applying this binder-free, metal-current-collector-free FeS2@carbon fiber electrode, both the redox reaction and capacity decay mechanisms for the Li-FeS2 system are revealed by changing the electrolyte (conventional carbonate electrolyte and a "solvent-in-salt"-type Li-S battery electrolyte) and working voltage ranges (1.0-3.0 V and 1.5-3.0 V vs Li/Li(+)). The FeS2@carbon fiber electrode shows stable cycling performance in both the conventional carbonate electrolyte and the solvent-in-salt-type Li-S battery electrolyte in the voltage range of 1.5-3.0 V. Electrochemical tests in the solvent-in-salt-type Li-S battery electrolyte indicate that the Li-FeS2 system becomes a hybrid of the Li-S cell and Li-iron sulfide cell after the initial cycle. Based on the understanding on the capacity decay mechanisms, the cycling stability of the Li-FeS2 system in the voltage range of 1.0-3.0 V is then significantly enhanced by coating the FeS2@carbon fiber electrode with a thin layer of Al2O3. The Al2O3-coated electrode demonstrates excellent cycling performance with high discharge energy densities at both the material level (∼1300 Wh/kg-FeS2) and the electrode level (∼1000 Wh/kg-FeS2 electrode).

  8. TCAD Analysis of Heating and Maximum Current Density in Carbon Nanofiber Interconnects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Carbon Nanotube MWCNT Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube SCU Santa Clara University Si Silicon SiO2 Silicon Dioxide SiC Silicon Carbide Au Gold...characteristics for the CNF section were modified from values originally associated with silicon carbide ( SiC ). These changes were all applied in ATLAS. 3...Oxynitride) material parameters changed are shown. ..................36  Table 5.  Active region (4H- SiC ) material parameters changed are shown

  9. Soil Organic Carbon Residence Time in Japanese Temperate Forest: Insight From Radiocarbon Analysis of Density Fractionated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, M.; Uchida, M.; Wagai, R.; Suzuki, M.; Shibata, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Soil organic matter is an important carbon reservoir managing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. However, the mechanism of soil carbon stabilization is little known. To explore the rate of C cycling in a temperate forest soil in Japan, at one of AsiaFlux monitoring sites, we sequentially density fractioned at 1.0, 1.6, 1.8, 2.1 and 2.4 g cm-3 on a soil at surface and deep soil layer and estimated turnover time of these SOC fractions. According to previous study in this site (Uchida et al., in prep.), large amount of light fraction (> 2.1 g cm-3) accounted at 35 - 50 cm depth and its age was significantly old as well as heavy fraction (> 2.1 g cm-3), although light fraction seems to consist of labile carbon. In this study, we investigated more better separation for labile fraction from mineral fraction in volcanic ash soil using different densities ranging from 1.6 to 1.8 g cm-3, excluding the most mineral and organio-mineral material from the light fraction. In surface layer (5 - 10 cm), carbon in lighter fractions (less than 1.8 g cm- 3) accounted for 42% of the total SOC their turnover times were shorter (6 - 43 yrs) than that in 1.8 - 2.1 g cm-3 (150 yrs). While, in deep layer (40 - 45 cm), lighter fraction comprised only small portion of total SOC (1%) but its age was significantly old (2038 yrs BP) as well as 1.8 - 2.1 g cm-3 (2335 yrs BP). The results partially support the previous study that volcanish-based Japanese temperate forest soil might be sequestrating carbon as light fractions semi-permanently.

  10. Quantifying variation in forest disturbance, and its effects on aboveground biomass dynamics, across the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Vanderwel, Mark C; Coomes, David A; Purves, Drew W

    2013-05-01

    The role of tree mortality in the global carbon balance is complicated by strong spatial and temporal heterogeneity that arises from the stochastic nature of carbon loss through disturbance. Characterizing spatio-temporal variation in mortality (including disturbance) and its effects on forest and carbon dynamics is thus essential to understanding the current global forest carbon sink, and to predicting how it will change in future. We analyzed forest inventory data from the eastern United States to estimate plot-level variation in mortality (relative to a long-term background rate for individual trees) for nine distinct forest regions. Disturbances that produced at least a fourfold increase in tree mortality over an approximately 5 year interval were observed in 1-5% of plots in each forest region. The frequency of disturbance was lowest in the northeast, and increased southwards along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts as fire and hurricane disturbances became progressively more common. Across the central and northern parts of the region, natural disturbances appeared to reflect a diffuse combination of wind, insects, disease, and ice storms. By linking estimated covariation in tree growth and mortality over time with a data-constrained forest dynamics model, we simulated the implications of stochastic variation in mortality for long-term aboveground biomass changes across the eastern United States. A geographic gradient in disturbance frequency induced notable differences in biomass dynamics between the least- and most-disturbed regions, with variation in mortality causing the latter to undergo considerably stronger fluctuations in aboveground stand biomass over time. Moreover, regional simulations showed that a given long-term increase in mean mortality rates would support greater aboveground biomass when expressed through disturbance effects compared with background mortality, particularly for early-successional species. The effects of increased tree mortality on

  11. Simulation results of aboveground woody biomass and leaf litterfall for African tropical forest with a global terrestrial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Weirdt, Marjolein; Maignan, Fabienne; Peylin, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin; Moreau, Inès; Ciais, Philippe; Defourny, Pierre; Steppe, Kathy; Verbeeck, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The response of tropical forest vegetation to global climate change could be central to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Tropical forests are believed to annually process approximately six times as much carbon via photosynthesis and respiration as humans emit from fossil fuel use. Of all tropical forests worldwide, the role of African tropical forest is not very well known and both the quantity as well as the dynamics of tropical forest carbon stocks and fluxes are very poorly quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Furthermore, African tropical forest spatial carbon stocks patterns as measured in the field are not as well represented by the global biogeochemical models as they are for temperate forests. In this study, a first simulation for the African tropical forest with the process based global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE was done. In this work, ORCHIDEE included deep soils, seasonal leaf litterfall and phosphorus availability mechanisms for tropical evergreen forests included. The ORCHIDEE model run outputs are evaluated against reported field inventories, investigating seasonal variations in leaf litterfall and spatial variation in aboveground woody biomass. A comparison between modeled and measured leaf litterfall was made at a semi-deciduous Equatorial rainforest site in the Republic of Congo at the Biosphere reserve Dimonika south of Gabon. Also, simulated woody aboveground biomass was compared against site-level field inventories and satellite-based estimates based on a combination of MODIS imagery with field inventory data from Uganda, DRC and Cameroon. First comparison results seem promising and show that the radiation driven leaf litterfall model results correspond well with the field inventories and that the mean of the modelled aboveground woody biomass matches the available field inventory observations but there is still a need for more ground data to evaluate the model outcome over a large region like

  12. Aboveground vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore impact on net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands.

    PubMed

    Risch, Anita C; Schotz, Martin; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L; Van Der Putten, Wim H; Duyts, Henk; Raschein, Ursina; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Busse, Matt D; Page-dumroese, Deborah S; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Aboveground herbivores have strong effects on grassland nitrogen (N) cycling. They can accelerate or slow down soil net N mineralization depending on ecosystem productivity and grazing intensity. Yet, most studies only consider either ungulates or invertebrate herbivores, but not the combined effect of several functionally different vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore species or guilds. We assessed how a diverse herbivore community affects net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands. By using size-selective fences, we progressively excluded large, medium, and small mammals, as well as invertebrates from two vegetation types, and assessed how the exclosure types (ET) affected net N mineralization. The two vegetation types differed in long-term management (centuries), forage quality, and grazing history and intensity. To gain a more mechanistic understanding of how herbivores affect net N mineralization, we linked mineralization to soil abiotic (temperature; moisture; NO3-, NH4+, and total inorganic N concentrations/pools; C, N, P concentrations; pH; bulk density), soil biotic (microbial biomass; abundance of collembolans, mites, and nematodes) and plant (shoot and root biomass; consumption; plant C, N, and fiber content; plant N pool) properties. Net N mineralization differed between ET, but not between vegetation types. Thus, short-term changes in herbivore community composition and, therefore, in grazing intensity had a stronger effect on net N mineralization than long-term management and grazing history. We found highest N mineralization values when only invertebrates were present, suggesting that mammals had a negative effect on net N mineralization. Of the variables included in our analyses, only mite abundance and aboveground plant biomass explained variation in net N mineralization among ET. Abundances of both mites and leaf-sucking invertebrates were positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, and biomass increased with progressive exclusion

  13. The effect of illumination power density on carbon defect configuration in silicon doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaess, Felix; Reddy, Pramod; Alden, Dorian; Klump, Andrew; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Axel; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko

    2016-12-01

    A study of efficacy of point defect reduction via Fermi level control during growth of GaN:Si as a function of above bandgap illumination power density and hence excess minority carrier density is presented. Electrical characterization revealed an almost two-fold increase in carrier concentration and a three-fold increase in mobility by increasing the illumination power density from 0 to 1 W cm-2, corroborating a decrease in compensation and ionic impurity scattering. The effect was further supported by the photoluminescence studies, which showed a monotonic decrease in yellow luminescence (attributed to CN) as a function of illumination power density. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies showed no effect of illumination on the total incorporation of Si or C. Thus, it is concluded that Fermi level management changed the configuration of the C impurity as the CN-1 configuration became energetically less favorable due to excess minority carriers.

  14. Adsorption of binary gas mixtures in heterogeneous carbon predicted by density functional theory: on the formation of adsorption azeotropes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, James A; Pan, Huanhua; Balbuena, Perla B

    2010-09-07

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) was used to predict the adsorption of nine different binary gas mixtures in a heterogeneous BPL activated carbon with a known pore size distribution (PSD) and in single, homogeneous, slit-shaped carbon pores of different sizes. By comparing the heterogeneous results with those obtained from the ideal adsorbed solution theory and with those obtained in the homogeneous carbon, it was determined that adsorption nonideality and adsorption azeotropes are caused by the coupled effects of differences in the molecular size of the components in a gas mixture and only slight differences in the pore sizes of a heterogeneous adsorbent. For many binary gas mixtures, selectivity was found to be a strong function of pore size. As the width of a homogeneous pore increases slightly, the selectivity for two different sized adsorbates may change from being greater than unity to less than unity. This change in selectivity can be accompanied by the formation of an adsorption azeotrope when this same binary mixture is adsorbed in a heterogeneous adsorbent with a PSD, like in BPL activated carbon. These results also showed that the selectivity exhibited by a heterogeneous adsorbent can be dominated by a small number of pores that are very selective toward one of the components in the gas mixture, leading to adsorption azeotrope formation in extreme cases.

  15. Effect of carbon dioxide injection on production of wood cement composites from waste medium density fiberboard (MDF).

    PubMed

    Qi, H; Cooper, P A; Wan, H

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of recycling waste medium density fiberboard (MDF) into wood-cement composites was evaluated. Both new fibers and recycled steam exploded MDF fibers had poor compatibility with cement if no treatment was applied, due to interference of the hydration process by the water soluble components of the fiber. However, this issue was resolved when a rapid hardening process with carbon dioxide injection was adopted. It appears that the rapid carbonation allowed the board to develop considerable strength before the adverse effects of the wood extractives could take effect. After 3-5 min of carbon dioxide injection, the composites reached 22-27% of total carbonation and developed 50-70% of their final (28-day) strength. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers had slightly lower splitting tensile strength and lower tensile toughness properties than those containing new fibers especially at a high fiber/cement ratio. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers also showed lower values of water absorption. Unlike composites cured conventionally, composites cured under CO(2) injection developed higher strength and toughness with increased fiber content. Incorporation of recycled MDF fibers into wood cement composites with CO(2) injection during the production stage presents a viable option for recycling of this difficult to manage waste material.

  16. Density Functional Study of the Carbon Dependence of the Structural, Mechanic, Thermodynamic, and Dynamic Properties of SiC Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langueur, H.; Kassali, K.

    2017-03-01

    Using a density functional scheme, for the first time the carbon dependence on the structural, dynamic, thermodynamic, and dynamic properties of Si_{1-x}Cx alloys (x=0.0 to 1.0 in steps of 0.125) has been investigated. The structural properties of these materials, in particular, the composition dependence of the lattice parameter and bulk modulus, are in excellent agreement with experimental data and follow a quadratic law in ( x). A nonlinear relationship is found between the elastic constants C_{11}, C_{12}, and C_{44} and the carbon concentration ( x). The behavior of the acoustical and optical phonon frequencies at high-symmetry points Γ, X, and L is predicted. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the photonic effects are taken into account, the Debye temperature, the heat capacity, the Helmholtz free energy, the internal energy, and the entropy are determined for the Si_{1-x}C_{x } compounds.

  17. Soil organic carbon stocks are systematically overestimated by misuse of the parameters bulk density and rock fragment content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Vos, Cora; Don, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks requires estimates of the carbon content, bulk density, rock fragment content and depth of a respective soil layer. However, different application of these parameters could introduce a considerable bias. Here, we explain why three out of four frequently applied methods overestimate SOC stocks. In soils rich in rock fragments (> 30 vol. %), SOC stocks could be overestimated by more than 100 %, as revealed by using German Agricultural Soil Inventory data. Due to relatively low rock fragments content, the mean systematic overestimation for German agricultural soils was 2.1-10.1 % for three different commonly used equations. The equation ensemble as re-formulated here might help to unify SOC stock determination and avoid overestimation in future studies.

  18. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  19. Design options for improved performance with high-density carbon ablators and low-gas fill hohlraum targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Lepape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E.; Ho, D.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Ross, J. S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent simulation-based and experimental work using high-density carbon ablators in unlined uranium hohlraums with 0.3 mg/cc helium fill have demonstrated round implosions with minimal evolution of Legendre moment P2 during burn. To extend this promising work, design studies have been performed to explore potential performance improvements with larger capsules, while maintaining similar case-to-capsule target ratios. We present here the results of these design studies, which will motivate a series of upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Metallic three-coordinated carbon networks with eight-membered rings showing high density of states at the Fermi level.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yusuke; Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2014-04-21

    Using a density functional method to study the electronic structure of various three-coordinated sp(2) carbon nanostructures, we find that the presence of an eight-membered ring adjoined to two five-membered rings in a unit cell brings about the simultaneous occurrence of flat and dispersive bands, quite similar to the band structure of precious metals. These bands are parts of an anisotropic Dirac cone tilted from an isotropic one. We reveal that in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations in the sign of the phase of the Kohn-Sham orbital contribute to the appearance of the unique band structures.

  1. Dependence of the single walled carbon nanotube length with growth temperature and catalyst density by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    López, Vicente; Welte, Lorena; Fernández, Miguel A; Moreno-Moreno, Miriam; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; de Pablo, Pedro J; Zamora, Félix

    2009-05-01

    We report the growth of isolated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a silicon surface by chemical vapor deposition, in the temperature range from 800 to 950 degrees C using two different iron catalyst precursors, Fe(NO3)3 x 9H2O and Fe(CO)5. The results show that while for the first catalyst precursor temperature is the key factor in determining nanotube length, for the second it is the density of catalyst precursor on the surface. Solutions of Fe(CO)5 adsorbed on silicon oxide result in a suitable catalyst precursor to obtain SWCNTs of controllable diameter and with clean surfaces.

  2. Evaluation of the Anisotropic Radiative Conductivity of a Low-Density Carbon Fiber Material from Realistic Microscale Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nouri, Nima; Panerai, Francesco; Tagavi, Kaveh A.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Martin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The radiative heat transfer inside a low-density carbon fiber insulator is analyzed using a three-dimensional direct simulation model. A robust procedure is presented for the numerical calculation of the geometric configuration factor to compute the radiative energy exchange processes among the small discretized surface areas of the fibrous material. The methodology is applied to a polygonal mesh of a fibrous insulator obtained from three-dimensional microscale imaging of the real material. The anisotropic values of the radiative conductivity are calculated for that geometry. The results yield both directional and thermal dependence of the radiative conductivity.

  3. Soil total carbon content, aggregation, bulk density, and penetration resistance of croplands and nearby grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converting native grassland (NGL) to cropland (CL) decreases soil organic matter contents (components of soil total carbon contents, STCCs), which often leads to soil degradation. Reestablishing grass on CL generally increases soil organic matter, which improves soil conditions. This study was condu...

  4. Adsorption of binary hydrocarbon mixtures in carbon slit pores: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, S.K.

    1998-10-13

    Adsorption of binary hydrocarbons mixtures involving methane in carbon slit pores is theoretically studied here from the viewpoints of separation and of the effect of impurities on methane storage. It is seen that even small amounts of ethane, propane, or butane can significantly reduce the methane capacity of carbons. Optimal pore sizes and pressures, depending on impurity concentration, are noted in the present work, suggesting that careful adsorbent and process design can lead to enhanced separation. These results are consistent with earlier literature studies for the infinite dilution limit. For methane storage applications a carbon micropore width of 11.4 {angstrom} (based on distance between centers of carbon atoms on opposing walls) is found to be the most suitable from the point of view of lower impurity uptake during high-pressure adsorption and greater impurity retention during low-pressure delivery. The results also theoretically confirm unusual recently reported observations of enhanced methane adsorption in the presence of a small amount of heavier hydrocarbon impurity.

  5. Recovery of aboveground plant biomass and productivity after fire in mesic and dry black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, M.C.; Treseder, K.K.; Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Vogel, J.G.; Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S.

    2008-01-01

    Plant biomass accumulation and productivity are important determinants of ecosystem carbon (C) balance during post-fire succession. In boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forests near Delta Junction, Alaska, we quantified aboveground plant biomass and net primary productivity (ANPP) for 4 years after a 1999 wildfire in a well-drained (dry) site, and also across a dry and a moderately well-drained (mesic) chronosequence of sites that varied in time since fire (2 to ???116 years). Four years after fire, total biomass at the 1999 burn site had increased exponentially to 160 ?? 21 g m-2 (mean ?? 1SE) and vascular ANPP had recovered to 138 ?? 32 g m-2 y -1, which was not different than that of a nearby unburned stand (160 ?? 48 g m-2 y-1) that had similar pre-fire stand structure and understory composition. Production in the young site was dominated by re-sprouting graminoids, whereas production in the unburned site was dominated by black spruce. On the dry and mesic chronosequences, total biomass pools, including overstory and understory vascular and non-vascular plants, and lichens, increased logarithmically (dry) or linearly (mesic) with increasing site age, reaching a maximum of 2469 ?? 180 (dry) and 4008 ?? 233 g m-2 (mesic) in mature stands. Biomass differences were primarily due to higher tree density in the mesic sites because mass per tree was similar between sites. ANPP of vascular and non-vascular plants increased linearly over time in the mesic chronosequence to 335 ?? 68 g m-2 y -1 in the mature site, but in the dry chronosequence it peaked at 410 ?? 43 g m-2 y-1 in a 15-year-old stand dominated by deciduous trees and shrubs. Key factors regulating biomass accumulation and production in these ecosystems appear to be the abundance and composition of re-sprouting species early in succession, the abundance of deciduous trees and shrubs in intermediate aged stands, and the density of black spruce across all stand ages. A better understanding of the controls

  6. 1D Ni-Co oxide and sulfide nanoarray/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructures for asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density and excellent cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pin; Tian, Jian; Sang, Yuanhua; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Cui, Guanwei; Shi, Xifeng; Wong, C P; Tang, Bo; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability is still a great challenge. A carbon aerogel, possessing a hierarchical porous structure, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity, is an ideal backbone to support transition metal oxides and bring hope to prepare electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability. Therefore, NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid supercapacitor electrode materials were synthesized by assembling Ni-Co precursor needle arrays on the surface of the channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan in this study. The 1D nanostructures grow on the channel surface of the carbon aerogel vertically and tightly, contributing to the enhanced electrochemical performance with ultrahigh energy density. The energy density of NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors can reach up to 55.3 Wh kg(-1) and 47.5 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 400 W kg(-1), respectively. These asymmetric devices also displayed excellent cycling stability with a capacitance retention of about 96.6% and 92% over 5000 cycles.

  7. Density functional study of carbon clusters C2n (2<=n<=16). I. Structure and bonding in the neutral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. O.

    1999-03-01

    Density functional calculations have been performed for many isomers of neutral carbon clusters Cn (4⩽n⩽32, n even) using both local spin density (LSD) and gradient-corrected (Becke-Perdew) approximations to the exchange-correlation energy. The stable isomers include chains, rings, cages, and graphitic ("plate " and "bowl") structures, and we observe a fourfold periodicity in several structural classes as n changes. Stable cages exist for all clusters with n⩾8, and double rings are less stable than the monocyclic rings in all cases. Most planar structures have low-frequency out-of-plane vibrations. Gradient corrections often change the ordering of the energies of the isomers, but the effects are remarkably regular within a given structural type.

  8. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites.

  9. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered.

  10. Urban Tree Effects on Soil Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L.; O'Sullivan, Odhran S.; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered. PMID:25003872

  11. Estimating above-ground biomasss using lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kevin S.; Treitz, Paul; Morrison, Ian; Baldwin, Ken

    2003-03-01

    Previous forest research using time-of-flight lidar suggests that there exists some quantile of the distribution of laser canopy heights that could provide an estimate of various forest biophysical properties. The results presented here not only support this theory, but also extend it by suggesting that a quantile of the distribution of all laser heights could provide estimates of aboveground biomass for forests with similar stand structure. Tolerant northern hardwood forests, composed predominantly of mature sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton), were surveyed using an ALTM 1225 (Optech Inc.) in August 2000. Field data for 49 circular plots, each 400 m2 in area, were collected in July 2000. Using site-specific allometric equations, total aboveground biomass and biomass components (i.e., stem wood, stem bark, live branches, and foliage) were derived for each plot. Three laser height metrics were derived from the lidar data: (i) maximum laser height; (ii) mean laser height; and (iii) mean laser height calculated from lidar returns filtered based on a threshold applied to the intensity return data LhIR). LhIR was identified as the best predictor of total aboveground biomass (R2 = 0.85) and biomass components (R2 between 0.84 to 0.85) when all plot types were considered.

  12. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-Temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14-70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz-Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14-70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where nvis and ? are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  13. Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B.; Mascaro, Joseph; Sinca, Felipe; Chadwick, K. Dana; Higgins, Mark; Farfan, William; Llactayo, William; Silman, Miles R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon conservation can provide critical environmental, social, and climate benefits. Yet, the geographically complex mosaic of threats to, and opportunities for, conserving carbon in landscapes remain largely unresolved at national scales. Using a new high-resolution carbon mapping approach applied to Perú, a megadiverse country undergoing rapid land use change, we found that at least 0.8 Pg of aboveground carbon stocks are at imminent risk of emission from land use activities. Map-based information on the natural controls over carbon density, as well as current ecosystem threats and protections, revealed three biogeographically explicit strategies that fully offset forthcoming land-use emissions. High-resolution carbon mapping affords targeted interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in rapidly developing tropical nations. PMID:25385593

  14. Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Mascaro, Joseph; Sinca, Felipe; Chadwick, K Dana; Higgins, Mark; Farfan, William; Llactayo, William; Silman, Miles R

    2014-11-25

    Terrestrial carbon conservation can provide critical environmental, social, and climate benefits. Yet, the geographically complex mosaic of threats to, and opportunities for, conserving carbon in landscapes remain largely unresolved at national scales. Using a new high-resolution carbon mapping approach applied to Perú, a megadiverse country undergoing rapid land use change, we found that at least 0.8 Pg of aboveground carbon stocks are at imminent risk of emission from land use activities. Map-based information on the natural controls over carbon density, as well as current ecosystem threats and protections, revealed three biogeographically explicit strategies that fully offset forthcoming land-use emissions. High-resolution carbon mapping affords targeted interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in rapidly developing tropical nations.

  15. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California forests.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, Thomas W.; Shook, Christine D.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  16. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California, forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, T.W.; Shook, C.D.; Keeley, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  17. Pantropical trends in mangrove above-ground biomass and annual litterfall.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Peter; Snedaker, Samuel C

    1993-12-01

    A major paradigm in biosphere ecology is that organic production, carbon turnover and, perhaps, species diversity are highest at tropical latitudes, and decrease toward higher latitudes. To examine these trends in the pantropical mangrove forest vegetation type, we collated and analysed data on above-ground biomass and annual litterfall for these communities. Regressions of biomass and litterfall data show significant relationships with height of the vegetation and latitude. It is suggested that height and latitude are causally related to biomass, while the relationship with litterfall reflects the specific growing conditions at the respective study sites. Comparison of mangrove and upland forest litterfall data shows similar trends with latitude but indicates that mangrove litterfall is higher than upland forest litterfall. The regression equations allow the litterfall/biomass ratio to be simulated, and this suggests that the patterns of organic matter partitioning differ according to latitude.

  18. Response of Plant Height, Species Richness and Aboveground Biomass to Flooding Gradient along Vegetation Zones in Floodplain Wetlands, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yanjing; Pan, Yanwen; Gao, Chuanyu; Jiang, Ming; Lu, Xianguo; Xu, Y Jun

    2016-01-01

    Flooding regime changes resulting from natural and human activity have been projected to affect wetland plant community structures and functions. It is therefore important to conduct investigations across a range of flooding gradients to assess the impact of flooding depth on wetland vegetation. We conducted this study to identify the pattern of plant height, species richness and aboveground biomass variation along the flooding gradient in floodplain wetlands located in Northeast China. We found that the response of dominant species height to the flooding gradient depends on specific species, i.e., a quadratic response for Carex lasiocarpa, a negative correlation for Calamagrostis angustifolia, and no response for Carex appendiculata. Species richness showed an intermediate effect along the vegetation zone from marsh to wet meadow while aboveground biomass increased. When the communities were analysed separately, only the water table depth had significant impact on species richness for two Carex communities and no variable for C. angustifolia community, while height of dominant species influenced aboveground biomass. When the three above-mentioned communities were grouped together, variations in species richness were mainly determined by community type, water table depth and community mean height, while variations in aboveground biomass were driven by community type and the height of dominant species. These findings indicate that if habitat drying of these herbaceous wetlands in this region continues, then two Carex marshes would be replaced gradually by C. angustifolia wet meadow in the near future. This will lead to a reduction in biodiversity and an increase in productivity and carbon budget. Meanwhile, functional traits must be considered, and should be a focus of attention in future studies on the species diversity and ecosystem function in this region.

  19. Shifting grassland plant community structure drives positive interactive effects of warming and diversity on aboveground net primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Cowles, Jane M; Wragg, Peter D; Wright, Alexandra J; Powers, Jennifer S; Tilman, David

    2016-02-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are increasingly impacted by multiple drivers of environmental change, including climate warming and loss of biodiversity. We show, using a long-term factorial experiment, that plant diversity loss alters the effects of warming on productivity. Aboveground primary productivity was increased by both high plant diversity and warming, and, in concert, warming (≈1.5 °C average above and belowground warming over the growing season) and diversity caused a greater than additive increase in aboveground productivity. The aboveground warming effects increased over time, particularly at higher levels of diversity, perhaps because of warming-induced increases in legume and C4 bunch grass abundances, and facilitative feedbacks of these species on productivity. Moreover, higher plant diversity was associated with the amelioration of warming-induced environmental conditions. This led to cooler temperatures, decreased vapor pressure deficit, and increased surface soil moisture in higher diversity communities. Root biomass (0-30 cm) was likewise consistently greater at higher plant diversity and was greater with warming in monocultures and at intermediate diversity, but at high diversity warming had no detectable effect. This may be because warming increased the abundance of legumes, which have lower root : shoot ratios than the other types of plants. In addition, legumes increase soil nitrogen (N) supply, which could make N less limiting to other species and potentially decrease their investment in roots. The negative warming × diversity interaction on root mass led to an overall negative interactive effect of these two global change factors on the sum of above and belowground biomass, and thus likely on total plant carbon stores. In total, plant diversity increased the effect of warming on aboveground net productivity and moderated the effect on root mass. These divergent effects suggest that warming and changes in plant diversity are likely to have both

  20. Response of Plant Height, Species Richness and Aboveground Biomass to Flooding Gradient along Vegetation Zones in Floodplain Wetlands, Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yanjing; Pan, Yanwen; Gao, Chuanyu; Jiang, Ming; Lu, Xianguo; Xu, Y. Jun

    2016-01-01

    Flooding regime changes resulting from natural and human activity have been projected to affect wetland plant community structures and functions. It is therefore important to conduct investigations across a range of flooding gradients to assess the impact of flooding depth on wetland vegetation. We conducted this study to identify the pattern of plant height, species richness and aboveground biomass variation along the flooding gradient in floodplain wetlands located in Northeast China. We found that the response of dominant species height to the flooding gradient depends on specific species, i.e., a quadratic response for Carex lasiocarpa, a negative correlation for Calamagrostis angustifolia, and no response for Carex appendiculata. Species richness showed an intermediate effect along the vegetation zone from marsh to wet meadow while aboveground biomass increased. When the communities were analysed separately, only the water table depth had significant impact on species richness for two Carex communities and no variable for C. angustifolia community, while height of dominant species influenced aboveground biomass. When the three above-mentioned communities were grouped together, variations in species richness were mainly determined by community type, water table depth and community mean height, while variations in aboveground biomass were driven by community type and the height of dominant species. These findings indicate that if habitat drying of these herbaceous wetlands in this region continues, then two Carex marshes would be replaced gradually by C. angustifolia wet meadow in the near future. This will lead to a reduction in biodiversity and an increase in productivity and carbon budget. Meanwhile, functional traits must be considered, and should be a focus of attention in future studies on the species diversity and ecosystem function in this region. PMID:27097325

  1. Validation of Carbon Monoxide Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY InfraRed Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, P.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Schreier, F.; Hamidouche, M.; Lichtenberg, G.

    2016-08-01

    This validation study examines the accuracy of carbon monoxide (CO) total columns derived from nadir measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). Therefore, an intercomparison of the CO columns estimated from SCIAMACHY measurements with coincidented and colocated retrievals provided by several ground-based (g-b) stations affiliated to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) had been performed. The study demonstrated that the SCIAMACHY CO total column validation results depend on many aspects. The results indicate particularly the importance of appropriate post- processing of the BIRRA retrievals (esp. filtering). It shows that the CO product is sensitive to settings in retrieval algorithm. Furthermore, the analysis gives evidence of a degrading channel 8 detector in later years. In conclusion, for most cases monthly mean SCIAMACHY CO total columns agree within the standard deviation when compared to g-b measurements.

  2. Assessment of dopamine receptor densities in the human brain with carbon-11-labeled N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstroem, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon-11-labeled 3-N-methylspiperone, a ligand that preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and, for the first time, in a human. The method has now been used in 58 humans for noninvasive assessment of the state of brain dopamine receptors under normal and pathological conditions.

  3. Density functional treatment of water-carbon dioxide van der Waals complex

    SciTech Connect

    Abashkin, Y.; Mele, F.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    1994-12-31

    LCGTO-LSD and LCGTO-NLSD methods have been tested for the study of water-carbon dioxide weakly bound binary complex. Different local and nonlocal exchange-correlation energy functionals and many grid radial points have been used. Results show that both nonlocal corrections and a large number of radial points in the grid are mandatory for well reproducing then experimental data. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE OF OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stand density reductions have been proposed as a method by which old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests of North America can be converted back to pre-1900 conditions, thereby reducing the danger of catastrophic forest fires and insect attacks while increasing product...

  5. [Carbon sequestration of young Robinia pseudoacacia plantation in Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-qun; Su, Yin-quan; Kang, Yong-xiang; Xu, Xi-ming; Qin, Yue

    2009-12-01

    In order to understand the carbon sequestration of ecological forests in Loess Plateau, a comparative study was made on the organic carbon density (OCD) of soil, litter, and plant organs in an 8-year-old Robinia pseudoacacia plantation and nearby barren land. Comparing with the barren land, the young R. pseudoacacia plantation had a decrease (0.26 kg x m(-2)) of soil OCD, but the OCD in its litter, root system, and aboveground organs increased by 121.1%, 202.0%, and 656. 7%, respectively, with a total carbon sequestration increased by 3.3% annually, which illustrated that R. pseudoacacia afforestation on Loess Plateau had an obvious positive effect on carbon sequestration.

  6. A Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Catalyst for Electrochemical CO2 Conversion to CO with High Selectivity and Current Density.

    PubMed

    Jhong, Huei-Ru Molly; Tornow, Claire E; Smid, Bretislav; Gewirth, Andrew A; Lyth, Stephen M; Kenis, Paul J A

    2017-03-22

    We report characterization of a non-precious metal-free catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO; namely, a pyrolyzed carbon nitride and multiwall carbon nanotube composite. This catalyst exhibits a high selectivity for production of CO over H2 (approximately 98 % CO and 2 % H2 ), as well as high activity in an electrochemical flow cell. The CO partial current density at intermediate cathode potentials (V=-1.46 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is up to 3.5× higher than state-of-the-art Ag nanoparticle-based catalysts, and the maximum current density is 90 mA cm(-2) . The mass activity and energy efficiency (up to 48 %) were also higher than the Ag nanoparticle reference. Moving away from precious metal catalysts without sacrificing activity or selectivity may significantly enhance the prospects of electrochemical CO2 reduction as an approach to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions or as a method for load-leveling in relation to the use of intermittent renewable energy sources.

  7. Reconstruction of palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities of various beech plants (Fagaceae): testing and application of a mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, M.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Konrad, W.

    2006-12-01

    A mechanistic model (Konrad &Roth-Nebelsick a, in prep.) was applied for the reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities and photosynthesis parameters of extant and fossil Fagaceae. The model is based on an approach which couples diffusion and the biochemical process of photosynthesis. Atmospheric CO2 is calculated on the basis of stomatal diffusion and photosynthesis parameters of the considered taxa. The considered species include the castanoid Castanea sativa, two quercoids Quercus petraea and Quercus rhenana and an intermediate species Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis. In the case of Quercus petraea literature data were used. Stomatal data of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis, Quercus rhenana and Castanea sativa were determined by the authors. Data of the extant Castanea sativa were collected by applying a peeling method and by counting of stomatal densities on the digitalized images of the peels. Additionally, isotope data of leaf samples of Castanea sativa were determined to estimate the ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide. The CO2 values calculated by the model (on the basis of stomatal data and measured or estimated biochemical parameters) are in good agreement with literature data, with the exception of the Late Eocene. The results thus demonstrate that the applied approach is principally suitable for reconstructing palaeoatmospheric CO2.

  8. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  9. Tree diversity, composition, forest structure and aboveground biomass dynamics after single and repeated fire in a Bornean rain forest.

    PubMed

    Slik, J W Ferry; Bernard, Caroline S; Van Beek, Marloes; Breman, Floris C; Eichhorn, Karl A O

    2008-12-01

    Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the pre-fire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.

  10. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  11. Synthesis of Low-Density, Carbon-Doped, Porous Hexagonal Boron Nitride Solids.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Chandkiram; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Jose, Sujin; Brunetto, Gustavo; Ozden, Sehmus; Vinod, Soumya; Raghavan, Prasanth; Biradar, Santoshkumar; Galvao, Douglas Soares; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-12-22

    Here, we report the scalable synthesis and characterization of low-density, porous, three-dimensional (3D) solids consisting of two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets. The structures are synthesized using bottom-up, low-temperature (∼300 °C), solid-state reaction of melamine and boric acid giving rise to porous and mechanically stable interconnected h-BN layers. A layered 3D structure forms due to the formation of h-BN, and significant improvements in the mechanical properties were observed over a range of temperatures, compared to graphene oxide or reduced graphene oxide foams. A theoretical model based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) is proposed for the formation of h-BN architectures. The material shows excellent, recyclable absorption capacity for oils and organic solvents.

  12. Effects of a waste paper product on soil phosphorus, carbon, and bulk density.

    PubMed

    Brauer, David; Aiken, Glen

    2006-01-01

    Applications of manures to agricultural fields have increased soil test values for P to high levels in parts of the USA and thus increased the likelihood that P will be transported to surface water and degrade its quality. Waste paper applications to soils with high STP (soil test P) may decrease the risk of P transport to surface water by decreasing DRP (dissolved reactive P) by the formation of insoluble Al-P complexes and providing organic matter to improve infiltration. A field experiment was conducted near Booneville, AR (USA) to assess the effects of different rates of a waste paper product addition on STP, soil bulk density, and total soil C with a soil with approximately 45 mg Bray1-P kg-1 soil (dry weight). A Leadvale silt loam soil (fine-silty, siliceous, thermic Typic Fragiudult) was amended with 0, 22, 44, or 88 Mg waste paper product ha-1 to supply approximately 90, 170, or 350 kg Al ha-1, respectively. One year after additions, there was a strong negative correlation between waste paper product application rates and soil bulk density, and a strong positive correlation between rates and total soil C content. Soil bulk density and total C 2 yr after additions, and soil DRP and Bray1-P were not affected by waste paper additions. These results support the hypothesis that decreases in DRP in runoff from soils receiving waste paper additions were probably due to changes in soil organic matter and bulk density, rather than changes in the chemical forms of soil P.

  13. Short-term bioavailability of carbon in soil organic matter fractions of different particle sizes and densities in grassland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Breulmann, Marc; Masyutenko, Nina Petrovna; Kogut, Boris Maratovich; Schroll, Reiner; Dörfler, Ulrike; Buscot, François; Schulz, Elke

    2014-11-01

    The quality, stability and availability of organic carbon (OC) in soil organic matter (SOM) can vary widely between differently managed ecosystems. Several approaches have been developed for isolating SOM fractions to examine their ecological roles, but links between the bioavailability of the OC of size-density fractions and soil microbial communities have not been previously explored. Thus, in the presented laboratory study we investigated the potential bioavailability of OC and the structure of associated microbial communities in different particle-size and density fractions of SOM. For this we used samples from four grassland ecosystems with contrasting management intensity regimes and two soil types: a Haplic Cambisol and a typical Chernozem. A combined size-density fractionation protocol was applied to separate clay-associated SOM fractions (CF1, <1 μm; CF2, 1-2 μm) from light SOM fractions (LF1, <1.8 g cm(-3); LF2, 1.8-2.0 g cm(-3)). These fractions were used as carbon sources in a respiration experiment to determine their potential bioavailability. Measured CO2-release was used as an index of substrate accessibility and linked to the soil microbial community structure, as determined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis. Several key factors controlling decomposition processes, and thus the potential bioavailability of OC, were identified: management intensity and the plant community composition of the grasslands (both of which affect the chemical composition and turnover of OC) and specific properties of individual SOM fractions. The PLFA patterns highlighted differences in the composition of microbial communities associated with the examined grasslands, and SOM fractions, providing the first broad insights into their active microbial communities. From observed interactions between abiotic and biotic factors affecting the decomposition of SOM fractions we demonstrate that increasing management intensity could enhance the potential bioavailability of

  14. A high power density miniaturized microbial fuel cell having carbon nanotube anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Pyo, Soonjae; Lee, Jae-Ik; Park, Tae-Jin; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Kim, Jongbaeg; Taylor, André D.; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology capable of directly converting the abundant biomass on the planet into electricity. Prior studies have adopted a variety of nanostructured materials with high surface area to volume ratio (SAV), yet the current and power density of these nanostructured materials do not deliver a significant leap over conventional MFCs. This study presents a novel approach to implement a miniaturized MFC with a high SAV of 4000 m-1 using three different CNT-based electrode materials: Vertically Aligned CNT (VACNT), Randomly Aligned CNT (RACNT), and Spin-Spray Layer-by-Layer (SSLbL) CNT. These CNT-based electrodes show unique biofilm morphology and thickness. The study of performance parameters of miniaturized MFCs with these CNT-electrodes are conducted with respect to a control bare gold electrode. The results show that CNT-based materials attract more exoelectrogens, Geobacter sp., than bare gold, yielding thicker biofilm formation. Among CNT-based electrodes, low sheet resistance electrodes result in thick biofilm generation and high current/power density. The miniaturized MFC having an SSLbL CNT anode exhibits a high volumetric power density of 3320 W m-3. This research may help lay the foundation for future research involving the optimization of MFCS with 2D and 3D nanostructured electrodes.

  15. Does Historical Urban Density Explain the Variation in Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions Across U.S. Cities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    The shape a city takes can have long-term impacts. The built environment is durable, and urban infrastructure is costly to alter post-construction, so decisions made early in a city's history have a lasting effect. Cities are some of the biggest aggregate sources of CO2 emissions but are also the areas with the lowest per capita emissions. Even though per capita emissions in urban areas are less than their rural counterparts, the variation in emissions across cities is drastic and understanding this variation can improve the way we build and plan cities. Research has been conducted on how density correlates with per capita emissions, but little has been done on how historical growth has influenced emissions. Using historical census data and the Vulcan Project's fossil fuel CO2 emissions data product, I investigate in greater detail whether historical population density in U.S. cities has had a significant impact on future CO2 emissions in the urban area and in the surrounding region. The census data includes all places that have reported a population of over 100,000 people in any decennial census between 1790 and 2000 and the land area the year that the city first crosses that 100,000-population threshold. This data is used to create the historical density measure. The Vulcan CO2 emissions data is broken down by sector. For this project I use the residential, commercial, and transportation (on road and non-road) emissions sectors on a 10x10km grid in 2002. I also control for regional variation in heating and cooling days, current urban density, average house age, median income, and variation in residential heating (gas, electric, fuel oil, and coal) as these are all known correlates of carbon dioxide emissions. Understanding if historical density better explains the variation in per capita carbon dioxide emissions across cities will help urban planners and city governments decide if it is appropriate to regulate growth during the initial boom of a city, a

  16. Infrared-actuated recovery of polyurethane filled by reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrids with high energy density.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Mengmeng; Guo, Haiqiang; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Optically actuated shape recovery materials receive much interest because of their great ability to control the creation of mechanical motion remotely and precisely. An infrared (IR) triggered actuator based on shape recovery was fabricated using polyurethane (TPU) incorporated by sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO)/sulfonated carbon nanotube (SCNT) hybrid nanofillers. Interconnected SRGO/SCNT hybrid nanofillers at a low weight loading of 1% dispersed in TPU showed good IR absorption and improved the crystallization of soft segments for a large shape deformation. The output force, energy density and recovery time of IR-triggered actuators were dependent on weight ratios of SRGO to SCNT (SRGO:SCNT). TPU nanocomposites filled by a hybrid nanofiller with SRGO:SCNT of 3:1 showed the maximum IR-actuated stress recovery of lifting a 107.6 g weight up 4.7 cm in 18 s. The stress recovery delivered a high energy density of 0.63 J/g and shape recovery force up to 1.2 MPa due to high thermal conductivity (1.473 W/mK) and Young's modulus of 23.4 MPa. Results indicate that a trade-off between the stiffness and efficient heat transfer controlled by synergistic effect between SRGO and SCNT is critical for high mechanical power output of IR-triggered actuators. IR-actuated shape recovery of SRGO/SCNT/TPU nanocomposites combining high energy density and output forces can be further developed for advanced optomechanical systems.

  17. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-01-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration. PMID:27094448

  18. Reactive transport modeling of the enhancement of density-driven CO2 convective mixing in carbonate aquifers and its potential implication on geological carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-20

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Furthermore, early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  19. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    PubMed

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-20

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  20. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  1. Temporal Variation of Wood Density and Carbon in Two Elevational Sites of Pinus cooperi in Relation to Climate Response in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pompa-García, Marín; Venegas-González, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of carbon uptake in forest ecosystems is much needed. Pinus cooperi is a widely distributed species in the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico and future climatic variations could impact these ecosystems. Here, we analyze the variations of trunk carbon in two populations of P. cooperi situated at different elevational gradients, combining dendrochronological techniques and allometry. Carbon sequestration (50% biomass) was estimated from a specific allometric equation for this species based on: (i) variation of intra-annual wood density and (ii) diameter reconstruction. The results show that the population at a higher elevation had greater wood density, basal area, and hence, carbon accumulation. This finding can be explained by an ecological response of trees to adverse weather conditions, which would cause a change in the cellular structure affecting the within-ring wood density profile. The influence of variations in climate on the maximum density of chronologies showed a positive correlation with precipitation and the Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation Index during the winter season, and a negative correlation with maximum temperature during the spring season. Monitoring previous conditions to growth is crucial due to the increased vulnerability to extreme climatic variations on higher elevational sites. We concluded that temporal variability of wood density contributes to a better understanding of environmental historical changes and forest carbon dynamics in Northern Mexico, representing a significant improvement over previous studies on carbon sequestration. Assuming a uniform density according to tree age is incorrect, so this method can be used for environmental mitigation strategies, such as for managing P. cooperi, a dominant species of great ecological amplitude and widely used in forest industries.

  2. Temporal Variation of Wood Density and Carbon in Two Elevational Sites of Pinus cooperi in Relation to Climate Response in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pompa-García, Marín; Venegas-González, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of carbon uptake in forest ecosystems is much needed. Pinus cooperi is a widely distributed species in the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico and future climatic variations could impact these ecosystems. Here, we analyze the variations of trunk carbon in two populations of P. cooperi situated at different elevational gradients, combining dendrochronological techniques and allometry. Carbon sequestration (50% biomass) was estimated from a specific allometric equation for this species based on: (i) variation of intra-annual wood density and (ii) diameter reconstruction. The results show that the population at a higher elevation had greater wood density, basal area, and hence, carbon accumulation. This finding can be explained by an ecological response of trees to adverse weather conditions, which would cause a change in the cellular structure affecting the within-ring wood density profile. The influence of variations in climate on the maximum density of chronologies showed a positive correlation with precipitation and the Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation Index during the winter season, and a negative correlation with maximum temperature during the spring season. Monitoring previous conditions to growth is crucial due to the increased vulnerability to extreme climatic variations on higher elevational sites. We concluded that temporal variability of wood density contributes to a better understanding of environmental historical changes and forest carbon dynamics in Northern Mexico, representing a significant improvement over previous studies on carbon sequestration. Assuming a uniform density according to tree age is incorrect, so this method can be used for environmental mitigation strategies, such as for managing P. cooperi, a dominant species of great ecological amplitude and widely used in forest industries. PMID:27272519

  3. Corrosion fundamentals and corrosion effects on aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion is an electrochemical process that involves ion migration and electron flow. The electrochemical process is explained and the four elements of the basic cell are described--anode, cathode, electrolyte and return circuit. The corrosion mechanisms affecting underground structures can be divided into two main categories--naturally occurring corrosion and stray current corrosion. Several examples of each are shown. These mechanisms of corrosion are applicable to aboveground storage tanks. Various types of exterior and interior corrosion of ASTs are explained in the light of electrochemical theory.

  4. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimethylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, J. Casey; Hong, Eunice; Mahurin, Shannon; Jiang, De -en; Long, Brian; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    The development of high performance materials for CO2 separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. In this work, (bicycloheptenyl) ethyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ~ 6800 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity ~ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in-situ cross-linking method of the difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and gas solubility measurements, we have elucidated the key parameters necessary for achieving their excellent performance.

  5. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimethylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; ...

    2015-01-01

    The development of high performance materials for CO2 separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. In this work, (bicycloheptenyl) ethyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ~ 6800 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity ~ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in-situ cross-linking method of the difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes.more » By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and gas solubility measurements, we have elucidated the key parameters necessary for achieving their excellent performance.« less

  6. Electrical resistivity of carbon black-filled high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composite containing radiation crosslinked HDPE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myong-Goo; Nho, Young Chang

    2001-04-01

    The room-temperature volume resistivity of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)-carbon black (CB) blends containing previously radiation crosslinked HDPE powder was studied. The results showed that the room-temperature volume resistivity decreases with increasing concentration of crosslinked HDPE powder. It is considered that the crosslinked HDPE particles act as a filler that increases the CB volume fraction in the HDPE matrix. The results of an optical microscope observation indicated that the crosslinked polymer particles are dispersed in the HDPE/CB composite. This effect of the crosslinked particles is attributed to the fact that the crosslinked mesh size of the HDPE particles is so small that the CB particles cannot go inside them. The effect of 60Co γ-ray and electron beam (EB) irradiation on the positive temperature coefficient, negative temperature coefficient and electrical resistivity behavior of the blends were studied.

  7. Permeation of low-Z atoms through carbon sheets: Density functional theory study on energy barriers and deformation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stefan E. E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at

    2013-12-15

    Energetic and geometric aspects of the permeation of the atoms hydrogen to neon neutral atoms through graphene sheets are investigated by investigating the associated energy barriers and sheet deformations. Density functional theory calculations on cluster models, where graphene is modeled by planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), provide the energies and geometries. Particularities of our systems, such as convergence of both energy barriers and deformation curves with increasing size of the PAHs, are discussed. Three different interaction regimes, adiabatic, planar and vertical, are investigated by enforcing different geometrical constraints. The adiabatic energy barriers range from 5 eV for hydrogen to 20 eV for neon. We find that the permeation of oxygen and carbon into graphene is facilitated by temporary chemical bonding while for other, in principle reactive atoms, it is not. We discuss implications of our results for modeling chemical sputtering of graphite.

  8. Superfast-response and ultrahigh-power-density electromechanical actuators based on hierarchal carbon nanotube electrodes and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinzhu; Ma, Wenjun; Song, Li; Niu, Zhiqiang; Cai, Le; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Dong, Haibo; Zhao, Duan; Zhou, Weiya; Xie, Sishen

    2011-11-09

    Here we report a novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based bimorph electromechanical actuator, which consists of unique as-grown SWNT films as double electrode layers separated by a chitosan electrolyte layer consisting of an ionic liquid. By taking advantage of the special hierarchical structure and the outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of the SWNT film electrodes, our actuators show orders-of-magnitude improvements in many aspects compared to previous ionic electroactive polymer (i-EAP) actuators, including superfast response (19 ms), quite wide available frequency range (dozens to hundreds of Hz), incredible large stress generating rate (1080 MPa/s), and ultrahigh mechanical output power density (244 W/kg). These remarkable achievements together with their facile fabrication, low driving voltage, flexibility, and long durability enable the SWNT-based actuators many applications such as artificial muscles for biomimetic flying insects or robots and flexible deployable reflectors.

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-06-30

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as “Aboveground Storage Tanks” and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site: · CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 03-01-04, Tank · CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank · CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain

  10. Aboveground total and green biomass of dryland shrub derived from terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsoy, Peter J.; Glenn, Nancy F.; Clark, Patrick E.; Derryberry, DeWayne R.

    2014-02-01

    Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), a dominant shrub species in the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem of the western US, is declining from its historical distribution due to feedbacks between climate and land use change, fire, and invasive species. Quantifying aboveground biomass of sagebrush is important for assessing carbon storage and monitoring the presence and distribution of this rapidly changing dryland ecosystem. Models of shrub canopy volume, derived from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds, were used to accurately estimate aboveground sagebrush biomass. Ninety-one sagebrush plants were scanned and sampled across three study sites in the Great Basin, USA. Half of the plants were scanned and destructively sampled in the spring (n = 46), while the other half were scanned again in the fall before destructive sampling (n = 45). The latter set of sagebrush plants was scanned during both spring and fall to further test the ability of the TLS to quantify seasonal changes in green biomass. Sagebrush biomass was estimated using both a voxel and a 3-D convex hull approach applied to TLS point cloud data. The 3-D convex hull model estimated total and green biomass more accurately (R2 = 0.92 and R2 = 0.83, respectively) than the voxel-based method (R2 = 0.86 and R2 = 0.73, respectively). Seasonal differences in TLS-predicted green biomass were detected at two of the sites (p < 0.001 and p = 0.029), elucidating the amount of ephemeral leaf loss in the face of summer drought. The methods presented herein are directly transferable to other dryland shrubs, and implementation of the convex hull model with similar sagebrush species is straightforward.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Components Using High Density Carbon Nanotube Yarn Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for design freedom and part complexity not currently attainable using traditional manufacturing technologies. Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), for example, can yield novel component geometries and functionalities because the method provides a high level of control over material placement and processing conditions. This is achievable by extrusion of a preprocessed filament feedstock material along a predetermined path. However if fabrication of a multifunctional part relies only on conventional filament materials, it will require a different material for each unique functionality printed into the part. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an attractive material for many applications due to their high specific strength as well as good electrical and thermal conductivity. The presence of this set of properties in a single material presents an opportunity to use one material to achieve multifunctionality in an additively manufactured part. This paper describes a recently developed method for processing continuous CNT yarn filaments into three-dimensional articles, and summarizes the mechanical, electrical, and sensing performance of the components fabricated in this way.

  12. Interaction of cholesterol with carbon nanotubes: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Anthony J.; Gupta, Bikash C.; Batra, Inder P.

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are being presented as medical devices at an increasing rate. To date, they have been suggested as targets for the thermal ablation of cancers, as delivery systems for pharmaceuticals, and as bio-sensors. A common thread amongst these applications is that CNTs are used as a delivery vector for some pharmaceutical into the body. We consider here the possibility that CNTs might be used as a device to trap and remove chemicals, particularly cholesterol, from a living organism. We have performed ab-initio calculations to determine how cholesterol might interact with CNTs placed inside the body. We have found that cholesterol exhibits no particular affinity for or effect on a bare CNT; however, its binding energy can be increased by functionalizing the CNT with a Ca adatom. We found that a Ca adatom on the wall of a CNT increases the binding energy of cholesterol to a CNT by around 1.5 eV, regardless of the nanotube's diameter. The presence of the cholesterol does not affect the band structure of the CNT, but the Ca atom does have an effect near the Fermi level. This indicates that a CNT based detector could function by detecting the alteration to the electronic structure caused by the induced adsorption of an adatom in the trinary system of CNT + cholesterol + adatom.

  13. Evaluation of forest structure, biomass and carbon sequestration in subtropical pristine forests of SW China.

    PubMed

    Nizami, Syed Moazzam; Yiping, Zhang; Zheng, Zheng; Zhiyun, Lu; Guoping, Yang; Liqing, Sha

    2017-03-01

    Very old natural forests comprising the species of Fagaceae (Lithocarpus xylocarpus, Castanopsis wattii, Lithocarpus hancei) have been prevailing since years in the Ailaoshan Mountain Nature Reserve (AMNR) SW China. Within these forest trees, density is quite variable. We studied the forest structure, stand dynamics and carbon density at two different sites to know the main factors which drives carbon sequestration process in old forests by considering the following questions: How much is the carbon density in these forest trees of different DBH (diameter at breast height)? How much carbon potential possessed by dominant species of these forests? How vegetation carbon is distributed in these forests? Which species shows high carbon sequestration? What are the physiochemical properties of soil in these forests? Five-year (2005-2010) tree growth data from permanently established plots in the AMNR was analysed for species composition, density, stem diameter (DBH), height and carbon (C) density both in aboveground and belowground vegetation biomass. Our study indicated that among two comparative sites, overall 54 species of 16 different families were present. The stem density, height, C density and soil properties varied significantly with time among the sites showing uneven distribution across the forests. Among the dominant species, L. xylocarpus represents 30% of the total carbon on site 1 while C. wattii represents 50% of the total carbon on site 2. The average C density ranged from 176.35 to 243.97 t C ha(-1). The study emphasized that there is generous degree to expand the carbon stocking in this AMNR through scientific management gearing towards conservation of old trees and planting of potentially high carbon sequestering species on good site quality areas.

  14. Experimental whole-lake increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration produces unexpected increase in crustacean zooplankton density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Patrick T.; Craig, Nicola; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian C.; Zwart, Jacob A.; Jones, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The observed pattern of lake browning, or increased terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, across the northern hemisphere has amplified the importance of understanding how consumer productivity varies with DOC concentration. Results from comparative studies suggest these increased DOC concentrations may reduce crustacean zooplankton productivity due to reductions in resource quality and volume of suitable habitat. Although these spatial comparisons provide an expectation for the response of zooplankton productivity as DOC concentration increases, we still have an incomplete understanding of how zooplankton respond to temporal increases in DOC concentration within a single system. As such, we used a whole-lake manipulation, in which DOC concentration was increased from 8 to 11 mg L−1 in one basin of a manipulated lake, to test the hypothesis that crustacean zooplankton production should subsequently decrease. In contrast to the spatially derived expectation of sharp DOC-mediated decline, we observed a small increase in zooplankton densities in response to our experimental increase in DOC concentration of the treatment basin. This was due to significant increases in gross primary production and resource quality (lower seston carbon-to-phosphorus ratio; C:P). These results demonstrate that temporal changes in lake characteristics due to increased DOC may impact zooplankton in ways that differ from those observed in spatial surveys. We also identified significant interannual variability across our study region, which highlights potential difficulty in detecting temporal responses of organism abundances to gradual environmental change (e.g., browning).

  15. Influence of the carbon substitution on the critical current density and AC losses in MgB2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciszek, M.; Rogacki, K.; Oganisian, K.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.

    2010-12-01

    The DC magnetization and AC complex magnetic susceptibilities were measured for MgB2 single crystals, unsubstituted and carbon substituted with the composition of Mg(B0.94C0.05)2. The measurements were performed in AC and DC magnetic fields oriented parallel to the c-axis of the crystals. From the DC magnetization loops and the AC susceptibility measurements, critical current densities ( J c were derived as a function of temperature and the DC and AC magnetic fields. Results show that the substitution with carbon decreases J c ) at low magnetic fields, opposite to the well known effect of an increase of J c at higher fields. AC magnetic losses were derived from the AC susceptibility data as a function of amplitude and the DC bias magnetic field. The AC losses were determined for temperatures of 0.6 and 0.7 of the transition temperature T c , so close to the boiling points of LH2 and LNe, potential cooling media for magnesium diboride based composites. The results are analyzed and discussed in the context of the critical state model.

  16. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on Al12X clusters studied by density functional theory: effect of charge and doping.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Ju, Xue-Hai

    2013-11-27

    The adsorption of a CO2 molecule on neutral and charged X-centered icosahedron Al12X(±z) clusters (X = Al, Be, Zn, Ni, Cu, B, P; z = 0, 1) was investigated by the density functional PW91 and PWC methods. Optimized configurations corresponding to physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 were identified. The adsorption energies, activation barriers, and binding energies involving both the physisorption (Al12X(±z)·CO2-I) and chemisorption (Al12X(±z)·CO2-II) for CO2 were determined. The chemisorption of a CO2 molecule on the Al12X clusters (X is a metallic doping element) requires relatively low activation barriers. The lowest barrier was found to be with the Al12Be cluster. For the Al12X(-) clusters, the barriers are all higher than those of the neutral analogues. For the Al12X(+) clusters, two corresponding configurations are linked by a low-energy barrier, and CO2 molecule chemisorption on the Al12Be(+) cluster has the lowest barrier. The adsorption energies are larger than the energy barriers, which facilitates the chemisorption. The results show that carbon dioxide adsorbed on the Al12X(±z) clusters can be tuned by controllable X doping and the total number of valence electrons and suggest the potential application of Al12X(±z) nanostructures for carbon dioxide capture and activation.

  17. Graphene oxide-encapsulated carbon nanotube hybrids for high dielectric performance nanocomposites with enhanced energy storage density.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Huang, Xingyi; Wu, Xinfeng; Xie, Liyuan; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Pingkai

    2013-05-07

    Polymer-based materials with a high dielectric constant show great potential for energy storage applications. Since the intrinsic dielectric constant of most polymers is very low, the integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the polymers provides an attractive and promising way to reach a high dielectric constant owing to their outstanding intrinsic physical performances. However, these CNT-based composites usually suffer from high dielectric loss, low breakdown strength and the difficulty to tailor the dielectric constant. Herein, we have designed and fabricated a new class of candidates composed of graphene oxide-encapsulated carbon nanotube (GO-e-CNT) hybrids. The obtained GO-e-CNT-polymer composites not only exhibit a high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss, but also have a highly enhanced breakdown strength and maximum energy storage density. Moreover, the dielectric constant of the composites can be tuned easily by tailoring the loading of GO-e-CNTs. It is believed that the GO shells around CNTs play an important role in realizing the high dielectric performances of the composites. GO shells can not only effectively improve the dispersion of CNTs, but also act as insulation barriers for suppressing leakage current and increasing breakdown strength. Our strategy provides a new pathway to achieve CNT-based polymer composites with high dielectric performances for energy storage applications.

  18. Pressure dependent stability and structure of carbon dioxide—A density functional study including long-range corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohr, Sebastian; Grimme, Stefan; Söhnel, Tilo; Paulus, Beate; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2013-11-01

    First-principles density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the solid-state modifications of carbon dioxide up to pressures of 60 GPa. All known molecular CO2 structures are investigated in this pressure range, as well as three non-molecular modifications. To account for long-range van der Waals interactions, the dispersion corrected DFT method developed by Grimme and co-workers (DFT-D3) is applied. We find that the DFT-D3 method substantially improves the results compared to the uncorrected DFT methods for the molecular carbon dioxide crystals. Enthalpies at 0 K and cohesive energies support only one possibility of the available experimental solutions for the structure of phase IV: the Roverline{3}c modification, proposed by Datchi and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 185701 (2009)]. Furthermore, comparing bulk moduli with experimental values, we cannot reproduce the quite large—rather typical for covalent crystal structures—experimental values for the molecular phases II and III.

  19. Nitrogen-doped carbon spheres: A new high-energy-density and long-life pseudo-capacitive electrode material for electrochemical flow capacitor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shujin; Wang, Miao; Xu, Xingtao; Li, Yandong; Li, Yanjiang; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2017-04-01

    One of the most challenging issues in developing electrochemical flow capacitor (EFC) technology is the design and synthesis of active electrode materials with high energy density and long cycle life. However, in practical cases, the energy density and cycle ability obtained currently cannot meet the practical need. In this work, we propose a new active material, nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (NCSs), as flowable electrodes for EFC application. The NCSs were prepared via one-pot hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of resorcinol/formaldehyde as carbon precursors and melamine as nitrogen precursor, followed by carbonization in nitrogen flow at various temperatures. The results of EFC experiments demonstrate that NCSs obtained at 800°C exhibit a high energy density of 13.5Whkg(-1) and an excellent cycle ability, indicating the superiority of NCSs for EFC application.

  20. Plot-level aboveground woody biomass modeling using canopy height and auxiliary remote sensing data in a heterogeneous savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenzi, David; Lefsky, Michael Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing studies aiming at assessing woody biomass have demonstrated a strong relationship between canopy height and plot-level aboveground biomass, but most of these studies focused on closed canopy forests. To date, a few studies have examined the strength and reliability of this relationship using large footprint lidar in savannas. Furthermore, there have been few studies of appropriate methods for the comparison of models that relate aboveground biomass to canopy height metrics without consideration of variation in species composition (generic models) to models developed for individual species composition or vegetation types. We developed generic models using the classical least-squares regression modeling approach to relate selected canopy height metrics to aboveground woody biomass in a savanna landscape. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis (HBA) was then used to explore the implications of using generic or composition-specific models. Our study used the estimates of aboveground biomass from field data, canopy height estimates from airborne discrete return lidar, and a proxy for canopy cover (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data, collected from the oak savannas of Tejon Ranch Conservancy in Kern County, California. Models were developed and analyzed using estimates of canopy height and aboveground biomass calculated at the level of 50-m diameter plots, comparable with footprint diameter of existing large footprint spaceborne lidar data. The two generic models that incorporated canopy cover proxies performed better than one model that did not use canopy cover information. From the HBA, we found out that for all models both the intercept and slope had interspecific variability. The valley oak dominated plots consistently had higher slopes and intercepts, whereas the plots dominated by blue oaks had the lowest. However, the intercept and slope values of the composition-specific models did not differ much from the

  1. Density functional study of the interaction of carbon monoxide with small neutral and charged silver clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Li, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Wen-Ning; Fan, Kang-Nian

    2006-06-08

    CO adsorption on small neutral, anionic, and cationic silver clusters Ag(n) (n = 1-7) has been studied with use of the PW91PW91 density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of CO on-top site, among various possible sites, is energetically preferred irrespective of the charge state of the silver cluster. The cationic silver clusters generally have a greater tendency to adsorb CO than the anionic and neutral silver ones, except for n = 3 and 4, and the binding energies reach a local minimum at n = 5. The binding energies on the neutral clusters, instead, reach a local maximum at n = 3, which is about 0.87 eV, probably large enough to be captured in the experiments. Binding of CO to the silver clusters is generally weaker than that to the copper and gold counterparts at the same size and charge state. This is due to the weaker orbital interaction between silver and CO, which is caused by the larger atomic radius of the silver atom. In contrast, Au atoms with a larger nuclear charge but a similar atomic radius to silver owing to the lanthanide contraction are able to have a stronger interaction with CO.

  2. Discriminating between Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Physisorbed Adsorbates: Role of Wavelike Charge-Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wang; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Discriminating between metallic (M ) and semiconducting (S ) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) remains a fundamental challenge in the field of nanotechnology. We address this issue by studying the adsorption of the isotropic atoms Xe, Kr, and a highly anisotropic molecule n heptane on M - and S -SWNTs with density functional theory that includes many-body dispersion forces. We find that the distinct polarizabilities of M - and S -SWNTs exhibit significantly different physisorption properties, which are also strongly controlled by the SWNT's diameter, adsorption site, adsorbate coverage, and the adsorbate's anisotropy. These findings stem from the wavelike nature of charge-density fluctuations in SWNTs. Particularly, these results allow us to rationalize the unusual √{3 }×√{3 }R 3 00 phase of Kr atoms on small gap M -SWNTs and the double desorption peak temperatures of n heptane on M -SWNTs in experiments, and also propose the n heptane as an effective sensor for experimentally discriminating M - and S -SWNTs.

  3. Model analysis of grazing effect on above-ground biomass and above-ground net primary production of a Mongolian grassland ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Lee, Gilzae; Lee, Pilzae; Oikawa, Takehisa

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the productivity of a grassland ecosystem in Kherlenbayan-Ulaan (KBU), Mongolia under non-grazing and grazing conditions using a new simulation model, Sim-CYCLE grazing. The model was obtained by integrating the Sim-CYCLE [Ito, A., Oikawa, T., 2002. A simulation model of carbon cycle in land ecosystems (Sim-CYCLE): a description based on dry-matter production theory and plot-scale validation. Ecological Modeling, 151, pp. 143-176] and a defoliation formulation [Seligman, N.G., Cavagnaro, J.B., Horno, M.E., 1992. Simulation of defoliation effects on primary production of warm-season, semiarid perennial- species grassland. Ecological Modelling, 60, pp. 45-61]. The results from the model have been validated against a set of field data obtained at KBU showing that both above-ground biomass (AB) and above-ground net primary production ( Np,a) decrease with increasing grazing intensity. The simulated maximum AB for a year maintains a nearly constant value of 1.15 Mg DM ha -1 under non-grazing conditions. The AB decreases and then reaches equilibrium under a stocking rate ( Sr) of 0.4 sheep ha -1 and 0.7 sheep ha -1. The AB decreases all the time if Sr is greater than 0.7 sheep ha -1. These results suggest that the maximum sustainable Sr is 0.7 sheep ha -1. A similar trend is also observed for the simulated Np,a. The annual Np,a is about 1.25 Mg DM ha -1 year -1 and this value is also constant under non-grazing conditions. The annual Np,a decreases and then reaches equilibrium under an Sr of 0.4 sheep ha -1 and 0.7 sheep ha -1, but the Np,a decreases all the time when Sr is greater than 0.7 sheep ha -1. It also indicates that the maximum sustainable Sr is 0.7 sheep ha -1. Transpiration ( ET) and evaporation ( EE) rates were determined by the Penman-Monteith method. Simulated results show that ET decreases with increasing Sr, while EE increases with increasing Sr. At equilibrium, the annual mean evapotranspiration ( E) is 189.11 mm year -1

  4. Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Simon L.; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sunderland, Terry; Begne, Serge K.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje M. F.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi; Baker, Timothy R.; Banin, Lindsay; Bastin, Jean-François; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles; Chezeaux, Eric; Clark, Connie J.; Collins, Murray; Djagbletey, Gloria; Djuikouo, Marie Noël K.; Droissart, Vincent; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Ewango, Cornielle E. N.; Fauset, Sophie; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Foli, Ernest G.; Gillet, Jean-François; Hamilton, Alan C.; Harris, David J.; Hart, Terese B.; de Haulleville, Thales; Hladik, Annette; Hufkens, Koen; Huygens, Dries; Jeanmart, Philippe; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Leal, Miguel E.; Lloyd, Jon; Lovett, Jon C.; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marshall, Andrew R.; Ojo, Lucas; Peh, Kelvin S.-H.; Pickavance, Georgia; Poulsen, John R.; Reitsma, Jan M.; Sheil, Douglas; Simo, Murielle; Steppe, Kathy; Taedoumg, Hermann E.; Talbot, Joey; Taplin, James R. D.; Taylor, David; Thomas, Sean C.; Toirambe, Benjamin; Verbeeck, Hans; Vleminckx, Jason; White, Lee J. T.; Willcock, Simon; Woell, Hannsjorg; Zemagho, Lise

    2013-01-01

    We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stem density and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha−1 (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha−1) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- compared with neotropical forests. However, mean stem density is low (426 ± 11 stems ha−1 greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationships with C : N ratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus–AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes. PMID:23878327

  5. Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon L; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sunderland, Terry; Begne, Serge K; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; van der Heijden, Geertje M F; Phillips, Oliver L; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi; Baker, Timothy R; Banin, Lindsay; Bastin, Jean-François; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles; Chezeaux, Eric; Clark, Connie J; Collins, Murray; Djagbletey, Gloria; Djuikouo, Marie Noël K; Droissart, Vincent; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Ewango, Cornielle E N; Fauset, Sophie; Feldpausch, Ted R; Foli, Ernest G; Gillet, Jean-François; Hamilton, Alan C; Harris, David J; Hart, Terese B; de Haulleville, Thales; Hladik, Annette; Hufkens, Koen; Huygens, Dries; Jeanmart, Philippe; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Leal, Miguel E; Lloyd, Jon; Lovett, Jon C; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marshall, Andrew R; Ojo, Lucas; Peh, Kelvin S-H; Pickavance, Georgia; Poulsen, John R; Reitsma, Jan M; Sheil, Douglas; Simo, Murielle; Steppe, Kathy; Taedoumg, Hermann E; Talbot, Joey; Taplin, James R D; Taylor, David; Thomas, Sean C; Toirambe, Benjamin; Verbeeck, Hans; Vleminckx, Jason; White, Lee J T; Willcock, Simon; Woell, Hannsjorg; Zemagho, Lise

    2013-01-01

    We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stem density and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha⁻¹ (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha⁻¹) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- compared with neotropical forests. However, mean stem density is low (426 ± 11 stems ha⁻¹ greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationships with C : N ratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus-AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes.

  6. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  7. Variability of above-ground litter inputs alters soil physicochemical and biological processes: a meta-analysis of litterfall-manipulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, L. L.; Sayer, E. J.

    2013-11-01

    Global change has been shown to alter the amount of above-ground litter inputs to soil greatly, which could cause substantial cascading effects on below-ground biogeochemical cycling. Despite extensive study, there is uncertainty about how changes in above-ground litter inputs affect soil carbon and nutrient turnover and transformation. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis on 70 litter-manipulation experiments in order to assess how changes in above-ground litter inputs alter soil physicochemical properties, carbon dynamics and nutrient cycles. Our results demonstrated that litter removal decreased soil respiration by 34%, microbial biomass carbon in the mineral soil by 39% and total carbon in the mineral soil by 10%, whereas litter addition increased them by 31, 26 and 10%, respectively. This suggests that greater litter inputs increase the soil carbon sink despite higher rates of carbon release and transformation. Total nitrogen and extractable inorganic nitrogen in the mineral soil decreased by 17 and 30%, respectively, under litter removal, but were not altered by litter addition. Overall, litter manipulation had a significant impact upon soil temperature and moisture, but not soil pH; litter inputs were more crucial in buffering soil temperature and moisture fluctuations in grassland than in forest. Compared to other ecosystems, tropical and subtropical forests were more sensitive to variation in litter inputs, as altered litter inputs affected the turnover and accumulation of soil carbon and nutrients more substantially over a shorter time period. Our study demonstrates that although the magnitude of responses differed greatly among ecosystems, the direction of the responses was very similar across different ecosystems. Interactions between plant productivity and below-ground biogeochemical cycling need to be taken into account to predict ecosystem responses to environmental change.

  8. Lennard-Jones parameters for small diameter carbon nanotubes and water for molecular mechanics simulations from van der Waals density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaukonen, M; Gulans, A; Havu, P; Kauppinen, E

    2012-03-05

    Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters are derived for classical nonpolarizable force fields for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and for CNT-water interaction from van der Waals (vdW) enhanced density functional calculations. The new LJ parameters for carbon-carbon interactions are of the same order as those previously used in the literature but differ significantly for CNT-water interactions. This may partially originate from the fact that in addition to pure vdW interactions the polarization and other quantum mechanics effects are embedded into the LJ-potential.

  9. Carbon reaction and diffusion on Ni(111), Ni(100), and Fe(110): Kinetic parameters from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltner, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Jacob, T.

    2008-08-28

    This paper investigates the reactivity of elemental carbon films deposited from the vapor phase with Fe and Ni substrates at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are presented as a method for evaluating kinetic reaction data. Carbon films are deposited on different surface orientations representing geometries from a dense atom packing as in fcc (111) to an open surface structure as in fcc (100). During annealing experiments several reactions are observed (carbon subsurface diffusion, carbide formation, carbide decomposition, and graphite ordering). These reactions and the respective kinetic parameters are analyzed and quantified by XPS measurements performed while annealing at elevated temperatures (620-820 K). The resulting activation barriers for carbon subsurface diffusion are compared with calculated values using the density functional theory. The determined kinetic parameters are used to reproduce the thermal behavior of carbon films on nickel surfaces.

  10. The hybrid nanostructure of MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel for symmetric supercapacitors with high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Pin; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Li, Liyi; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Li, Haidong; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Wong, C. P.; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Current applications of carbon-based supercapacitors are limited by their low energy density. One promising strategy to enhance the energy density is to couple metal oxides with carbon materials. In this study, a porous MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructure was synthesized by assembling MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle arrays on the surface of channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan for the supercapacitor application. The synthetic process of the hybrid nanostructure involves two steps, i.e. the growth of Mn-Co precursors on carbon aerogel by a hydrothermal process and the conversion of the precursor into MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedles by calcination. The carbon aerogel exhibits a high electrical conductivity, high specific surface area and porous structure, ensuring high electrochemical performance of the hybrid nanostructure when coupled with the porous MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedles. The symmetric supercapacitor using the MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructure as the active electrode material exhibits a high energy density of about 84.3 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 600 W kg-1. The voltage window is as high as 1.5 V in neutral aqueous electrolytes. Due to the unique nanostructure of the electrodes, the capacitance retention reaches 86% over 5000 cycles.Current applications of carbon-based supercapacitors are limited by their low energy density. One promising strategy to enhance the energy density is to couple metal oxides with carbon materials. In this study, a porous MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructure was synthesized by assembling MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedle arrays on the surface of channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan for the supercapacitor application. The synthetic process of the hybrid nanostructure involves two steps, i.e. the growth of Mn-Co precursors on carbon aerogel by a hydrothermal process and the conversion of the precursor into MnCo2O4.5 nanoneedles by

  11. Aboveground Biomass Monitoring over Siberian Boreal Forest Using Radar Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczuk-Gorska, M. A.; Thiel, C. J.; Schmullius, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) plays an essential role in ecosystem research, global cycles, and is of vital importance in climate studies. AGB accumulated in the forests is of special monitoring interest as it contains the most of biomass comparing with other land biomes. The largest of the land biomes is boreal forest, which has a substantial carbon accumulation capability; carbon stock estimated to be 272 +/-23 Pg C (32%) [1]. Russian's forests are of particular concern, due to the largest source of uncertainty in global carbon stock calculations [1], and old inventory data that have not been updated in the last 25 years [2]. In this research new empirical models for AGB estimation are proposed. Using radar L-band data for AGB retrieval and optical data for an update of in situ data the processing scheme was developed. The approach was trained and validated in the Asian part of the boreal forest, in southern Russian Central Siberia; two Siberian Federal Districts: Krasnoyarsk Kray and Irkutsk Oblast. Together the training and testing forest territories cover an area of approximately 3,500 km2. ALOS PALSAR L-band single (HH - horizontal transmitted and received) and dual (HH and HV - horizontal transmitted, horizontal and vertical received) polarizations in Single Look Complex format (SLC) were used to calculate backscattering coefficient in gamma nought and coherence. In total more than 150 images acquired between 2006 and 2011 were available. The data were obtained through the ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative Project (K&C). The data were used to calibrate a randomForest algorithm. Additionally, a simple linear and multiple-regression approach was used. The uncertainty of the AGB estimation at pixel and stand level were calculated approximately as 35% by validation against an independent dataset. The previous studies employing ALOS PALSAR data over boreal forests reported uncertainty of 39.4% using randomForest approach [2] or 42.8% using semi-empirical approach [3].

  12. Toward CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during Ni/Fe-catalyzed carbon nanofiber growth: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chen; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Chen, De; Cheng, Hong-Ye; Zhu, Yi-An

    2011-04-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during the Ni/Fe-catalyzed growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Two bulk models with different Ni to Fe molar ratios (1:1 and 2:1) are constructed, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) simulations are conducted to evaluate their reliability. With the comparison between the calculated and experimental XRD patterns, these models are found to be well suited to reproduce the crystalline structures of Ni/Fe bulk alloys. The calculations indicate the binding of the C1 derivatives to the Ni/Fe closest-packed surfaces is strengthened compared to that on Ni(111), arising from the upshift of the weighted d-band centers of catalyst surfaces. Then, the transition states for the four successive dehydrogenation steps in CH4 dissociation are located using the dimer method. It is found that the energy barriers for the first three steps are rather close on the alloyed Ni/Fe and Ni surfaces, while the activation energy for CH dissociation is substantially lowered with the introduction of Fe. The dissolution of the generated C from the surface into the bulk of the Ni/Fe alloys is thermodynamically favorable, and the diffusion of C through catalyst particles is hindered by the Fe component. With the combination of density functional theory calculations and kinetic analysis, the C concentration in catalyst particles is predicted to increase with the Fe content. Meanwhile, other experimental conditions, such as the composition of carbon-containing gases, feedstock partial pressure, and reaction temperature, are also found to play a key role in determining the C concentration in bulk metal, and hence the microstructures of generated CNFs.

  13. Testing cathodic protection systems on aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    The evaluation of cathodic protection systems on aboveground storage tanks presents a unique challenge. Paramount with selection of system type is the method of verification that corrosion control has indeed been achieved. Past experience indicates that standard monitoring procedures intended to determine satisfaction of the industry recognized criteria may not be adequate in analyzing the degree of protection being afforded a storage tank resting on the ground. The standard method of determining the effectiveness of cathodic protection on any structure is the structure-to-electrolyte potential measurement. These measurements are performed utilizing a high impedance voltmeter and a stable, reproducible reference electrode contacting the electrolyte. The paper describes several case histories to illustrate methods.

  14. Transport of Carbon Tetrachloride in a Fractured Vadose Zone due to Atmospheric Pressure Fluctuations, Diffusion, and Vapor Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Downs, W.; Falta, R. W.; Housley, T.

    2005-12-01

    DNAPL sources of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vapors are of interest at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The site is underlain by thick fractured basalt that includes sedimentary interbeds, each are a few meters thick. Daily atmospheric pressure fluctuations serve as driving forces for CT vapor transport in the subsurface. Other important transport processes for vapor movement include gas-phase diffusion and density-driven transport. The objective of this research is to investigate the influence and relative importance of these processes on gaseous transport of CT. Gas pressure and vapor concentration measurements were conducted at various depths in two wells. A numerical multiphase flow model (TOUGH2), calibrated to field pressure data, is used to conduct sensitivity analyses to elucidate the importance of the different transport mechanisms. Results show that the basalt is highly permeable to vertical air flow. The pressure dampening occurs mainly in the sedimentary interbeds. Model-calibrated permeability values for the interbeds are similar to those obtained in a study by the U.S. Geological Survey for shallow sediments, and an order of magnitude higher than column-scale values obtained by previous studies conducted by INEEL scientists. The transport simulations indicate that considering the effect of barometric pressure changes is critical to simulating transport of pollutants in the vadose zone above the DNAPL source. Predicted concentrations can be orders of magnitude smaller than actual concentrations if the effect is not considered. Below the DNAPL vapor source, accounting for density and diffusion alone would yield acceptable results provided that a 20% error in concentrations are acceptable, and that simulating concentrations trends (and not actual concentrations) is the primary goal.

  15. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

    PubMed

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Larriviere, Jack C; From, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  16. Chronic Nitrogen Deposition Has a Minor Effect on the Quantity and Quality of Aboveground Litter in a Boreal Forest

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Annika; Palmqvist, Kristin; Gundale, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition enhances carbon (C) sequestration in boreal soils. However, key underlying mechanisms explaining this increase have not been resolved. Two potentially important mechanisms are that aboveground litter production increases, or that litter quality changes in response to N enrichment. As such, our aim was to quantify whether simulated chronic N deposition caused changes in aboveground litter production or quality in a boreal forest. We conducted a long-term (17 years) stand-scale (0.1 ha) forest experiment, consisting of three N addition levels (0, 12.5, and 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1) in northern Sweden, where background N deposition rates are very low. We measured the annual quantity of litter produced for 8 different litter categories, as well as their concentrations of C, N, phosphorus (P), lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose. Our results indicate that mosses were the only major litter component showing significant quantitative and qualitative alterations in response to the N additions, indicative of their ability to intercept a substantial portion of the N added. These effects were, however, offset by the other litter fractions where we found no changes in the total litter fluxes, or individual chemical constituents when all litter categories were summed. This study indicates that the current annual litter fluxes cannot explain the increase in soil C that has occurred in our study system in response to simulated chronic N application. These results suggest that other mechanisms are likely to explain the increased soil C accumulation rate we have observed, such as changes in soil microbial activity, or potentially transient changes in aboveground litter inputs that were no longer present at the time of our study. PMID:27580120

  17. Chronic Nitrogen Deposition Has a Minor Effect on the Quantity and Quality of Aboveground Litter in a Boreal Forest.

    PubMed

    Maaroufi, Nadia I; Nordin, Annika; Palmqvist, Kristin; Gundale, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition enhances carbon (C) sequestration in boreal soils. However, key underlying mechanisms explaining this increase have not been resolved. Two potentially important mechanisms are that aboveground litter production increases, or that litter quality changes in response to N enrichment. As such, our aim was to quantify whether simulated chronic N deposition caused changes in aboveground litter production or quality in a boreal forest. We conducted a long-term (17 years) stand-scale (0.1 ha) forest experiment, consisting of three N addition levels (0, 12.5, and 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1) in northern Sweden, where background N deposition rates are very low. We measured the annual quantity of litter produced for 8 different litter categories, as well as their concentrations of C, N, phosphorus (P), lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose. Our results indicate that mosses were the only major litter component showing significant quantitative and qualitative alterations in response to the N additions, indicative of their ability to intercept a substantial portion of the N added. These effects were, however, offset by the other litter fractions where we found no changes in the total litter fluxes, or individual chemical constituents when all litter categories were summed. This study indicates that the current annual litter fluxes cannot explain the increase in soil C that has occurred in our study system in response to simulated chronic N application. These results suggest that other mechanisms are likely to explain the increased soil C accumulation rate we have observed, such as changes in soil microbial activity, or potentially transient changes in aboveground litter inputs that were no longer present at the time of our study.

  18. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Larriviere, Jack C.; From, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  19. Dryland Wheat Domestication Changed the Development of Aboveground Architecture for a Well-Structured Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu-Fang; Cheng, Zheng-Guo; Ma, Bao-Luo; Palta, Jairo A.; Kong, Hai-Yan; Mo, Fei; Wang, Jian-Yong; Zhu, Ying; Lv, Guang-Chao; Batool, Asfa; Bai, Xue; Li, Feng-Min; Xiong, You-Cai

    2014-01-01

    We examined three different-ploidy wheat species to elucidate the development of aboveground architecture and its domesticated mechanism under environment-controlled field conditions. Architecture parameters including leaf, stem, spike and canopy morphology were measured together with biomass allocation, leaf net photosynthetic rate and instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi). Canopy biomass density was decreased from diploid to tetraploid wheat, but increased to maximum in hexaploid wheat. Population yield in hexaploid wheat was higher than in diploid wheat, but the population fitness and individual competition ability was higher in diploid wheats. Plant architecture was modified from a compact type in diploid wheats to an incompact type in tetraploid wheats, and then to a more compact type of hexaploid wheats. Biomass accumulation, population yield, harvest index and the seed to leaf ratio increased from diploid to tetraploid and hexaploid, associated with heavier specific internode weight and greater canopy biomass density in hexaploid and tetraploid than in diploid wheat. Leaf photosynthetic rate and WUEi were decreased from diploid to tetraploid and increased from tetraploid to hexaploid due to more compact leaf type in hexaploid and diploid than in tetraploid. Grain yield formation and WUEi were closely associated with spatial stance of leaves and stems. We conclude that the ideotype of dryland wheats could be based on spatial reconstruction of leaf type and further exertion of leaf photosynthetic rate. PMID:25181037

  20. Ablation and carbon deposition induced by UV laser irradiation of polyimide: Application to the metallization of VIAs in high density printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metayer, P.; Davenas, J.; Bureau, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Polyimides are known to exhibit large ablation rates upon irradiation with excimer laser due to their high absorbance in the UV and low fluorescence yield. We have studied different regimes of laser ablation according to the fluence and studied the structures resulting from carbon products deposition. For fluences larger than the polyimide ablation threshold, but lower than the carbon one, the development of one structure is the dominant process, whereas large ablation rates lead to polyimide etching above the carbon ablation threshold. The deposition of a carbon layer on the walls of ablated slits has in particular been investigated using an original experimental technique. Optical microscopy and MEB have shown that this carbon layer covered the main height of the ablated holes whereas a threshold (bare polyimide) for carbon condensation was evidenced at the bottom of the ablated hole. Raman spectroscopy and conductivity measurements have shown that the carbon phase is mainly graphitic. A dependence of the carbon condensation threshold on the slit width has been evidenced and discussed in relation with the angle of ejection of ablation debris. A procedure has been developed to render the bare polyimide of the threshold region conductive. At last the conductive properties of the walls of the ablated holes have been exploited to perform an electrolytic metallization. Implications for the production of interconnection vertical interconnections (VIAs) in high density printed circuits are addressed.

  1. [Estimation of China soil organic carbon storage and density based on 1:1,000,000 soil database].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongsheng; Shi, Xuezheng; Sun, Weixia; Wang, Hongjie; Liu, Qinghua; Zhao, Yongcun

    2005-12-01

    Based on 1:1,000,000 soil database, and employing the methods of spatial expression, this paper estimated the soil organic carbon storage (SOCS) and density (SOCD) of China. The database consists of 1:1,000,000 digital soil map, soil profile attribution database, and soil reference system. The digital soil map contained 926 soil mapping units, 690 soil families, and 94 000 or more polygons, while the soil profile attribution database collected 7292 soil profiles, including 81 attribution fields. The SOCDs of soil profiles were calculated and linked to the soil polygons in the digital soil map by the method of "GIS linkage based on soil type", resulting in a vector map of 1:1,000,000 China SOCD. The SOCS of the country or of a soil could be estimated by summing up the SOCS of all polygons or the polygons of a soil, and their SOCD were the SOCS of them derived by their areas. The estimated SOCS and SOCD of the country was 89. 14 Pg (1 Pg = 10(15) g) and 9.60 kg m(-2), respectively, covered all the soils with a total area of 928.10 x 10(4) km2, which might be considered closest to the real value.

  2. Effect of cooling rate on the properties of high density polyethylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dong; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Linton, David

    2015-05-22

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing using twin-screw extrusion. The extruded pellets were compression moulded at 200°C for 5min followed by cooling at different cooling rates (20°C/min and 300°C/min respectively) to produce sheets for characterization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the MWCNTs are uniformly dispersed in the HDPE. At 4 wt% addition of MWCNTs composite modulus increased by over 110% compared with the unfilled HDPE (regardless of the cooling rate). The yield strength of both unfilled and filled HDPE decreased after rapid cooling by about 10% due to a lower crystallinity and imperfect crystallites. The electrical percolation threshold of composites, irrespective of the cooling rate, is between a MWCNT concentration of 1∼2 wt%. Interestingly, the electrical resistivity of the rapidly cooled composite with 2 wt% MWCNTs is lower than that of the slowly cooled composites with the same MWCNT loading. This may be due to the lower crystallinity and smaller crystallites facilitating the formation of conductive pathways. This result may have significant implications for both process control and the tailoring of electrical conductivity in the manufacture of conductive HDPE/MWCNT nanocomposites.

  3. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the durability of Ni-YSZ based solid oxide cells was investigated during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45% H2O + 45% CO2 + 10% H2) at current density of -1.5 or -2.0 A cm-2. The cell consists of ∼300 μm Ni-YSZ support, ∼10 μm Ni-YSZ electrode, ∼10 μm YSZ electrolyte and ∼15 μm LSM-YSZ oxygen electrode. The gas conversion was 45% at -1.5 A cm-2 and 60% at -2.0 A cm-2, and the operating durations were up to 700 h. The detailed electrochemical analysis revealed significant increase of the ohmic resistance, oxide ion transport resistance in the Ni-YSZ composite electrodes and the electrochemical reaction resistance at the Ni-YSZ triple-phase boundaries. The performance degradation is mainly ascribed to the microstructural change in the Ni-YSZ electrode close to the YSZ electrolyte, including the percolation loss of Ni, the contact loss between Ni and YSZ electrolyte and the decomposition of YSZ close to Ni-YSZ|YSZ interface. The electrochemical performance and the microstructure of the oxygen electrode were found to be relatively stable.

  4. Electronic Structure of Semiconducting and Metallic Tubes in TiO2/Carbon Nanotube Heterojunctions: Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Long, Run

    2013-04-18

    The electronic structure of the TiO2(110) surface interfaced with both a semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated by density functional theory. Our simulations rationalized visible light photocatalytic activity of CNT/TiO2 hybrid materials higher than that under ultraviolent irradiation and showed that the photoactivity of a semiconducting CNT decorating TiO2 is better than that of the metallic CNT/TiO2 system due to efficient charge separation across the interface. This suggests that semiconducting CNT/TiO2 could be a potential photovoltaic material. In contrast, strong interaction between a metallic CNT and TiO2 leads to large charge transfer. Such charge transfer reduces the built-in potential, in turn resulting in inefficient charge separation. Functionalizing the metallic CNT with a small platinum cluster can increase the built-in potential and drive charge separation. These observations indicate that the CNT/TiO2 interface can be a potential photovoltaic material by a metal cluster decorating a CNT despite a real tube being composed of the mixture of metallic and semiconducting CNTs.

  5. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Marana, Naiara L.; Albuquerque, Anderson R.; La Porta, Felipe A.; Longo, Elson; Sambrano, Julio R.

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  6. The protective properties of ultra-thin diamond like carbon films for high density magnetic storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Zhang, Chenhui; Luo, Jianbin; Lu, Xinchun

    2009-10-01

    With the increase of magnetic storage density, the thickness of the protective diamond like carbon (DLC) film on the surfaces of head and disk is required as thin as possible. In this paper, the structure, mechanical properties and corrosion and oxidation resistance of ultra-thin DLC films are investigated. The ultra-thin DLC films were deposited by using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The exact thickness of the ultra-thin DLC film was determined by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Raman analysis indicates that the ultra-thin DLC film presents ta-C structure with high sp 3 fraction. In the wear test, a diamond tip was used to simulate a single-asperity contact with the film surface and the wear marks were produced on the film surface. The wear depths decrease with film thickness increasing. If the film thickness was 1.4 nm or above, the wear depth was much lower than that of Si substrate. This indicates that the ultra-thin DLC film with thickness of 1.4 nm shows excellent wear resistance. Corrosion tests in water and oxidation tests in air were carried out to investigate the diffusion barrier effect of the ultra-thin DLC films. The results show that the DLC film with thickness of 1.4 nm provides adequate coverage on the substrate and has good corrosion and oxidation resistance.

  7. Effect of cooling rate on the properties of high density polyethylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dong; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Linton, David

    2015-05-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing using twin-screw extrusion. The extruded pellets were compression moulded at 200°C for 5min followed by cooling at different cooling rates (20°C/min and 300°C/min respectively) to produce sheets for characterization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the MWCNTs are uniformly dispersed in the HDPE. At 4 wt% addition of MWCNTs composite modulus increased by over 110% compared with the unfilled HDPE (regardless of the cooling rate). The yield strength of both unfilled and filled HDPE decreased after rapid cooling by about 10% due to a lower crystallinity and imperfect crystallites. The electrical percolation threshold of composites, irrespective of the cooling rate, is between a MWCNT concentration of 1˜2 wt%. Interestingly, the electrical resistivity of the rapidly cooled composite with 2 wt% MWCNTs is lower than that of the slowly cooled composites with the same MWCNT loading. This may be due to the lower crystallinity and smaller crystallites facilitating the formation of conductive pathways. This result may have significant implications for both process control and the tailoring of electrical conductivity in the manufacture of conductive HDPE/MWCNT nanocomposites.

  8. Estimating stand structure using discrete-return lidar: an example from low density, fire prone ponderosa pine forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, S. A.; Burke, I.C.; Box, D. O.; Kaufmann, M. R.; Stoker, Jason M.

    2005-01-01

    The ponderosa pine forests of the Colorado Front Range, USA, have historically been subjected to wildfires. Recent large burns have increased public interest in fire behavior and effects, and scientific interest in the carbon consequences of wildfires. Remote sensing techniques can provide spatially explicit estimates of stand structural characteristics. Some of these characteristics can be used as inputs to fire behavior models, increasing our understanding of the effect of fuels on fire behavior. Others provide estimates of carbon stocks, allowing us to quantify the carbon consequences of fire. Our objective was to use discrete-return lidar to estimate such variables, including stand height, total aboveground biomass, foliage biomass, basal area, tree density, canopy base height and canopy bulk density. We developed 39 metrics from the lidar data, and used them in limited combinations in regression models, which we fit to field estimates of the stand structural variables. We used an information–theoretic approach to select the best model for each variable, and to select the subset of lidar metrics with most predictive potential. Observed versus predicted values of stand structure variables were highly correlated, with r2 ranging from 57% to 87%. The most parsimonious linear models for the biomass structure variables, based on a restricted dataset, explained between 35% and 58% of the observed variability. Our results provide us with useful estimates of stand height, total aboveground biomass, foliage biomass and basal area. There is promise for using this sensor to estimate tree density, canopy base height and canopy bulk density, though more research is needed to generate robust relationships. We selected 14 lidar metrics that showed the most potential as predictors of stand structure. We suggest that the focus of future lidar studies should broaden to include low density forests, particularly systems where the vertical structure of the canopy is important

  9. Interplay between Senecio jacobaea and plant, soil, and aboveground insect community composition.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, T Martijn; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Kowalchuk, George A; Korpershoek, Hanna; van der Putten, Wim H

    2006-08-01

    To elucidate the factors that affect the performance of plants in their natural environment, it is essential to study interactions with other neighboring plants, as well as with above- and belowground higher trophic organisms. We used a long-term field experiment to study how local plant community diversity influenced colonization by the biennial composite Senecio jacobaea in its native range in The Netherlands in Europe. We tested the effect of sowing later-succession plant species (0, 4, or 15 species) on plant succession and S. jacobaea performance. Over a period of eight years, the percent cover of S. jacobaea was relatively low in communities sown with 15 or 4 later-succession plant species compared to plots that were not sown, but that were colonized naturally. However, after four years of high abundance, the density of S. jacobaea in unsown plots started to decline, and the size of the individual plants was smaller than in the plots sown with 15 or 4 plant species. In the unsown plots, densities of aboveground leaf-mining, flower-feeding, and stem-boring insects on S. jacobaea plants were lower than on plants in sown plots, and there was a strong positive relationship between plant size and levels of herbivory. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew S. jacobaea in sterilized soil inoculated with soil from the different sowing treatments of the field experiment. Biomass production was lower when S. jacobaea test plants were grown in soil from the unsown plots than in soil from the sown plots (4 or 15 species). Molecular analysis of the fungal and bacterial communities revealed that the composition of fungal communities in unsown plots differed significantly from those in sown plots, suggesting that soil fungi could have been involved in the relative growth reduction of S. jacobaea in the greenhouse bioassay. Our results show that, in its native habitat, the abundance of S. jacobaea depends on the initial composition of the plant community and that, on a scale of

  10. Toward Aboveground Biomass Estimation with RADAR, Lidar and Optical Remote Sensing Data in Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbazaev, M.; Thiel, C. J.; Schmullius, C.

    2014-12-01

    Information on the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) over large areas is needed (1) for understanding and managing the processes involved in the carbon cycle, and (2) supporting international policies for climate change mitigation and adaption. Using remote sensing techniques it is possible to provide spatially explicit information of AGB from local to global scales. In this work we present the first results on the use of multi-sensor remote sensing data to estimate AGB over three test sites in southern Mexico. In order to develop a set of AGB retrieval algorithms, we firstly compared different SAR parameters (e.g. multi-polarized backscatter intensities and interferometric coherence) obtained from ALOS PALSAR sensor and Landsat imagery with field-based AGB estimates using empirical regressions and analyzed the relationships between them. The next steps of the work will be development of a two-stage up-scaling approach: firstly, to enlarge the cal/val data, we propose to estimate AGB along airborne LiDAR (from G-LiHT sensor) transects using field-based AGB and LiDAR height metrics. With LiDAR-based AGB we will then calibrate SAR parameters in a non-parametric model (e.g., randomForest) to create AGB maps over the study areas. An overall aim of the study is the analysis of capabilities and limitations of SAR data for AGB mapping and the investigation of the potential synergistic use of SAR, LiDAR and optical systems.The proposed monitoring tool will facilitate quantitative estimations in loss of carbon storage and support the selection of terrestrial (e.g. tropical dry forests, shrublands) sites for conservation priorities with high value for the national carbon budget.

  11. Models of reforestation productivity and carbon sequestration for land use and climate change adaptation planning in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Trevor J; Neumann, Craig R; Meyer, Wayne S; Moon, Travis; Bryan, Brett A

    2016-10-01

    Environmental management and regional land use planning has become more complex in recent years as growing world population, climate change, carbon markets and government policies for sustainability have emerged. Reforestation and agroforestry options for environmental benefits, carbon sequestration, economic development and biodiversity conservation are now important considerations of land use planners. New information has been collected and regionally-calibrated models have been developed to facilitate better regional land use planning decisions and counter the limitations of currently available models of reforestation productivity and carbon sequestration. Surveys of above-ground biomass of 264 reforestation sites (132 woodlots, 132 environmental plantings) within the agricultural regions of South Australia were conducted, and combined with spatial information on climate and soils, to develop new spatial and temporal models of plant density and above-ground biomass productivity from reforestation. The models can be used to estimate productivity and total carbon sequestration (i.e. above-ground + below-ground biomass) under a continuous range of planting designs (e.g. variable proportions of trees and shrubs or plant densities), timeframes and future climate scenarios. Representative spatial models (1 ha resolution) for 3 reforestation designs (i.e. woodlots, typical environmental planting, biodiverse environmental plantings) × 3 timeframes (i.e. 25, 45, 65 years) × 4 possible climates (i.e. no change, mild, moderate, severe warming and drying) were generated (i.e. 36 scenarios) for use within land use planning tools.

  12. Sequential effects of root and foliar herbivory on aboveground and belowground induced plant defense responses and insect performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minggang; Biere, Arjen; Van der Putten, Wim H; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2014-05-01

    Plants are often simultaneously or sequentially attacked by multiple herbivores and changes in host plants induced by one herbivore can influence the performance of other herbivores. We examined how sequential feeding on the plant Plantago lanceolata by the aboveground herbivore Spodoptera exigua and the belowground herbivore Agriotes lineatus influences plant defense and the performance of both insects. Belowground herbivory caused a reduction in the food consumption by the aboveground herbivore independent of whether it was initiated before, at the same time, or after that of the aboveground herbivore. By contrast, aboveground herbivory did not significantly affect belowground herbivore performance, but significantly reduced the performance of later arriving aboveground conspecifics. Interestingly, belowground herbivores negated negative effects of aboveground herbivores on consumption efficiency of their later arriving conspecifics, but only if the belowground herbivores were introduced simultaneously with the early arriving aboveground herbivores. Aboveground-belowground interactions could only partly be explained by induced changes in an important class of defense compounds, iridoid glycosides (IGs). Belowground herbivory caused a reduction in IGs in roots without affecting shoot levels, while aboveground herbivory increased IG levels in roots in the short term (4 days) but only in the shoots in the longer term (17 days). We conclude that the sequence of aboveground and belowground herbivory is important in interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores and that knowledge on the timing of exposure is essential to predict outcomes of aboveground-belowground interactions.

  13. Estimation of aboveground woody biomass using HJ-1 and Radarsat-2 data for deciduous forests in Daxing'anling, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Yang, Le; Liu, Qinhuo; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Accurate estimation of forest aboveground biomass is important for global carbon budgets and ecosystem change studies. Most algorithms for regional or global aboveground biomass estimation using optical and microwave remote sensing data are based on empirical regression and non-parametric training methods, which require large amount of ground measurements for training and are lacking of explicit interaction mechanisms between electromagnetic wave and vegetation. In this study, we proposed an optical/microwave synergy method based on a coherent polarimetric SAR model to estimate woody biomass. The study area is sparse deciduous forest dominated by birch with understory of shrubs and herbs in Daxing'anling, China. HJ-1, Radarsat-2 images, and field LAI were collected during May to August in 2013, tree biophysical parameters were measured at the field campaign during August to September in 2012. The effects of understory and wet ground were evaluated by introducing the NDVI derived from HJ-1 image and rain rate. Field measured LAI was used as an input to the SAR model to define the scattering and attenuation of the green canopy to the total backscatter. Finally, an logarithmic equation between the backscatter coefficient of direct forest scattering mechanism and woody biomass was generated (R2=0.582). The retrieval results were validated with the ground biomass measurements (RMSE=29.01ton/ha). The results indicated the synergy of optical and microwave remote sensing data based on SAR model has the potential to improve the accuracy of woody biomass estimation.

  14. The response of tundra plant biomass, above-ground production, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} flux to experimental warming

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbie, S.E.; Chapin, F.S. III

    1998-07-01

    The authors manipulated air temperature in tussock tundra near Toolik Lake, Alaska, and determined the consequences for total plant biomass, aboveground net primary production (ANPP), ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools and N uptake, and ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. After 3.5 growing seasons, in situ plastic greenhouses that raised air temperature during the growing season had little effect on total biomass, N content, or growing-season N uptake of the major plant and soil pools. Similarly, vascular ANPP and net ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange did not change with warming, although net primary production of mosses decreased with warming. Such general lack of response supports the hypothesis that productivity in tundra is constrained by the indirect effects of cold temperatures rather than by cold growing-season temperatures per se. Despite no effect on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux, air warming stimulated early-season gross photosynthesis (GP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) throughout the growing season. This increased carbon turnover was probably associated with species-level responses to increased air temperature. Warming increased the aboveground biomass of the overstory shrub, dwarf birch (Betula nana), and caused a significant net redistribution of N from the understory evergreen shrub, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, to B. nana, despite no effects on soil temperature, total plant N, or N availability.

  15. Responses of Soil Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen Deposition and Precipitation Increment Are Closely Linked with Aboveground Community Variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Xu, Zhuwen; Yang, Shan; Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M; Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yuge; Cai, Jiangping; Yao, Fei; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    It has been predicted that precipitation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition will increase in northern China; yet, ecosystem responses to the interactive effects of water and N remain largely unknown. In particular, responses of belowground microbial community to projected global change and their potential linkages to aboveground macro-organisms are rarely studied. In this study, we examined the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community composition to increased precipitation and multi-level N deposition in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and explored the diversity linkages between aboveground and belowground communities. It was observed that N addition caused the significant decrease in bacterial alpha-diversity and dramatic changes in community composition. In addition, we documented strong correlations of alpha- and beta-diversity between plant and bacterial communities in response to N addition. It was found that N enriched the so-called copiotrophic bacteria, but reduced the oligotrophic groups, primarily by increasing the soil inorganic N content and carbon availability and decreasing soil pH. We still highlighted that increased precipitation tended to alleviate the effects of N on bacterial diversity and dampen the plant-microbe connections induced by N. The counteractive effects of N addition and increased precipitation imply that even though the ecosystem diversity and function are predicted to be negatively affected by N deposition in the coming decades; the combination with increased precipitation may partially offset this detrimental effect.

  16. An Asymmetric Supercapacitor with Both Ultra-High Gravimetric and Volumetric Energy Density Based on 3D Ni(OH)2/MnO2@Carbon Nanotube and Activated Polyaniline-Derived Carbon.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanjuan; Li, Xiaocheng; Wan, Liu; Liang, Kun; Tay, Beng Kang; Kong, Lingbin; Yan, Xingbin

    2017-01-11

    Development of a supercapacitor device with both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density is one of the most important requirements for their practical application in energy storage/conversion systems. Currently, improvement of the gravimetric/volumetric energy density of a supercapacitor is restricted by the insufficient utilization of positive materials at high loading density and the inferior capacitive behavior of negative electrodes. To solve these problems, we elaborately designed and prepared a 3D core-shell structured Ni(OH)2/MnO2@carbon nanotube (CNT) composite via a facile solvothermal process by using the thermal chemical vapor deposition grown-CNTs as support. Owing to the superiorities of core-shell architecture in improving the service efficiency of pseudocapacitive materials at high loading density, the prepared Ni(OH)2/MnO2@CNT electrode demonstrated a high capacitance value of 2648 F g(-1) (1 A g(-1)) at a high loading density of 6.52 mg cm(-2). Coupled with high-performance activated polyaniline-derived carbon (APDC, 400 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)), the assembled Ni(OH)2/MnO2@CNT//APDC asymmetric device delivered both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density (126.4 Wh kg(-1) and 10.9 mWh cm(-3), respectively), together with superb rate performance and cycling lifetime. Moreover, we demonstrate an effective approach for building a high-performance supercapacitor with high gravimetric/volumetric energy density.

  17. Modeling aboveground biomass of Tamarix ramosissima in the Arkansas River Basin of Southeastern Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evangelista, P.; Kumar, S.; Stohlgren, T.J.; Crall, A.W.; Newman, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Predictive models of aboveground biomass of nonnative Tamarix ramosissima of various sizes were developed using destructive sampling techniques on 50 individuals and four 100-m2 plots. Each sample was measured for average height (m) of stems and canopy area (m2) prior to cutting, drying, and weighing. Five competing regression models (P < 0.05) were developed to estimate aboveground biomass of T. ramosissima using average height and/or canopy area measurements and were evaluated using Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size (AICc). Our best model (AICc = -148.69, ??AICc = 0) successfully predicted T. ramosissima aboveground biomass (R2 = 0.97) and used average height and canopy area as predictors. Our 2nd-best model, using the same predictors, was also successful in predicting aboveground biomass (R2 = 0.97, AICc = -131.71, ??AICc = 16.98). A 3rd model demonstrated high correlation between only aboveground biomass and canopy area (R2 = 0.95), while 2 additional models found high correlations between aboveground biomass and average height measurements only (R2 = 0.90 and 0.70, respectively). These models illustrate how simple field measurements, such as height and canopy area, can be used in allometric relationships to accurately predict aboveground biomass of T. ramosissima. Although a correction factor may be necessary for predictions at larger scales, the models presented will prove useful for many research and management initiatives.

  18. Linking Topographic, Hydrologic, Climatic, and Ecologic Processes in Semi-arid Forests: an investigation of aboveground growth dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, H. R.; Loomis, A. K.; Barnard, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    Topography and climate play an integral role in the spatial variability and annual dynamics of aboveground carbon sequestration. Topographic, climatic, and hydrologic dynamics of a catchment interact to drive vegetation spatial distribution, growth patterns, and physiological processes in the catchment. Despite previous knowledge concerning gradient-theory influences on vegetation spatial distribution, little is known about the specific influence of complex terrain coupled with hydrologic and topo-climatic variation on aboveground biomass, especially in semi-arid forests of the Rocky Mountains. Climate change predictions for the semi-arid west, however, include increased temperatures, more frequent and extreme drought events, and decreases in snow pack all of which put forests at risk of altered species ranges and physiological processes, and susceptibility to disturbance events. In this study, we determine how species-specific tree growth patterns and water use efficiency respond to interannual variability in moisture availability (drought) through the use of dendrochronology techniques and carbon isotopes as a measure of water use efficiency with regard to topography and climate through data collection at 75 forest plots. Preliminary results suggest that tree growth and physiological processes respond directly to topographic and climatic parameters including aspect, elevation, and drought events (p < .05) and species vary in their response to these parameters (p < .05). Carbon isotope analyses indicate no significant difference appears in the water use efficiency of ponderosa pine between a drought year and a non-drought year while lodgepole pine water use efficiency increases significantly in a drought year. Both species, however, experience decreases in growth in drought years (p < .05) and, while aspect is a significant predictor of lodgepole pine tree growth in a wet year (p < .05), it becomes insignificant in a dry year. Varying responses from different

  19. Comparison of machine-learning methods for above-ground biomass estimation based on Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaofan; Shen, Huanhuan; Shen, Aihua; Deng, Jinsong; Gan, Muye; Zhu, Jinxia; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Biomass is one significant biophysical parameter of a forest ecosystem, and accurate biomass estimation on the regional scale provides important information for carbon-cycle investigation and sustainable forest management. In this study, Landsat satellite imagery data combined with field-based measurements were integrated through comparisons of five regression approaches [stepwise linear regression, K-nearest neighbor, support vector regression, random forest (RF), and stochastic gradient boosting] with two different candidate variable strategies to implement the optimal spatial above-ground biomass (AGB) estimation. The results suggested that RF algorithm exhibited the best performance by 10-fold cross-validation with respect to R2 (0.63) and root-mean-square error (26.44 ton/ha). Consequently, the map of estimated AGB was generated with a mean value of 89.34 ton/ha in northwestern Zhejiang Province, China, with a similar pattern to the distribution mode of local forest species. This research indicates that machine-learning approaches associated with Landsat imagery provide an economical way for biomass estimation. Moreover, ensemble methods using all candidate variables, especially for Landsat images, provide an alternative for regional biomass simulation.

  20. Spatially explicit estimation of aboveground boreal forest biomass in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Wylie, Bruce K.; Brown, Dana R. N.; Peterson, Birgit E.; Alexander, Heather D.; Mack, Michelle C.; Rover, Jennifer R.; Waldrop, Mark P.; McFarland, Jack W.; Chen, Xuexia; Pastick, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of aboveground biomass (AGB) in Alaska’s boreal forest is essential to the accurate evaluation of terrestrial carbon stocks and dynamics in northern high-latitude ecosystems. Our goal was to map AGB at 30 m resolution for the boreal forest in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska using Landsat data and ground measurements. We acquired Landsat images to generate a 3-year (2008–2010) composite of top-of-atmosphere reflectance for six bands as well as the brightness temperature (BT). We constructed a multiple regression model using field-observed AGB and Landsat-derived reflectance, BT, and vegetation indices. A basin-wide boreal forest AGB map at 30 m resolution was generated by applying the regression model to the Landsat composite. The fivefold cross-validation with field measurements had a mean absolute error (MAE) of 25.7 Mg ha−1 (relative MAE 47.5%) and a mean bias error (MBE) of 4.3 Mg ha−1(relative MBE 7.9%). The boreal forest AGB product was compared with lidar-based vegetation height data; the comparison indicated that there was a significant correlation between the two data sets.

  1. Evaluation of approaches to estimating aboveground biomass in southern pine forests using SIR-C data

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, P.A.; Haney, E.M.; Christensen, N.L. Jr.; Kasischke, E.S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L.L.

    1997-02-01

    Estimation of forest biomass on a global basis is a key issue in studies of ecology and biogeochemical cycling. Forests are a terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide and play a central role in regulating the exchange of this important greenhouse gas between the atmosphere and the biosphere. A study was performed to evaluate various techniques for estimating aboveground, woody plant biomass in pine stands found in the southeastern United States, using C- and L- band multiple polarization radar imagery collected by the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) system. The biomass levels present in the test stands ranged between 0.0 and 44.5 kg m{sup {minus}2}. Two SIR-C data sets were used one collected in April, 1994, when the soil conditions were very wet and the canopy was slightly wet from dew and a second collected in October, 1994, when the soils and canopy were dry. During the October mission, pine needles were completely flushed and the foliar biomass was twice as great in the forest stands as in April. Four methods were evaluated to estimate total biomass: one including a straight multiple linear correlation between total biomass and the various SIR-C channels, another including a ratio of the L-band HV/C-band HV channels; and two others requiring multiple steps, where linear regression equations for different stand components were used as the basis for estimating total biomass.

  2. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of carbon deposits on cobalt: a combined density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Antonius P J; Agrawal, Ravi; Spanu, Leonardo

    2016-10-19

    We have built a lattice gas model for cobalt-carbon interaction to investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of carbon deposition on Co(0001) surfaces. The formation of carbon structures on cobalt is considered to be one of the causes of deactivation of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst. The formation of graphene - the most thermodynamically stable phase under FT conditions - is kinetically inhibited during the first 30 hours of exposure of the surface to carbon, while the build-up of surface carbide is the fastest reaction. Our simulations clearly show that the kinetics of carbon deposition is the result of two competing effects: a fast subsurface diffusion and a slower surface diffusion to form a carbon-carbon bond.

  4. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Loftager, Simon; García-Lastra, Juan María; Vegge, Tejs

    2017-01-18

    Lithium iron borate (LiFeBO3) is a promising cathode material due to its high theoretical specific capacity, inexpensive components and small volume change during operation. Yet, challenges related to severe air- and moisture-induced degradation have prompted the utilization of a protective coating on the electrode which also improves the electronic conductivity. However, not much is known about the preferential geometries of the coating as well as how these coating-electrode interfaces influence the lithium diffusion between the coating and the electrode. Here, we therefore present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO3 and LiFeBO3 electrode surfaces, large structural defects in the graphene coating are required for fast Li-ion diffusion. However, such defects are expected to exist only in small concentrations due to their high formation energies. Alternative coating geometries were therefore investigated, and the configuration in which the coating layers were anchored normal to the electrode surface at B and O atoms was found to be most stable. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations of the lithium diffusion barriers across the interface between the optimally oriented coating layers and the electrode show no kinetic limitations for lithium extraction and insertion. Additionally, this graphite-coating configuration showed partial blocking of electrode-degrading species.

  5. Oxygen-promoted catalyst sintering influences number density, alignment, and wall number of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenbo; Li, Jinjing; Polsen, Erik S; Oliver, C Ryan; Zhao, Yikun; Meshot, Eric R; Barclay, Michael; Fairbrother, D Howard; Hart, A John; Plata, Desiree L

    2017-04-11

    A lack of synthetic control and reproducibility during vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis has stifled many promising applications of organic nanomaterials. Oxygen-containing species are particularly precarious in that they have both beneficial and deleterious effects and are notoriously difficult to control. Here, we demonstrated diatomic oxygen's ability, independent of water, to tune oxide-supported catalyst thin film dewetting and influence nanoscale (diameter and wall number) and macro-scale (alignment and density) properties for as-grown vertically aligned CNTs. In particular, single- or few-walled CNT forests were achieved at very low oxygen loading, with single-to-multi-walled CNT diameters ranging from 4.8 ± 1.3 nm to 6.4 ± 1.1 nm over 0-800 ppm O2, and an expected variation in alignment, where both were related to the annealed catalyst morphology. Morphological differences were not the result of subsurface diffusion, but instead occurred via Ostwald ripening under several hundred ppm O2, and this effect was mitigated by high H2 concentrations and not due to water vapor (as confirmed in O2-free water addition experiments), supporting the importance of O2 specifically. Further characterization of the interface between the Fe catalyst and Al2O3 support revealed that either oxygen-deficit metal oxide or oxygen-adsorption on metals could be functional mechanisms for the observed catalyst nanoparticle evolution. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the impacts of O2 and H2 on the catalyst evolution have been underappreciated and underleveraged in CNT synthesis, and these could present a route toward facile manipulation of CNT forest morphology through control of the reactive gaseous atmosphere alone.

  6. Carbon nanodots featuring efficient FRET for two-photon photodynamic cancer therapy with a low fs laser power density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zehui; Zha, Shuai; Zhu, Yinyan; Wu, Peiyi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin; Chen, Ji-Yao

    2014-11-01

    The 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl 4-pyridinio) porphyrins (TMPyP), a photosensitizer used for photodynamic therapy of cancers (PDT), were linked to carbon dots (CDots) to form the conjugates of CDot-TMPyP by the electrostatic force. The 415 nm emission band of CDots was well overlapped with the absorption band of TMPyP, so that the Cdots in conjugates can work as donor to transfer the energy to TMPyP moiety by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with an FRET efficiency of 45%, determined by the fluorescence lifetime change between the free CDots and conjugated CDots. The two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of TMPyP is as low as 110 GM and the TMPyP thus be not suitable for two-photon PDT. Whereas the CDots have high TPACS, and their TPACS are excitation wavelength dependent with the maximum value of 15000 GM at 700 nm. Therefore, the conjugates of CDot-TMPyP were explored for two-photon excitation (TPE) PDT. The two-photon image of CDot-TMPyP in Hela cells was clearly seen under the excitation of a 700 nm femto-second (fs) laser. The singlet oxygen production of CDot-TMPyP was also much higher than that of TMPyP alone under TPE of a 700 nm fs laser. The in vitro PDT killing was further achieved with CDot-TMPyP by TPE of the 700 nm fs laser. Particularly herein the low power density of fs laser from unfocused laser beam was successfully used to carry out the TPE PDT, because of the high TPACS of CDots. These results demonstrate that the CDot-TMPyP conjugates are promising for TPE PDT and needed to investigate further.

  7. Variation in stem mortality rates determines patterns of above-ground biomass in Amazonian forests: implications for dynamic global vegetation models.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle O; Galbraith, David; Gloor, Manuel; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten; Verbeeck, Hans; von Randow, Celso; Monteagudo, Abel; Phillips, Oliver L; Brienen, Roel J W; Feldpausch, Ted R; Lopez Gonzalez, Gabriela; Fauset, Sophie; Quesada, Carlos A; Christoffersen, Bradley; Ciais, Philippe; Sampaio, Gilvan; Kruijt, Bart; Meir, Patrick; Moorcroft, Paul; Zhang, Ke; Alvarez-Davila, Esteban; Alves de Oliveira, Atila; Amaral, Ieda; Andrade, Ana; Aragao, Luiz E O C; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J M M; Arroyo, Luzmila; Aymard, Gerardo A; Baraloto, Christopher; Barroso, Jocely; Bonal, Damien; Boot, Rene; Camargo, Jose; Chave, Jerome; Cogollo, Alvaro; Cornejo Valverde, Fernando; Lola da Costa, Antonio C; Di Fiore, Anthony; Ferreira, Leandro; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio, Euridice N; Killeen, Tim J; Laurance, Susan G; Laurance, William F; Licona, Juan; Lovejoy, Thomas; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marimon, Bia; Marimon, Ben Hur; Matos, Darley C L; Mendoza, Casimiro; Neill, David A; Pardo, Guido; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pitman, Nigel C A; Poorter, Lourens; Prieto, Adriana; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Roopsind, Anand; Rudas, Agustin; Salomao, Rafael P; Silveira, Marcos; Stropp, Juliana; Ter Steege, Hans; Terborgh, John; Thomas, Raquel; Toledo, Marisol; Torres-Lezama, Armando; van der Heijden, Geertje M F; Vasquez, Rodolfo; Guimarães Vieira, Ima Cèlia; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Baker, Timothy R

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the processes that determine above-ground biomass (AGB) in Amazonian forests is important for predicting the sensitivity of these ecosystems to environmental change and for designing and evaluating dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). AGB is determined by inputs from woody productivity [woody net primary productivity (NPP)] and the rate at which carbon is lost through tree mortality. Here, we test whether two direct metrics of tree mortality (the absolute rate of woody biomass loss and the rate of stem mortality) and/or woody NPP, control variation in AGB among 167 plots in intact forest across Amazonia. We then compare these relationships and the observed variation in AGB and woody NPP with the predictions of four DGVMs. The observations show that stem mortality rates, rather than absolute rates of woody biomass loss, are the most important predictor of AGB, which is consistent with the importance of stand size structure for determining spatial variation in AGB. The relationship between stem mortality rates and AGB varies among different regions of Amazonia, indicating that variation in wood density and height/diameter relationships also influences AGB. In contrast to previous findings, we find that woody NPP is not correlated with stem mortality rates and is weakly positively correlated with AGB. Across the four models, basin-wide average AGB is similar to the mean of the observations. However, the models consistently overestimate woody NPP and poorly represent the spatial patterns of both AGB and woody NPP estimated using plot data. In marked contrast to the observations, DGVMs typically show strong positive relationships between woody NPP and AGB. Resolving these differences will require incorporating forest size structure, mechanistic models of stem mortality and variation in functional composition in DGVMs.

  8. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  9. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  10. Airport, air base benefit from switch to aboveground tanks

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency requires that by the end of 1998 all underground fuel tanks must comply with requirements established for tanks installed after Dec. 22, 1988. To comply with federal and state regulations, authorities at Mansfield (Mass.) Municipal Airport decided during a recent reconstruction effort to replace several 46-year-old underground fuel tanks with an 8,000-gallon, aboveground tank. After researching several types of tanks and weighing recommendations from the airport`s fueling company, officials chose to install a lightweight, double-walled tank from Aero-Power Unitized Fueler Inc., Smithtown, NY. The Fireguard{trademark} tank has a concrete-insulated lining between its two walls that can absorb aviation fuel in case of a pool fire. An outer steel wall provides secondary containment, protecting the insulating material, and resists cracking and spalling. Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Georgia recently installed two 2,000-gallon Fireguard tanks to contain diesel and unleaded fuel for a new military-vehicle refueling station.

  11. Legislative and regulatory update of aboveground storage tank requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Today, a patchwork of federal and state requirements regulate the three general categories of aboveground storage tanks: petroleum tanks (which comprise about 90% of all ASTs in use), hazardous substances tanks, and hazardous waste tanks. Various federal regulatory programs address ASTs, including the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). At the state or local level, regulations and building codes have incorporated industry guidelines for designing, building, and testing tanks for fire prevention and safety purposes. With respect to environmental protection requirements, only the hazardous waste tanks are subject to a comprehensive federal regulatory program, under RCRA, and the states have adopted these federal regulations or promulgated their own. Some states have enacted comprehensive tank programs governing petroleum, and a few have addressed hazardous substances. The prospects for comprehensive legislation or regulation for petroleum ASTs in 1995, however, are dim. Federal legislation has been introduced, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is studying ASTs, and most states are waiting for Congress and EPA to act. The paper briefly summarizes the applicable federal and state regulations and then discusses federal legislative and regulatory developments.

  12. Implication of Forest-Savanna Dynamics on Biomass and Carbon Stock: Effectiveness of an Amazonian Ecological Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto-Santos, F. R.; Luizao, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The forests-savanna advancement/retraction process seems to play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in the climate-vegetation balance maintenance in the Amazon. To contribute with long term carbon dynamics and assess effectiveness of a protected area in reduce carbon emissions in Brazilian Amazon transitional areas, variations in forest-savanna mosaics biomass and carbon stock within Maraca Ecological Station (MES), Roraima/Brazil, and its outskirts non-protected areas were compared. Composite surface soil samples and indirect methods based on regression models were used to estimate aboveground tree biomass accumulation and assess vegetation and soil carbon stock along eleven 0.6 ha transects perpendicular to the forest-savanna limits. Aboveground biomass and carbon accumulation were influenced by vegetation structure, showing higher values within protected area, with great contribution of trees above 40 cm in diameter. In the savanna environments of protected areas, a higher tree density and carbon stock up to 30 m from the border confirmed a forest encroachment. This pointed that MES acts as carbon sink, even under variations in soil fertility gradient, with a potential increase of the total carbon stock from 9 to 150 Mg C ha-1. Under 20 years of fire and disturbance management, the results indicated the effectiveness of this protected area to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate greenhouse and climate change effects in a forest-savanna transitional area in Brazilian Northern Amazon. The contribution of this study in understanding rates and reasons for biomass and carbon variation, under different management strategies, should be considered the first approximation to assist policies of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) from underresearched Amazonian ecotone; despite further efforts in this direction are still needed. FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Boticário Group Foundation (Fundação Grupo Boticário); National Council for

  13. Carbon-Coated Porous Aluminum Foil Anode for High-Rate, Long-Term Cycling Stability, and High Energy Density Dual-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuefeng; Zhang, Fan; Ji, Bifa; Sheng, Maohua; Tang, Yongbing

    2016-12-01

    A 3D porous Al foil coated with a uniform carbon layer (pAl/C) is prepared and used as the anode and current collector in a dual-ion battery (DIB). The pAl/C-graphite DIB demonstrates superior cycling stability and high rate performance, achieving a highly reversible capacity of 93 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 2 C over the voltage range of 3.0-4.95 V. In addition, the DIB could achieve an energy density of ≈204 Wh kg(-1) at a high power density of 3084 W kg(-1) .

  14. Sensitivity of Backscatter Intensity of ALOS/PALSAR to Above-ground Biomass and Other Biophysical Parameters of Boreal Forests in Alaska and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, R.; Hayashi, M.; Kim, Y.; Ishii, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Shoyama, K.; Adachi, M.; Takahashi, A.; Saigusa, N.; Ito, A.

    2012-12-01

    For the better understanding of the carbon cycle in the global environment, investigations on the spatio-temporal variation of the carbon stock which is stored as vegetation biomass is important. The backscatter intensity of "Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR)" onboard the satellite "Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)" provides us the information which is applicable to estimate the forest above-ground biomass (AGB). This study examines the sensitivity of the backscatter intensity of ALOS/PALSAR to the forest AGB and other biophysical parameters (tree height, tree diameter at breast height (DBH), and tree stand density) for boreal forests in two geographical regions of Alaska and Kushiro, northern Japan, and compares the sensitivities in two regions. In Alaska, a forest survey was executed in the south-north transect (about 300 km long) along a trans-Alaska pipeline which profiles the ecotone from the boreal forest to tundra in 2007. Forest AGBs and other biophysical parameters at 29 forests along the transect were measured by Bitterlich method. In Kushiro, a forest survey was carried out at 42 forests in 2011 and those parameters were similarly obtained by Bitterlich method. 20 and 2 scenes of ALOS/PALSAR FBD Level 1.5 data that cover the regions in Alaska and Kushiro, respectively, were collected and mosaicked. Backscatter intensities of ALOS/PALSAR in HH (horizontally polarized transmitted and horizontally polarized received) and HV (horizontally polarized transmitted and vertically polarized received) modes were compared with the forest AGB and other biophysical parameters. The intensity generally increased with the increase of those biophysical parameters in both HV and HH modes, but the intensity in HV mode generally had a stronger correlation to those parameters than in HH mode in both Alaska and Kushiro. The HV intensity had strong correlation to the forest AGB and DBH, while weak correlation to the tree stand density in Alaska

  15. Does Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFETs) Device Performance using Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Depend on the Density of SWNT in the Electrode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Narae; Sarker, Biddut K.; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes as an electrode material for organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have attracted significant attention. One open question is that whether the density of the Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the electrode has any influence in the device performance of OFETs. In order to address this issue, we fabricated OFETs using SWNT aligned array electrode, where we varied the linear density of the nanotubes in the array of the electrodes during dielectrophoretic assembly of high quality surfactant free and stable aqueous SWNT solution. The source and drain of SWNT electrodes have been formed by electron beam lithography (EBL) and oxygen plasma etching. The OFETs were fabricated by depositing a thin film of poly (3-hexylthiophene) on the SWNT electrodes. We will present detailed result of our study.

  16. Effective porosity and density of carbonate rocks (Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite) within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation based on modern petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, J.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide quantitative data on effective porosity of carbonate rock from the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite within Bear Creek Valley based on modern petrophysical techniques. The data will be useful for groundwater-flow and contaminant-flow modeling in the vicinity of the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Furthermore, the data provides needed information on the amount of interconnected pore space potentially available for operation of matrix diffusion as a transport process within the fractured carbonate rock. A second aspect of this study is to compare effective porosity data based on modern petrophysical techniques to effective porosity data determined earlier by Goldstrand et al. (1995) with a different technique. An added bonus of the study is quantitative data on the bulk density and grain density of dolostone and limestone of the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite which might find use for geophysical modeling on the ORR.

  17. Sensitivity of tropical forest aboveground productivity to climate anomalies in SW Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofhansl, Florian; Kobler, Johannes; Ofner, Joachim; Drage, Sigrid; Pölz, Eva-Maria; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    The productivity of tropical forests is driven by climate (precipitation, temperature, and light) and soil fertility (geology and topography). While large-scale drivers of tropical productivity are well established, knowledge on the sensitivity of tropical lowland net primary production to climate anomalies remains scarce. We here analyze seven consecutive years of monthly recorded tropical forest aboveground net primary production (ANPP) in response to a recent El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) anomaly. The ENSO transition period resulted in increased temperatures and decreased precipitation during the El Niño dry period, causing a decrease in ANPP. However, the subsequent La Niña wet period caused strong increases in ANPP such that drought-induced reductions were overcompensated. Most strikingly, the climatic controls differed between canopy production (CP) and wood production (WP). Whereas CP showed strong seasonal variation but was not affected by ENSO, WP decreased significantly in response to a 3°C increase in annual maximum temperatures during the El Niño period but subsequently recovered to above predrought levels during the La Niña period. Moreover, the climate sensitivity of tropical forest ANPP components was affected by local topography (water availability) and disturbance history (species composition). Our results suggest that projected increases in temperature and dry season length could impact tropical carbon sequestration by shifting ANPP partitioning toward decreased WP, thus decreasing the carbon storage of highly productive lowland forests. We conclude that the impact of climate anomalies on tropical forest productivity is strongly related to local site characteristics and will therefore likely prevent uniform responses of tropical lowland forests to projected global changes.

  18. Root-fed salicylic acid in grape involves the response caused by aboveground high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Yue-Ping; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2008-06-01

    In order to investigate the transportation and distribution of salicylic acid (SA) from root to aboveground tissues in response to high temperature, the roots of grape plant were fed with (14)C-SA before high temperature treatment. Radioactivity results showed that progressive increase in SA transportation from root to aboveground as compared with the control varied exactly with the heat treatment time. Radioactivity results of leaves at different stem heights indicated that the increase in SA amount at the top and middle leaves during the early period was most significant in comparison with the bottom leaves. The up-transportation of SA from root to aboveground tissues was dependent on xylem rather than phloem. Auto-radiographs of whole grape plants strongly approved the conclusions drawn above. Root-derived SA was believed to be a fundamental source in response to aboveground high temperature.

  19. Field-quantified responses of tropical rainforest aboveground productivity to increasing CO2 and climatic stress, 1997-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Deborah A.; Clark, David B.; Oberbauer, Steven F.

    2013-06-01

    A directional change in tropical-forest productivity, a large component in the global carbon budget, would affect the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]). One current hypothesis is that "CO2 fertilization" has been increasing tropical forest productivity. Some lines of evidence instead suggest climate-driven productivity declines. Relevant direct field observations remain extremely limited for this biome. Using a unique long-term record of annual field measurements, we assessed annual aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and its relation to climatic factors and [CO2] in a neotropical rainforest through 1997-2009. Over this 12 year period, annual productivity did not increase, as would be expected with a dominant CO2 fertilization effect. Instead, the negative responses of ANPP components to climatic stress far exceeded the small positive responses associated with increasing [CO2]. Annual aboveground biomass production was well explained (73%) by the independent negative effects of increasing minimum temperatures and greater dry-season water stress. The long-term records enable a first field-based estimate of the [CO2] response of tropical forest ANPP: 5.24 g m-2 yr-1 yr-1 (the summed [CO2]-associated increases in two of the four production components; the largest component, leaf litterfall, showed no [CO2] association). If confirmed by longer data series, such a small response from a fertile tropical rainforest would indicate that current global models overestimate the benefits from CO2 fertilization for this biome, where most forests' poorer nutrient status more strongly constrains productivity responses to increasing [CO2]. Given the rapidly intensifying warming across tropical regions, tropical forest productivity could sharply decline through coming decades.

  20. Limited carbon and biodiversity co-benefits for tropical forest mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Beaudrot, Lydia; Kroetz, Kailin; Alvarez-Loayza, Patricia; Amaral, Eda; Breuer, Thomas; Fletcher, Christine; Jansen, Patrick A; Kenfack, David; Lima, Marcela Guimarães Moreira; Marshall, Andrew R; Martin, Emanuel H; Ndoundou-Hockemba, Mireille; O'Brien, Timothy; Razafimahaimodison, Jean Claude; Romero-Saltos, Hugo; Rovero, Francesco; Roy, Cisquet Hector; Sheil, Douglas; Silva, Carlos E F; Spironello, Wilson Roberto; Valencia, Renato; Zvoleff, Alex; Ahumada, Jorge; Andelman, Sandy

    2016-06-01

    The conservation of tropical forest carbon stocks offers the opportunity to curb climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and simultaneously conserve biodiversity. However, there has been considerable debate about the extent to which carbon stock conservation will provide benefits to biodiversity in part because whether forests that contain high carbon density in their aboveground biomass also contain high animal diversity is unknown. Here, we empirically examined medium to large bodied ground-dwelling mammal and bird (hereafter "wildlife") diversity and carbon stock levels within the tropics using camera trap and vegetation data from a pantropical network of sites. Specifically, we tested whether tropical forests that stored more carbon contained higher wildlife species richness, taxonomic diversity, and trait diversity. We found that carbon stocks were not a significant predictor for any of these three measures of diversity, which suggests that benefits for wildlife diversity will not be maximized unless wildlife diversity is explicitly taken into account; prioritizing carbon stocks alone will not necessarily meet biodiversity conservation goals. We recommend conservation planning that considers both objectives because there is the potential for more wildlife diversity and carbon stock conservation to be achieved for the same total budget if both objectives are pursued in tandem rather than independently. Tropical forests with low elevation variability and low tree density supported significantly higher wildlife diversity. These tropical forest characteristics may provide more affordable proxies of wildlife diversity for future multi-objective conservation planning when fine scale data on wildlife are lacking.

  1. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation-Mediated Reshaping of the Root Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun G.; Kim, Byung K.; Song, Geun C.; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    study provides a new framework for investigating how aboveground insect feeding modulates the belowground microbiome. PMID:27656163

  2. Metal-Organic Coordination Polymer to Prepare Density Controllable and High Nitrogen-Doped Content Carbon/Graphene for High Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinwei; Zhong, Wenbin; Zou, Yubo; Xiong, Changlun; Yang, Wantai

    2017-01-11

    Design and preparation of carbon-based electrode material with high nitrogen-doping ratio and appropriate density attract much interest for supercapacitors in practical application. Herein, three porous carbon/graphene (NCGCu, NCGFe, and NCGZn) with high doping ratio of nitrogen have been prepared via directly pyrolysis of graphene oxide (GO)/metal-organic coordination polymer (MOCP) composites, which were formed by reacting 4,4'-bipyridine (BPD) with CuCl2, FeCl3, and ZnCl2, respectively. As-prepared NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn showed high nitrogen doping ratio of 10.68, 12.99, and 11.21 at. %; and high density of 1.52, 0.84, and 1.15 g cm(-3), respectively. When as-prepared samples were used as supercapacitor electrodes, NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn exhibited high gravimetric specific capacitances of 369, 298.5, 309.5 F g(-1), corresponding to high volumetric specific capacitances of 560.9, 250.7, 355.9 F cm(-3) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), as well as good cycling stability, nearly 100% of the capacitance retained after 1000 cycles even at a large current density of 10 A g(-1). It is expected that the provided novel strategy can be used to develop electrode materials in high performance energy conversion/storage devices.

  3. Core-shell N-doped active carbon fiber@graphene composites for aqueous symmetric supercapacitors with high-energy and high-power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qinxing; Bao, Rongrong; Xie, Chao; Zheng, Anran; Wu, Shihua; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Renwei; Zhao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene wrapped nitrogen-doped active carbon fibers (ACF@GR) of a core-shell structure were successfully prepared by a simple dip-coating method using natural silk as template. Compared to pure silk active carbon, the as-prepared ACF@GR composites exhibit high specific surface area in a range of 1628-2035 m2 g-1, as well as superior energy storage capability, an extremely high single-electrode capacitance of 552.8 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. The assembled aqueous symmetric supercapacitors are capable of deliver both high energy density and high power density, for instance, 17.1 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 50.0 W kg-1, and 12.2 Wh kg-1 at 4.7 kW kg-1 with a retention rate of 71.3% for ACF@GR1-based supercapacitor.

  4. Carbon pools of an intact forest in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sishir; Pietsch, Stephan A

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and qualitative loss of tropical forests prompted international policy agendas to slow down forest loss through reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD)+, ensuring carbon offset payments to developing countries. So far, many African countries lack reliable forest carbon data and monitoring systems as required by REDD+. In this study, we estimate the carbon stocks of a naturally forested landscape unaffected by direct human impact. We used data collected from 34 plots randomly distributed across the Mount Birougou National Park (690 km(2)) in southern Gabon. We used tree-level data on species, diameter, height, species-specific wood density and carbon fraction as well as site-level data on dead wood, soil and litter carbon to calculate carbon content in aboveground, belowground, dead wood, soil and litter as 146, 28, 14, 186 and 7 Mg ha(-1), respectively. Results may serve as a benchmark to assess ecosystem carbon loss/gain for the Massif du Chaillu in Gabon and the Republic of Congo, provide field data for remote sensing and also may contribute to establish national monitoring systems.

  5. Mapping aboveground woody biomass using forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bechu K V; Nandy, S

    2015-05-01

    Mapping forest biomass is fundamental for estimating CO₂ emissions, and planning and monitoring of forests and ecosystem productivity. The present study attempted to map aboveground woody biomass (AGWB) integrating forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques, viz., direct radiometric relationships (DRR), k-nearest neighbours (k-NN) and cokriging (CoK) and to evaluate their accuracy. A part of the Timli Forest Range of Kalsi Soil and Water Conservation Division, Uttarakhand, India was selected for the present study. Stratified random sampling was used to collect biophysical data from 36 sample plots of 0.1 ha (31.62 m × 31.62 m) size. Species-specific volumetric equations were used for calculating volume and multiplied by specific gravity to get biomass. Three forest-type density classes, viz. 10-40, 40-70 and >70% of Shorea robusta forest and four non-forest classes were delineated using on-screen visual interpretation of IRS P6 LISS-III data of December 2012. The volume in different strata of forest-type density ranged from 189.84 to 484.36 m(3) ha(-1). The total growing stock of the forest was found to be 2,024,652.88 m(3). The AGWB ranged from 143 to 421 Mgha(-1). Spectral bands and vegetation indices were used as independent variables and biomass as dependent variable for DRR, k-NN and CoK. After validation and comparison, k-NN method of Mahalanobis distance (root mean square error (RMSE) = 42.25 Mgha(-1)) was found to be the best method followed by fuzzy distance and Euclidean distance with RMSE of 44.23 and 45.13 Mgha(-1) respectively. DRR was found to be the least accurate method with RMSE of 67.17 Mgha(-1). The study highlighted the potential of integrating of forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques for forest biomass mapping.

  6. Diameter and density control of single-walled carbon nanotube forests by modulating Ostwald ripening through decoupling the catalyst formation and growth processes.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shunsuke; Inaguma, Masayasu; Futaba, Don N; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-11

    A continuous and wide range control of the diameter (1.9-3.2 nm) and density (0.03-0.11 g cm(-3) ) of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests is demonstrated by decoupling the catalyst formation and SWNT growth processes. Specifically, by managing the catalyst formation temperature and H2 exposure, the redistribution of the Fe catalyst thin film into nanoparticles is controlled while a fixed growth condition preserved the growth yield. The diameter and density are inversely correlated, where low/high density forests would consist of large/small diameter SWNTs, which is proposed as a general rule for the structural control of SWNT forests. The catalyst formation process is modeled by considering the competing processes, Ostwald ripening, and subsurface diffusion, where the dominant mechanism is found to be Ostwald ripening. Specifically, H2 exposure increases catalyst surface energy and decreases diameter, while increased temperature leads to increased diffusion on the surface and an increase in diameter.

  7. Carbon storage by urban soils in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pouyat, Richard V; Yesilonis, Ian D; Nowak, David J

    2006-01-01

    We used data available from the literature and measurements from Baltimore, Maryland, to (i) assess inter-city variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools (1-m depth) of six cities (Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Oakland, and Syracuse); (ii) calculate the net effect of urban land-use conversion on SOC pools for the same cities; (iii) use the National Land Cover Database to extrapolate total SOC pools for each of the lower 48 U.S. states; and (iv) compare these totals with aboveground totals of carbon storage by trees. Residential soils in Baltimore had SOC densities that were approximately 20 to 34% less than Moscow or Chicago. By contrast, park soils in Baltimore had more than double the SOC density of Hong Kong. Of the six cities, Atlanta and Chicago had the highest and lowest SOC densities per total area, respectively (7.83 and 5.49 kg m(-2)). On a pervious area basis, the SOC densities increased between 8.32 (Oakland) and 10.82 (Atlanta) kg m(-2). In the northeastern United States, Boston and Syracuse had 1.6-fold less SOC post- than in pre-urban development stage. By contrast, cities located in warmer and/or drier climates had slightly higher SOC pools post- than in pre-urban development stage (4 and 6% for Oakland and Chicago, respectively). For the state analysis, aboveground estimates of C density varied from a low of 0.3 (WY) to a high of 5.1 (GA) kg m(-2), while belowground estimates varied from 4.6 (NV) to 12.7 (NH) kg m(-2). The ratio of aboveground to belowground estimates of C storage varied widely with an overall ratio of 2.8. Our results suggest that urban soils have the potential to sequester large amounts of SOC, especially in residential areas where management inputs and the lack of annual soil disturbances create conditions for net increases in SOC. In addition, our analysis suggests the importance of regional variations of land-use and land-cover distributions, especially wetlands, in estimating urban SOC pools.

  8. Highly porous PEM fuel cell cathodes based on low density carbon aerogels as Pt-support: Experimental study of the mass-transport losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Julien; Chenitz, Regis; Chatenet, Marian; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Cornet, Nathalie; Achard, Patrick

    Carbon aerogels exhibiting high porous volumes and high surface areas, differentiated by their pore-size distributions were used as Pt-supports in the cathode catalytic layer of H 2/air-fed PEM fuel cell. The cathodes were tested as 50 cm 2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The porous structure of the synthesized catalytic layers was impacted by the nanostructure of the Pt-doped carbon aerogels (Pt/CAs). In this paper thus we present an experimental study aiming at establishing links between the porous structure of the cathode catalytic layers and the MEAs performances. For that purpose, the polarization curves of the MEAs were decomposed in 3 contributions: the kinetic loss, the ohmic loss and the mass-transport loss. We showed that the MEAs made with the different carbon aerogels had similar kinetic activities (low current density performance) but very different mass-transport voltage losses. It was found that the higher the pore-size of the initial carbon aerogel, the higher the mass-transport voltage losses. Supported by our porosimetry (N 2-adsorption and Hg-porosimetry) measurement, we interpret this apparent contradiction as the consequence of the more important Nafion penetration into the carbon aeorogel with larger pore-size. Indeed, the catalytic layers made from the larger pore-size carbon aerogel had lower porosities. We thus show in this work that carbon aerogels are materials with tailored nanostructured structure which can be used as model materials for experimentally testing the optimization of the PEM fuel cell catalytic layers.

  9. The impact of steam and current density on carbon formation from biomass gasification tar on Ni/YSZ, and Ni/CGO solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermelstein, Joshua; Millan, Marcos; Brandon, Nigel

    The combination of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and biomass gasification has the potential to become an attractive technology for the production of clean renewable energy. However the impact of tars, formed during biomass gasification, on the performance and durability of SOFC anodes has not been well established experimentally. This paper reports an experimental study on the mitigation of carbon formation arising from the exposure of the commonly used Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium-doped ceria) SOFC anodes to biomass gasification tars. Carbon formation and cell degradation was reduced through means of steam reforming of the tar over the nickel anode, and partial oxidation of benzene model tar via the transport of oxygen ions to the anode while operating the fuel cell under load. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that a threshold current density of 365 mA cm -2 was required to suppress carbon formation in dry conditions, which was consistent with the results of experiments conducted in this study. The importance of both anode microstructure and composition towards carbon deposition was seen in the comparison of Ni/YSZ and Ni/CGO anodes exposed to the biomass gasification tar. Under steam concentrations greater than the thermodynamic threshold for carbon deposition, Ni/YSZ anodes still exhibited cell degradation, as shown by increased polarization resistances, and carbon formation was seen using SEM imaging. Ni/CGO anodes were found to be more resilient to carbon formation than Ni/YSZ anodes, and displayed increased performance after each subsequent exposure to tar, likely due to continued reforming of condensed tar on the anode.

  10. Variations in ecosystem structure, carbon, and nutrient storage along a fertility gradient in tropical savanna of southern Mato Grosso, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlitis, G. L.; Lobo, F. D.; Lawrence, S.; Holt, K.; Pinto Junior, O. B.; Dalmagro, H. J.; Nogueira, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Brazilian savanna (cerrado) is composed of vegetation and soil types that are spatially variable, and links between cerrado physiognomy and soil properties are poorly understood. To reduce this uncertainty, we measured the plant community structure and carbon (C) and nutrient (N, P, K, and Ca) stocks in aboveground wood, foliage, and litter, and soil (0-50 cm) pools in a variety of cerrado vegetation types located in the Cuiaba Basin and the Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil. We hypothesized that aboveground and surface soil C and nutrient stocks would be correlated with soil fertility and vegetation structure (including tree species composition, density and tree species diversity). Our results indicate that aboveground woody (AGW), foliage, and soil C stocks were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with indices of soil fertility but not texture. Since AGWC was the largest C pool, total ecosystem C stocks increase significantly as a function of soil fertility. Similarly, AGWC and foliage C stocks were significantly correlated with tree species diversity (H'), but not soil texture. These data suggest that small-scale (m2-ha) variations in soil fertility are important controls on ecosystem C storage in Brazilian cerrado, and that ecosystem C and nutrient storage is positively related to tree species diversity. These results are qualitatively similar to those reported for tropical forests across regional fertility gradients in the Amazon Basin. These results have implications for the maintenance of soil C storage and fertility and tree species diversity in cerrado.

  11. Orientation and density control of bispecific anti-HER2 antibody on functionalized carbon nanotubes for amplifying effective binding reactivity to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-In; Hwang, Dobeen; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Sangyeop; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, Dabin; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Homan; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Junho; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2 × cotinine tandem antibody. This new approach provides an effective control over antibody orientation and density on the surface of carbon nanotubes through site-specific binding between the anti-cotinine domain of the bispecific tandem antibody and the cotinine group of the functionalized carbon nanotubes. The developed synthetic carbon nanotube/bispecific tandem antibody conjugates (denoted as SNAs) show an effective binding affinity against HER2 that is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the carbon nanotubes bearing a randomly conjugated tandem antibody prepared by carbodiimide chemistry. As the density of a tandem antibody on SNAs increases, their effective binding affinity to HER2 increases as well. SNAs exhibit strong resonance Raman signals for signal transduction, and are successfully applied to the selective detection of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells.Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2

  12. China Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation by Fusion of Inventory and Remote Sensing Data: 1st results from Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, G.; Sun, G.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Forests play an irreplaceable role in maintaining regional ecological environment, global carbon balance and mitigating global climate change. Forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important indicator of forest carbon stocks. Estimating forest aboveground biomass accurately could significantly reduce the uncertainties in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. LIDAR provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests (Lefsky et al., 2007; Naesset et al., 2004; Pang et al., 2008). Combining airborne LiDAR and spaceborne LiDAR for regional forest biomass retrieval could provide a more reliable and accurate quantitative information in regional forest biomass estimate (Boudreau et al., 2008; Nelson et al., 2009; Pang et al., 2011; Saatchi et al., 2011). The Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province are rich in forest resources and suffers intensive forest management activities for timber products. The Heilongjiang Province is typical in temperate forest and the Yunnan Province contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. These two provinces also have good ground inventory system with thousands of permanent field plots. Two campaign consists of in-situ measurement, airborne Lidar data and spaceborne data fusion were designed and implemented. First results show that i). Both spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data are useful for AGB mapping at province level. ii). The combination of spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data gave better biomass estimation with less bias. iii). A pixel level bias mapping was also proposed and gave spatial explicit map of estimation uncertainties. This method will be investigated further with more reference data and tested in other area.

  13. The effect of organism density on bioaccumulation of contaminants from sediment in three aquatic test species: a case for standardizing to sediment organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Van Geest, J L; Poirier, D G; Solomon, K R; Sibley, P K

    2011-05-01

    Laboratory methods for measuring bioaccumulation of organic contaminants from sediment into aquatic organisms continue to improve, but some aspects are still in need of standardization. From a review of published methods, we noted that the loading density of organisms was determined inconsistently and was primarily based on either sediment volume or total organic carbon (TOC). The rationale mainly expressed for standardizing to TOC was to minimize the depletion of sediment contaminants. However, even when density was standardized to TOC, the relative amount of TOC provided (i.e., ratio of TOC to organism dry weight [dw]) was highly variable. In this study, we examined the effect of organism density (standardized to sediment TOC or volume) on bioaccumulation in three freshwater organisms. The oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, mayfly nymph Hexagenia spp., and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas were exposed for 28 days to two field-contaminated sediments that varied in concentration of PCBs and TOC. Densities tested were 50:1 and 27:1 ratios of TOC to organism dw and 140 ml sediment/g wet weight (ww) biomass, yielding low to high organism densities. Bioaccumulation in Hexagenia spp. was significantly higher at the lowest organism density compared with the highest organism density when exposed to site 2 sediment (1.1% TOC) but only with tissue concentrations expressed on a ww basis. Otherwise, there was no significant effect of density on bioaccumulation in organisms exposed to sediments from site 1 (12% TOC) or site 2. Survival of Hexagenia spp. was adversely affected at the highest organism density when the relative amount of TOC was low. The results of this study support the recommendation of standardizing organism density relative to a particular amount of TOC for invertebrate species. A 27:1 ratio of TOC:organism dw was selected as a standard organism density for a new bioaccumulation method because survival, growth, and bioaccumulation were not impacted

  14. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  15. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    PubMed Central

    Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  16. What are the Potential CO2 Emission Offsets for Thorn Woodlands? A Promising Remote Sensing Approach for Mapping Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, A.; White, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying carbon sequestration poses a challenge for monitoring and assessment of recently established woody plants with relatively small canopies. Multispectral remote sensing can increase efficacy of carbon assessment in woodlands for large spatial extents by using fine grained data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel crown identification algorithm using Digital Ortho Quarter Quadrangle (DOQQ) data, with 1 m spatial resolution and three bands in the green, red, and near-infrared wavelengths, to determine canopy attributes for woodlands in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, USA, which as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife South Texas Refuge Complex. We applied this algorithm for areas within the refuge covering 7496 ha of thorn woodlands which had been restored through natural regeneration and replanting since the early 1990’s. On average, the algorithm delineated 83% of individual crowns, though calibration of algorithm thresholds was necessary for different areas. From derived canopy attributes, carbon stored by individual plants was calculated from allometric equations developed for three shrub species for this biotic province. The remotely sensed data estimated plant densities of 25 individuals/ha in naturally regenerated and 20 individuals/ha for replanted areas. From these data, we calculated average aboveground carbon of 1.6 kg/plant for naturally regeneration area and 0.5 kg/plant for replanted areas. We estimated an average value of 1.41+ 0.01 Mg/ha of carbon stored by woody plants in natural regeneration areas compared to 1.1+0.01 Mg/ha in replanted areas. Belowground biomass estimated from aboveground carbon density literature values with 0.41+0.01 Mg/ha and 0.49+0.01 Mg/ha for natural regeneration versus replanted areas, respectively. Based on these derived values, we estimate that woody plants for the entire refuge complex have sequestered 20516 Mg carbon, with approximately 6% of this amount attributed to restoration.

  17. Estimation of aboveground biomass in Mediterranean forests by statistical modelling of ASTER fraction images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Manso, O.; Fernández-Manso, A.; Quintano, C.

    2014-09-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation from optical satellite data is usually based on regression models of original or synthetic bands. To overcome the poor relation between AGB and spectral bands due to mixed-pixels when a medium spatial resolution sensor is considered, we propose to base the AGB estimation on fraction images from Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA). Our study area is a managed Mediterranean pine woodland (Pinus pinaster Ait.) in central Spain. A total of 1033 circular field plots were used to estimate AGB from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) optical data. We applied Pearson correlation statistics and stepwise multiple regression to identify suitable predictors from the set of variables of original bands, fraction imagery, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and Tasselled Cap components. Four linear models and one nonlinear model were tested. A linear combination of ASTER band 2 (red, 0.630-0.690 μm), band 8 (short wave infrared 5, 2.295-2.365 μm) and green vegetation fraction (from LSMA) was the best AGB predictor (Radj2=0.632, the root-mean-squared error of estimated AGB was 13.3 Mg ha-1 (or 37.7%), resulting from cross-validation), rather than other combinations of the above cited independent variables. Results indicated that using ASTER fraction images in regression models improves the AGB estimation in Mediterranean pine forests. The spatial distribution of the estimated AGB, based on a multiple linear regression model, may be used as baseline information for forest managers in future studies, such as quantifying the regional carbon budget, fuel accumulation or monitoring of management practices.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  19. Inter-annual Variability of Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in Regenerating Tropical Dry Forests

    NASA Astr