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Sample records for abr threshold shifts

  1. Protective Effects of α-Tocopherol on ABR Threshold Shift in Rabbits Exposed to Noise and Carbon Monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Motallebi Kashani, Masoud; Mortazavi, Seyyed Bagher; Khavanin, Ali; Allameh, Abdolamir; Mirzaee, Ramezan; Akbari, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Noise induced hearin gloss (NIHL) is one of the most important occupational disease world wide. NIHL has been found potentiate by simultaneous carbon monoxide (CO) exposure. Free radicals have been implicated in cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to noise and due to the CO hypoxia. This study examined whether α-tocopherol administration , as a free radical scavenger, causes the attenuation of auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts resulting from noise exposure and noise plus CO exposure. Forty-two rabbits were divided in to seven groups including control, noise + saline, noise + CO + saline, noise + α-tocopherol, noise + CO + α-tocopherol , CO + α-tocopherol and α-tocopherol alone. ABR was assessed before exposure, 1 hand 14 days post exposure. The administration of 50 mg/Kg of α-tocopherol prior, following and post exposure to noise or noise plus CO recovered permanent ABR threshold shift at 1 and KHz almost to the baseline and provided significant attenuation in permanent ABR threshold shift at 4 and 8 KHz in subject swhich were exposed to noise but it did not block the potentiating of threshold elevation by CO exposure (extra threshold loss by combined exposure) at 4 and 8 KHz. α Tocopherol provides protective effect against the hearing loss resulting from noise exposure and simultaneous exposure to noise plus CO. PMID:24250363

  2. Protective Effects of α-Tocopherol on ABR Threshold Shift in Rabbits Exposed to Noise and Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Motallebi Kashani, Masoud; Mortazavi, Seyyed Bagher; Khavanin, Ali; Allameh, Abdolamir; Mirzaee, Ramezan; Akbari, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Noise induced hearin gloss (NIHL) is one of the most important occupational disease world wide. NIHL has been found potentiate by simultaneous carbon monoxide (CO) exposure. Free radicals have been implicated in cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to noise and due to the CO hypoxia. This study examined whether α-tocopherol administration , as a free radical scavenger, causes the attenuation of auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold shifts resulting from noise exposure and noise plus CO exposure. Forty-two rabbits were divided in to seven groups including control, noise + saline, noise + CO + saline, noise + α-tocopherol, noise + CO + α-tocopherol , CO + α-tocopherol and α-tocopherol alone. ABR was assessed before exposure, 1 hand 14 days post exposure. The administration of 50 mg/Kg of α-tocopherol prior, following and post exposure to noise or noise plus CO recovered permanent ABR threshold shift at 1 and KHz almost to the baseline and provided significant attenuation in permanent ABR threshold shift at 4 and 8 KHz in subject swhich were exposed to noise but it did not block the potentiating of threshold elevation by CO exposure (extra threshold loss by combined exposure) at 4 and 8 KHz. α Tocopherol provides protective effect against the hearing loss resulting from noise exposure and simultaneous exposure to noise plus CO.

  3. Prolonged noise exposure-induced auditory threshold shifts in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Di; Decker, Brandon; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) initially increases with exposure duration, but eventually reaches an asymptotic threshold shift (ATS) once the exposure duration exceeds 18-24 h. Equations for predicting the ATS have been developed for several species, but not for rats, even though this species is extensively used in noise exposure research. To fill this void, we exposed rats to narrowband noise (NBN, 16-20 kHz) for 5 weeks starting at 80 dB SPL in the first week and then increasing the level by 6 dB per week to a final level of 104 dB SPL. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded before, during, and following the exposure to determine the amount of hearing loss. The noise induced threshold shift to continuous long-term exposure, defined as compound threshold shift (CTS), within and above 16-20 kHz increased with noise level at the rate of 1.82 dB threshold shift per dB of noise level (NL) above a critical level (C) of 77.2 dB SPL i.e. CTS = 1.82(NL-77.2). The normalized amplitude of the largest ABR peak measured at 100 dB SPL decreased at the rate of 3.1% per dB of NL above the critical level of 76.9 dB SPL, i.e., %ABR Reduction = 3.1%(NL-76.9). ABR thresholds measured >30 days post-exposure only partially recovered resulting in a permanent threshold shift of 30-40 dB along with severe hair cell loss in the basal, high-frequency region of the cochlea. In the rat, CTS increases with noise level with a slope similar to humans and chinchillas. The critical level (C) in the rat is similar to that of humans, but higher than that of chinchillas. PMID:25219503

  4. Involvement of nitric oxide generation in noise-induced temporary threshold shift in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Shyang; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Liu, Tien-Chen; Lin-Shiau, Shoei Yn; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2005-05-01

    The present study explored the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in the temporary threshold shift caused by acoustic trauma. Guinea pigs were exposed to broadband white noise at a level of 105+/-2dB sound pressure level (SPL) for 10min, causing a temporary threshold shift (TTS). The guinea pigs were divided into six groups (N-1 to N-6) according to survival days after noise exposure (0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28days). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded before noise exposure, immediately after noise exposure and before sacrifice. Immediately after animals were sacrificed, the stria vascularis and the spiral ligament of the lateral wall of each individual cochlea were harvest as a unit and prepared for assay of NO. There was a significant correlation (P<0.001) between the NO concentration and final ABR threshold in the noise exposure groups. But the return of ABR threshold to pre-noise-exposed level is early than that of NO concentration. An average 16.2dB threshold shift was found immediately after noise exposure. The threshold returned to the pre-noise-exposed level on the second post-exposure day. Comparing to unexposed control animals, the NO concentration increased nearly threefold immediately following noise exposure and decreased to twofold when the hearing threshold had returned to the pre-noise-exposed level. On the seventh post-exposure day the NO concentration was not different from that in unexposed control animals. Those findings indicate that endogenous NO is generated in the noise-induced temporal threshold shift and its concentration is correlated with the hearing loss.

  5. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described.

  6. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  7. The dissimilar time course of temporary threshold shifts and reduction of inhibition in the inferior colliculus following intense sound exposure.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, A N; van Dijk, P

    2014-06-01

    Excessive noise exposure is known to produce an auditory threshold shift, which can be permanent or transient in nature. Recent studies showed that noise-induced temporary threshold shifts are associated with loss of synaptic connections to the inner hair cells and with cochlear nerve degeneration, which is reflected in a decreased amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). This suggests that, despite normal auditory thresholds, central auditory processing may be abnormal. We recorded changes in central auditory processing following a sound-induced temporary threshold shift. Anesthetized guinea pigs were exposed for 1 h to a pure tone of 11 kHz (124 dB sound pressure level). Hearing thresholds, amplitudes of ABR waves I and IV, and spontaneous and tone-evoked firing rates in the inferior colliculus (IC) were assessed immediately, one week, two weeks, and four weeks post exposure. Hearing thresholds were elevated immediately following overexposure, but recovered within one week. The amplitude of the ABR wave I was decreased in all sound-exposed animals for all test periods. In contrast, the ABR wave IV amplitude was only decreased immediately after overexposure and recovered within a week. The proportion of IC units that show inhibitory responses to pure tones decreased substantially up to two weeks after overexposure, especially when stimulated with high frequencies. The proportion of excitatory responses to low frequencies was increased. Spontaneous activity was unaffected by the overexposure. Despite rapid normalization of auditory thresholds, our results suggest an increased central gain following sound exposure and an abnormal balance between excitatory and inhibitory responses in the midbrain up to two weeks after overexposure. These findings may be associated with hyperacusis after a sound-induced temporary threshold shift.

  8. Interaction of noise-induced permanent threshold shift and age-related threshold shift.

    PubMed

    Mills, J H; Boettcher, F A; Dubno, J R

    1997-03-01

    Current medical-legal practices as well as an international standard (ISO 1999) assume the permanent threshold shifts produced by exposure to noise add (in dB) to the threshold shifts caused by increased chronological age (presbyacusis). This assumption, known as the additivity rule, was tested in an animal model. Mongolian gerbils, born and raised in a quiet vivarium, were exposed at age 18 months to a 3.5-kHz pure tone for 1 h at 113 dB SPL. At 6-weeks post-exposure, permanent threshold shifts in the exposed ear were approximately 20 dB in the 4- to 8-kHz region. Thresholds in the nonexposed, control ear were unaffected by the exposure. Animals were then allowed to age in the quiet vivarium until age 36 months and then were retested. Thus in a given animal, aging-only effects were assessed in one ear (internal control) and noise-plus-aging effects were assessed in the other (test) ear. A second control was mean age-related threshold shift measured in 48 gerbils who were born and raised in the quiet vivarium. This group is referred to as a non-noise-exposed population (population control). Using the additivity rule, predictions with either the internal or population control significantly overestimated noise-plus-aging effects. Use of the ISO 1999 compression factor reduced the overestimations by 0-5 dB. The intensity rule produced the most accurate predictions. These results suggest that the interaction of noise-induced permanent threshold shift and age-related threshold shift is not straightforward and that current medical-legal methods using the additivity rule overestimate the contribution of "noise effects". PMID:9069635

  9. Relations among early postexposure noise-induced threshold shifts and permanent threshold shifts in the chinchilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamernik, Roger P.; Ahroon, William A.; Patterson, James H.; Qiu, Wei

    2002-01-01

    Threshold shifts (TS) were measured at various times following a wide variety of noise exposures on over 900 chinchillas. An analysis of postexposure TS measures and noise-induced permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed that, across audiometric test frequency, there was a consistent relation between these variables of the form PTS (dB)=α(eTS/β-1), where, for a given test frequency, α (dB) and β (dB) are constants. TSs were measured immediately following exposure (TS0), 24 h after exposure (TS24), and at several intermediate times in order to estimate the maximum TS (TSmax). Correlation between TS and PTS at the various test frequencies was highest for TS24. An analysis of the 90th-percentile PTS showed a linear growth of PTS with TS24 of approximately 0.7 dB PTS/dB TS24. These data provide some support, in the chinchilla model, for a variation of the three postulates originally presented by Kryter et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 39, 451 (1966)]. Specifically: (i) TS24 is a consistent measure of the effects of a traumatic noise exposure. (ii) All exposures that produce a given TS24 will be equally hazardous. (iii) Noise-induced PTS in the most susceptible animals, following many years of exposure, is approximately equal to (0.7)TS24 measured after an 8-h exposure to the same noise.

  10. Temporary Threshold Shift Caused by Hearing Aid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrae, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Temporary threshold shift over a wide range of frequencies was found after 4 hours of hearing aid use by a 15-year-old student with severe sensorineural hearing loss who was using real-ear insertion gains 10 to 20 decibels greater than those recommended by current standards. Less gain was recommended at frequencies from 500 to 1500 hertz.…

  11. Effects of N-acetylcysteine on noise-induced temporary threshold shift and temporary emission shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinette, Martin

    2001-05-01

    Animal research has shown that antioxidants can provide significant protection to the cochlea from traumatic noise exposure with some benefit when given after the exposure. Similar results in humans would have a significant impact on both prevention and treatment of noise-induced hearing loss. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on temporary threshold shift (TTS) by using both behavioral and physiological measures. Sixteen healthy, normal-hearing subjects were given NAC or a placebo prior to exposure to a 10-min, 102-dB narrow-band noise, centered at 2 kHz. This exposure was designed to induce a 10-15-dB TTS. Following the noise exposure, pure-tone thresholds (Bekesy) and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) were measured for 60 min to monitor the effects of NAC on TTS recovery. Postexposure measures were compared to baseline data. [Work supported by American BioHealth Group.

  12. Thresholds for Coral Bleaching: Are Synergistic Factors and Shifting Thresholds Changing the Landscape for Management? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C.; Donner, S. D.; Logan, C. A.; Gledhill, D. K.; Liu, G.; Heron, S. F.; Christensen, T.; Rauenzahn, J.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    As carbon dioxide rises in the atmosphere, climate change and ocean acidification are modifying important physical and chemical parameters in the oceans with resulting impacts on coral reef ecosystems. Rising CO2 is warming the world’s oceans and causing corals to bleach, with both alarming frequency and severity. The frequent return of stressful temperatures has already resulted in major damage to many of the world’s coral reefs and is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. Warmer oceans also have contributed to a rise in coral infectious diseases. Both bleaching and infectious disease can result in coral mortality and threaten one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth and the important ecosystem services they provide. Additionally, ocean acidification from rising CO2 is reducing the availability of carbonate ions needed by corals to build their skeletons and perhaps depressing the threshold for bleaching. While thresholds vary among species and locations, it is clear that corals around the world are already experiencing anomalous temperatures that are too high, too often, and that warming is exceeding the rate at which corals can adapt. This is despite a complex adaptive capacity that involves both the coral host and the zooxanthellae, including changes in the relative abundance of the latter in their coral hosts. The safe upper limit for atmospheric CO2 is probably somewhere below 350ppm, a level we passed decades ago, and for temperature is a sustained global temperature increase of less than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. How much can corals acclimate and/or adapt to the unprecedented fast changing environmental conditions? Any change in the threshold for coral bleaching as the result of acclimation and/or adaption may help corals to survive in the future but adaptation to one stress may be maladaptive to another. There also is evidence that ocean acidification and nutrient enrichment modify this threshold. What do shifting thresholds mean

  13. The effect of cockpit noise on the temporary threshold shift of Cessna 172SP flight instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Andrew Robert

    The purpose of this thesis was to study the temporary threshold shift of general aviation flight instructors resulting from their working environment. Exposure to noise before a temporary threshold shift completely recovers can cause a permanent threshold shift with no possibility of recovery, resulting in permanent hearing loss. A result showing minimal to no temporary threshold shift would indicate that hearing personal protective equipment is working properly. This study used sound-level measurements, and audiometric testing, together with survey data to determine whether or not flight instructors were at risk for potential hearing impairment due to temporary threshold shift. Independent t-tests and descriptive statistics were used in analyzing the data. It was determined that there was a difference in temporary threshold shift based on the number of hours a flight instructor flies in a Cessna 172SP for only one frequency - 2000Hz in the left ear. All other frequencies tested in both ears showed no difference. Because there was a very low mean temporary threshold shift at 2000Hz in the left ear and no differences shown for all other frequencies in both ears, it was concluded that there was no need to improve or require additional hearing personal protective equipment, or to require decreased exposure times to aircraft noise.

  14. Difference in Noise-Induced Threshold Shift between Planar and Homeotropic Electroconvections in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon; Kuribayashi, Akiyuki; Kai, Shoichi

    2009-08-01

    We report the threshold shift induced by externally applied noises for electrohydrodynamic convections (EHCs) in both planarly and homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystals as well as in both the conduction and dielectric regimes. Owing to the difference in timescales among the intrinsic properties of EHCs, externally applied noises, and deterministic fields, the stabilization or destabilization effects induced by noises are observed. In particular, the difference in the threshold shift between both alignments is found, and discussed in terms of the EHC mechanisms for both alignments. Moreover, a noticeable noise-induced threshold shift is observed in the dielectric regime, which is markedly different from that in the conventional conduction regime.

  15. Evaluation of different criteria for significant threshold shift in occupational hearing conservation programs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Royster, J.D.

    1992-12-09

    A comparison was undertaken of six different criteria for determinig significant hearing threshold shift. Each criterion was applied to the first eight audiograms for males participating in 15 different industrial hearing conservation programs. Of the different criteria used, the OSHA STS criterion produced the lowest overall percentage of employees tagged as having suffered a threshold shift. The 15-dB SHIFT and NIOSH SHIFT criteria produced the highest percentages. The mean percentages of employees tagged on an annual basis generally were small, less than 10 percent in referent data bases and 20 percent or less in the noncontrol data bases. The 15-dB SHIFT and NIOSH SHIFT criteria tagged 37 percent and 51 percent of employees in noncontrol data bases on the first test comparison and averaged 14 percent and 24 percent of employees even in referent data bases. The purpose of the significant threshold shift criterion was to tag employees with temporary threshold shifts (TTS) before they develop hearing loss. Therefore, the purpose of the threshold shift criterion selected was not to act as a recordable occupational illness but rather to reflect a significant amount of persistent hearing change.

  16. Underwater temporary threshold shift in pinnipeds: Effects of noise level and duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastak, David; Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Kastak, Colleen Reichmuth

    2005-11-01

    Behavioral psychophysical techniques were used to evaluate the residual effects of underwater noise on the hearing sensitivity of three pinnipeds: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Temporary threshold shift (TTS), defined as the difference between auditory thresholds obtained before and after noise exposure, was assessed. The subjects were exposed to octave-band noise centered at 2500 Hz at two sound pressure levels: 80 and 95 dB SL (re: auditory threshold at 2500 Hz). Noise exposure durations were 22, 25, and 50 min. Threshold shifts were assessed at 2500 and 3530 Hz. Mean threshold shifts ranged from 2.9-12.2 dB. Full recovery of auditory sensitivity occurred within 24 h of noise exposure. Control sequences, comprising sham noise exposures, did not result in significant mean threshold shifts for any subject. Threshold shift magnitudes increased with increasing noise sound exposure level (SEL) for two of the three subjects. The results underscore the importance of including sound exposure metrics (incorporating sound pressure level and exposure duration) in order to fully assess the effects of noise on marine mammal hearing.

  17. Bone-Conduction ABR Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone-Wesson, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the accuracy of bone-conduction auditory brainstem response (BC-ABR) tests to determine the presence and severity of conductive hearing impairment. It provides warnings about technical pitfalls and recommends incorporating BC-ABR protocols for routine clinical use. It concludes that the method allows estimating cochlear…

  18. A Multinomial Model for Identifying Significant Pure-Tone Threshold Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Carney, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Significant threshold differences on retest for pure-tone audiometry are often evaluated by application of ad hoc rules, such as a shift in a pure-tone average or in 2 adjacent frequencies that exceeds a predefined amount. Rules that are so derived do not consider the probability of observing a particular audiogram. Methods: A general…

  19. Comparative temporary threshold shifts in a harbor porpoise and harbor seal, and severe shift in a seal.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2013-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise may cause temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in marine mammals. Tests with identical methods show that harbor porpoises are more susceptible to TTS induced by octave-band white noise (OBN) centered around 4 kHz than harbor seals, although their unmasked (basic) hearing thresholds for that frequency are similar. A harbor seal was exposed for 1 h to an OBN with a very high sound pressure level (SPL), 22-30 dB above levels causing TTS onset. This elicited 44 dB TTS; hearing recovered within 4 days. Thus, for this signal and this single exposure, permanent threshold shift requires levels at least 22 dB above TTS onset levels. The severe TTS in the seal suggests that the critical level (above which TTS increases rapidly with increasing SPL) is between 150 and 160 dB re 1 μPa for a 60 min exposure to OBN centered at 4 kHz. In guidelines on TTS in marine mammals produced by policy makers in many countries, TTS is assumed to follow the equal energy hypothesis, so that when the sound exposure levels of fatiguing sounds are equal, the same TTS is predicted to be induced. However, like previous studies, the present study calls this model into question. PMID:23862780

  20. Severe Obesity Shifts Metabolic Thresholds but Does Not Attenuate Aerobic Training Adaptations in Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Thiago S.; Simões, Herbert G.; Rogero, Marcelo M.; Moraes, Milton R.; Denadai, Benedito S.; Arida, Ricardo M.; Andrade, Marília S.; Silva, Bruno M.

    2016-01-01

    Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10) were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60%) (obese = 78 ± 9% and lean = 68 ± 5%, P < 0.05 vs. 60%). The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean). Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean). In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations. PMID:27148063

  1. Vibrotactile temporary threshold shifts induced by hand-transmitted vibration during underwater work.

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Yonekawa, Y; Kanada, K; Takahashi, Y; Griffin, M J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the temporary threshold shifts (TTS) of fingertip vibratory sensation produced by hand-transmitted vibration in an underwater work environment. The hand-transmitted vibration was applied with a pneumatic tool to the right hand of four experienced male SCUBA divers. The threshold of 125 Hz vibratory sensation was measured at the tip of the right forefinger before and after vibration exposure in the atmosphere and underwater. Vibration exposure at a 4 m depth produced greater TTS than in the atmosphere. The recovery time of TTS after vibration exposure in an underwater were affected by the underwater pressure.

  2. Alarm pheromones do not mediate rapid shifts in honey bee guard acceptance threshold.

    PubMed

    Couvillon, Margaret J; Barton, Sarah N; Cohen, Jennifer A; Fabricius, Onna K; Kärcher, Martin H; Cooper, Lee S; Silk, Matthew J; Helanterä, Heikki; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2010-12-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) guards discriminate nestmates from non-nestmates at the hive entrance. The acceptance threshold of guards is known to change adaptively, for example becoming less permissive when the number of intruder bees from other colonies increases. These adaptive shifts can occur within minutes. What is unknown is the mechanism behind this rapid shift. It was hypothesized that alarm pheromones released by guards may cause the adoption of a less permissive acceptance threshold. Here, we tested this hypothesis on five discriminator hives by using a behavioral assay. We used three amounts each of iso-pentyl acetate (IPA) and 2-heptanone (2H), which are the major components of the pheromones from the sting and the mandibular glands, respectively. Biologically relevant levels of chemicals were delivered to the hive entrance platform via an air pump. We found no effect of either IPA or 2H: there was no change in guard acceptance of either nestmate (on average, 91% accepted) or non-nestmate (on average, 30% accepted) under any of the pheromone treatments compared to the pentane control (98% nestmates accepted and 32% non-nestmates accepted). Therefore, we reject the hypothesis that the presence of IPA or 2H causes a rapid shift of guard acceptance threshold. PMID:21069439

  3. Eco-evolutionary dynamics of range shifts: elastic margins and critical thresholds.

    PubMed

    Henry, Roslyn C; Bocedi, Greta; Travis, Justin M J

    2013-03-21

    It is widely recognised that the response of a population to environmental change will be determined by the eco-evolutionary dynamics of dispersal. Here, modelling the evolution of dispersal distance within a species structured across an environmental gradient yields some important general insights. First, it demonstrates that 'elastic' ranges are more likely features of range-shifting dynamics than has been recently reported; when dispersal distance, rather than simply emigration rate, is modelled elastic ranges occur regardless of the nature of the environmental gradient. Second, we start to identify critical survival thresholds beyond which even the evolution of greater dispersal distance is unlikely to rescue a population. The position of such thresholds depends on a combination of genetic, demographic and environmental parameters. We find simulated species rarely survive if the location of the range front of a range-shift falls behind the optimal environmental conditions of the species. Should similar thresholds exist for real species aggressive conservation actions such as assisted colonisation are likely to be required to reduce the risk of extinction. We believe simple models, such as the one presented in this study, will be essential for providing a theoretical underpinning for more tactical eco-evolutionary models and informing conservation strategies to be employed under rapid climate change.

  4. Temporary threshold shift after impulse-noise during video game play: Laboratory data

    PubMed Central

    Spankovich, C.; Griffiths, S. K.; Lobariñas, E.; Morgenstein, K.E.; de la Calle, S.; Ledon, V.; Guercio, D.; Le Prell, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prevention of temporary threshold shift (TTS) after laboratory-based exposure to pure-tones, broadband noise, and narrow band noise signals has been achieved, but prevention of TTS under these experimental conditions may not accurately reflect protection against hearing loss following impulse noise. This study used a controlled laboratory-based TTS paradigm that incorporated impulsive stimuli into the exposure protocol; development of this model could provide a novel platform for assessing proposed therapeutics. Design Participants played a video game that delivered gunfire-like sound through headphones as part of a target practice game. Effects were measured using audiometric threshold evaluations and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The sound level and number of impulses presented were sequentially increased throughout the study. Study sample Participants were normal-hearing students at the University of Florida who provided written informed consent prior to participation. Results TTS was not reliably induced by any of the exposure conditions assessed here. However, there was significant individual variability, and a subset of subjects showed TTS under some exposure conditions. Conclusions A subset of participants demonstrated reliable threshold shifts under some conditions. Additional experiments are needed to better understand and optimize stimulus parameters that influence TTS after simulated impulse noise. PMID:24564694

  5. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on permanent threshold shift in acoustic trauma among rats.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, J; Virkkala, J; Zhai, S; Ylikoski, J

    1997-01-01

    Impulse noise from firearms is a common cause of acute acoustic trauma (AAT). Recently hyperbaric oxygen treatment has become available in many hospitals treating AAT. We exposed 39 Wistar rats to intense impulse noise of 60 shots from the assault rifle (162 dB SPL). After the exposure 15 animals were given hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO) by 10 treatment cycles of 90 minutes 100% oxygen in 0.25 MPa, one treatment cycle per day. Four weeks after the exposure the hearing thresholds were measured with auditory brainstem response audiometry at frequencies of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kHz. Characteristics for the resulting noise-induced hearing loss were large variations in its severity not only between animals, but also between the ears of a single animal. The largest permanent threshold shifts were found at 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kHz. Most of the HBO-treated animals showed less threshold shift than the non-treated animals. The difference between the HBO group and the control group was only slightly statistically significant (p = 0.067). PMID:9288276

  6. Noise-induced temporary threshold shift and recovery in Yangtze finless porpoises Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Dong, Lijun; Wang, Shiyong

    2011-07-01

    In Yangtze finless porpoises Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis, the effects of fatiguing noise on hearing thresholds at frequencies of 32, 45, 64, and 128 kHz were investigated. The noise parameters were: 0.5-oct bandwidth, -1 to +0.5 oct relative to the test frequency, 150 dB re 1 μPa (140-160 dB re 1 μPa in one measurement series), with 1-30 min exposure time. Thresholds were evaluated using the evoked-potential technique allowing the tracing of threshold variations with a temporal resolution better than 1 min. The most effective fatiguing noise was centered at 0.5 octave below the test frequency. The temporary threshold shift (TTS) depended on the frequencies of the fatiguing noise and test signal: The lower the frequencies, the bigger the noise effect. The time-to-level trade of the noise effect was incomplete: the change of noise level by 20 dB resulted in a change of TTS level by nearly 20 dB, whereas the tenfold change of noise duration resulted in a TTS increase by 3.8-5.8 dB.

  7. Longitudinal ABR in the NICU infant.

    PubMed

    Cox, L C; Hack, M; Metz, D A

    1982-08-01

    To assess the reliability of ABR testing of NICU infants, longitudinal ABR testing was accomplished on 50 NICU infants while hospitalized and subsequently at 4 and at 20-24 months of age. The results indicate that ABR testing in the NICU may be a poor predictor of subsequent permanent hearing loss. The implications of these findings are discussed with the recommendation that ABR testing in the NICU be used in concert with follow-up testing.

  8. Early ABRs in infants undergoing assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Cox, L C; Martin, R J; Carlo, W A; Hack, M

    1993-01-01

    ABR was performed on 42 preterm infants undergoing assisted ventilation with conventional or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). ABRs from these very young neonates were evaluated to further detail the emerging response and to determine if type of ventilation or other perinatal factors had effects on the ABR. While responses were present down to 26 weeks gestational age, the only factors which appeared related to absent ABRs were birthweight and gestational age.

  9. Pattern segmentation with activity dependent natural frequency shift and sub-threshold resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrahman, E.; Zochowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying distributed pattern formation in brain networks and its content driven dynamical segmentation is an area of intense study. We investigate a theoretical mechanism for selective activation of diverse neural populations that is based on dynamically shifting cellular resonances in functionally or structurally coupled networks. We specifically show that sub-threshold neuronal depolarization from synaptic coupling or external input can shift neurons into and out of resonance with specific bands of existing extracellular oscillations, and this can act as a dynamic readout mechanism during information storage and retrieval. We find that this mechanism is robust and suggest it as a general coding strategy that can be applied to any network with oscillatory nodes.

  10. Hearing threshold shifts and recovery after noise exposure in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysuyeva, Evgenia V; Klishin, Vladimir O; Pletenko, Mikhail G; Tarakanov, Mikhail B

    2013-05-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) after loud noise exposure was investigated in a male and a female beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The thresholds were evaluated using the evoked-potential technique, which allowed for threshold tracing with a resolution of ~1 min. The fatiguing noise had a 0.5 octave bandwidth, with center frequencies ranging from 11.2 to 90 kHz, a level of 165 dB re. 1 μPa and exposure durations from 1 to 30 min. The effects of the noise were tested at probe frequencies ranging from -0.5 to +1.5 octaves relative to the noise center frequency. The effect was estimated in terms of both immediate (1.5 min) post-exposure TTS and recovery duration. The highest TTS with the longest recovery duration was produced by noises of lower frequencies (11.2 and 22.5 kHz) and appeared at a test frequency of +0.5 octave. At higher noise frequencies (45 and 90 kHz), the TTS decreased. The TTS effect gradually increased with prolonged exposures ranging from 1 to 30 min. There was a considerable TTS difference between the two subjects.

  11. Hearing threshold shifts and recovery after noise exposure in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysuyeva, Evgenia V; Klishin, Vladimir O; Pletenko, Mikhail G; Tarakanov, Mikhail B

    2013-05-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) after loud noise exposure was investigated in a male and a female beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The thresholds were evaluated using the evoked-potential technique, which allowed for threshold tracing with a resolution of ~1 min. The fatiguing noise had a 0.5 octave bandwidth, with center frequencies ranging from 11.2 to 90 kHz, a level of 165 dB re. 1 μPa and exposure durations from 1 to 30 min. The effects of the noise were tested at probe frequencies ranging from -0.5 to +1.5 octaves relative to the noise center frequency. The effect was estimated in terms of both immediate (1.5 min) post-exposure TTS and recovery duration. The highest TTS with the longest recovery duration was produced by noises of lower frequencies (11.2 and 22.5 kHz) and appeared at a test frequency of +0.5 octave. At higher noise frequencies (45 and 90 kHz), the TTS decreased. The TTS effect gradually increased with prolonged exposures ranging from 1 to 30 min. There was a considerable TTS difference between the two subjects. PMID:23596281

  12. Crossing the Threshold - Reviewed Evidence for Regime Shifts in Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mård Karlsson, J.; Destouni, G.; Peterson, G.; Gordon, L.

    2009-12-01

    which each regime shift alters the supply of ecosystem services (benefits that people receive from nature), as well as identify the processes and characteristics that may increase or decrease regime resilience. These comparisons allow us to identify processes and locations that have the potential to experience abrupt threshold changes or regime shifts, which is useful for building resilience and adapting to the consequences of global change.

  13. Regime shifts, thresholds and multiple stable states in freshwater ecosystems; a critical appraisal of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Capon, Samantha J; Lynch, A Jasmyn J; Bond, Nick; Chessman, Bruce C; Davis, Jenny; Davidson, Nick; Finlayson, Max; Gell, Peter A; Hohnberg, David; Humphrey, Chris; Kingsford, Richard T; Nielsen, Daryl; Thomson, James R; Ward, Keith; Mac Nally, Ralph

    2015-11-15

    The concepts of ecosystem regime shifts, thresholds and alternative or multiple stable states are used extensively in the ecological and environmental management literature. When applied to aquatic ecosystems, these terms are used inconsistently reflecting differing levels of supporting evidence among ecosystem types. Although many aquatic ecosystems around the world have become degraded, the magnitude and causes of changes, relative to the range of historical variability, are poorly known. A working group supported by the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) reviewed 135 papers on freshwater ecosystems to assess the evidence for pressure-induced non-linear changes in freshwater ecosystems; these papers used terms indicating sudden and non-linear change in their titles and key words, and so was a positively biased sample. We scrutinized papers for study context and methods, ecosystem characteristics and focus, types of pressures and ecological responses considered, and the type of change reported (i.e., gradual, non-linear, hysteretic or irreversible change). There was little empirical evidence for regime shifts and changes between multiple or alternative stable states in these studies although some shifts between turbid phytoplankton-dominated states and clear-water, macrophyte-dominated states were reported in shallow lakes in temperate climates. We found limited understanding of the subtleties of the relevant theoretical concepts and encountered few mechanistic studies that investigated or identified cause-and-effect relationships between ecological responses and nominal pressures. Our results mirror those of reviews for estuarine, nearshore and marine aquatic ecosystems, demonstrating that although the concepts of regime shifts and alternative stable states have become prominent in the scientific and management literature, their empirical underpinning is weak outside of a specific environmental setting. The application of these

  14. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dell, S.; Hensley, B.; Hall, J. W.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Antonelli, P. J.; Green, G. E.; Miller, J. M.; Guire, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is availability of an established clinical paradigm with real world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects. Design Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93–95 (n=10), 98–100 (n=11), or 100–102 (n=12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of four hours. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured prior to and after music exposure. Post-music tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and one week later. Results Changes in thresholds after the lowest level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a “notch” configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean=6.3±3.9dB; range=0–13 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hours post-exposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1-week post-exposure. Conclusions These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function following digital music player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be

  15. Temporary threshold shift in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to intermittent tones.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Carder, Donald A; Schlundt, Carolyn E; Dear, Randall L

    2010-05-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) was measured in a bottlenose dolphin exposed to a sequence of four 3-kHz tones with durations of 16 s and sound pressure levels (SPLs) of 192 dB re 1 μPa. The tones were separated by 224 s of silence, resulting in duty cycle of approximately 7%. The resulting growth and recovery of TTS were compared to experimentally measured TTS in the same subject exposed to single, continuous tones with similar SPLs. The data confirm the potential for accumulation of TTS across multiple exposures and for recovery of hearing during the quiet intervals between exposures. The degree to which various models could predict the growth of TTS across multiple exposures was also examined. PMID:21117775

  16. Temporary threshold shift in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to intermittent tones.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Carder, Donald A; Schlundt, Carolyn E; Dear, Randall L

    2010-05-01

    Temporary threshold shift (TTS) was measured in a bottlenose dolphin exposed to a sequence of four 3-kHz tones with durations of 16 s and sound pressure levels (SPLs) of 192 dB re 1 μPa. The tones were separated by 224 s of silence, resulting in duty cycle of approximately 7%. The resulting growth and recovery of TTS were compared to experimentally measured TTS in the same subject exposed to single, continuous tones with similar SPLs. The data confirm the potential for accumulation of TTS across multiple exposures and for recovery of hearing during the quiet intervals between exposures. The degree to which various models could predict the growth of TTS across multiple exposures was also examined.

  17. Rapid Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity and Shifting Thresholds of Genetic Assimilation in the Nematode Caenorhabditis remanei

    PubMed Central

    Sikkink, Kristin L.; Reynolds, Rose M.; Ituarte, Catherine M.; Cresko, William A.; Phillips, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms can acclimate to new environments through phenotypic plasticity, a complex trait that can be heritable, subject to selection, and evolve. However, the rate and genetic basis of plasticity evolution remain largely unknown. We experimentally evolved outbred populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei under an acute heat shock during early larval development. When raised in a nonstressful environment, ancestral populations were highly sensitive to a 36.8° heat shock and exhibited high mortality. However, initial exposure to a nonlethal high temperature environment resulted in significantly reduced mortality during heat shock (hormesis). Lines selected for heat shock resistance rapidly evolved the capacity to withstand heat shock in the native environment without any initial exposure to high temperatures, and early exposure to high temperatures did not lead to further increases in heat resistance. This loss of plasticity would appear to have resulted from the genetic assimilation of the heat induction response in the noninducing environment. However, analyses of transcriptional variation via RNA-sequencing from the selected populations revealed no global changes in gene regulation correlated with the observed changes in heat stress resistance. Instead, assays of the phenotypic response across a broader range of temperatures revealed that the induced plasticity was not fixed across environments, but rather the threshold for the response was shifted to higher temperatures over evolutionary time. These results demonstrate that apparent genetic assimilation can result from shifting thresholds of induction across environments and that analysis of the broader environmental context is critically important for understanding the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:24727288

  18. Effectiveness of the hearing conservation program: Change in hearing threshold shift incidence among industrial workers, 1978 to 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Hugh

    2005-04-01

    Hearing conservation programs (HCP) are widely employed in preventing noise-induced hearing loss, but studies of their effectiveness have been rare. The impact of the implementation of hearing conservation programs was assessed in a large group of highly noise-exposed blue-collar workers by investigating time-trends in hearing-threshold shift incidence. Serial annual audiograms for employees of 14 British Columbia lumber mills for the period 1978 to 2003 were obtained from local regulatory-agency archives. Audiograms and concomitant otological medical histories were linked to subjects' work histories and noise exposure data. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to model the incidence of hearing threshold shift while controlling for age, baseline level of hearing loss, and other potential confounders. A total of 109257 audiograms were associated with 10590 subjects. Mean noise exposure in this group was 91.4 dBA(A). Mean interval between hearing tests was 566 days and mean age at first threshold shift was 44. Forty-six percent of subjects had at least one OSHA significant threshold shift during follow up. Preliminary analyses indicated a trend toward lower incidence of threshold shifts over the study period, with incidence in 5 approximately equal 5-year periods from 1978 to 2003 being 3.2%, 6.6%, 4.9%, 4.3% and 2.4%, respectively.

  19. A Dissolved Oxygen Threshold for Shifts in Bacterial Community Structure in a Seasonally Hypoxic Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Spietz, Rachel L.; Williams, Cheryl M.; Rocap, Gabrielle; Horner-Devine, M. Claire

    2015-01-01

    Pelagic ecosystems can become depleted of dissolved oxygen as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic effects. As dissolved oxygen concentration decreases, energy shifts from macrofauna to microorganisms, which persist in these hypoxic zones. Oxygen-limited regions are rapidly expanding globally; however, patterns of microbial communities associated with dissolved oxygen gradients are not yet well understood. To assess the effects of decreasing dissolved oxygen on bacteria, we examined shifts in bacterial community structure over space and time in Hood Canal, Washington, USA−a glacial fjord-like water body that experiences seasonal low dissolved oxygen levels known to be detrimental to fish and other marine organisms. We found a strong negative association between bacterial richness and dissolved oxygen. Bacterial community composition across all samples was also strongly associated with the dissolved oxygen gradient, and significant changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a dissolved oxygen concentration between 5.18 and 7.12 mg O2 L-1. This threshold value of dissolved oxygen is higher than classic definitions of hypoxia (<2.0 mg O2 L-1), suggesting that changes in bacterial communities may precede the detrimental effects on ecologically and economically important macrofauna. Furthermore, bacterial taxa responsible for driving whole community changes across the oxygen gradient are commonly detected in other oxygen-stressed ecosystems, suggesting that the patterns we uncovered in Hood Canal may be relevant in other low oxygen ecosystems. PMID:26270047

  20. Study on an improved wavelet shift-invariant threshold denoising for pulsed laser induced glucose photoacoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzi; Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong

    2015-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration has become a hotspot research in the world due to its characteristic of convenient, rapid and non-destructive etc. The blood glucose concentration monitoring based on photoacoustic technique has attracted many attentions because the detected signal is ultrasonic signals rather than the photo signals. But during the acquisition of the photoacoustic signals of glucose, the photoacoustic signals are not avoid to be polluted by some factors, such as the pulsed laser, electronic noises and circumstance noises etc. These disturbances will impact the measurement accuracy of the glucose concentration, So, the denoising of the glucose photoacoustic signals is a key work. In this paper, a wavelet shift-invariant threshold denoising method is improved, and a novel wavelet threshold function is proposed. For the novel wavelet threshold function, two threshold values and two different factors are set, and the novel function is high order derivative and continuous, which can be looked as the compromise between the wavelet soft threshold denoising and hard threshold denoising. Simulation experimental results illustrate that, compared with other wavelet threshold denoising, this improved wavelet shift-invariant threshold denoising has higher signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) and smaller root mean-square error (RMSE) value. And this improved denoising also has better denoising effect than others. Therefore, this improved denoising has a certain of potential value in the denoising of glucose photoacoustic signals.

  1. Standard threshold shift criteria. An investigation of the most reliable indicator of noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, C.L.; Dobie, R.A.; Crawford, D.R.; Morgan, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Definition of a standard threshold shift (STS) and its use as an early indicator to identify those employees with deteriorating hearing are necessary aspects of hearing conservation programs in industry. STS criteria were evaluated using techniques borrowed from decision theory and signal detection theory to separate audiometric threshold shifts into true-positive and false-positive shifts. The current Occupational Safety and Health Administration definition of a change in hearing threshold relative to the baseline audiogram of an average of 10 dB or more at 2, 3 or 4 kHz in either ear and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery recommendation of a ''10 dB or greater change for the worse for either the 0.5, 1, 2 kHz pure tone average or the 3, 4, 6 kHz pure tone average, in either ear were supported. Revision of baselines after an STS occurs is recommended.

  2. [Phosphorus threshold for the shift between grass- and algae-stable states in Dahong Harbor of Gehu Lake].

    PubMed

    Tao, Hua; Pan, Ji-Zheng; Shen, Yao-Liang; Li, Wen-Chao; Huang, Feng; Zhao, Hai-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Taking the macrophytes remaining area in Dahong Harbor of Gehu Lake as test object, this paper studied the phosphorus threshold for the shift between grass- and algae-stable states under natural conditions. The correlation analysis on the environmental factors showed that the total phosphorous in water body had better liner relationships with phytoplankton chlorophyll a and Secchi depth, and principal component analysis indicated that total phosphorous and nitrogen in the water body were the two main components affecting the water quality, among which, total phosphorous was the maximum weight source and played a determinant role in the shift between grass- and algae-stable states. The Harbor was in grass-stable state in winter, shifted to grass-algae intermediate state in spring, and kept the intermediate state in summer and autumn. The total phosphorous threshold for grass-stable state shifting to grass-algae intermediate state was 61 microg x L(-1), and that for grass-algae intermediate state shifting to algae-stable state was 115 microg x L(-1). In order to make the ecosystem shift from algae-stable state to grass-stable state, some measures such as cutting and controlling the Lake's nutrient sources, removing the sediment rich in organic matter, and constructing submerged macrophytes areas should be adopted to make the total phosphorous threshold in the water body dropped to below 61 microg x L(-1).

  3. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up corrective... determines the standard threshold shift is neither work-related nor aggravated by occupational noise exposure... controls to identify and correct any deficiencies....

  4. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  5. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  6. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  7. Genetic Polymorphisms Associated with Hearing Threshold Shift in Subjects during First Encounter with Occupational Impulse Noise

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Yohann; Bortoni, Magda E.; Sepulveda, Rosalinda; Ghelfi, Elisa; Bartos, Adam; Cotanche, Douglas; Clifford, Royce E.; Rogers, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the most significant occupational health issue worldwide. We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with hearing threshold shift in young males undergoing their first encounter with occupational impulse noise. We report a significant association of SNP rs7598759 (p < 5 x 10-7; p = 0.01 after permutation and correction; Odds Ratio = 12.75) in the gene coding for nucleolin, a multifunctional phosphoprotein involved in the control of senescence and protection against apoptosis. Interestingly, nucleolin has been shown to mediate the anti-apoptotic effect of HSP70, a protein found to prevent ototoxicity and whose polymorphisms have been associated with susceptibility to NIHL. Increase in nucleolin expression has also been associated with the prevention of apoptosis in cells undergoing oxidative stress, a well-known metabolic sequela of noise exposure. To assess the potential role of nucleolin in hearing loss, we tested down-regulation of nucleolin in cochlear sensory cells HEI-OC1 under oxidative stress conditions and report increased sensitivity to cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic drug with ototoxic side effects. Additional SNPs were found with suggestive association (p < 5 x 10-4), of which 7 SNPs were located in genes previously reported to be related to NIHL and 43 of them were observed in 36 other genes previously not reported to be associated with NIHL. Taken together, our GWAS data and in vitro studies reported herein suggest that nucleolin is a potential candidate associated with NIHL in this population. PMID:26121033

  8. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Jiquan; Yang, Jianfei; Liu, Aijun; Sun, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS) were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS). It is composed of three successful components: (i) exponential wavelet transform, (ii) iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii) random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:27066068

  9. A Novel Compressed Sensing Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Exponential Wavelet Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm with Random Shift

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Yang, Jiquan; Yang, Jianfei; Liu, Aijun; Sun, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim. It can help improve the hospital throughput to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. Patients will benefit from less waiting time. Task. In the last decade, various rapid MRI techniques on the basis of compressed sensing (CS) were proposed. However, both computation time and reconstruction quality of traditional CS-MRI did not meet the requirement of clinical use. Method. In this study, a novel method was proposed with the name of exponential wavelet iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with random shift (abbreviated as EWISTARS). It is composed of three successful components: (i) exponential wavelet transform, (ii) iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, and (iii) random shift. Results. Experimental results validated that, compared to state-of-the-art approaches, EWISTARS obtained the least mean absolute error, the least mean-squared error, and the highest peak signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusion. EWISTARS is superior to state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:27066068

  10. Temporary shift in masked hearing thresholds in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) after exposure to seismic airgun stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lucke, Klaus; Siebert, Ursula; Lepper, Paul A; Blanchet, Marie-Anne

    2009-06-01

    An auditory study was conducted to derive data on temporary threshold shift (TTS) induced by single impulses. This information should serve as basis for the definition of noise exposure criteria for harbor porpoises. The measurements of TTS were conducted on a harbor porpoise by measuring the auditory evoked potentials in response to amplitude-modulated sounds. After obtaining baseline hearing data the animal was exposed to single airgun stimuli at increasing received levels. Immediately after each exposure the animal's hearing threshold was tested for significant changes. The received levels of the airgun impulses were increased until TTS was reached. At 4 kHz the predefined TTS criterion was exceeded at a received sound pressure level of 199.7 dB(pk-pk) re 1 microPa and a sound exposure level (SEL) of 164.3 dB re 1 microPa(2) s. The animal consistently showed aversive behavioral reactions at received sound pressure levels above 174 dB(pk-pk) re 1 microPa or a SEL of 145 dB re 1 microPa(2) s. Elevated levels of baseline hearing sensitivity indicate potentially masked acoustic thresholds. Therefore, the resulting TTS levels should be considered masked temporary threshold shift (MTTS) levels. The MTTS levels are lower than for any other cetacean species tested so far. PMID:19507987

  11. Thresholds for Shifting Visually Perceived Eye Level Due to Incremental Pitches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Donald M.; Welch, Robert; Cohen, M. M.; Hill, Cyndi

    2001-01-01

    Visually perceived eye level (VPEL) was judged by subjects as they viewed a luminous grid pattern that was pitched by 2 or 5 deg increments between -20 deg and +20 deg. Subjects were dark adapted for 20 min and indicated--VPEL by directing the beam of a laser pointer to the rear wall of a 1.25 m cubic pitch box that rotated about a horizontal axis midpoint on the rear wall. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and the Tukey HSD procedure. Results showed a 10.0 deg threshold for pitches P(sub i) above the reference pitch P(sub 0), and a -10.3 deg threshold for pitches P(sub i) below-the reference-pitch P(sub 0). Threshold data for pitches P(sub i) < P(sub 0) suggest an asymmetric threshold for VPEL below and above physical eye level.

  12. Secondhand Smoke is Associated with Hearing Threshold Shifts in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan-Yung; Wu, Li-Wei; Kao, Tung-Wei; Wu, Chen-Jung; Yang, Hui-Fang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jen; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss resulted from multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Secondhand smoke (SHS) and obesity had been reported to be related to hearing loss. This study explored the possible associations of SHS and obesity with the hearing threshold. The relations between SHS and the hearing threshold in subjects from three different body mass index classes were analyzed. Our study included data from 1,961 subjects aged 20–69 years that were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 1999–2004. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the subjects with the higher tertiles of serum cotinine levels tended to have higher hearing thresholds than those with the lowest tertile of serum cotinine levels (for both trends, p < 0.05). Notably, the obese subjects with the higher tertiles of serum cotinine levels had significantly higher hearing thresholds for high frequencies and low frequencies than those with the lowest tertile of serum cotinine levels (for both trends, p < 0.05). Our study showed a significant positive association between SHS exposure and hearing thresholds in the adult population, especially in obese individuals. Based on our findings, avoiding exposure to SHS, especially in obese adults, may decrease the risk of hearing loss. PMID:27605137

  13. Secondhand Smoke is Associated with Hearing Threshold Shifts in Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Yung; Wu, Li-Wei; Kao, Tung-Wei; Wu, Chen-Jung; Yang, Hui-Fang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jen; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss resulted from multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Secondhand smoke (SHS) and obesity had been reported to be related to hearing loss. This study explored the possible associations of SHS and obesity with the hearing threshold. The relations between SHS and the hearing threshold in subjects from three different body mass index classes were analyzed. Our study included data from 1,961 subjects aged 20-69 years that were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 1999-2004. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the subjects with the higher tertiles of serum cotinine levels tended to have higher hearing thresholds than those with the lowest tertile of serum cotinine levels (for both trends, p < 0.05). Notably, the obese subjects with the higher tertiles of serum cotinine levels had significantly higher hearing thresholds for high frequencies and low frequencies than those with the lowest tertile of serum cotinine levels (for both trends, p < 0.05). Our study showed a significant positive association between SHS exposure and hearing thresholds in the adult population, especially in obese individuals. Based on our findings, avoiding exposure to SHS, especially in obese adults, may decrease the risk of hearing loss. PMID:27605137

  14. The Relationship Between Exposure to Recreational Noise and Temporary Threshold Shifts in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirreffs, Janet; And Others

    An investigation was conducted to identify the effects of exposure to selected entertainment environments on hearing threshold levels. Twenty-five normal hearing females were randomly assigned to one of the following five taped noise conditions: (1) a discotheque band, (2) a motor speedway, (3) a hotel dance band, (4) an amusement park, and (5) a…

  15. Threshold-Voltage-Shift Compensation and Suppression Method Using Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistors for Large Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyonghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A threshold-voltage-shift compensation and suppression method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays fabricated using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane is proposed. The proposed method compensates for the threshold voltage variation of TFTs due to different threshold voltage shifts during emission time and extends the lifetime of the AMOLED panel. Measurement results show that the error range of emission current is from -1.1 to +1.7% when the threshold voltage of TFTs varies from 1.2 to 3.0 V.

  16. Geometrical Structure and Interface Dependence of Bias Stress Induced Threshold Voltage Shift in C60-Based OFETs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the nature of interface between organic semiconductor and gate dielectric on bias stress electrical stability of n-type C60-based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) was studied. The bias stress induced threshold voltage (Vth) shift was found to depend critically on the OFET device structure: the direction of Vth shift in top-gate OFETs was opposite to that in bottom-gate OFETs, while the use of the dual-gate OFET structure resulted in just very small variations in Vth. The opposite direction of Vth shift is attributed to the different nature of interfaces between C60 semiconductor and Parylene dielectric in these devices. The Vth shift to more positive voltages upon bias stress in bottom-gate C60-OFET was similar to that observed for other n-type semiconductors and rationalized by electron trapping in the dielectric or at the gate dielectric/C60 interface. The opposite direction of Vth shift in top-gate C60-OFETs is attributed to free radical species created in the course of Parylene deposition on the surface of C60 during device fabrication, which produce plenty of hole traps. It was also realized that the dual-gate OFETs gives stable characteristics, which are immune to bias stress effects. PMID:25142130

  17. Recovery from ultraviolet-induced threshold voltage shift in indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors by positive gate bias

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Chen, T. P.; Li, X. D.; Wong, J. I.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    2013-11-11

    The effect of short-duration ultraviolet (UV) exposure on the threshold voltage (V{sub th}) of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) and its recovery characteristics were investigated. The V{sub th} exhibited a significant negative shift after UV exposure. The V{sub th} instability caused by UV illumination is attributed to the positive charge trapping in the dielectric layer and/or at the channel/dielectric interface. The illuminated devices showed a slow recovery in threshold voltage without external bias. However, an instant recovery can be achieved by the application of positive gate pulses, which is due to the elimination of the positive trapped charges as a result of the presence of a large amount of field-induced electrons in the interface region.

  18. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans. PMID:26720128

  19. Primary neural degeneration in the Guinea pig cochlea after reversible noise-induced threshold shift.

    PubMed

    Lin, Harrison W; Furman, Adam C; Kujawa, Sharon G; Liberman, M Charles

    2011-10-01

    Recent work in mouse showed that acoustic overexposure can produce a rapid and irreversible loss of cochlear nerve peripheral terminals on inner hair cells (IHCs) and a slow degeneration of spiral ganglion cells, despite full recovery of cochlear thresholds and no loss of inner or outer hair cells (Kujawa and Liberman, J Neurosci 29:14077-14085, 2009). This contrasts with earlier ultrastructural work in guinea pig suggesting that acute noise-induced neural degeneration is followed by full regeneration of cochlear nerve terminals in the IHC area (Puel et al., Neuroreport 9:2109-2114, 1998; Pujol and Puel, Ann N Y Acad Sci 884:249-254, 1999). Here, we show that the same patterns of primary neural degeneration reported for mouse are also seen in the noise-exposed guinea pig, when IHC synapses and cochlear nerve terminals are counted 1 week post-exposure in confocal images from immunostained whole mounts and that the same slow degeneration of spiral ganglion cells occurs despite no loss of IHCs and apparent recovery of cochlear thresholds. The data cast doubt on prior claims that there is significant neural regeneration and synaptogenesis in the adult cochlea and suggest that denervation of the inner hair cell is an important sequela of "reversible" noise-induced hearing loss, which likely applies to the human ear as well. PMID:21688060

  20. Shifting Thresholds: Rapid Evolution of Migratory Life Histories in Steelhead/Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Phillis, Corey C; Moore, Jonathan W; Buoro, Mathieu; Hayes, Sean A; Garza, John Carlos; Pearse, Devon E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of phenotypic plasticity depends on reaction norms adapted to historic selective regimes; anthropogenic changes in these selection regimes necessitate contemporary evolution or declines in productivity and possibly extinction. Adaptation of conditional strategies following a change in the selection regime requires evolution of either the environmentally influenced cue (e.g., size-at-age) or the state (e.g., size threshold) at which an individual switches between alternative tactics. Using a population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) introduced above a barrier waterfall in 1910, we evaluate how the conditional strategy to migrate evolves in response to selection against migration. We created 9 families and 917 offspring from 14 parents collected from the above- and below-barrier populations. After 1 year of common garden-rearing above-barrier offspring were 11% smaller and 32% lighter than below-barrier offspring. Using a novel analytical approach, we estimate that the mean size at which above-barrier fish switch between the resident and migrant tactic is 43% larger than below-barrier fish. As a result, above-barrier fish were 26% less likely to express the migratory tactic. Our results demonstrate how rapid and opposing changes in size-at-age and threshold size contribute to the contemporary evolution of a conditional strategy and indicate that migratory barriers may elicit rapid evolution toward the resident life history on timescales relevant for conservation and management of conditionally migratory species. PMID:26585381

  1. Shifting Thresholds: Rapid Evolution of Migratory Life Histories in Steelhead/Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Phillis, Corey C; Moore, Jonathan W; Buoro, Mathieu; Hayes, Sean A; Garza, John Carlos; Pearse, Devon E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of phenotypic plasticity depends on reaction norms adapted to historic selective regimes; anthropogenic changes in these selection regimes necessitate contemporary evolution or declines in productivity and possibly extinction. Adaptation of conditional strategies following a change in the selection regime requires evolution of either the environmentally influenced cue (e.g., size-at-age) or the state (e.g., size threshold) at which an individual switches between alternative tactics. Using a population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) introduced above a barrier waterfall in 1910, we evaluate how the conditional strategy to migrate evolves in response to selection against migration. We created 9 families and 917 offspring from 14 parents collected from the above- and below-barrier populations. After 1 year of common garden-rearing above-barrier offspring were 11% smaller and 32% lighter than below-barrier offspring. Using a novel analytical approach, we estimate that the mean size at which above-barrier fish switch between the resident and migrant tactic is 43% larger than below-barrier fish. As a result, above-barrier fish were 26% less likely to express the migratory tactic. Our results demonstrate how rapid and opposing changes in size-at-age and threshold size contribute to the contemporary evolution of a conditional strategy and indicate that migratory barriers may elicit rapid evolution toward the resident life history on timescales relevant for conservation and management of conditionally migratory species.

  2. Primary neural degeneration in the Guinea pig cochlea after reversible noise-induced threshold shift.

    PubMed

    Lin, Harrison W; Furman, Adam C; Kujawa, Sharon G; Liberman, M Charles

    2011-10-01

    Recent work in mouse showed that acoustic overexposure can produce a rapid and irreversible loss of cochlear nerve peripheral terminals on inner hair cells (IHCs) and a slow degeneration of spiral ganglion cells, despite full recovery of cochlear thresholds and no loss of inner or outer hair cells (Kujawa and Liberman, J Neurosci 29:14077-14085, 2009). This contrasts with earlier ultrastructural work in guinea pig suggesting that acute noise-induced neural degeneration is followed by full regeneration of cochlear nerve terminals in the IHC area (Puel et al., Neuroreport 9:2109-2114, 1998; Pujol and Puel, Ann N Y Acad Sci 884:249-254, 1999). Here, we show that the same patterns of primary neural degeneration reported for mouse are also seen in the noise-exposed guinea pig, when IHC synapses and cochlear nerve terminals are counted 1 week post-exposure in confocal images from immunostained whole mounts and that the same slow degeneration of spiral ganglion cells occurs despite no loss of IHCs and apparent recovery of cochlear thresholds. The data cast doubt on prior claims that there is significant neural regeneration and synaptogenesis in the adult cochlea and suggest that denervation of the inner hair cell is an important sequela of "reversible" noise-induced hearing loss, which likely applies to the human ear as well.

  3. Ultralow-threshold laser and blue shift cooperative luminescence in a Yb{sup 3+} doped silica microsphere

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yantang Huang, Yu; Zhang, Peijin; Guo, Changlei

    2014-02-15

    An experimental investigation on ultralow threshold laser and blue shift cooperative luminescence (CL) in a Yb{sup 3+} doped silica microsphere (YDSM) with continuous-wave 976 nm laser diode pumping is reported. The experimental results show that the YDSM emits laser oscillation with ultralow threshold of 2.62 μW, and the laser spectrum is modulated by the microsphere morphology characteristics. In addition, blue emission of YDSM is also observed with the increase of pump power, which is supposed to be generated by CL of excited Yb ion-pairs with the absorption of 976 nm photons and Si-O vibration phonons, and the process is explained with an energy level diagram. This property of the blue shift CL with phonons absorption in the Yb{sup 3+}doped microcavity makes it attractive for the application of laser cooling based on anti-Stokes fluorescence emission, if the Yb{sup 3+}doped microcavity made from with low phonon energy host materials.

  4. Color shifts at different viewing eccentricities on flat-panel rear projection displays in steps of perceptibility threshold units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Hovis, Jeffery; Zsivanov, Delia; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2013-08-01

    Nearly all-flat panel video display monitors have luminance and color variations as the angle of view vary from the monitor's perpendicular. The objective of this study was to measure the shift in hue and luminance of a simulated tiled monitor display at different viewing angles. The perceptibility experiment was carried out using three reference colors and 12 vectors heading towards the blue-green region of the L∗a∗b∗ color space. The reference colors used were white, skin-tone, and green. A uniform reference color was presented in three of the four quadrants on a CRT monitor and one quadrant changed color in the direction of the sampled vector. An adaptive, four alternate forced choice procedure was employed to determine thresholds for each of the three reference colors. Across the three reference colors, the thresholds were at least 20% lower than the conventional one ΔEL∗a∗b∗ unit used for calibrating monitors. Color difference thresholds were lowest for the blue-green region of the color space. Our results suggest that a one ΔEL∗a∗b∗ uniformity criterion typically used for calibrating monitors is too lenient for tiled displays.

  5. Temporary threshold shift in military pilots measured using conventional and extended high-frequency audiometry after one flight.

    PubMed

    Kuronen, Pentti; Sorri, Martti J; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Muhli, Arto

    2003-01-01

    Noise of such a high level that it can result in hearing deterioration is an inherent characteristic of military flying. Susceptibility to hearing impairment was studied using 51 Finnish Air Force military personnel as subjects. The test persons flew missions on a British Aerospace Hawk 51 advanced jet trainer, Boeing F-18 Hornet, Mikoyan & Gurevich MiG-21bis and Saab 35 Draken interceptors, and a Valmet Redigo turboprop liaison aircraft. The duration of noise exposure was one flight mission, which varied from 30 to 60 min. Noise doses and levels were measured using a miniature microphone at the inlet of the ear canal, while a second microphone was located at the level of the subject's shoulder. Hearing thresholds were measured before each flight using conventional (0.125-8 kHz) and extended high-frequency (EHF) (8.20 kHz) audiometry. The measurements were repeated as soon as possible after the flight. The study showed that the pre-flight threshold levels of the subjects were good. Both conventional and EHF audiometry revealed statistically significant temporary threshold shifts (TTS) at several frequencies and with all aircraft types involved. The changes were, however, minor. The risk of noise-induced hearing impairment at the studied exposure levels is, in all probability, rather small. The role of extended high-frequency audiometry would be in research, and it might be performed for flying personnel upon entering service and every fifth year thereafter. PMID:12564513

  6. Catastrophic shifts and lethal thresholds in a propagating front model of unstable tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Amor, Daniel R; Solé, Ricard V

    2014-08-01

    Unstable dynamics characterizes the evolution of most solid tumors. Because of an increased failure of maintaining genome integrity, a cumulative increase in the levels of gene mutation and loss is observed. Previous work suggests that instability thresholds to cancer progression exist, defining phase transition phenomena separating tumor-winning scenarios from tumor extinction or coexistence phases. Here we present an integral equation approach to the quasispecies dynamics of unstable cancer. The model exhibits two main phases, characterized by either the success or failure of cancer tissue. Moreover, the model predicts that tumor failure can be due to either a reduced selective advantage over healthy cells or excessive instability. We also derive an approximate, analytical solution that predicts the front speed of aggressive tumor populations on the instability space.

  7. Changes in size and shape of auditory hair cells in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift.

    PubMed

    Dew, L A; Owen, R G; Mulroy, M J

    1993-03-01

    In this study we describe changes in the size and shape of auditory hair cells of the alligator lizard in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift. These changes consist of a decrease in cell volume, a decrease in cell length and an increase in cell width. We speculate that these changes are due to relaxation of cytoskeletal contractile elements and osmotic loss of intracellular water. We also describe a decrease in the surface area of the hair cell plasmalemma, and speculate that it is related to the endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of cell membrane during synaptic vesicle recycling. Finally we describe an increase in the endolymphatic surface area of the hair cell, and speculate that this could alter the micromechanics of the stereociliary tuft to attenuate the effective stimulus.

  8. ABR Examinations: The Why, What, and How

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Gary J.; Bosma, Jennifer L. Guiberteau, Milton J.; Gerdeman, Anthony M.; Frush, Donald P.; Borgstede, James P.

    2013-10-01

    The American Board of Radiology (ABR) has provided certification for diagnostic radiologists and other specialists and subspecialists for more than 75 years. The Board certification process is a tangible expression of the social contract between the profession and the public by which the profession enjoys the privilege of self-regulation and the public is assured that it can expect medical professionals to put patients' interests first, guarantees the competence of practitioners, and guards the public health. A primary tool used by the ABR in fulfilling this responsibility is the secure proctored examination. This article sets forth seven standards based on authoritative sources in the field of psychometrics (the science of mental measurements), and explains in each case how the ABR implements that standard. Readers are encouraged to understand that, despite the multiple opinions that may be held, these standards developed over decades by experts using the scientific method should be the central feature in any discussion or critique of examinations given for the privilege of professional practice and for safeguarding the public well-being.

  9. Prevalence of permanent hearing threshold shift among workers of Indian iron and steel small and medium enterprises: a study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakhwinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arvind; Kumar, Deepak Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Occupational noise exposure and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) have been recognized as a problem among workers in Indian industries. The major industries in India are based on manufacturing. There are appreciable numbers of casting and forging units spread across the country. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of permanent hearing threshold shift among the workers engaged in Indian iron and steel small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and compared with control group subjects. As a part of hearing protection intervention, audiometric tests were conducted at low (250-1000 Hz), medium (1500-3000 Hz), and high (4000-8000 Hz) frequencies. The occurrence of hearing loss was determined based on hearing threshold levels with a low fence of 25 dB. Comparisons were made for hearing threshold at different frequencies between the exposed and control groups using Student's t test. ANOVA was used for the comparison of hearing threshold dB at different frequencies among occupation and year of experience. A P value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All data were presented as mean value (SD). Over 90% of workers engaged in various processes of casting and forging industry showed hearing loss in the noise-sensitive medium and higher frequencies. Occupation was significantly associated with NIHL, and hearing loss was particularly high among the workers of forging section. The analyses revealed a higher prevalence of significant hearing loss among the forging workers compared to the workers associated with other activities. The study shows alarming signals of NIHL, especially in forging workers. The occupational exposure to noise could be minimized by efficient control measures through engineering controls, administrative controls, and the use of personal protective devices. Applications of engineering and/or administrative controls are frequently not feasible in the developing countries for technical and financial reasons. A complete hearing

  10. Growth and recovery of temporary threshold shift at 3 kHz in bottlenose dolphins: experimental data and mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Carder, Donald A; Schlundt, Carolyn E; Dear, Randall L

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of temporary threshold shift (TTS) in marine mammals have become important components in developing safe exposure guidelines for animals exposed to intense human-generated underwater noise; however, existing marine mammal TTS data are somewhat limited in that they have typically induced small amounts of TTS. This paper presents experimental data for the growth and recovery of larger amounts of TTS (up to 23 dB) in two bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Exposures consisted of 3-kHz tones with durations from 4 to 128 s and sound pressure levels from 100 to 200 dB re 1 μPa. The resulting TTS data were combined with existing data from two additional dolphins to develop mathematical models for the growth and recovery of TTS. TTS growth was modeled as the product of functions of exposure duration and sound pressure level. TTS recovery was modeled using a double exponential function of the TTS at 4-min post-exposure and the recovery time. PMID:21117774

  11. Temporary auditory-threshold shifts induced by twenty-five-minute continuous exposures to intense tones in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. F.; Wojtowicz, J. J.

    1985-09-01

    Four bare-headed divers were exposed for twenty-five minutes to continuous tones in water at frequencies of 700, 1400, and 5600 hertz at estimated sound pressure levels between 153 and 165 decibels (dB) above 20 micropascal. Subsequent analyses revealed that the eight ears involved were actually exposed to average sound pressure levels between 143.1 and 165.1 dB. These exposure levels are comparable to those to which divers may be exposed while using some underwater hand-held tools. Temporary auditory-threshold shifts (TTS) were measured from two minutes to five minutes after the exposure terminated. TTS at two minutes post-exposure was between 23 and 55 dB and recovery times varied from twenty-four hours to more than fifty hours depending on exposure conditions. Nonauditory effects including middle-ear sensations and a reddened ear-drum were also observed. The results indicate that several hand-held tools now in use by military and civilian divers are extremely hazardous to hearing. The results also support the theory that the dynamic range of the water-immersed ear is smaller than the dynamic range of the ear in air.

  12. Further evidence of a relation between noise-induced permanent threshold shift and vibration-induced digital vasospasms.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, I; Starck, J; Pekkarinen, J

    1986-01-01

    The relation between noise-induced permanent threshold shift (NIPTS) and vibration-induced dysfunction in the digital circulation was examined in a longitudinal survey among forest workers. The survey was based on annual examinations done between 1972 and 1983. Thirty-two forest workers with digital vasospasms were compared with referents matched for age, exposure, and use of ear protectors. No significant differences between the groups were observed at 1,000 or 2,000 Hz. The forest workers with digital vasospasms had significantly greater NIPTS at 4,000 and 8,000 Hz than the symptom-free referents. During the follow-up period, the gap in NIPTS between the two groups did not increase. Vibration measurements from chain saws manufactured in different years indicated that chain saws manufactured after 1970 had a tenfold reduction in vibration, whereas the reduction in noise levels was only slight. The results suggest that vibration-induced activation of the autonomic nervous system, which is thought to elicit digital vasospasms, may also contribute to the development of NIPTS.

  13. The impact of degree of hearing loss on auditory brainstem response predictions of behavioral thresholds

    PubMed Central

    McCreery, Ryan W.; Kaminski, Jan; Beauchaine, Kathryn; Lenzen, Natalie; Simms, Kendell; Gorga, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Diagnosis of hearing loss and prescription of amplification for infants and young children require accurate estimates of ear- and frequency-specific behavioral thresholds based on auditory brainstem response measurements. Although the overall relationship between ABR and behavioral thresholds has been demonstrated, the agreement is imperfect, and the accuracy of predictions of behavioral threshold based on ABR may depend on degree of hearing loss. Behavioral thresholds are lower than ABR thresholds, at least in part due to differences in calibration interacting with the effects of temporal integration, which are manifest in behavioral measurements but not ABR measurements and depend on behavioral threshold. Listeners with sensory hearing loss exhibit reduced or absent temporal integration, which could impact the relationship between ABR and behavioral thresholds as degree of hearing loss increases. The current study evaluated the relationship between ABR and behavioral thresholds in infants and children over a range of hearing thresholds, and tested an approach for adjusting the correction factor based on degree of hearing loss as estimated by ABR measurements. Design: A retrospective review of clinical records was completed for 309 ears of 177 children with hearing thresholds ranging from normal to profound hearing loss and for whom both ABR and behavioral thresholds were available. Children were required to have the same middle-ear status at both evaluations. The relationship between ABR and behavioral thresholds was examined. Factors that potentially could affect the relationship between ABR and behavioral thresholds were analyzed, including degree of hearing loss observed on the ABR, behavioral test method (visual reinforcement, conditioned play or conventional audiometry), the length of time between ABR and behavioral assessments, and clinician-reported reliability of the behavioral assessment. Predictive accuracy of a correction factor based on

  14. Biological Imaging Capability in the ABRS Facility on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David R.; Murdoch, T.; Regan, M. F.; Meshlberger, R. J.; Mortenson, T. E.; Albino, S. A.; Paul, A. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) on the International Space Station (ISS) and its biological imaging capability. The ABRS is an environmental control chamber. It has two indpendently controlled Experiment Research Chambers (ERCs) with temperature, relative humidity and carbon dioxide controls. ABRS is a third generation plant growth system. Several experiments are reviewed, with particular interest in the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) a non-destructive plant stress reporting mechanism, naturally found in jellyfish.

  15. Newborn Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses (ABRs): Prenatal and Contemporary Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ann D.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are a literature review and new data on correlates of newborn auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs). Concludes that disorders of the central components of the ABR may be more of prenatal than of postnatal origin. The I-V interval had low but reliable correlations with four of 11 Brazelton scale variables. (RH)

  16. Temporary Threshold Shifts in Naïve and Experienced Belugas: Can Dampening of the Effects of Fatiguing Sounds Be Learned?

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir; Supin, Alexander; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    In belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), substantial (10-15 dB) differences in temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) were observed between the first and subsequent experimental sessions in the same subjects. In the first session (naïve subject state), the TTSs produced by exposure to fatiguing noises were larger than the TTSs produced in subsequent sessions (experienced subject state). After one to two sessions, the TTSs stabilized. The baseline hearing thresholds did not differ between the naïve and experienced states. One possible explanation for this effect is that the animals learned to dampen their hearing during exposure to fatiguing noises and thus mitigate the impact of those noises.

  17. Threshold-Voltage Shifts in Organic Transistors Due to Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Dielectric: Evidence for Electronic Coupling and Dipolar Effects.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadi, Mahdieh; Rödel, Reinhold; Zschieschang, Ute; Ocal, Carmen; Boschker, Hans; Weitz, R Thomas; Barrena, Esther; Klauk, Hagen

    2015-10-21

    The mechanisms behind the threshold-voltage shift in organic transistors due to functionalizing of the gate dielectric with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are still under debate. We address the mechanisms by which SAMs determine the threshold voltage, by analyzing whether the threshold voltage depends on the gate-dielectric capacitance. We have investigated transistors based on five oxide thicknesses and two SAMs with rather diverse chemical properties, using the benchmark organic semiconductor dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene. Unlike several previous studies, we have found that the dependence of the threshold voltage on the gate-dielectric capacitance is completely different for the two SAMs. In transistors with an alkyl SAM, the threshold voltage does not depend on the gate-dielectric capacitance and is determined mainly by the dipolar character of the SAM, whereas in transistors with a fluoroalkyl SAM the threshold voltages exhibit a linear dependence on the inverse of the gate-dielectric capacitance. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements indicate this behavior is attributed to an electronic coupling between the fluoroalkyl SAM and the organic semiconductor.

  18. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niang, K. M.; Barquinha, P. M. C.; Martins, R. F. P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M. J.; Flewitt, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and analysed using the thermalization energy concept. The peak energy barrier to defect conversion is extracted to be 0.75 eV and the attempt-to-escape frequency is extracted to be 107 s-1. These values are in remarkable agreement with measurements in a-IGZO TFTs under negative gate bias illumination stress (NBIS) reported recently (Flewitt and Powell, J. Appl. Phys. 115, 134501 (2014)). This suggests that the same physical process is responsible for both PBS and NBIS, and supports the oxygen vacancy defect migration model that the authors have previously proposed.

  19. Electric-field-induced Shift in the Threshold Voltage in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Shin-Ik; Lim, Hyungkwang; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kwon, Beomjin; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Kim, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between insulating LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is intriguing both as a fundamental science topic and for possible applications in electronics or sensors. For example, because the electrical conductance of the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface can be tuned by applying an electric field, new electronic devices utilizing the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface could be possible. For the implementation of field-effect devices utilizing the 2DEG, determining the on/off switching voltage for the devices and ensuring their stability are essential. However, the factors influencing the threshold voltage have not been extensively investigated. Here, we report the voltage-induced shift of the threshold voltage of Pt/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. A large negative voltage induces an irreversible positive shift in the threshold voltage. In fact, after the application of such a large negative voltage, the original threshold voltage cannot be recovered even by application of a large positive electric field. This irreversibility is attributed to the generation of deep traps near the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface under the negative voltage. This finding could contribute to the implementation of nanoelectronic devices using the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. PMID:25620684

  20. Electric-field-induced shift in the threshold voltage in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Shin-Ik; Lim, Hyungkwang; Jeong, Doo Seok; Kwon, Beomjin; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Kim, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between insulating LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is intriguing both as a fundamental science topic and for possible applications in electronics or sensors. For example, because the electrical conductance of the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface can be tuned by applying an electric field, new electronic devices utilizing the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface could be possible. For the implementation of field-effect devices utilizing the 2DEG, determining the on/off switching voltage for the devices and ensuring their stability are essential. However, the factors influencing the threshold voltage have not been extensively investigated. Here, we report the voltage-induced shift of the threshold voltage of Pt/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. A large negative voltage induces an irreversible positive shift in the threshold voltage. In fact, after the application of such a large negative voltage, the original threshold voltage cannot be recovered even by application of a large positive electric field. This irreversibility is attributed to the generation of deep traps near the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface under the negative voltage. This finding could contribute to the implementation of nanoelectronic devices using the 2DEG at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. PMID:25620684

  1. Masked auditory thresholds in three species of birds, as measured by the auditory brainstem response (L).

    PubMed

    Noirot, Isabelle C; Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Dooling, Robert J

    2011-06-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded in adult budgerigars, canaries, and zebra finches in quiet and in three levels of white noise for tone stimuli between 1 and 4 kHz. Similar to behavioral results, masked ABR thresholds increased linearly with increasing noise levels. When the three species are considered together, ABR-derived CRs were higher than behavioral CRs by 18-23 dB between 2 and 4 kHz and by about 30 dB at 1 kHz. This study clarifies the utility of using ABRs for estimating masked auditory thresholds in natural environmental noises in species that cannot be tested behaviorally. PMID:21682367

  2. Evaluation of ABR traffic control schemes for ATM LAN and WAN: effects of congestion indication schemes and ER switch algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, W. Melody; Shenoy, Sandeep

    1997-10-01

    The ATM Forum has adopted rate-based congestion control for ABR (available bit rate) traffic. Much of the existing work evaluating ABR congestion control schemes has used some threshold value on buffer queue length to indicate congestion. On the other hand, many ER (explicit rate) algorithms calculate their 'fair-share' values based on utilization level, with the assumption that ER switches are able to measure the current utilization level of ABR traffic. If one would use the same mechanism -- measuring utilization level -- to indicate congestion, then the same switch could easily implement both binary and ER ABR control algorithms. Based on the above observations, in this paper we study the effect of using two different congestion indication methods: (1) buffer queue length (the most commonly used method); and (2) utilization level (the new method). We evaluate two binary ABR control schemes: EFCI (explicit forward congestion indication) and CI (congestion indication) using backward notification, using the two different congestion methods. We also evaluate and compare two ER algorithms: the ERICA (explicit rate indication for congestion avoidance) algorithm proposed by Jain and the CAPC-2 (congestion avoidance with proportional control - 2) algorithm proposed by Barnhart. Performance evaluation are carried out by computer simulation. We simulate two ABR switches connected by an OC-3 link, with each switch connecting five end-systems. The distance between the two switches are 20 km for LAN and 1,000 km for WAN, based on ATM forum specification. For each simulation run, we measure average queuing delay, maximum queue length, and network utilization. Traces of ACR (allowed cell rate) and buffer queue length are also examined. We found that using the new congestion method indication dramatically reduces the maximum queue length and average queuing delay, with a slight decrease in utilization. Both ER schemes show smooth buffer occupancy and attain high utilization.

  3. The temporal dimension of regime shifts: How long can ecosystems operate beyond critical thresholds before transitions become irreversible?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Question/Methods: Ecosystem thresholds are often identified by observing or inducing slow changes in different driver variables and investigating changes in the asymptotic state of the system, such as the response of lakes to nutrient loading or biome responses to climate change. Yet ma...

  4. Abnormal behavior of threshold voltage shift in bias-stressed a-Si:H thin film transistor under extremely high intensity illumination.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Youn; Park, Kyung Tea; Kim, Cheolkyu; Jeon, Sanghyun; Yang, Sung-Hoon; Kong, Hyang-Shik

    2015-07-22

    We report on the unusual behavior of threshold voltage turnaround in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) when biased under extremely high intensity illumination. The threshold voltage shift changes from negative to positive gate bias direction after ∼30 min of bias stress even when the negative gate bias stress is applied under high intensity illumination (>400 000 Cd/cm(2)), which has not been observed in low intensity (∼6000 Cd/cm(2)). This behavior is more pronounced in a low work function gate metal structure (Al: 4.1-4.3 eV), compared to the high work function of Cu (4.5-5.1 eV). Also this is mainly observed in shorter wavelength of high photon energy illumination. However, this behavior is effectively prohibited by embedding the high energy band gap (∼8.6 eV) of SiOx in the gate insulator layer. These imply that this behavior could be originated from the injection of electrons from gate electrode, transported and trapped in the electron trap sites of the SiNx/a-Si:H interface, which causes the shift of threshold voltage toward positive gate bias direction. The results reported here can be applicable to the large-sized outdoor displays which are usually exposed to the extremely high intensity illumination.

  5. Temporary Threshold Shifts in Naïve and Experienced Belugas: Can Dampening of the Effects of Fatiguing Sounds Be Learned?

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir; Supin, Alexander; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    In belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), substantial (10-15 dB) differences in temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) were observed between the first and subsequent experimental sessions in the same subjects. In the first session (naïve subject state), the TTSs produced by exposure to fatiguing noises were larger than the TTSs produced in subsequent sessions (experienced subject state). After one to two sessions, the TTSs stabilized. The baseline hearing thresholds did not differ between the naïve and experienced states. One possible explanation for this effect is that the animals learned to dampen their hearing during exposure to fatiguing noises and thus mitigate the impact of those noises. PMID:26611042

  6. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under simultaneous negative gate bias and illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Flewitt, A. J.; Powell, M. J.

    2014-04-07

    It has been previously observed that thin film transistors (TFTs) utilizing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) semiconducting channel suffer from a threshold voltage shift when subjected to a negative gate bias and light illumination simultaneously. In this work, a thermalization energy analysis has been applied to previously published data on negative bias under illumination stress (NBIS) in a-IGZO TFTs. A barrier to defect conversion of 0.65–0.75 eV is extracted, which is consistent with reported energies of oxygen vacancy migration. The attempt-to-escape frequency is extracted to be 10{sup 6}−10{sup 7} s{sup −1}, which suggests a weak localization of carriers in band tail states over a 20–40 nm distance. Models for the NBIS mechanism based on charge trapping are reviewed and a defect pool model is proposed in which two distinct distributions of defect states exist in the a-IGZO band gap: these are associated with states that are formed as neutrally charged and 2+ charged oxygen vacancies at the time of film formation. In this model, threshold voltage shift is not due to a defect creation process, but to a change in the energy distribution of states in the band gap upon defect migration as this allows a state formed as a neutrally charged vacancy to be converted into one formed as a 2+ charged vacancy and vice versa. Carrier localization close to the defect migration site is necessary for the conversion process to take place, and such defect migration sites are associated with conduction and valence band tail states. Under negative gate bias stressing, the conduction band tail is depleted of carriers, but the bias is insufficient to accumulate holes in the valence band tail states, and so no threshold voltage shift results. It is only under illumination that the quasi Fermi level for holes is sufficiently lowered to allow occupation of valence band tail states. The resulting charge localization then allows a negative threshold voltage

  7. Cumulative Effects of Exposure to Continuous and Intermittent Sounds on Temporary Hearing Threshold Shifts Induced in a Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2016-01-01

    The effects of exposure to continuous and intermittent anthropogenic sounds on temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in a harbor porpoise were investigated by testing hearing before and after exposure to 1- to 2-kHz downsweeps of 1 s, without harmonics, presented as paired-intermittent and continuous-exposure combinations with identical cumulative sound exposure levels (SEL(cum)). Exposure to intermittent sounds resulted in lower TTSs than exposure to continuous sounds with the same SEL(cum). Therefore, the hearing of marine mammals is at less risk from intermittent anthropogenic noises than from continuous ones at the same received sound pressure level and duration. PMID:26611000

  8. Cumulative Effects of Exposure to Continuous and Intermittent Sounds on Temporary Hearing Threshold Shifts Induced in a Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2016-01-01

    The effects of exposure to continuous and intermittent anthropogenic sounds on temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in a harbor porpoise were investigated by testing hearing before and after exposure to 1- to 2-kHz downsweeps of 1 s, without harmonics, presented as paired-intermittent and continuous-exposure combinations with identical cumulative sound exposure levels (SEL(cum)). Exposure to intermittent sounds resulted in lower TTSs than exposure to continuous sounds with the same SEL(cum). Therefore, the hearing of marine mammals is at less risk from intermittent anthropogenic noises than from continuous ones at the same received sound pressure level and duration.

  9. First-principles calculation of spectral features, chemical shift and absolute threshold of ELNES and XANES using a plane wave pseudopotential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Tanaka, Isao; Gao, Shang-Peng; Pickard, Chris J.

    2009-03-01

    Spectral features, chemical shifts, and absolute thresholds of electron energy loss near-edge structure (ELNES) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) for selected compounds, i.e. TiO2 (rutile), TiO2 (anatase), SrTiO3, Ti2O3, Al2O3, AlN and β-Ga2O3, were calculated by a plane wave pseudopotential method. Experimental ELNES/XANES of those compounds were well reproduced when an excited pseudopotential, which includes a core hole, was used. In addition to the spectral features, it was found that chemical shifts among different compounds were also reproduced by correcting the contribution of the excited pseudopotentials to the energy of the core orbital.

  10. Using a combination of click- and toneburst-evoked auditory brainstem response measurements to estimate pure-tone thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Gorga, Michael P.; Johnson, Tiffany A.; Kaminski, Jan K.; Beauchaine, Kathryn L.; Garner, Cassie A.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Design A retrospective medical-record review of evoked-potential and audiometric data was used to determine the accuracy with which click-evoked and toneburst-evoked ABR thresholds predict pure-tone audiometric thresholds. Methods The medical records were reviewed of a consecutive group of patients who were referred for ABR testing for audiometric purposes over the past four years. ABR thresholds were measured for clicks and for several tonebursts, including a single-cycle, Blackman-windowed, 250-Hz toneburst, which has a broad spectrum with little energy above 600 Hz. Typically, the ABR data were collected because the patients were unable to provide reliable estimates of hearing sensitivity, based on behavioral-test techniques, due to developmental level. Data were included only if subsequently obtained behavioral audiometric data were available to which the ABR data could be compared. Almost invariably, the behavioral data were collected after the ABR results were obtained. Because of this, data were included on only those ears for which middle-ear tests (tympanometry, otoscopic examination, pure-tone air- and bone-conduction thresholds) indicated that middle-ear status was similar at the times of both tests. With these inclusion criteria, data were available on 140 ears of 77 subjects. Results Correlation was 0.94 between click-evoked ABR thresholds and the average pure-tone threshold at 2 and 4 kHz. Correlations exceeded 0.92 between ABR thresholds for the 250-Hz toneburst and low-frequency behavioral thresholds (250 Hz, 500 Hz, and the average pure-tone thresholds at 250 and 500 Hz). Similar or higher correlations were observed when ABR thresholds at other frequencies were compared to the pure-tone thresholds at corresponding frequencies. Differences between ABR and behavioral threshold depended on behavioral threshold, with ABR thresholds overestimating behavioral threshold in cases of normal hearing and underestimating behavioral threshold in cases of

  11. The limits of applicability of the sound exposure level (SEL) metric to temporal threshold shifts (TTS) in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V

    2014-05-15

    The influence of fatiguing sound level and duration on post-exposure temporary threshold shift (TTS) was investigated in two beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). The fatiguing sound was half-octave noise with a center frequency of 22.5 kHz. TTS was measured at a test frequency of 32 kHz. Thresholds were measured by recording rhythmic evoked potentials (the envelope following response) to a test series of short (eight cycles) tone pips with a pip rate of 1000 s(-1). TTS increased approximately proportionally to the dB measure of both sound pressure (sound pressure level, SPL) and duration of the fatiguing noise, as a product of these two variables. In particular, when the noise parameters varied in a manner that maintained the product of squared sound pressure and time (sound exposure level, SEL, which is equivalent to the overall noise energy) at a constant level, TTS was not constant. Keeping SEL constant, the highest TTS appeared at an intermediate ratio of SPL to sound duration and decreased at both higher and lower ratios. Multiplication (SPL multiplied by log duration) better described the experimental data than an equal-energy (equal SEL) model. The use of SEL as a sole universal metric may result in an implausible assessment of the impact of a fatiguing sound on hearing thresholds in odontocetes, including under-evaluation of potential risks.

  12. The limits of applicability of the sound exposure level (SEL) metric to temporal threshold shifts (TTS) in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V

    2014-05-15

    The influence of fatiguing sound level and duration on post-exposure temporary threshold shift (TTS) was investigated in two beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). The fatiguing sound was half-octave noise with a center frequency of 22.5 kHz. TTS was measured at a test frequency of 32 kHz. Thresholds were measured by recording rhythmic evoked potentials (the envelope following response) to a test series of short (eight cycles) tone pips with a pip rate of 1000 s(-1). TTS increased approximately proportionally to the dB measure of both sound pressure (sound pressure level, SPL) and duration of the fatiguing noise, as a product of these two variables. In particular, when the noise parameters varied in a manner that maintained the product of squared sound pressure and time (sound exposure level, SEL, which is equivalent to the overall noise energy) at a constant level, TTS was not constant. Keeping SEL constant, the highest TTS appeared at an intermediate ratio of SPL to sound duration and decreased at both higher and lower ratios. Multiplication (SPL multiplied by log duration) better described the experimental data than an equal-energy (equal SEL) model. The use of SEL as a sole universal metric may result in an implausible assessment of the impact of a fatiguing sound on hearing thresholds in odontocetes, including under-evaluation of potential risks. PMID:24829327

  13. The ASSR: clinical application in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired infants and adults, comparison with the click-evoked ABR and pure-tone audiometry.

    PubMed

    Scherf, Fanny; Brokx, Jan; Wuyts, Floris L; Van de Heyning, Paul H

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical application of the ASSR (GSI Audera). It was completed in two parts: Study 1. Correlation between the ASSR-based threshold estimations and the conventional pure-tone thresholds in adults; and Study 2. Correlation between the average of the 2-4 kHz ASSR-based threshold estimations and c-ABR thresholds in children. The ASSRs were recorded in awake adults and sleeping infants with a range of hearing loss at CFs of 0.5 to 4 kHz and MFs between 46 and 95 Hz. The results show that in hearing-impaired adults (thresholds > 40 dBHL) good correlations can be observed between the behavioural thresholds and the ASSR-based threshold estimations. For the normal- to near-normal-hearing adults, a significant correspondence exists between the ASSR-based threshold estimations and FPTA. In children, strong correlations were found between the c-ABR and the 2-4 kHz ASSR-based threshold estimation average. These studies illustrate that the GSI Audera ASSR can accurately predict the behavioural audiogram in hearing-impaired subjects. In subjects with normal hearing the individual ASSR-based threshold estimations scatter too much. Instead the average of the ASSR-based threshold estimations corresponds well with the FPTA. PMID:16717018

  14. Respiratory complex I dysfunction due to mitochondrial DNA mutations shifts the voltage threshold for opening of the permeability transition pore toward resting levels.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Angelin, Alessia; Ghelli, Anna; Mariani, Elisa; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Rugolo, Michela

    2009-01-23

    We have studied mitochondrial bioenergetics in HL180 cells (a cybrid line harboring the T14484C/ND6 and G14279A/ND6 mtDNA mutations of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, leading to an approximately 50% decrease of ATP synthesis) and XTC.UC1 cells (derived from a thyroid oncocytoma bearing a disruptive frameshift mutation in MT-ND1, which impairs complex I assembly). The addition of rotenone to HL180 cells and of antimycin A to XTC.UC1 cells caused fast mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was prevented by treatment with cyclosporin A, intracellular Ca2+ chelators, and antioxidant. Both cell lines also displayed an anomalous response to oligomycin, with rapid onset of depolarization that was prevented by cyclosporin A and by overexpression of Bcl-2. These findings indicate that depolarization by respiratory chain inhibitors and oligomycin was due to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). A shift of the threshold voltage for PTP opening close to the resting potential may therefore be the underlying cause facilitating cell death in diseases affecting complex I activity. This study provides a unifying reading frame for previous observations on mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic defects, and Ca2+ deregulation in mitochondrial diseases. Therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing the PTP voltage threshold may be instrumental in ameliorating the course of complex I-dependent mitochondrial diseases.

  15. Further characterization of the ABR gene in medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wright-White, E.C.; Haken, M.S. von; McDonald J.D.

    1994-09-01

    Although brain tumors are the most common type of solid cancer in children, little is known about their etiology at the molecular genetic level. Using a panel of 20 chromosome 17p markers, we have previously determined that loss of distal chromosome 17p DNA sequences occurs in 14 of 35 specimens (40%) of medulloblastoma, one of the most common pediatric intracranial neoplasms. Analysis of these same tumors using a PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique has shown only two p53 gene mutations. These results suggest that a tumor suppressor gene in addition to p53 may be located on distal chromosome 17p. Consensus deletion mapping of our specimens suggests that the smallest site of chromosomal loss in defined distally by marker 144-D6, the most telomeric probe as yet identified on chromosome 17p, and proximally by the ABR marker, a BCR homologous gene containing two highly polymorphic VNTR regions. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine that the ABR gene lies transcriptionally oriented 5{prime} to 3{prime} at a distance of 240 kb from marker 144-D6. We have also constructed a cosmid contig map spanning 120 kb of this region. Using one of these cosmids as a probe, we have detected breakpoints in three of the tumor specimens that lie between the two VNTR regions within the ABR gene. We have subsequently designed PCR primers to cover the breakpoint region which include the ABR exons which have the strongest homology to the BCR gene (Mbcr region), and are screening our tumor specimens for mutations. These results suggest that loss of ABR gene sequences may be involved in the etiology of medulloblastoma.

  16. Correlation of interface states/border traps and threshold voltage shift on AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tian-Li Groeseneken, Guido; Marcon, Denis; De Jaeger, Brice; Lin, H. C.; Franco, Jacopo; Stoffels, Steve; Van Hove, Marleen; Decoutere, Stefaan; Bakeroot, Benoit; Roelofs, Robin

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, three electrical techniques (frequency dependent conductance analysis, AC transconductance (AC-g{sub m}), and positive gate bias stress) were used to evaluate three different gate dielectrics (Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) for AlGaN/GaN Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor High-Electron-Mobility Transistors. From these measurements, the interface state density (D{sub it}), the amount of border traps, and the threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) shift during a positive gate bias stress can be obtained. The results show that the V{sub TH} shift during a positive gate bias stress is highly correlated to not only interface states but also border traps in the dielectric. A physical model is proposed describing that electrons can be trapped by both interface states and border traps. Therefore, in order to minimize the V{sub TH} shift during a positive gate bias stress, the gate dielectric needs to have a lower interface state density and less border traps. However, the results also show that the commonly used frequency dependent conductance analysis technique to extract D{sub it} needs to be cautiously used since the resulting value might be influenced by the border traps and, vice versa, i.e., the g{sub m} dispersion commonly attributed to border traps might be influenced by interface states.

  17. Newborn Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses (ABRs): Longitudinal Correlates in the First Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ann D.

    1988-01-01

    Aimed to determine to what degree newborns' auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) predict delayed or impaired development during the first year. When 93 infants' ABRs were evaluated at three, six, and nine months, newborn ABR was moderately sensitive for detecting hearing impairment and more sensitive than other indicators in detecting…

  18. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  19. Temporary threshold shifts and recovery in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) after octave-band noise at 4 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean; Olthuis, Juul

    2012-11-01

    Safety criteria for underwater sound produced during offshore pile driving are needed to protect marine mammals. A harbor porpoise was exposed to fatiguing noise at 18 sound pressure level (SPL) and duration combinations. Its temporary hearing threshold shift (TTS) and hearing recovery were quantified with a psychoacoustic technique. Octave-band white noise centered at 4 kHz was the fatiguing stimulus at three mean received SPLs (124, 136, and 148 dB re 1 μPa) and at six durations (7.5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min). Approximate received sound exposure levels (SELs) varied between 151 and 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave (3.9-4.1 kHz; 1 s) before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, and 96 min after exposure. The lowest SEL (151 dB re 1 μPa(2) s) which caused a significant TTS(1-4) was due to exposure to an SPL of 124 dB re 1 μPa for 7.5 min. The maximum TTS(1-4), induced after a 240 min exposure to 148 dB re 1 μPa, was around 15 dB at a SEL of 190 dB re 1 μPa(2) s. Recovery time following TTS varied between 4 min and under 96 min, depending on the exposure level, duration, and the TTS induced. PMID:23145632

  20. Identifying the Threshold of Iron Deficiency in the Central Nervous System of the Rat by the Auditory Brainstem Response

    PubMed Central

    Greminger, Allison R.

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and severity of ABR latency defects. To generate various levels of ID, female Long-Evans rats were exposed to diets containing sufficient, borderline, or deficient iron (Fe) concentrations throughout gestation and offspring lifetime. We measured hematological indices of whole body iron stores in dams and offspring to assess the degree of ID. Progression of AN ID in the offspring was measured as ferritin protein levels at different times during postnatal development to complement ABR functional measurements. The severity of ABR deficits correlated with the level of Fe restriction in each diet. The sufficient Fe diet did not induce AN ID and consequently did not show an impaired ABR latency response. The borderline Fe diet, which depleted AN Fe stores but did not cause systemic anemia resulted in significantly increased ABR latency isolated to Peak I.The low Fe diet, which induced anemia and growth retardation, significantly increased ABR latencies of Peaks I to IV. Our findings indicate that changes in the ABR could be related to various degrees of ID experienced throughout development. PMID:25732706

  1. The two kinases, AbrC1 and AbrC2, of the atypical two-component system AbrC are needed to regulate antibiotic production and differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rico, Sergio; Yepes, Ana; Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Antoraz, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Díaz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the most important sensing mechanisms in bacteria. In Streptomyces, TCSs-mediated responses to environmental stimuli are involved in the regulation of antibiotic production. This study examines the individual role of two histidine kinases (HKs), AbrC1 and AbrC2, which form part of an atypical TCS in Streptomyces coelicolor. qRT-PCR analysis of the expression of both kinases demonstrated that both are expressed at similar levels in NB and NMMP media. Single deletion of abrC1 elicited a significant increase in antibiotic production, while deletion of abrC2 did not have any clear effect. The origin of this phenotype, probably related to the differential phosphorylation ability of the two kinases, was also explored indirectly, analyzing the toxic phenotypes associated with high levels of phosphorylated RR. The higher the AbrC3 regulator phosphorylation rate, the greater the cell toxicity. For the first time, the present work shows in Streptomyces the combined involvement of two different HKs in the response of a regulator to environmental signals. Regarding the possible applications of this research, the fact that an abrC1 deletion mutant overproduces three of the S. coelicolor antibiotics makes this strain an excellent candidate as a host for the heterologous production of secondary metabolites. PMID:26029189

  2. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu; David Alberstein

    2008-02-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

  3. Noise-induced threshold shift dynamics measured with distortion-product otoacoustic emissions and auditory evoked potentials in chinchillas with inner hair cell deficient cochleas.

    PubMed

    Hamernik, R P; Ahroon, W A; Jock, B M; Bennett, J A

    1998-04-01

    Chinchillas (n = 6) were treated with carboplatin and, following a 30-day recovery period, were exposed to a 115 dB peak SPL impact noise presented at a rate of l/s for 6 h/day for 10 days. A second group (n = 6) received only the noise treatment. Cubic distortion product otoacoustic emissions (2f1-f2) and auditory evoked potential (AEP) detection thresholds in response to tone bursts were measured before and 30 days after drug treatment and following the first and 10th day of the noise exposure. Thirty days after the final exposure day, permanent changes in AEP detection thresholds and emissions were measured and cochleograms constructed. The drug treatment eliminated over 80% of the inner hair cells (IHC) in the cochlea, leaving the outer hair cell (OHC) population essentially intact prior to the interrupted noise exposure. The drug treatment alone had very little or no effect on AEP detection thresholds and emission metrics. Following the noise exposure, the IHC-deficient animals showed clear 'toughening' effects in the AEP and emission measures which were the same as measured in the group receiving only the noise. After a 30-day post-exposure recovery period. AEP thresholds were elevated about 10 dB at the low frequencies in the drug-noise group whereas emissions returned to near normal despite the massive IHC losses. These results are consistent with the idea that an intact OHC population is required for toughening. However, sound-evoked efferent pathways activated by the few remaining IHCs (approximately 20%) which, in this preparation, are distributed throughout the cochlea, may still contribute significantly to the toughening phenomena. PMID:9606062

  4. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in children with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    el Khateeb, I; Abdul Razzak, B; Moosa, A

    1988-01-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were studied in 35 children with neurological disorders and 24 controls. Abnormal results were obtained in 16 patients. All 5 of the patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy had evidence of peripheral and/or central delay in transmission in keeping with evidence of demyelination of both peripheral (i.e. auditory nerve) and central (i.e. brainstem) pathways as occurs in this disorder. Two children with lead poisoning had delayed conduction in the peripheral pathways only and in these there was good correlation between the degree of delay and the ulnar nerve conduction velocity; both improved after chelation therapy. One infant with lead poisoning had central delay only. One infant with osteopetrosis manifested progressive damage to the auditory nerves. Delayed conduction was also found in one patient each with hydrocephalus, spinal muscular atrophy, and in 2 infants with cerebral palsy. No responses were obtained in one infant with congenital rubella, one deaf-mute and one child with an undiagnosed degenerative neurological disease. Auditory brainstem responses are of value in detecting disturbances of the auditory nerve or brainstem in children with various neurological disorders. PMID:3218703

  5. Recording of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABR) with an integrated stimulus generator in Matlab.

    PubMed

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2008-08-30

    Electrical auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs) of subjects with cochlear implants are used for monitoring the physiologic responses of early signal processing of the auditory system. Additionally, E-ABR measurements allow the diagnosis of retro-cochlear diseases. Therefore, E-ABR should be available in every cochlear implant center as a diagnostic tool. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost setup designed to perform an E-ABR as well as a conventional ABR for research purposes. The distributable form was developed with Matlab and the Matlab Compiler (The Mathworks Inc.). For the ABR, only a PC with a soundcard, conventional system headphones, and an EEG pre-amplifier are necessary; for E-ABR, in addition, an interface to the cochlea implant is required. For our purposes, we implemented an interface for the Combi 40+/Pulsar implant (MED-EL, Innsbruck).

  6. The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) treating communal wastewater under mesophilic conditions: a review.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, N; Buckley, C A

    2016-01-01

    A review concerning the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) treating communal wastewater under mesophilic conditions is presented. Existing studies indicate strong resilience of the reactor towards loading variations and shock-loads. The compartmentalisation of the ABR is a strongly stabilising factor with feed fluctuations being evened out across reactor chambers. Significant chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction occurs almost exclusively in the first three chambers. The hydraulic rather than the organic loading rate is treatment limiting. Laboratory-scale studies show high treatment efficiencies of above 80% COD removal. It was found that most laboratory-scale studies do not factor in important aspects of field operation, such as diurnal fluctuations of feed characteristics, adequate start-up periods and periods of constant loading and optimised chamber outlet design, and never studied the effect of loading on sludge digestion. Performance data on full-scale ABR implementations, however, are extremely scarce, and existing studies are without exception affected by site-specific treatment-limiting factors hindering the extrapolation of generally valid conclusions. In view of a large-scale roll-out, communal ABRs are not sufficiently understood. Current challenges concerning the optimisation of reactor design require numerous well-monitored long-term full-scale reactor investigations. Existing ABR investigations yield encouraging results, supporting that the ABR may be one of the solutions answering the global call for low-maintenance, robust treatment systems.

  7. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-05-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000-3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals. PMID:27250191

  8. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Sowmya S; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Rahman, Muhammad H; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat NV

    2008-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10) are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT) and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin (CK) responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of transcripts for many stress

  9. Cardiovascular changes and hearing threshold shifts in men under complex exposures to noise, whole body vibrations, temperatures and competition-type psychic load.

    PubMed

    Manninen, O

    1985-01-01

    This study deals with changes in the temporary hearing threshold (TTS2), heart rate (HR), R-wave amplitude (RWA), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP) and reaction time (RT) in subjects (n = 108) who, while working on a choice reaction apparatus, were exposed in an exposure chamber to combinations of noise and vibration at dry bulb temperatures of 20 degrees and 30 degrees C. The study was carried out as a type 2-3-3 factorial experiment, the number of the exposure combinations thus being 18. To find out the effects of competition-type psychic stress, some of the subjects were placed in a competitive group and some in a non-competitive group. The members of the competitive group were given financial encouragement and information on their progress during the test, whereas those in the non-competitive group worked at the rate they considered best without any monetary rewards or interim information. The noise classes were: no noise, a stable broadband (bandwidth 0.2-16.0 kHz) A-weighted noise of 90 dB not related to competition, and a stable broadband A-weighted noise of 90 dB related to competition about the fastest reaction time. The vibration classes were: no vibration, sinusoidal whole body vibration (Z-axis) at a frequency of 5 Hz, and stochastic broadband (bandwidth 2.8-11.2 Hz) whole body vibration (Z-axis). The acceleration (rms) of both vibrations was 2.12 m/s2. One experiment consisted of a control period of 30 min, three consecutive exposure periods of 16 min with an interval of 4 min, and a 15-min recovery period. The variance analysis model best explained the variation in TTS2 values at 4 kHz and second best the variation in TTS2 values at 6 kHz; it explained the variation in HR values third best, the variation in SBP values fourth best and the variation in PP values fifth best. On the other hand, the model explained least well the variation in DBP and RWA values. In general, the explanatory power of the model

  10. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  11. SU-E-E-02: An Excel-Based Study Tool for ABR-Style Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, K; Stanley, D; Defoor, D; Stathakis, S; Gutierrez, A; Papanikolaou, N; Kirby, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As the landscape of learning and testing shifts toward a computer-based environment, a replacement for paper-based methods of studying is desirable. Using Microsoft Excel, a study tool was developed that allows the user to populate multiple-choice questions and then generate an interactive quiz session to answer them. Methods: The code for the tool was written using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications with the intent that this tool could be implemented by any institution with Excel. The base tool is a template with a setup macro, which builds out the structure based on user’s input. Once the framework is built, the user can input sets of multiple-choice questions, answer choices, and even add figures. The tool can be run in random-question or sequential-question mode for single or multiple courses of study. The interactive session allows the user to select answer choices and immediate feedback is provided. Once the user is finished studying, the tool records the day’s progress by reporting progress statistics useful for trending. Results: Six doctoral students at UTHSCSA have used this tool for the past two months to study for their qualifying exam, which is similar in format and content to the American Board of Radiology (ABR) Therapeutic Part II exam. The students collaborated to create a repository of questions, met weekly to go over these questions, and then used the tool to prepare for their exam. Conclusion: The study tool has provided an effective and efficient way for students to collaborate and be held accountable for exam preparation. The ease of use and familiarity of Excel are important factors for the tool’s use. There are software packages to create similar question banks, but this study tool has no additional cost for those that already have Excel. The study tool will be made openly available.

  12. Effect of nitrogen addition on the band gap, core level shift, surface energy, and the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H. J.; Chen, X. F.; Pan, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Sun, Chang Q.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) doping on the behavior of field emission, surface energy and the band structure of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) thin films coated on silicon tip arrays has been examined in detail. Measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, water contact angle and field emission testing revealed that the optimal 50%-nitrogen partial pressure (PN) could improve substantially the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 films accompanied with narrowed band gap, lowered surface energy and work function and a negative energy shift of the N 1s level from 404 to 396 eV. Results evidence consistently the presence of the nonbonding lone pairs and the lone pair induced antibonding dipoles upon tetrahedron formation which is responsible for the observations. At PN below and above the optimal value physisorption and hydrogen bond likes formation like to occur.

  13. Evoked potential measurement of the masked hearing threshold of a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Jeanette, Thomas; Western, A.; Rameriz, Kenneth M.

    2003-04-01

    The masked hearing threshold of a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) was determined by measuring the animal's auditory brainstem response (ABR). The dolphin was trained to wear surface-contact electrodes embedded in suction cups and to swim into a hoop centered at 1 m below the water surface facing a sound projector 5 m away. Broadband transient signals with center frequencies of 8, 16, 32, 64, 80, and 100 kHz were used as the stimuli. ABR signals were measured by digitizing the electrode signals in 32 point blocks at a sampling rate of 20 kHz. Five hundred blocks were averaged in order to obtain an ABR. The response latency for suprathreshold threshold signals was approximately 1.9 ms with the highest peak-to-peak ABR amplitude of approximately 2.8 uV occurring for a signal frequency of 64 kHz. The spectrum of the ABR signal was similar to that of Tursiops truncatus, with a major peak at 1120 Hz and a secondary peak at 664 Hz. Threshold was determined by progressively reducing the amplitude of the stimulus until an evoked potential could not be detected. The energy signal-to-noise ratio within an integration window at threshold varied between 1 and 8 dB.

  14. Performance of an Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) in treatment of cassava wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Fernanda M.; Bruni, Aline T.; Del Bianchi, Vanildo L.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was evaluated in the treatment of cassava wastewater, a pollutant residue. An ABR divided in four equal volume compartments (total volume 4L) and operated at 35ºC was used in cassava wastewater treatment. Feed tank chemical oxygen demand (COD) was varied from 2000 to 7000 mg L-1 and it was evaluated the most appropriated hydraulic retention time (HRT) for the best performance on COD removal. The ABR was evaluated by analysis of COD (colorimetric method), pH, turbidity, total and volatile solids, alkalinity and acidity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried to better understand data obtained. The system showed buffering ability as acidity decreased along compartments while alkalinity and pH values were increased. There was particulate material retention and COD removal varied from 83 to 92% for HRT of 3.5 days. PMID:24031316

  15. Performance of an Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) in treatment of cassava wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Fernanda M; Bruni, Aline T; Del Bianchi, Vanildo L

    2009-01-01

    The performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was evaluated in the treatment of cassava wastewater, a pollutant residue. An ABR divided in four equal volume compartments (total volume 4L) and operated at 35ºC was used in cassava wastewater treatment. Feed tank chemical oxygen demand (COD) was varied from 2000 to 7000 mg L(-1) and it was evaluated the most appropriated hydraulic retention time (HRT) for the best performance on COD removal. The ABR was evaluated by analysis of COD (colorimetric method), pH, turbidity, total and volatile solids, alkalinity and acidity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried to better understand data obtained. The system showed buffering ability as acidity decreased along compartments while alkalinity and pH values were increased. There was particulate material retention and COD removal varied from 83 to 92% for HRT of 3.5 days.

  16. The synthetic DNA duplex of poly d(Abr5U).poly d(Abr5U) adopts an A-DNA-like structure.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, R; Puigjaner, L C; Arnott, S; He, R G; Brahms, S; Brahms, J

    1989-02-01

    An X-ray fiber diffraction study of the synthetic DNA duplex poly d(Abr5U).poly d(Abr5U) shows that its sodium salt adopts an unexceptional A-DNA-like structure. Similar to A-DNA, two molecules are packed in a monoclinic unit cell (a = 2.23 nm, b = 4.14 nm, c = 5.61 nm and alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees) of space group C2. Because of its dinucleotide chemical motif, the c-repeat is twice that in A-DNA but, notably, corresponding backbone conformation angles of adjacent nucleotides are almost identical. This is in marked contrast to many B-like conformations of polydinucleotides.

  17. Tele-ABR using a satellite connection in a mobile van for newborn hearing testing.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Vidya; Hall, James W; Nagarajan, Roopa; Shankarnarayan, Vanaja C; Kumaravelu, Selvakumar

    2013-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of conducting Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) testing in a mobile van with satellite connectivity, with the help of trained health workers. ABR recordings in newborn babies made by telemedicine were compared with recordings made face to face. The auditory evoked response equipment was controlled by an audiologist at a nearby hospital. Videoconferencing was used during the testing process to monitor patient preparation by the village health worker. A total of 24 newborns (13 male and 11 female) aged 8-30 days underwent ABR in face-to-face and tele-mode. There was no significant difference between peak V latency measured at three intensity levels in the two modes. Agreement between the two methods of measurement was examined with a Bland-Altman plot. Almost all points were within the limits of agreement, suggesting no bias in the telemedicine measurements. Real-time tele-ABR testing as a component of newborn hearing screening is feasible in a mobile van using satellite link with the assistance of village health workers.

  18. Evaluation of Hearing in Children with Autism by Using TEOAE and ABR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Abdullah; Yagiz, Recep; Tas, Memduha; Esme, Meral; Uzun, Cem; Karasalihoglu, Ahmet Rifat

    2007-01-01

    Assessment of auditory abilities is important in the diagnosis and treatment of children with autism. The aim was to evaluate hearing objectively by using transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR). Tests were performed on 30 children with autism and 15 typically developing children, following otomicroscopy…

  19. Deciphering the Regulon of Streptomyces coelicolor AbrC3, a Positive Response Regulator of Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Yepes, Ana; Rodríguez, Héctor; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Smith, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    The atypical two-component system (TCS) AbrC1/C2/C3 (encoded by SCO4598, SCO4597, and SCO4596), comprising two histidine kinases (HKs) and a response regulator (RR), is crucial for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor and for morphological differentiation under certain nutritional conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the RR-encoding gene, abrC3 (SCO4596), results in a dramatic decrease in actinorhodin (ACT) and undecylprodiginine (RED) production and delays morphological development. In contrast, the overexpression of abrC3 in the parent strain leads to a 33% increase in ACT production in liquid medium. Transcriptomic analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis of the ΔabrC3 mutant and the parent strain revealed that AbrC3 directly controls ACT production by binding to the actII-ORF4 promoter region; this was independently verified by in vitro DNA-binding assays. This binding is dependent on the sequence 5′-GAASGSGRMS-3′. In contrast, the regulation of RED production is not due to direct binding of AbrC3 to either the redZ or redD promoter region. This study also revealed other members of the AbrC3 regulon: AbrC3 is a positive autoregulator which also binds to the promoter regions of SCO0736, bdtA (SCO3328), absR1 (SCO6992), and SCO6809. The direct targets share the 10-base consensus binding sequence and may be responsible for some of the phenotypes of the ΔabrC3 mutant. The identification of the AbrC3 regulon as part of the complex regulatory network governing antibiotic production widens our knowledge regarding TCS involvement in control of antibiotic synthesis and may contribute to the rational design of new hyperproducer host strains through genetic manipulation of such systems. PMID:24509929

  20. [Nitrogen removal performance of ANAMMOX ABR process in tannery wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qu; Jia, Xiao-Shan

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-N removal from tannery wastewater was investigated using a lab-scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR). The results indicated that ABR could be used as a good anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor, the stable and effective performance of ammonium-N and COD removal from tannery wastewater was demonstrated in the ANAMMOX ABR. When the NH4(+) -N concentration of the influents were in the range of 25.0 mg x L(-1) to 76.2 mg x L(-1) and COD ranged from 131 mg x L(-1) to 237 mg x L(-1), under the volumetric loading of 0.05 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) to 0.15 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), the NH4(+)-N and COD of the effluents were from 0.20 mg x L(-1) to 7.12 mg x L(-1) and from 35.1 mg x L(-1) to 69.2 mg x L(-1), respectively, and the removal efficiency of NH4(+) -N and COD were 90.8% to 99.6% and 66.9% to 74.7%, respectively. In addition, the brown-red, brown-yellow, red granular sludges were developed in ABR. SEM observation confirmed the presence of ANAMMOX bacteria in granular sludge of all four compartments of ANAMMOX ABR. According to FISH results, ANAMMOX bacteria had grown in all four compartments to various degrees during the acclimatization and running process, the percentage of ANAMMOX bacteria in sludge increased from 4% to 9%, 8%, 12% and 30% in compartment 1, compartment 2, compartment 3 and compartment 4, respectively, and a higher population percentage of ANAMMOX bacteria existed in the rear than in the front compartments.

  1. A proposed medical physics curriculum: preparing for the 2013 ABR examination.

    PubMed

    Nachiappan, Arun C; Wynne, David M; Katz, David P; Willis, Marc H; Bushong, Stewart C

    2011-01-01

    The upcoming ABR examination format for radiology residents is undergoing significant changes in 2013. This requires adaptation of the didactic curriculum for radiology residents entering in July 2010 to meet these changes. Physics will now be incorporated into the core (qualifying) examination during the third year of residency, instead of being tested as a separate examination that was often taken earlier in residency training in past years. In this article, the authors discuss the past, present, and future of medical physics instruction and outline a revised medical physics curriculum for radiology residents that has been internally approved for implementation at the authors' institution and has not been advocated by any society or by the ABR. Starting with this article, the authors hope to encourage a discussion of physics curriculum revision with other institutions.

  2. [Electrophysiological examinations (ABR and DPOAE) of hearing organ in hemodialysed patients suffering from chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Gierek, Tatiana; Markowski, Jarosław; Kokot, Franciszek; Paluch, Jarosław; Wiecek, Andrzej; Klimek, Dariusz

    2002-01-01

    Deterioration of function of hearing organ is one of the most important clinical problem in uremic patients with chronic renal failure. The present study aimed to assess the function of hearing organ using the brainstem auditory evoked responses (ABR), impedance audiometry and distortion product otoacoustic emission cochlear function (DPOAE) in 31 haemodialysed patients with chronic renal failure (16 females and 15 males, mean age 43.0 years). The control group consisted of 15 healthy subjects. The latency of the waves I, III, V and I-V interpeak in evoked response audiometry were significantly longer in the patients with CRF (chronic renal failure) compared to the control group. Measurement of DPOAE showed decrease of DPOAE level in patients suffering from CRF. A influence of single hemodialysis and treatment of hemodialysis by 6 months on ABR latencies and DPOAE values were not observed. PMID:12094644

  3. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO{sub 2} structure using fast I-V measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Chang, Ting-Chang Lu, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-03-17

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (V{sub t}) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, V{sub t} shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting Hf{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect.

  4. Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Oscar; Monje, Oscar; Shellack, James; Mortenson, Todd; Wells, Howard

    Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility. O. Monje Space Life Sciences Laboratory, Dynamac Corp., DYN-3, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA J.L. Shellack, T.E. Mortenson, and H.W. Wells. Bionetics Corporation, BIO-1, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA The Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) is a rear-breathing, single middeck locker equivalent plant growth system. ABRS is composed of two independently controlled growth chambers (each with 330 cm2 of growth area). The air revitalization system in each chamber is composed of two subsystems: CO2 Control and a Ethylene/VOC Control. The CO2 Control subsystem must control chamber [CO2] within a range of 300-2000 ppm, with a nominal setpoint of 1500 ppm. The Ethylene/VOC Control subsystem is required to maintain chamber ethylene concentration at ¡50 ppb. Previous spaceflight plant payloads have used non-regenerable cartridges for CO2 control and photocatalytic scrubbers for controlling concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Non-regenerable systems have used LiOH cartridges for [CO2] control with a combination of Purafil (KMnO4)/Activated charcoal for scrubbing VOCs. Regenerable air revitalization systems offer the potential for reducing the mass and volume of consumables used during spaceflight plant experiments. A system utilizing technologies employing regenerable adsorbents: zeolites 13X and 5A for CO2 control and Carbosieve SIII (C molecular sieve) for VOC control has been designed for ABRS. The filter cartridges were sized using expected chamber leak rates, measurements of adsorptive capacities, and measured CO2 consumption and VOC generation rates.

  5. Interim progress report on safety and licensing strategy support for the ABR prototype.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J .E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-26

    Argonne National Laboratory is providing support to the U.S. Department of Energy in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in certification of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast reactor. The reactor is to be constructed as a prototype for future commercial power reactors that will produce electricity while consuming actinides recovered from light water reactor spent fuel. This prototype reactor has been called the ABR, or Advanced Burner Reactor.

  6. Proteomics and functional analyses of pepper abscisic acid-responsive 1 (ABR1), which is involved in cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of plant growth and development, as well as plant defense responses. A high-throughput in planta proteome screen identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) GRAM (for glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators, and myotubularins) domain-containing ABA-RESPONSIVE1 (ABR1), which is highly induced by infection with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and also by treatment with ABA. The GRAM domain is essential for the cell death response and for the nuclear localization of ABR1. ABR1 is required for priming cell death and reactive oxygen species production, as well as ABA-salicylic acid (SA) antagonism. Silencing of ABR1 significantly compromised the hypersensitive response but enhanced bacterial pathogen growth and ABA levels in pepper. High levels of ABA in ABR1-silenced plants antagonized the SA levels induced by pathogen infection. Heterologous transgenic expression of ABR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. The susceptibility of the Arabidopsis ABR1 putative ortholog mutant, abr1, to these pathogens also supports the involvement of ABR1 in disease resistance. Together, these results reveal ABR1 as a novel negative regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that the nuclear ABR1 pool is essential for the cell death induction associated with ABA-SA antagonism.

  7. Self-adaptive trust based ABR protocol for MANETs using Q-learning.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anitha Vijaya; Jeyapal, Akilandeswari

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are a collection of mobile nodes with a dynamic topology. MANETs work under scalable conditions for many applications and pose different security challenges. Due to the nomadic nature of nodes, detecting misbehaviour is a complex problem. Nodes also share routing information among the neighbours in order to find the route to the destination. This requires nodes to trust each other. Thus we can state that trust is a key concept in secure routing mechanisms. A number of cryptographic protection techniques based on trust have been proposed. Q-learning is a recently used technique, to achieve adaptive trust in MANETs. In comparison to other machine learning computational intelligence techniques, Q-learning achieves optimal results. Our work focuses on computing a score using Q-learning to weigh the trust of a particular node over associativity based routing (ABR) protocol. Thus secure and stable route is calculated as a weighted average of the trust value of the nodes in the route and associativity ticks ensure the stability of the route. Simulation results show that Q-learning based trust ABR protocol improves packet delivery ratio by 27% and reduces the route selection time by 40% over ABR protocol without trust calculation. PMID:25254243

  8. Self-Adaptive Trust Based ABR Protocol for MANETs Using Q-Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapal, Akilandeswari

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are a collection of mobile nodes with a dynamic topology. MANETs work under scalable conditions for many applications and pose different security challenges. Due to the nomadic nature of nodes, detecting misbehaviour is a complex problem. Nodes also share routing information among the neighbours in order to find the route to the destination. This requires nodes to trust each other. Thus we can state that trust is a key concept in secure routing mechanisms. A number of cryptographic protection techniques based on trust have been proposed. Q-learning is a recently used technique, to achieve adaptive trust in MANETs. In comparison to other machine learning computational intelligence techniques, Q-learning achieves optimal results. Our work focuses on computing a score using Q-learning to weigh the trust of a particular node over associativity based routing (ABR) protocol. Thus secure and stable route is calculated as a weighted average of the trust value of the nodes in the route and associativity ticks ensure the stability of the route. Simulation results show that Q-learning based trust ABR protocol improves packet delivery ratio by 27% and reduces the route selection time by 40% over ABR protocol without trust calculation. PMID:25254243

  9. Self-adaptive trust based ABR protocol for MANETs using Q-learning.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anitha Vijaya; Jeyapal, Akilandeswari

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are a collection of mobile nodes with a dynamic topology. MANETs work under scalable conditions for many applications and pose different security challenges. Due to the nomadic nature of nodes, detecting misbehaviour is a complex problem. Nodes also share routing information among the neighbours in order to find the route to the destination. This requires nodes to trust each other. Thus we can state that trust is a key concept in secure routing mechanisms. A number of cryptographic protection techniques based on trust have been proposed. Q-learning is a recently used technique, to achieve adaptive trust in MANETs. In comparison to other machine learning computational intelligence techniques, Q-learning achieves optimal results. Our work focuses on computing a score using Q-learning to weigh the trust of a particular node over associativity based routing (ABR) protocol. Thus secure and stable route is calculated as a weighted average of the trust value of the nodes in the route and associativity ticks ensure the stability of the route. Simulation results show that Q-learning based trust ABR protocol improves packet delivery ratio by 27% and reduces the route selection time by 40% over ABR protocol without trust calculation.

  10. Preliminary estimation of isotopic inventories of 2000 MWt ABR (revision 1).

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-06-16

    The isotopic inventories of a 2000 MWt Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core have been estimated to support the ABR accident analysis to be reported in the Appendix D of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Based on the Super-PRISM design, a preliminary core design of 2000 MWt ABR was developed to achieve a one-year cycle length with 3-batch fuel management scheme. For a bounding estimation of transuranics (TRU) inventory, a low TRU conversion ratio ({approx}0.3) was targeted to increase the TRU enrichment. By changing the fuel compositions, isotopic inventories of mass and radioactivity were evaluated for four different core configurations: recycled metal fuel core, recycled oxide fuel core, startup metal fuel core, and startup oxide fuel core. For recycled cores, the TRU recovered from ABR spent fuel was used as the primary TRU feed, and the TRU recovered from 10-year cooled light water reactor spent fuel was used as the makeup TRU feed. For startup cores, weapons-grade plutonium was used as TRU feed without recycling ABR spent fuel. It was also assumed that a whole batch of discharged fuel assemblies is stored in the in-vessel storage for an entire irradiation cycle. For both metal and oxide fuel cores, the estimated TRU mass at beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC), including spent fuel TRU stored in the in-vessel storage, was about 8.5-8.7 MT for the recycled cores and 5.2 MT for the startup cores. Since a similar power was generated, the fission product mass are comparable for all four cores: 1.4 MT at BOEC and about 2.0 MT at end of equilibrium cycle (EOEC). Total radioactivity at BOEC is about 8.2 x 10{sup 8} curies in recycled cores and about 6.9 x 10{sup 8} curies in startup cores, and increases to about 1.1 x 10{sup 10} curies at EOEC for all four cases. Fission products are the dominant contributor (more than 80%) to the total radioactivity at EOEC for all four cases, but the fission product radioactivity decreases by 79% after one

  11. MO-F-16A-03: AAPM Online Learning Support of New ABR MOC Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, C; Ogburn, J; Woodward, M

    2014-06-15

    In 2002 the American Board of Radiology (ABR) discontinued issuing lifetime board certification. After that time diplomates received a timelimited certificate and must participate in the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program in order to maintain their certification. Initially certificates were issued with a 10 year expiration period and the MOC had requirements to be met over that 10 year period. The goal was to demonstrate continuous maintenance of clinical competency, however some diplomates were attempting to fulfill most or all of the requirements near the end of the 10 year period. This failed to meet the continuous aspect of the goal and so the ABR changed to a sliding 3-year window. This was done to recognize that not every year would be the same, but that diplomates should be able to maintain a reasonable average over any 3 year period.A second significant change occurred in 2013. The initial requirements included 20 selfassessment modules (SAMs) over the original 10 year term. SAMs are a special type of continuing education (CE) credit that were an addition to the 250 standard CE credits required over the 10 year period. In 2013, however, the new requirement is 75 CE credits over the previous 3 years, of which 25 must include self-assessment. Effectively this raised the self-assessment requirement from 20 in 10 years to 25 in 3 years. Previously SAMs were an interactive presentation available in limited quantities at live meetings. However, the new requirement is not for SAMs but CE-SA which includes SAMs, but also includes the online quizzes provided at the AAPM online learning center. All credits earned at the AAPM online learning center fulfill the ABR SA requirement.This talk will be an interactive demonstration of the AAPM online learning center along with a discussion of the MOC requirements.

  12. Substitutional Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of AbrB Revealed Its Essential Role in DNA-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Svetlana; Dolgova, Olga; Präg, Gregory; Borriss, Rainer; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2014-01-01

    The global transition state regulator AbrB controls more than 100 genes of the Bacillus relatives and is known to interact with varying DNA-sequences. The DNA-binding domain of the AbrB-like proteins was proposed to be located exclusively within the amino-terminal ends. However, the recognition of DNA, and specificity of the binding mechanism, remains elusive still in view of highly differing recognition sites. Here we present a substitutional analysis to examine the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of AbrB from Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Our results demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domains of AbrB affect the DNA-binding properties of the tetrameric AbrB. Most likely, the C-termini are responsible for the cooperative character observed for AbrB interaction with some DNA targets like tycA and phyC. PMID:24832089

  13. SU-B-213-06: Development of ABR Examination Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.

    2015-06-15

    The North American medical physics community validates the education received by medical physicists and the clinical qualifications for medical physicists through accreditation of educational programs and certification of medical physicists. Medical physics educational programs (graduate education and residency education) are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP), whereas medical physicists are certified by several organizations, the most familiar of which is the American Board of Radiology (ABR). In order for an educational program to become accredited or a medical physicist to become certified, the applicant must meet certain specified standards set by the appropriate organization. In this Symposium, representatives from both CAMPEP and the ABR will describe the process by which standards are established as well as the process by which qualifications of candidates for accreditation or certification are shown to be compliant with these standards. The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion. Learning Objectives: Recognize the difference between accreditation of an educational program and certification of an individual Identify the two organizations primarily responsible for these tasks Describe the development of educational standards Describe the process by which examination questions are developed GS is Executive Secretary of CAMPEP.

  14. SU-B-213-05: Development of ABR Certification Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, J.

    2015-06-15

    The North American medical physics community validates the education received by medical physicists and the clinical qualifications for medical physicists through accreditation of educational programs and certification of medical physicists. Medical physics educational programs (graduate education and residency education) are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP), whereas medical physicists are certified by several organizations, the most familiar of which is the American Board of Radiology (ABR). In order for an educational program to become accredited or a medical physicist to become certified, the applicant must meet certain specified standards set by the appropriate organization. In this Symposium, representatives from both CAMPEP and the ABR will describe the process by which standards are established as well as the process by which qualifications of candidates for accreditation or certification are shown to be compliant with these standards. The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion. Learning Objectives: Recognize the difference between accreditation of an educational program and certification of an individual Identify the two organizations primarily responsible for these tasks Describe the development of educational standards Describe the process by which examination questions are developed GS is Executive Secretary of CAMPEP.

  15. [Formation Mechanism of Aerobic Granular Sludge and Removal Efficiencies in Integrated ABR-CSTR Reactor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-cheng; Wu, Peng; Xu, Yue-zhong; Li, Yue-han; Shen, Yao-liang

    2015-08-01

    Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) was altered to make an integrated anaerobic-aerobic reactor. The research investigated the mechanism of aerobic sludge granulation, under the condition of continuous-flow. The last two compartments of the ABR were altered into aeration tank and sedimentation tank respectively with seeded sludge of anaerobic granular sludge in anaerobic zone and conventional activated sludge in aerobic zone. The HRT was gradually decreased in sedimentation tank from 2.0 h to 0.75 h and organic loading rate was increased from 1.5 kg x (M3 x d)(-1) to 2.0 kg x (M3 x d)(-1) while the C/N of 2 was controlled in aerobic zone. When the system operated for 110 days, the mature granular sludge in aerobic zone were characterized by compact structure, excellent sedimentation performance (average sedimentation rate was 20.8 m x h(-1)) and slight yellow color. The system performed well in nitrogen and phosphorus removal under the conditions of setting time of 0.75 h and organic loading rate of 2.0 kg (m3 x d)(-1) in aerobic zone, the removal efficiencies of COD, NH4+ -N, TP and TN were 90%, 80%, 65% and 45%, respectively. The results showed that the increasing selection pressure and the high organic loading rate were the main propulsions of the aerobic sludge granulation.

  16. Summary report on safety and licensing strategy support for the ABR prototype.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-09-18

    Argonne National Laboratory is providing support to the US Department of Energy in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in certification of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast reactor. The reactor is to be constructed as a prototype for future commercial power reactors that will produce electricity while consuming actinides recovered from light water reactor spent fuel. This prototype reactor has been called the Advanced Burner Reactor, or ABR, and is now often referred to as the advanced recycle reactor. As part of its activities, Argonne is providing technical services to assist definition of a safety and licensing strategy for the ABR prototype, and to further implementation of the strategy. In FY06, an organizational meeting was held for DOE and its laboratory contractors to discuss licensing alternatives and review previous licensing experience for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). Near the end of FY06, a report summarizing the discussions and conclusions was written. One of the top-level conclusions recorded in the report was a recommendation to follow a licensing strategy that included the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as the regulatory review and licensing authority. In FY07, activities ar Argonne to support safety and licensing progress have continued. These activities have focused on further evaluation of licensing alternatives; assessment of design, analysis, and documentation implications of licensing paths; and initial technical interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes FY07 activities.

  17. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    PubMed

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability.

  18. Nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.; Breizman, B.N. |

    1997-05-01

    A new nonlinear equation has been derived and solved for the evolution of an unstable collective mode in a kinetic system close to the threshold of linear instability. The resonant particle response produces the dominant nonlinearity, which can be calculated iteratively in the near-threshold regime as long as the mode doe snot trap resonant particles. With sources and classical relaxation processes included, the theory describes both soft nonlinear regimes, where the mode saturation level is proportional to an increment above threshold, and explosive nonlinear regimes, where the mode grows to a level that is independent of the closeness to threshold. The explosive solutions exhibit mode frequency shifting. For modes that exist in the absence of energetic particles, the frequency shift is both upward and downward. For modes that require energetic particles for their existence, there is a preferred direction of the frequency shift. The frequency shift continues even after the mode traps resonant particles.

  19. Growth and development of Arabidopsis in the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) hardware designed for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, Rodney

    Wild type (Col 0) Arabidopsis thaliana were grown in a growth chamber within the single mid-deck sized Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) spaceflight hardware developed by NASA Kennedy Space Center. Before beginning this experiment, the plants, each rooted in individual transferable tubes containing nutrients, were cultivated hydroponically on halfstrength Hoagland's solution beneath either LED lighting similar to that provided by the ABRS growth chamber or white fluorescent lighting. The leaves of the basal whorl of plants pre-grown in ABRS lighting were small and purplish at the start of the experiment, whereas those under fluorescent lighting were larger and green. The plants were transferred to the ABRS soon after their inflorescence axes had started to elongate, and thereafter they were maintained under preset conditions (22 o C, approximately 1500 ppm CO2 , predominantly 125 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) with pulses of water provided at 1-3 d intervals (as needed) to the module into which the root tubes were inserted. That module was pre-treated with half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution on day 0, but no additional nutrients were provided the plants thereafter. Strong primary growth of all inflorescence stems occurred soon after initiating the ABRS experiment, and the plants began forming an overarching canopy of flowering stems beneath the LED lighting module within two weeks. After 38 days the root module was littered with seeds, siliques and abscised leaves, but all plants remained alive. Plants pre-grown in ABRS lighting were more advanced toward senescence, and leaves and stems of plants pre-grown in fluorescent lighting although greener were also acquiring a purplish hue. Microscopy revealed that the flowering stems achieved no secondary growth; however, progressive inward conversion of pith parenchyma into sclerenchyma cells did occur resulting in the inflorescence stems becoming abnormally woody.

  20. A Cochlear Implant Performance Prognostic Test Based on Electrical Field Interactions Evaluated by eABR (Electrical Auditory Brainstem Responses)

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Nicolas; Hoen, Michel; Truy, Eric; Gallego, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background Cochlear implants (CIs) are neural prostheses that have been used routinely in the clinic over the past 25 years. They allow children who were born profoundly deaf, as well as adults affected by hearing loss for whom conventional hearing aids are insufficient, to attain a functional level of hearing. The “modern” CI (i.e., a multi-electrode implant using sequential coding strategies) has yielded good speech comprehension outcomes (recognition level for monosyllabic words about 50% to 60%, and sentence comprehension close to 90%). These good average results however hide a very important interindividual variability as scores in a given patients’ population often vary from 5 to 95% in comparable testing conditions. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model for patients with unilateral CI. A novel method of objectively measuring electrical and neuronal interactions using electrical auditory brainstem responses (eABRs) is proposed. Methods and Findings The method consists of two measurements: 1) eABR measurements with stimulation by a single electrode at 70% of the dynamic range (four electrodes distributed within the cochlea were tested), followed by a summation of these four eABRs; 2) Measurement of a single eABR with stimulation from all four electrodes at 70% of the dynamic range. A comparison of the eABRs obtained by these two measurements, defined as the monaural interaction component (MIC), indicated electrical and neural interactions between the stimulation channels. Speech recognition performance without lip reading was measured for each patient using a logatome test (64 "vowel-consonant-vowel"; VCV; by forced choice of 1 out of 16). eABRs were measured in 16 CI patients (CIs with 20 electrodes, Digisonic SP; Oticon Medical ®, Vallauris, France). Significant correlations were found between speech recognition performance and the ratio of the amplitude of the V wave of the eABRs obtained with the two measurements (Pearson's linear regression

  1. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period.

  2. Air and Bone Conduction Click and Tone-burst Auditory Brainstem Thresholds using Kalman Adaptive Processing in Non-sedated Normal Hearing Infants

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Alaaeldin M.; Hunter, Lisa L.; Keefe, Douglas H.; Feeney, M. Patrick; Brown, David K.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K.; Baroch, Kelly; Sullivan-Mahoney, Maureen; Francis, Kara; Schaid, Leigh G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study normative thresholds and latencies for click and tone-burst auditory brainstem response (TB-ABR) for air and bone conduction in normal infants and those discharged from neonatal intensive care units (NICU), who passed newborn hearing screening and follow-up DPOAE. An evoked potential system (Vivosonic Integrity™) that incorporates Bluetooth electrical isolation and Kalman-weighted adaptive processing to improve signal to noise ratios was employed for this study. Results were compared with other published data. Research Design One hundred forty-five infants who passed two-stage hearing screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (OAE) or automated ABR were assessed with clicks at 70 dB nHL and threshold TB-ABR. Tone-bursts at frequencies between 500 to 4000 Hz were employed for air and bone conduction ABR testing using a specified staircase threshold search to establish threshold levels and Wave V peak latencies. Results Median air conduction hearing thresholds using TB-ABR ranged from 0-20 dB nHL, depending on stimulus frequency. Median bone conduction thresholds were 10 dB nHL across all frequencies, and median air-bone gaps were 0 dB across all frequencies. There was no significant threshold difference between left and right ears and no significant relationship between thresholds and hearing loss risk factors, ethnicity or gender. Older age was related to decreased latency for air conduction. Compared to previous studies, mean air conduction thresholds were found at slightly lower (better) levels, while bone conduction levels were better at 2000 Hz and higher at 500 Hz. Latency values were longer at 500 Hz than previous studies using other instrumentation. Sleep state did not affect air or bone conduction thresholds. Conclusions This study demonstrated slightly better Wave V thresholds for air conduction than previous infant studies. The differences found in the current study, while statistically significant, were within the test

  3. Abr1, a Transposon-Like Element in the Genome of the Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.; Baars, Johan J. P.; Mikosch, Thomas S. P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.

    1999-01-01

    A 300-bp repetitive element was found in the genome of the white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, and designated Abr1. It is present in ∼15 copies per haploid genome in the commercial strain Horst U1. Analysis of seven copies showed 89 to 97% sequence identity. The repeat has features typical of class II transposons (i.e., terminal inverted repeats, subterminal repeats, and a target site duplication of 7 bp). The latter shows a consensus sequence. When used as probe on Southern blots, Abr1 identifies relatively little variation within traditional and present-day commercial strains, indicating that most strains are identical or have a common origin. In contrast to these cultivars, high variation is found among field-collected strains. Furthermore, a remarkable difference in copy numbers of Abr1 was found between A. bisporus isolates with a secondarily homothallic life cycle and those with a heterothallic life cycle. Abr1 is a type II transposon not previously reported in basidiomycetes and appears to be useful for the identification of strains within the species A. bisporus. PMID:10427018

  4. The DNA-recognition fold of Sso7c4 suggests a new member of SpoVT-AbrB superfamily from archaea

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms growing at elevated temperatures face the challenge of maintaining the integrity of their genetic materials. Archaea possess unique chromatin proteins for gene organization and information processing. We present the solution structure of Sso7c4 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, which has a homodimeric DNA-binding fold forming a swapped β-loop-β ‘Tai-Chi’ topology. The fold is reminiscent of the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of AbrB and MazE. In addition, several amide resonances in the heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra of Sso7c4 are shifted and broadened with the addition of small amounts of duplex DNA oligomers. The locations of the corresponding amides in the Sso7c4 structure define its DNA-interacting surface. NMR spectra of DNA titrated with the protein further indicated that Sso7c4 interacts with DNA in the major groove. Taken together, a plausible model for the Sso7c4–DNA complex is presented, in which the DNA double helix is curved around the protein dimer. PMID:21546550

  5. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  6. Hydraulic characteristics simulation of an innovative self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR).

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei-Kang; Hojo, Toshimasa; Li, Yu-You

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on a self-agitation anaerobic baffled reactor (SA-ABR) with agitation caused solely by the release of stored gas. The compound in the reactor is mixed without the use of any mechanical equipment and electricity. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation used to provide details of the flow pattern and information about the agitation process and a solid basis for design and optimization purposes. Every self-agitation cycle could be separated into the pressure energy storage process, the exergonic process and the buffer stage. The reactor is regarded as the combination of continuous stirred tank reactor and a small plug flow reactor. The liquid level and diffusion varies widely depending on the length of the U-tube. The compound transition phenomenon in the 1st chamber mainly occurs during the energy exergonic process and buffer stage. The fluid-diffusion in the 3rd and 4th chambers mainly happens after the buffer period. PMID:23567669

  7. [Research on Cultivation and Stability of Nitritation Granular Sludge in Integrated ABR-CSTR Reactor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-cheng; Wu, Peng; Shen, Yao-liang; Li, Yue-han; Wang, Han-fang; Xu, Yue-zhong

    2015-11-01

    Abstract: The last two compartments of the Anaerobic Baffled Readtor ( ABR) were altered into aeration tank and sedimentation tank respectively to get an integrated anaerobic-aerobic reactor, using anaerobic granular sludge in anaerobic zone and aerobic granular sludge in aerobic zone as seed sludge. The research explored the condition to cultivate nitritation granular sludge, under the condition of continuous flow. The C/N rate was decreased from 1 to 0.4 and the ammonia nitrogen volumetric loading rate was increased from 0.89 kg x ( m3 x d)(-1) to 2.23 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) while the setting time of 1 h was controlled in the aerobic zone. After the system was operated for 45 days, the mature nitritation granular sludge in aerobic zone showed a compact structure and yellow color while the nitrite accumulation rate was about 80% in the effluent. The associated inhibition of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) dominated the nitritation. Part of granules lost stability during the initial period of operation and flocs appeared in the aerobic zone. However, the flocs were transformed into newly generated small particles in the following reactor operation, demonstrating that organic carbon was benefit to granulation and the enrichment of slow-growing nitrifying played an important role in the stability of granules. PMID:26911009

  8. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    PubMed

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  9. Ethnobotany, chemical constituents and biological activities of the flowers of Hydnora abyssinica A.Br. (Hydnoraceae).

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Ali, N A A; Kilian, N; Franke, K; Arnold, N; Kuhnt, C; Schmidt, J; Lindequist, U

    2016-04-01

    Hydnora abyssinica A.Br. (Hydnoraceae), a holoparasitic herb, is for the first time recorded for Abyan governorate of South Yemen. Flowers of this species were studied for their ethnobotanical, biological and chemical properties for the first time. In South Yemen, they are traditionally used as wild food and to cure stomach diseases, gastric ulcer and cancer. Phytochemical analysis of the extracts showed the presence of terpenes, tannins, phenols, and flavonoids. The volatile components of the air-dried powdered flowers were identified using a static headspace GC/MS analysis as acetic acid, ethyl acetate, sabinene, α-terpinene, (+)-D-limonene and γ-terpinene. These volatile compounds that characterize the odor and taste of the flowers were detected for the first time in a species of the family Hydnoraceae. The flowers were extracted by n-hexane, dichlormethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol, methanol and water. With exception of the water extract all extracts demonstrated activities against Gram-positive bacteria as well as remarkable radical scavenging activities in DPPH assay. Ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts exhibited good antifungal activities. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts against FL cells, measured in neutral red assay, was only weak (IC50 > 500 μg/mL). The results justify the traditional use of the flowers of Hydnora abyssinica in South Yemen.

  10. [Research on Cultivation and Stability of Nitritation Granular Sludge in Integrated ABR-CSTR Reactor].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-cheng; Wu, Peng; Shen, Yao-liang; Li, Yue-han; Wang, Han-fang; Xu, Yue-zhong

    2015-11-01

    Abstract: The last two compartments of the Anaerobic Baffled Readtor ( ABR) were altered into aeration tank and sedimentation tank respectively to get an integrated anaerobic-aerobic reactor, using anaerobic granular sludge in anaerobic zone and aerobic granular sludge in aerobic zone as seed sludge. The research explored the condition to cultivate nitritation granular sludge, under the condition of continuous flow. The C/N rate was decreased from 1 to 0.4 and the ammonia nitrogen volumetric loading rate was increased from 0.89 kg x ( m3 x d)(-1) to 2.23 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) while the setting time of 1 h was controlled in the aerobic zone. After the system was operated for 45 days, the mature nitritation granular sludge in aerobic zone showed a compact structure and yellow color while the nitrite accumulation rate was about 80% in the effluent. The associated inhibition of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) dominated the nitritation. Part of granules lost stability during the initial period of operation and flocs appeared in the aerobic zone. However, the flocs were transformed into newly generated small particles in the following reactor operation, demonstrating that organic carbon was benefit to granulation and the enrichment of slow-growing nitrifying played an important role in the stability of granules.

  11. Characterisation of microbial flocs formed from raw textile wastewater in aerobic biofilm reactor (ABR).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zaharah; Amin, Mohamad Faiz Mohd; Yahya, Adibah; Aris, Azmi; Umor, Noor Azrimi; Muda, Khalida; Sofian, Nur Shalena

    2009-01-01

    Microbial flocs formed from raw textile wastewater in a prototype Aerobic Biofilm Reactor (ABR) system were characterised and studied for their potential use in the treatment of textile wastewater. After 90-100 days of operation, microbial flocs of loose irregular structures were obtained from the reactor with good settling velocity of 33 m/h and sludge volume index (SVI) of 48.2 mL/g. Molecular analysis of the flocs using PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequence showed 98% homology to those of Bacillus sp, Paenibacillus sp and Acromobacter sp. Detection of Ca(2+)(131 mg/g) and Fe(2+)(131 mg/g) using atomic absorption spectrometer might be implicated with the flocs formation. In addition, presence of Co(2+) and Ni(2+) were indicative of the flocs ability to accumulate at least a fraction of the metals' present in the wastewater. When the flocs were used for the treatment of raw textile wastewater, they showed good removal of COD and colour about 55% and 70% respectively, indicating their potential application.

  12. Evaluation of COD effect on anammox process and microbial communities in the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongjun; Sun, Faqian; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Jianfang; Shen, Yaoliang; Liang, Xinqiang

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen removal with different organic carbon effect was investigated using anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) anammox reactor. Results indicated that organic carbon exert an important effect on nitrogen removal through anammox process. When the feeding COD concentration was lower than 99.7mgL(-1), nitrogen removal could be enhanced via the coexistence of denitrification and anammox. Elevated COD could further deteriorate the anammox activity with almost complete inhibition at the COD concentration of 284.1mgL(-1). The nitrogen removal contribution rate of anammox was varied from 92.7% to 6.9%. However, the anammox activity was recovered when the COD/TN was decreased from 2.33 to 1.25 with influent nitrite addition. And, the anammox process was again intensified from 27.0 to 51.2%. High-throughput Miseq sequencing analyses revealed that the predominant phylum changed from Chloroflexi to Proteobacteria with the elevated COD addition, which indicated COD concentration was the most important factor regulating the bacterial community structure.

  13. Evaluation of COD effect on anammox process and microbial communities in the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongjun; Sun, Faqian; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Jianfang; Shen, Yaoliang; Liang, Xinqiang

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen removal with different organic carbon effect was investigated using anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) anammox reactor. Results indicated that organic carbon exert an important effect on nitrogen removal through anammox process. When the feeding COD concentration was lower than 99.7mgL(-1), nitrogen removal could be enhanced via the coexistence of denitrification and anammox. Elevated COD could further deteriorate the anammox activity with almost complete inhibition at the COD concentration of 284.1mgL(-1). The nitrogen removal contribution rate of anammox was varied from 92.7% to 6.9%. However, the anammox activity was recovered when the COD/TN was decreased from 2.33 to 1.25 with influent nitrite addition. And, the anammox process was again intensified from 27.0 to 51.2%. High-throughput Miseq sequencing analyses revealed that the predominant phylum changed from Chloroflexi to Proteobacteria with the elevated COD addition, which indicated COD concentration was the most important factor regulating the bacterial community structure. PMID:27285572

  14. Ethnobotany, chemical constituents and biological activities of the flowers of Hydnora abyssinica A.Br. (Hydnoraceae).

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Ali, N A A; Kilian, N; Franke, K; Arnold, N; Kuhnt, C; Schmidt, J; Lindequist, U

    2016-04-01

    Hydnora abyssinica A.Br. (Hydnoraceae), a holoparasitic herb, is for the first time recorded for Abyan governorate of South Yemen. Flowers of this species were studied for their ethnobotanical, biological and chemical properties for the first time. In South Yemen, they are traditionally used as wild food and to cure stomach diseases, gastric ulcer and cancer. Phytochemical analysis of the extracts showed the presence of terpenes, tannins, phenols, and flavonoids. The volatile components of the air-dried powdered flowers were identified using a static headspace GC/MS analysis as acetic acid, ethyl acetate, sabinene, α-terpinene, (+)-D-limonene and γ-terpinene. These volatile compounds that characterize the odor and taste of the flowers were detected for the first time in a species of the family Hydnoraceae. The flowers were extracted by n-hexane, dichlormethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol, methanol and water. With exception of the water extract all extracts demonstrated activities against Gram-positive bacteria as well as remarkable radical scavenging activities in DPPH assay. Ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts exhibited good antifungal activities. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts against FL cells, measured in neutral red assay, was only weak (IC50 > 500 μg/mL). The results justify the traditional use of the flowers of Hydnora abyssinica in South Yemen. PMID:27209704

  15. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  16. Complex effects of stable noise, sinusoidal vs stochastic low frequency whole-body vibration and dynamic muscular work in temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTS) at a dry-bulb temperature of 30/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, O.

    1982-01-01

    In the metal industry occupational loss of hearing occurred twice as often among those working with vibrating equipment than among those not exposed to vibration. Occupational loss of hearing also occurred frequently in miners. In the same pits, hearing loss occurred less often among those engaged in pit-propping and among other specialist workers. The generation and development of occupational hearing loss in miners is, in fact, said to depend critically upon vibration, to the effects of which coal-face workers are particularly exosed when drilling. No absolute conclusions can, however, be drawn from these observations, since in many cases the number of different environmental factors prevailing in production life is very large and varies in each stage of production. The aim of this study was, therefore, to examine under controlled laboratory conditions the temporary hearing thresholds (TTS) of subjects who, during dynamic muscular work, are exposed at slightly elevated ambient temperature to either noise or vibration separately or to combinations of these factors.

  17. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  18. Input and Output Compensation for the Cochlear Traveling Wave Delay in Wide-Band ABR Recordings: Implications for Small Acoustic Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Don, Manuel; Elberling, Claus; Malof, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Background The Stacked ABR (auditory brainstem response) attempts at the output of the auditory periphery to compensate for the temporal dispersion of neural activation caused by the cochlear traveling wave in response to click stimulation. Compensation can also be made at the input by using a chirp stimulus. It has been demonstrated that the Stacked ABR is sensitive to small tumors that are often missed by standard ABR latency measures. Purpose Because a chirp stimulus requires only a single data acquisition run whereas the Stacked ABR requires six, we try to evaluate some indirect evidence justifying the use of a chirp for small tumor detection. Research Design We compared the sensitivity and specificity of different Stacked ABRs formed by aligning the derived-band ABRs according to (1) the individual’s peak latencies, (2) the group mean latencies, and (3) the modeled latencies used to develop a chirp. Results For tumor detection with a chosen sensitivity of 95%, a relatively high specificity of 85% may be achieved with a chirp. Conclusion It appears worthwhile to explore the actual use of a chirp because significantly shorter test and analysis times might be possible. PMID:19927673

  19. Constitutive expression of the pea ABA-responsive 17 (ABR17) cDNA confers multiple stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Rahman, Muhammad H; Shah, Salehuzzaman; Kav, Nat N V

    2006-09-01

    The constitutive expression of the pea ABR17 (abscisic acid-responsive 17) cDNA, which is a member of the group 10 family of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR 10), in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported. The presence of ABR17 transcripts and the protein in the three transgenic lines is demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Three independently derived transgenic lines containing ABR17 germinated better in the presence of salt, cold temperature or both. Furthermore, the transgenic plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to freezing temperature, suggesting the potential utility of the ABR17 gene to engineer multiple stress tolerance. In order to obtain insights into the mechanism underlying ABR17-mediated stress tolerance, we have compared the proteome of a transgenic line with that of its wild-type counterpart. Several proteins were observed to be significantly altered in the transgenic line, including some with a role(s) in photosynthesis, stress tolerance and the regulation of gene expression. Our findings are discussed within the context of available genes to engineer multiple stress tolerance as well as the biological activities of the ABR17 protein.

  20. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  1. Distribution Characteristics of Normal Pure-Tone Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the statistical properties of normal air-conduction thresholds obtained with automated and manual audiometry to test the hypothesis that thresholds are normally distributed and to examine the distributions for evidence of bias in manual testing. Design Four databases were mined for normal thresholds. One contained audiograms obtained with an automated method. The other three were obtained with manual audiometry. Frequency distributions were examined for four test frequencies (250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). Study Sample The analysis is based on 317,569 threshold determinations of 80,547 subjects from four clinical databases. Results Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained with automated audiometry are normal in form. Corrected for age, the mean thresholds are within 1.5 dB of Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Levels. Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained by manual audiometry are shifted toward higher thresholds. Two of the three datasets obtained by manual audiometry are positively skewed. Conclusions The positive shift and skew of the manual audiometry data may result from tester bias. The striking scarcity of thresholds below 0 dB HL suggests that audiologists place less importance on identifying low thresholds than they do for higher-level thresholds. We refer to this as the Good Enough Bias and suggest that it may be responsible for differences in distributions of thresholds obtained by automated and manual audiometry. PMID:25938502

  2. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  3. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  4. Effects of nitrobenzene concentration and hydraulic retention time on the treatment of nitrobenzene in sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system.

    PubMed

    Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-04-01

    The effects of increasing nitrobenzene (NB) concentrations and hydraulic retention times (HRT) on the treatment of NB were investigated in a sequential anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. In the first step of the study, the maximum COD removal efficiencies were found as 88% and 92% at NB concentrations varying between 30 mg L(-1) and 210 mg L(-1) in ABR. The minimum COD removal efficiency was 79% at a NB concentration of 700 mg L(-1). The removal efficiency of NB was nearly 100% for all NB concentrations in the ABR reactor. The methane gas production and the methane gas percentage remained stable (1500 mL day(-1) and 48-50%, respectively) as the NB concentration was increased from 30 to 210 mg L(-1). In the second step of the study it was found that as the HRT decreased from 10.38 days to 2.5 days the COD removal efficiencies decreased slightly from 94% to 92% in the ABR. For maximum COD and NB removal efficiencies the optimum HRT was found as 2.5 days in the ABR. The total COD removal efficiency was 95% in sequential anaerobic (ABR)/aerobic (CSTR) reactor system at a minimum HRT of 1 day. When the HRT was decreased from 10.38 days to 1 day, the methane percentage decreased from 42% to 29% in an ABR reactor treating 100 mg L(-1) NB. Nitrobenzene was reduced to aniline under anaerobic conditions while aniline was mineralized to catechol with meta cleavage under aerobic conditions.

  5. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  6. Global warming, convective threshold and false thermostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian N.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Huber, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate a theoretically expected behavior of the tropical sea surface temperature probability density function (PDF) in future and past (Eocene) greenhouse climate simulations. To first order this consists of a shift to warmer temperatures as climate warms, without change of shape of the PDF. The behavior is tied to a shift of the temperature for deep convection onset. Consequently, the threshold for appearance of high clouds and associated radiative forcing shifts along with temperature. An excess entropy coordinate provides a reference to which the onset of deep convection is invariant, and gives a compact description of SST changes and cloud feedbacks suitable for diagnostics and as a basis for simplified climate models. The results underscore that the typically skewed appearance of tropical SST histograms, with a sharp drop-off above some threshold value, should not be taken as evidence for tropical thermostats.

  7. Synthesis and succinylation of subtilin-like lantibiotics are strongly influenced by glucose and transition state regulator AbrB.

    PubMed

    Bochmann, Sophie M; Spieß, Tobias; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Subtilin and the closely related entianin are class I lantibiotics produced by different subspecies of Bacillus subtilis. Both molecules are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics with unusual ring structures. Subtilin-like lantibiotics develop strong antibiotic activities against various Gram-positive organisms with an efficiency similar to that of nisin from Lactococcus lactis. In contrast to nisin, subtilin-like lantibiotics partially undergo an additional posttranslational modification, where the N-terminal tryptophan residue becomes succinylated, resulting in drastically reduced antibiotic activities. A highly sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based quantification method enabled us to determine entianin and succinylated entianin (S-entianin) concentrations in the supernatant during growth. We show that entianin synthesis and the degree of succinylation drastically change with culture conditions. In particular, increasing glucose concentrations resulted in higher entianin amounts and lower proportions of S-entianin in Landy-based media. In contrast, no succinylation was observed in medium A with 10% glucose. Interestingly, glucose retarded the expression of entianin biosynthesis genes. Furthermore, deletion of the transition state regulator AbrB resulted in a 6-fold increased entianin production in medium A with 10% glucose. This shows that entianin biosynthesis in B. subtilis is strongly influenced by glucose, in addition to its regulation by the transition state regulator AbrB. Our results suggest that the mechanism underlying the succinylation of subtilin-like lantibiotics is enzymatically catalyzed and occurs in the extracellular space or at the cellular membrane. PMID:25381239

  8. Synthesis and Succinylation of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics Are Strongly Influenced by Glucose and Transition State Regulator AbrB

    PubMed Central

    Bochmann, Sophie M.; Spieß, Tobias; Kötter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Subtilin and the closely related entianin are class I lantibiotics produced by different subspecies of Bacillus subtilis. Both molecules are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics with unusual ring structures. Subtilin-like lantibiotics develop strong antibiotic activities against various Gram-positive organisms with an efficiency similar to that of nisin from Lactococcus lactis. In contrast to nisin, subtilin-like lantibiotics partially undergo an additional posttranslational modification, where the N-terminal tryptophan residue becomes succinylated, resulting in drastically reduced antibiotic activities. A highly sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based quantification method enabled us to determine entianin and succinylated entianin (S-entianin) concentrations in the supernatant during growth. We show that entianin synthesis and the degree of succinylation drastically change with culture conditions. In particular, increasing glucose concentrations resulted in higher entianin amounts and lower proportions of S-entianin in Landy-based media. In contrast, no succinylation was observed in medium A with 10% glucose. Interestingly, glucose retarded the expression of entianin biosynthesis genes. Furthermore, deletion of the transition state regulator AbrB resulted in a 6-fold increased entianin production in medium A with 10% glucose. This shows that entianin biosynthesis in B. subtilis is strongly influenced by glucose, in addition to its regulation by the transition state regulator AbrB. Our results suggest that the mechanism underlying the succinylation of subtilin-like lantibiotics is enzymatically catalyzed and occurs in the extracellular space or at the cellular membrane. PMID:25381239

  9. Performance analysis of ATM ABR service under self-similar traffic in the presence of background VBR traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Benke, G. |; Brandt, J.; Chen, H.; Dastangoo, S.; Miller, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    Recent empirical studies of traffic measurements of packet switched networks have demonstrated that actual network traffic is self-similar, or long range dependent, in nature. That is, the measured traffic is bursty over a wide range of time intervals. Furthermore, the emergence of high-speed network backbones demands the study of accurate models of aggregated traffic to assess network performance. This paper provides a method for generation of self-similar traffic, which can be used to drive network simulation models. The authors present the results of a simulation study of a two-node ATM network configuration that supports the ATM Forum`s Available Bit Rate (ABR) service. In this study, the authors compare the state of the queue at the source router at the edge of the ATM network under both Poisson and self-similar traffic loading. These findings indicate an order of magnitude increase in queue length for self-similar traffic loading as compared to Poisson loading. Moreover, when background VBR traffic is present, self-similar ABR traffic causes more congestion at the ATM switches than does Poisson traffic.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  11. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  12. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  13. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  14. An animal model for the analysis of cochlear blood flow [corrected] disturbance and hearing threshold in vivo.

    PubMed

    Canis, Martin; Arpornchayanon, Warangkana; Messmer, Catalina; Suckfuell, Markus; Olzowy, Bernhard; Strieth, Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    Impairment of cochlear blood flow (CBF) is considered to be important in inner ear pathology. However, direct measurement of CBF is difficult and has not been investigated in combination with hearing function. Six guinea pigs were used to show feasibility of an animal model for the analysis of cochlear microcirculation by intravital microscopy in combination with investigation of the hearing threshold by brainstem response audiometry (ABR). By the application of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), CBF was increased over 30 min. Reproducibility of measurements was shown by retest measurements. Mean baseline velocity of CBF was 109 +/- 19 mum/s. Vessel diameters had a mean value of 9.4 +/- 2.7 mum. Mean hearing threshold was 19 +/- 6 dB. In response to SNP, CBF velocity increased significantly to 161 +/- 26 mum/s. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly to 36 +/- 11 mmHg. After the end of the application, CBF velocity recovered to a minimum of 123 +/- 17 microm/s. Within the retest, CBF velocity significantly increased to a maximum of 160 +/- 31 microm/s. Second recovery of CBF velocity was 125 +/- 14 mum/s. Within the second retest, CBF increased significantly to 157 +/- 25 microm/s. ABR thresholds did not change significantly. The increase in blood flow velocity occurred in spite of substantial hypotension as induced by a vasodilator. This may explain the fact that ABR threshold remained unchanged reflecting a maintained blood supply in this part of the brain. This technique can be used to evaluate effects of treatments aimed at cochlear microcirculation in inner ear pathologies.

  15. The perils of thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Pruessner, Gunnar; Moloney, Nicholas R.; Deluca, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The thresholding of time series of activity or intensity is frequently used to define and differentiate events. This is either implicit, for example due to resolution limits, or explicit, in order to filter certain small scale physics from the supposed true asymptotic events. Thresholding the birth-death process, however, introduces a scaling region into the event size distribution, which is characterized by an exponent that is unrelated to the actual asymptote and is rather an artefact of thresholding. As a result, numerical fits of simulation data produce a range of exponents, with the true asymptote visible only in the tail of the distribution. This tail is increasingly difficult to sample as the threshold is increased. In the present case, the exponents and the spurious nature of the scaling region can be determined analytically, thus demonstrating the way in which thresholding conceals the true asymptote. The analysis also suggests a procedure for detecting the influence of the threshold by means of a data collapse involving the threshold-imposed scale.

  16. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  17. Effect of self-similar traffic on the performance and buffer requirements of ATM ABR edge devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dastangoo, S.; Miller, G.J.; Chen, H.; Brandt, J.

    1996-02-05

    Previous studies demonstrated that Ethemet local area network traffic is statistically self-similar and that the commonly used Poisson models are not able to capture the fractal characteristics of Ethemet traffic. This contribution uses simulated self-similar traffic traces from the MITRE Corporation and Sandia`s simulation software to evaluate the ABR performance of an ATM backbone. The ATM backbone interconnects Ethemet LANs via edge devices such as routers and bridges. We evaluate the overall network performance in terms of throughput, response time, fairness, and buffer requirements. Because typical edge devices perform simple forwarding functions, their usual mechanism for signaling network congestion is packet dropping. Therefore, we believe that the proper provisioning of buffer resources in ATM edge devices is crucial to the overall network performance.

  18. Regulation of Synaptic Rac1 Activity, Long-Term Potentiation Maintenance, and Learning and Memory by BCR and ABR Rac GTPase-Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Daeyoung; Han, Seungnam; Seo, Jinsoo; Lee, Jae-Ran; Choi, Jeonghoon; Groffen, John; Kim, Karam; Cho, Yi Sul; Choi, Han-Saem; Shin, Hyewon; Woo, Jooyeon; Won, Hyejung; Park, Soon Kwon; Kim, Soo-Young; Jo, Jihoon; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Cho, Kwangwook; Kim, Hyun; Bae, Yong Chul; Heisterkamp, Nora; Choi, Se-Young; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Rho family small GTPases are important regulators of neuronal development. Defective Rho regulation causes nervous system dysfunctions including mental retardation and Alzheimer’s disease. Rac1, a member of the Rho family, regulates dendritic spines and excitatory synapses, but relatively little is known about how synaptic Rac1 is negatively regulated. Breakpoint cluster region (BCR) is a Rac GTPase-activating protein known to form a fusion protein with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. Despite the fact that BCR mRNAs are abundantly expressed in the brain, the neural functions of BCR protein have remained obscure. We report here that BCR and its close relative active BCR-related (ABR) localize at excitatory synapses and directly interact with PSD-95, an abundant postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Mice deficient for BCR or ABR show enhanced basal Rac1 activity but only a small increase in spine density. Importantly, mice lacking BCR or ABR exhibit a marked decrease in the maintenance, but not induction, of long-term potentiation, and show impaired spatial and object recognition memory. These results suggest that BCR and ABR have novel roles in the regulation of synaptic Rac1 signaling, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory, and that excessive Rac1 activity negatively affects synaptic and cognitive functions. PMID:20962234

  19. Goos-Haenchen shift in complex crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-10-15

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for wave scattering from complex PT-symmetric periodic potentials (complex crystals) is theoretically investigated, with specific reference to optical GH shift in photonic crystal slabs with a sinusoidal periodic modulation of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The analysis highlights some distinct and rather unique features as compared to the GH shift found in ordinary crystals. In particular, as opposed to GH shift in ordinary crystals, which is large at the band gap edges, in complex crystals the GH shift can be large inside the reflection (amplification) band and becomes extremely large as the PT symmetry-breaking threshold is approached.

  20. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  1. Pivotal role of the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 pathway in ABRE-mediated transcription in response to osmotic stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yasunari; Yoshida, Takuya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    Water availability is one of the main limiting factors for plant growth and development. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) fulfills a critical role in coordinating the responses to reduced water availability as well as in multiple developmental processes. Endogenous ABA levels increase in response to osmotic stresses such as drought and high salinity, and ABA activates the expression of many genes via ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in their promoter regions. ABRE-binding protein/ABRE-binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors (TFs) regulate the ABRE-mediated transcription of downstream target genes. Three subclass III sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases (SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6/OST1 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3) phosphorylate and positively control the AREB/ABF TFs. Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the ABA-sensing system mediated by Pyrabactin resistance1/PYR1-like/regulatory components of ABA receptor (PYR/PYL/RCAR)-protein phosphatase 2C complexes. In addition to PP2C-PYR/PYL/RCAR ABAreceptor complex, the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 pathway, which is well conserved in land plants, was recently shown to play a major role as a positive regulator of ABA/stress signaling through ABRE-mediated transcription of target genes implicated in the osmotic stress response. This review focuses on current progress in the study of the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 positive regulatory pathway in plants and describes additional signaling factors implicated in the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 pathway. Moreover, to help promote the link between basic and applied studies, the nomenclature and phylogenetic relationships between the AREB/ABFs and SnRK2s are summarized and discussed.

  2. The variations in visual threshold measurement.

    PubMed

    Hallett, P E

    1969-06-01

    1. This paper presents a statistical analysis of the thresholds of test flashes viewed against zero, steady or transient backgrounds by peripheral vision. The method of threshold measurement is that of the Medical Research Council Report (Pirenne, Marriott & O'Doherty, 1957; Hartline & McDonald, 1943). The data are from the previous paper (Hallett, 1969b) and consist of k days' samples of n threshold measurements on an intensity scale of interval 0.087 log. The collection of a sample required 5-6 min and the samples were spread over a 3-month period.2. The analysis suggests that the nature of biological variations is that the ;instantaneous' frequency-of-seeing curve can occupy a variety of positions, or levels, scattered about its typical position on the log. energy axis. Change of the position of the curve for a given threshold task is most obvious when one compares threshold measurements obtained on different days, but this is not true day-to-day variation; the same sorts of change occur on the same day if the viewing conditions (independent variables) are changed and are perhaps due to shifts in the observer's signal/noise criterion K.3. Two important consequences of the analysis are (i) the errors of visual threshold functions are worse than one method of calculating error suggests and (ii) it is possible to eliminate part of the biological variations from a particular sort of frequency-of-seeing curve and thus obtain a better estimate of the instantaneous curve which is the physiological function of prime interest.4. Some possible causes of the biological variations are considered. The design of experiments is discussed. The method of the M.R.C. Report is to be recommended since it can be applied without prior assumptions about the value of the mean threshold or the nature of the errors. PMID:5784294

  3. Crossing the Writing Threshold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol Lea

    What pushes a writer over the edge of thought into text production--over what may be called "the writing threshold?" This is the moment when the thoughts in a writer's mind, the writing situation, and personal motivations create a momentum that results in a pattern of written words. There is evidence that not everyone crosses the writing threshold…

  4. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  5. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  6. Forecasting the Effect of the Change in Timing of the ABR Diagnostic Radiology Examinations: Results of the ACR Survey of Practice Leaders.

    PubMed

    Bluth, Edward I; Muroff, Lawrence R; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Moore, Arl V; Smith, Geoffrey G; Flug, Jonathan; DeStigter, Kristen K; Allen, Bibb; Thorwarth, William T; Roberts, Anne C

    2015-05-01

    The results of a survey sent to practice leaders in the ACR Practice of Radiology Environment Database show that the majority of responding groups will continue to hire recently trained residents and fellows even though they have been unable to take the final ABR diagnostic radiology certifying examination. However, a significant minority of private practice groups will not hire these individuals. The majority of private practices expect the timing change for the ABR certifying examinations to affect their groups' function. In contrast, the majority of academic medical school practices expect little or no impact. Residents and fellows should not expect work time off or protected time to study for the certifying examination or for their maintenance of certification examinations in the future.

  7. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements. PMID:16980540

  8. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements.

  9. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  10. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  11. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  12. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  13. "Variation in Student Learning" as a Threshold Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Threshold Concepts Framework acts as a catalyst in faculty development activities, energising and provoking discussion by faculty about their own courses in their own disciplines, and often leading to the discovery of transformational concepts that occasion epistemic and ontological shifts in their students. The present study focuses on…

  14. Gear shift control mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, D.A.

    1987-03-10

    A gear shift control mechanism is described comprising: multiple shift rods directed substantially parallel to one another, each rod carrying a shift fork for axial movement; a shift lever supported for pivotal movement about a first axis directed parallel to the axes of the shift rods and for pivotal movement about a second axis directed substantially perpendicular to the axes of the shift rods. The lever is moveable about the first axis and the second axis into engagement with a selected shift fork; interlock means located on each lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis for blocking engagement with the shift forks; detent means for holding the shift lever in multiple predetermined angular positions about the second axis; and spring means located on a lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis into interference contact with the shift forks for producing a force tending to resiliently bias the shift lever out of engagement with the selected shift fork.

  15. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  16. Impact of photodarkening on the mode instability threshold.

    PubMed

    Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Modsching, Norbert; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-15

    The threshold-like onset of mode instabilities is currently the main limitation for the scaling of the average output power of fiber laser systems with diffraction limited beam quality. In this contribution, the impact of a wavelength shift of the seed signal on the mode instability threshold has been investigated. Against expectations, it is experimentally shown that the highest mode instabilities threshold is reached around 1030 nm and not for the smallest wavelength separation between pump and signal. This finding implies that the quantum defect is not the only source of thermal heating in the fiber. Systematic experiments and simulations have helped in identifying photodarkening as the most likely second heat source in the fiber. It is shown that even a negligible photodarkening-induced power loss can lead to a decrease of the mode instabilities threshold by a factor of two. Consequently, reduction of photodarkening is a promising way to mitigate mode instabilities. PMID:26193508

  17. Threshold fatigue and information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Benjamin; Longtin, André

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vivo must process sensory information in the presence of significant noise. It is thus plausible to assume that neural systems have developed mechanisms to reduce this noise. Theoretical studies have shown that threshold fatigue (i.e. cumulative increases in the threshold during repetitive firing) could lead to noise reduction at certain frequencies bands and thus improved signal transmission as well as noise increases and decreased signal transmission at other frequencies: a phenomenon called noise shaping. There is, however, no experimental evidence that threshold fatigue actually occurs and, if so, that it will actually lead to noise shaping. We analyzed action potential threshold variability in intracellular recordings in vivo from pyramidal neurons in weakly electric fish and found experimental evidence for threshold fatigue: an increase in instantaneous firing rate was on average accompanied by an increase in action potential threshold. We show that, with a minor modification, the standard Hodgkin–Huxley model can reproduce this phenomenon. We next compared the performance of models with and without threshold fatigue. Our results show that threshold fatigue will lead to a more regular spike train as well as robustness to intrinsic noise via noise shaping. We finally show that the increased/reduced noise levels due to threshold fatigue correspond to decreased/increased information transmission at different frequencies. PMID:17436067

  18. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  19. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  20. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  1. Enhanced decolorization of azo dye in a small pilot-scale anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with biocatalyzed electrolysis system (ABR-BES): a design suitable for scaling-up.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Wu, Wei-Min; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2014-07-01

    A four-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) incorporated with membrane-less biocatalyzed electrolysis system (BES) was tested for the treatment of azo dye (alizarin yellow R, AYR) wastewater (AYR, 200 mg L(-1); glucose, 1000 mg L(-1)). The ABR-BES was operated without and with external power supply to examine AYR reduction process and reductive intermediates with different external voltages (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 V) and hydraulic retention times (HRT: 8, 6 and 4h). The decolorization efficiency in the ABR-BES (8h HRT, 0.5 V) was higher than that in ABR-BES without electrolysis, i.e. 95.1 ± 1.5% versus 86.9 ± 6.3%. Incorporation of BES with ABR accelerated the consumption of VFAs (mainly acetate) and attenuated biogas (methane) production. Higher power supply (0.7 V) enhanced AYR decolorization efficiency (96.4 ± 1.8%), VFAs removal, and current density (24.1 Am(-3) TCV). Shorter HRT increased volumetric AYR decolorization rates, but decreased AYR decolorization efficiency.

  2. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  3. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  4. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  5. A holistic view of marine regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    Conversi, Alessandra; Dakos, Vasilis; Gårdmark, Anna; Ling, Scott; Folke, Carl; Mumby, Peter J.; Greene, Charles; Edwards, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten; Casini, Michele; Pershing, Andrew; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding marine regime shifts is important not only for ecology but also for developing marine management that assures the provision of ecosystem services to humanity. While regime shift theory is well developed, there is still no common understanding on drivers, mechanisms and characteristic of abrupt changes in real marine ecosystems. Based on contributions to the present theme issue, we highlight some general issues that need to be overcome for developing a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystem regime shifts. We find a great divide between benthic reef and pelagic ocean systems in how regime shift theory is linked to observed abrupt changes. Furthermore, we suggest that the long-lasting discussion on the prevalence of top-down trophic or bottom-up physical drivers in inducing regime shifts may be overcome by taking into consideration the synergistic interactions of multiple stressors, and the special characteristics of different ecosystem types. We present a framework for the holistic investigation of marine regime shifts that considers multiple exogenous drivers that interact with endogenous mechanisms to cause abrupt, catastrophic change. This framework takes into account the time-delayed synergies of these stressors, which erode the resilience of the ecosystem and eventually enable the crossing of ecological thresholds. Finally, considering that increased pressures in the marine environment are predicted by the current climate change assessments, in order to avoid major losses of ecosystem services, we suggest that marine management approaches should incorporate knowledge on environmental thresholds and develop tools that consider regime shift dynamics and characteristics. This grand challenge can only be achieved through a holistic view of marine ecosystem dynamics as evidenced by this theme issue.

  6. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  7. Thresholds in conservation effectiveness under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Phillips, L.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a new approach to conservation that derives from the effect of energy on ecosystem properties and then evaluate potential threshold responses of conservation effectiveness under climate change. Many tests of species energy theory provide evidence that species richness varies with measures of energy such as net primary productivity (NPP). Across continents, this relationship is most often unimodal, with species richness peaking in intermediate energy places and decreasing at higher NPP levels. NPP also influences ecosystem response to habitat fragmentation, recovery after disturbance, and trophic relationships. We have developed a topology for conservation whereby conservation priorities and management effectiveness differ among low, intermediate, and high energy ecosystems. We evaluated the projected change in NPP and conservation topology of ecoregions under future climate change scenarios. We found that projected NPP under climate change caused a subset of ecoregions to shift across the peak of the unimodal species energy curve, suggesting dramatic changes in conservation effectiveness are possible.

  8. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvini, Marco; Marzani, Simone; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-09-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculations. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  9. Excitation threshold for subharmonic generation from contrast microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2011-01-01

    Six models of contrast microbubbles are investigated to determine the excitation threshold for subharmonic generation. The models are applied to a commercial contrast agent; its characteristic parameters according to each model are determined using experimentally measured ultrasound attenuation. In contrast to the classical perturbative result, the minimum threshold for subharmonic generation is not always predicted at excitation with twice the resonance frequency; instead it occurs over a range of frequencies from resonance to twice the resonance frequency. The quantitative variation of the threshold with frequency depends on the model and the bubble radius. All models are transformed into a common interfacial rheological form, where the encapsulation is represented by two radius dependent surface properties—effective surface tension and surface dilatational viscosity. Variation of the effective surface tension with radius, specifically having an upper limit (resulting from strain softening or rupture of the encapsulation during expansion), plays a critical role. Without the upper limit, the predicted threshold is extremely large, especially near the resonance frequency. Having a lower limit on surface tension (e.g., zero surface tension in the buckled state) increases the threshold value at twice the resonance frequency, in some cases shifting the minimum threshold toward resonance. PMID:22087942

  10. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  11. Face verification with balanced thresholds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuicheng; Xu, Dong; Tang, Xiaoou

    2007-01-01

    The process of face verification is guided by a pre-learned global threshold, which, however, is often inconsistent with class-specific optimal thresholds. It is, hence, beneficial to pursue a balance of the class-specific thresholds in the model-learning stage. In this paper, we present a new dimensionality reduction algorithm tailored to the verification task that ensures threshold balance. This is achieved by the following aspects. First, feasibility is guaranteed by employing an affine transformation matrix, instead of the conventional projection matrix, for dimensionality reduction, and, hence, we call the proposed algorithm threshold balanced transformation (TBT). Then, the affine transformation matrix, constrained as the product of an orthogonal matrix and a diagonal matrix, is optimized to improve the threshold balance and classification capability in an iterative manner. Unlike most algorithms for face verification which are directly transplanted from face identification literature, TBT is specifically designed for face verification and clarifies the intrinsic distinction between these two tasks. Experiments on three benchmark face databases demonstrate that TBT significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art subspace techniques for face verification.

  12. Chemical shifts in biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary NMR chemical shifts are sensitive probes of stucture and dynamics in proteins. Empirical models, based on a large database of measured shifts, take an input structure and provide increasingly accurate estimates of the corresponding shifts. Quantum chemical calculations can provide the same information, with greater generality but (currently) with less accuracy. These methods are now providing new ways to approach NMR structure determination, and new insights into the conformational dynamics of proteins. PMID:23422068

  13. Global regime shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin overgrazing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, S. D.; Scheibling, R. E.; Rassweiler, A.; Johnson, C. R.; Shears, N.; Connell, S. D.; Salomon, A. K.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Hernández, J. C.; Clemente, S.; Blamey, L. K.; Hereu, B.; Ballesteros, E.; Sala, E.; Garrabou, J.; Cebrian, E.; Zabala, M.; Fujita, D.; Johnson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A pronounced, widespread and persistent regime shift among marine ecosystems is observable on temperate rocky reefs as a result of sea urchin overgrazing. Here, we empirically define regime-shift dynamics for this grazing system which transitions between productive macroalgal beds and impoverished urchin barrens. Catastrophic in nature, urchin overgrazing in a well-studied Australian system demonstrates a discontinuous regime shift, which is of particular management concern as recovery of desirable macroalgal beds requires reducing grazers to well below the initial threshold of overgrazing. Generality of this regime-shift dynamic is explored across 13 rocky reef systems (spanning 11 different regions from both hemispheres) by compiling available survey data (totalling 10 901 quadrats surveyed in situ) plus experimental regime-shift responses (observed during a total of 57 in situ manipulations). The emergent and globally coherent pattern shows urchin grazing to cause a discontinuous ‘catastrophic’ regime shift, with hysteresis effect of approximately one order of magnitude in urchin biomass between critical thresholds of overgrazing and recovery. Different life-history traits appear to create asymmetry in the pace of overgrazing versus recovery. Once shifted, strong feedback mechanisms provide resilience for each alternative state thus defining the catastrophic nature of this regime shift. Importantly, human-derived stressors can act to erode resilience of desirable macroalgal beds while strengthening resilience of urchin barrens, thus exacerbating the risk, spatial extent and irreversibility of an unwanted regime shift for marine ecosystems.

  14. Ultralow-threshold cascaded Brillouin microlaser for tunable microwave generation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changlei; Che, Kaijun; Cai, Zhiping; Liu, Shuai; Gu, Guoqiang; Chu, Chengxu; Zhang, Pan; Fu, Hongyan; Luo, Zhengqian; Xu, Huiying

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an ultralow-threshold cascaded Brillouin microlaser for tunable microwave generation in a high-Q silica microsphere resonator. The threshold of the Brillouin microlaser is as low as 8 μW, which is close to the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the fifth-order Stokes line with a frequency shift up to 55 GHz is achieved with a coupled pump power of less than 0.6 mW. Benefiting from resonant wavelength shifts driven by thermal dynamics in the microsphere, we further realized tunable microwave signals with tuning ranges of 40 MHz at an 11 GHz band and 20 MHz at a 22 GHz band. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first attempt for tunable microwave source based on the whispering-gallery-mode Brillouin microlaser. Such a tunable microwave source from a cascaded Brillouin microlaser could find significant applications in aerospace, communication engineering, and metrology.

  15. Voyager flight crew hearing threshold levels resulting from 5- and 9-day continuous in-flight noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, M R; Billings, B L; Jutila, G A

    1990-02-01

    The flight crew of the Voyager aircraft were continuously exposed to a broadband noise for nearly 5 days during a trial flight, and for over 9 days during their nonstop flight around the world. Evaluation of the threshold shifts resulting from these exposures represents a unique opportunity to study the effect of human exposure to intense continuous noise for long durations. Postflight audiometry demonstrated that the 9-day flight did not result in larger hearing threshold shifts than those following the 5-day flight. Neither crewmember incurred a permanent threshold shift from these exposures.

  16. Effect of threshold disorder on the quorum percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau, Pascal; Renault, Renaud; Métens, Stéphane; Bottani, Samuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the modifications induced in the behavior of the quorum percolation model on neural networks with Gaussian in-degree by taking into account an uncorrelated Gaussian thresholds variability. We derive a mean-field approach and show its relevance by carrying out explicit Monte Carlo simulations. It turns out that such a disorder shifts the position of the percolation transition, impacts the size of the giant cluster, and can even destroy the transition. Moreover, we highlight the occurrence of disorder independent fixed points above the quorum critical value. The mean-field approach enables us to interpret these effects in terms of activation probability. A finite-size analysis enables us to show that the order parameter is weakly self-averaging with an exponent independent on the thresholds disorder. Last, we show that the effects of the thresholds and connectivity disorders cannot be easily discriminated from the measured averaged physical quantities.

  17. Effect of threshold disorder on the quorum percolation model.

    PubMed

    Monceau, Pascal; Renault, Renaud; Métens, Stéphane; Bottani, Samuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the modifications induced in the behavior of the quorum percolation model on neural networks with Gaussian in-degree by taking into account an uncorrelated Gaussian thresholds variability. We derive a mean-field approach and show its relevance by carrying out explicit Monte Carlo simulations. It turns out that such a disorder shifts the position of the percolation transition, impacts the size of the giant cluster, and can even destroy the transition. Moreover, we highlight the occurrence of disorder independent fixed points above the quorum critical value. The mean-field approach enables us to interpret these effects in terms of activation probability. A finite-size analysis enables us to show that the order parameter is weakly self-averaging with an exponent independent on the thresholds disorder. Last, we show that the effects of the thresholds and connectivity disorders cannot be easily discriminated from the measured averaged physical quantities. PMID:27575157

  18. SU-E-E-01: ABR Diagnostic Radiology Core Exam: Was Our Redesigned Physics Course Successful in Teaching Physics to Radiology Residents?

    SciTech Connect

    Kanal, K; Hoff, M; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of our two year physics course in preparing radiology residents for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) diagnostic radiology exam. Methods: We designed a new two-year physics course that integrates radiology clinical content and practice and is primarily based on the AAPM curriculum and RSNA/AAPM physics modules. Biweekly classes focus on relevant concepts from assigned reading and use audience response systems to encourage participation. Teaching efficiency is optimized through lecturer rotations of physicists, radiologists, and guest speakers. An emphasis is placed on clinical relevance by requiring lab work and providing equipment demonstrations. Periodic quiz were given during the course. The course website was also redesigned for usability, and physics review lectures were conducted two weeks before the board exam to refresh key concepts. At the completion of our first two-year course, we conducted a confidential evaluation of the faculty and course. The evaluation assessed metrics such as overall organization, clinical relevance of content, and level of difficulty, with a rating scale from poor to excellent. Results: Our evaluation indicated that the redesigned course provided effective board exam preparation, with most responses between good and excellent. There was some criticism on the course length and on chronological discontinuity, but the review lectures were appreciated by the residents. All of our residents passed the physics component of the ABR exam with scores exceeding the minimum passing score by a significant margin. Conclusion: The course evaluation and board exam results indicate that our new two-year course format provides valuable board exam preparation. This is possible thanks to the time and effort taken by the physics faculty on ensuring the residents get quality physics education.

  19. Spectral shift amplification.

    PubMed

    Han, Pin

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of a limited bandwidth light wave reflected from a material interface is studied theoretically. It is shown that near the anomalous dispersion zone, if the incident center wavelength is shifted by a small amount, this shift can be amplified by about three times in the reflected light. PMID:23202082

  20. Style Shift in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qinai, Jamal

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of style shift in translated texts is ascribed mainly to textual incompatibility in terms of rhetorical asymmetry and divergence at the formality level. Mandatory shifts result from a systematic dissimilarity between the source language and the target language in terms of the underlying system of syntax, semantics and rhetorical…

  1. Spectral shift amplification.

    PubMed

    Han, Pin

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of a limited bandwidth light wave reflected from a material interface is studied theoretically. It is shown that near the anomalous dispersion zone, if the incident center wavelength is shifted by a small amount, this shift can be amplified by about three times in the reflected light.

  2. Making Shifts toward Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The Leading for Mathematical Proficiency (LMP) Framework (Bay-Williams et al.) has three components: (1) The Standards for Mathematical Practice; (2) Shifts in classroom practice; and (3) Teaching skills. This article briefly describes each component of the LMP framework and then focuses more in depth on the second component, the shifts in…

  3. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  4. Taste Detection Thresholds of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Koga, Clarissa C; Becraft, Alexandra R; Lee, Youngsoo; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that is associated with numerous health benefits related to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and neurological function. The addition of this compound to food products would help to deliver these health benefits to the consumer. However, bitterness associated with resveratrol may impart negative sensory qualities on the food products into which resveratrol is added; thus, decreasing consumer acceptability. This concern may be resolved by encapsulating resveratrol through spray drying, an innovative processing technique. The objectives of this research were to (1) compare taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol and encapsulated resveratrol and (2) determine if the inclusion of anhydrous milk fat in the formulation of the encapsulation wall material affects the taste detection threshold of resveratrol within the microcapsules. Resveratrol microcapsules were produced by encapsulating resveratrol in a protein matrix through spray drying. R-index measure by the rating method was used to determine the average taste detection threshold and the pooled group taste detection threshold. The average and pooled group taste detection thresholds of unencapsulated resveratrol, sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule without fat (SC), and sodium-caseinate-based resveratrol microcapsule with fat (SCAMF) were 90 and 47 mg resveratrol/L (unencapsulated), 313 and 103 mg resveratrol/L (SC), 334 and 108 mg resveratrol/L (SCAMF), respectively. The findings demonstrate that the encapsulation of resveratrol decreased the detection of the compound and provided a means to incorporate resveratrol into food products without imparting negative sensory properties.

  5. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  6. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  7. Do Optimal Prognostic Thresholds in Continuous Physiological Variables Really Exist? Analysis of Origin of Apparent Thresholds, with Systematic Review for Peak Oxygen Consumption, Ejection Fraction and BNP

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Tora; Rehman, Michaela B.; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Harrell, Frank E.; Coats, Andrew J. S.; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians are sometimes advised to make decisions using thresholds in measured variables, derived from prognostic studies. Objectives We studied why there are conflicting apparently-optimal prognostic thresholds, for example in exercise peak oxygen uptake (pVO2), ejection fraction (EF), and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) in heart failure (HF). Data Sources and Eligibility Criteria Studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds in heart failure, published between 1990 and 2010, listed on Pubmed. Methods First, we examined studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds. Second, we created repeated simulations of 1500 patients to identify whether an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold indicates step change in risk. Results 33 studies (8946 patients) tested a pVO2 threshold. 18 found it prognostically significant: the actual reported threshold ranged widely (10–18 ml/kg/min) but was overwhelmingly controlled by the individual study population's mean pVO2 (r = 0.86, p<0.00001). In contrast, the 15 negative publications were testing thresholds 199% further from their means (p = 0.0001). Likewise, of 35 EF studies (10220 patients), the thresholds in the 22 positive reports were strongly determined by study means (r = 0.90, p<0.0001). Similarly, in the 19 positives of 20 BNP studies (9725 patients): r = 0.86 (p<0.0001). Second, survival simulations always discovered a “most significant” threshold, even when there was definitely no step change in mortality. With linear increase in risk, the apparently-optimal threshold was always near the sample mean (r = 0.99, p<0.001). Limitations This study cannot report the best threshold for any of these variables; instead it explains how common clinical research procedures routinely produce false thresholds. Key Findings First, shifting (and/or disappearance) of an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold is strongly determined by studies' average pVO2, EF or BNP. Second

  8. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  9. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  10. Our World: Fluid Shift

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about the circulatory system and how gravity aids blood flow in our bodies here on Earth. Find out how NASA flight surgeons help the astronauts deal with the fluid shift that happens during s...

  11. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  12. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  13. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  14. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  15. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-)scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 1/2MA threshold and a small decay width, < 1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 1/2MA and ii) a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  16. Vehicular transmission shift mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, K.

    1988-12-27

    This patent describes a vehicular transmission having a main speed change mechanism and a sub speed change mechanism both housed within a transmission case. The main speed change mechanism has gear trains in plural shifting stages provided between input and output shafts and capable of being established selectively and also has a plurality of synchronizing mechanisms operable by shift forks to establish the gear trains selectively. The sub speed change mechanism has a reduction gear train for obtaining a still lower speed than the lowest shifting stage in the main speed change mechanism and also has a sub speed gear shifting synchronizing mechanism operable by a sub speed gear shift fork to establish the reduction gear train. This sub speed change mechanism is disposed in parallel with the main speed change mechanism, the sub speed gear shift fork having means connected to one end of a lever pivotably supported at an intermediate part thereof by a pivot pin, the pivot pin being mounted on the transmission case from the outside thereof.

  17. Thresholds, Mode-Switching, and Emergent Pseudo-Equilibrium in Geomorphic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Many geomorphic systems exhibit mode shifts as they evolve, or react to disturbances, from an initial mode of dynamically unstable, divergent evolution, to a mode of convergent evolution. These trends are often interpreted as progression toward a normative equilibrium. However, these mode shifts are shown to arise from two basic principles: gradient (or resistance) selection, and threshold-mediated modulation. In early stages of system development positive feedbacks associated with gradient selection are dominant, and dynamical instability, chaos, and divergence result. Eventually, however, as the system approaches limiting thresholds, negative feedback associated with the thresholds becomes stronger than the positive feedbacks, and the system becomes stable, with convergent evolution. The unstable-to-stable mode switches are an emergent outcome of the gradient selection and threshold modulation principles, not a goal function of Earth surface systems. These principles are illustrated with two examples—fluvial dissection of the Cumberland Plateau, Kentucky, and channel development in deltas of the Texas coastal plain.

  18. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  19. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  20. Predicting catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2016-05-21

    Catastrophic shifts are known to pose a serious threat to ecology, and a reliable set of early warning indicators is desperately needed. However, the tools suggested so far have two problems. First, they cannot discriminate between a smooth transition and an imminent irreversible shift. Second, they aimed at predicting the tipping point where a state loses its stability, but in noisy spatial system the actual transition occurs when an alternative state invades. Here we suggest a cluster tracking technique that solves both problems, distinguishing between smooth and catastrophic transitions and to identify an imminent shift in both cases. Our method may allow for the prediction, and thus hopefully the prevention of such transitions, avoiding their destructive outcomes. PMID:26970446

  1. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  2. Abnormal Dirac point shift in graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoqing; Jin, Zhi; Huang, Xinnan; Peng, Songang; Zhang, Dayong; Shi, Jingyuan

    2016-09-01

    The shift of Dirac point in graphene devices is of great importance, influencing the reliability and stability. Previous studies show the Dirac point shifts slightly to be more positive when the drain bias increases. Here, an abnormal shift of Dirac point is observed in monolayer graphene field effect transistors by investigating the transfer curves under various drain biases. The voltage of Dirac point shifts positively at first and then decreases rapidly when the channel electric field exceeds some threshold. The negative Dirac point shift is attributed to holes injection into oxide layer and captured by the oxide traps under high channel electric field. This can also be demonstrated through a simple probability model and the graphene Raman spectra before and after the DC measurement.

  3. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift

    PubMed Central

    Spanbauer, Trisha L.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Eason, Tarsha; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Nash, Kirsty L.; Stone, Jeffery R.

    2014-01-01

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia. PMID:25280010

  4. Trophic shift, not collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Stow, Craig A.; Roseman, Edward F.; He, Ji X.

    2013-01-01

    scientists who are closely monitoring Lake Huron’s food web, we believe that the ongoing changes are more accurately characterized as a trophic shift in which benthic pathways have become more prominent. While decreases in abundance have occurred for some species, others are experiencing improved reproduction resulting in the restoration of several important native species.

  5. Eluding catastrophic shifts

    PubMed Central

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A.; Levin, Simon A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  6. Eluding catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A; Levin, Simon A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-04-14

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences.

  7. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  8. Threshold for permanent refractive index change in crystalline silicon by femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, D.; Chen, Z.; Fedosejevs, R.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Van, V.

    2016-08-01

    An optical damage threshold for crystalline silicon from single femtosecond laser pulses was determined by detecting a permanent change in the refractive index of the material. This index change could be detected with unprecedented sensitivity by measuring the resonant wavelength shift of silicon integrated optics microring resonators irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths. The threshold for permanent index change at 400 nm wavelength was determined to be 0.053 ± 0.007 J/cm2, which agrees with previously reported threshold values for femtosecond laser modification of crystalline silicon. However, the threshold for index change at 800 nm wavelength was found to be 0.044 ± 0.005 J/cm2, which is five times lower than the previously reported threshold values for visual change on the silicon surface. The discrepancy is attributed to possible modification of the crystallinity of silicon below the melting temperature that has not been detected before.

  9. The detection of impending regime shifts from Fisher Information(presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilient systems typically exhibit periodic fluctuations yet are able to withstand perturbations while maintaining functionality. However, it is possible for a system to reach a dynamic threshold and shift to another set of system conditions. These regime shifts have been demon...

  10. The detection and assessment of impending regime shifts from Fisher Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilient systems typically exhibit periodic fluctuations yet are able to withstand perturbations while maintaining functionality. However, it is possible for a system to reach a dynamic threshold and shift to another set of system conditions. These regime shifts have been demon...

  11. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this subpart if the facility meets the reporting threshold as defined in...

  12. USE OF THRESHOLDS IN LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and use of thresholds are potentially important additions to interpretations of ecological monitoring data. However, there are a number of issues related to defining and using thresholds in interpreting ecological data. Most of these issues center around the pauc...

  13. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  14. Thresholds for impaired species recovery.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-22

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, r(realized), a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (N(max)), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals.Articulation of a 'recovering population paradigm' would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  15. Chemical Processes and Thresholds in Hawaiin Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, O.

    2007-12-01

    and aluminum oxides tend to move rapidly from poorly crystalline to crystalline forms, which in turn leads to formation of Oxisols under an arid climate regimes - Torrox formation without substantial climate change. By contrast, soils forming in humid environments along the same time trajectory take much longer to go through the same transformations (allophane to halloysite; poorly crystalline goethite to well crystallized goethite; poorly crystalline gibbsite to well crystallized gibbsite). The longer time required for transformation is related to wet rather than wet- dry cycles and interference by organic carbon in the transformation process. Thus whereas it takes about 400,000 years to form a Torrox, it takes more than three times that long to form a humid-zone Oxisol. In Hawaii we have identified several important thresholds in soil properties that have universal applicability: 1. the shift from udic to perudic soil moisture regime is accompanied by reduction related changes in soil properties particularly accumulation of organic matter and loss of iron-bound phosphorus; 2. shift from ustic to udic moisture leads to rapid loss of nutrients with far reaching implications for soil exchange properties and prehistoric land use, 3. the shift from from ustic to aridic soil conditions leads to greater losses of plant nutrients (bases, P, Si) due to greater wind erosion. Based on archeological evidence, it is clear that Polynesians made land-use decisions that incorporated observations of the soil properties associated with these thresholds.

  16. Follow-up of hearing thresholds among forge hammering workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.A.; Mikael, R.A.; Faris, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Hearing threshold was reexamined in a group of forge hammering workers investigated 8 years ago with consideration of the age effect and of auditory symptoms. Workers were exposed to impact noise that ranged from 112 to 139 dB(A)--at an irregular rate of 20 to 50 drop/minute--and a continuous background noise that ranged from 90 to 94 dB(A). Similar to what was observed 8 years ago, the present permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed a maximum notch at the frequency of 6 kHz and considerable elevations at the frequencies of 0.25-1 kHz. The age-corrected PTS and the postexposure hearing threshold were significantly higher than the corresponding previous values at the frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 8 kHz only. The rise was more evident at the low than at the high frequencies. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) values were significantly less than those 8 years ago. Contrary to the previous TTS, the present TTS were higher at low than at high frequencies. Although progression of PTS at the frequencies 0.25 and 0.5 kHz was continuous throughout the observed durations of exposure, progression at higher frequencies occurred essentially in the first 10 to 15 years of exposure. Thereafter, it followed a much slower rate. Tinnitus was significantly associated with difficulty in hearing the human voice and with elevation of PTS at all the tested frequencies, while acoustic after-image was significantly associated with increment of PTS at the frequencies 0.25-2 kHz. No relation between PTS and smoking was found. PTS at low frequencies may provide an indication of progression of hearing damage when the sensitivity at 6 and 4 kHz diminishes after prolonged years of exposure. Tinnitus and acoustic after-image are related to the auditory effect of forge hammering noise.

  17. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  18. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  19. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution. PMID:24483506

  20. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments. PMID:14766147

  1. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  2. Epidemic threshold in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τc for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ1 in directed networks, where λ1, also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ1, principal eigenvector x1, spectral gap (λ1-λ2), and algebraic connectivity μN-1 is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ1 decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρD. Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  3. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments.

  4. Lowering the lasing threshold of distributed feedback lasers with loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, V. Yu.; Zyablovsky, A. A.; Andrianov, E. S.; Pukhov, A. A.; Vinogradov, A. P.; Dorofeenko, A. V.; Lisyansky, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    We study laser generation in one-dimensional distributed feedback lasers with amplifying and lossy layers. We show that when the lasing frequency differs from the transition frequencies of the amplifying medium, loss induced lasing may occur due to the broadening of the resonator mode with increasing loss in the absorbing layers. This broadening leads to a shift in the lasing frequency towards the transition frequency. As a result, the cavity mode interaction with the amplifying medium is enhanced, and the lasing threshold is lowered.

  5. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Chapin, F Stuart

    2012-12-26

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  6. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  7. Thresholds of cutaneous afferents related to perceptual threshold across the human foot sole.

    PubMed

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    Perceptual thresholds are known to vary across the foot sole, despite a reported even distribution in cutaneous afferents. Skin mechanical properties have been proposed to account for these differences; however, a direct relationship between foot sole afferent firing, perceptual threshold, and skin mechanical properties has not been previously investigated. Using the technique of microneurography, we recorded the monofilament firing thresholds of cutaneous afferents and associated perceptual thresholds across the foot sole. In addition, receptive field hardness measurements were taken to investigate the influence of skin hardness on these threshold measures. Afferents were identified as fast adapting [FAI (n = 48) or FAII (n = 13)] or slowly adapting [SAI (n = 21) or SAII (n = 20)], and were grouped based on receptive field location (heel, arch, metatarsals, toes). Overall, perceptual thresholds were found to most closely align with firing thresholds of FA afferents. In contrast, SAI and SAII afferent firing thresholds were found to be significantly higher than perceptual thresholds and are not thought to mediate monofilament perceptual threshold across the foot sole. Perceptual thresholds and FAI afferent firing thresholds were significantly lower in the arch compared with other regions, and skin hardness was found to positively correlate with both FAI and FAII afferent firing and perceptual thresholds. These data support a perceptual influence of skin hardness, which is likely the result of elevated FA afferent firing threshold at harder foot sole sites. The close coupling between FA afferent firing and perceptual threshold across foot sole indicates that small changes in FA afferent firing can influence perceptual thresholds.

  8. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  9. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  10. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  11. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  12. Elective automatic shift transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Redzinski, G.E.

    1986-09-02

    For use in vehicle of the type having an engine coupled with traction wheels through a driveline including a change-speed transmission, the transmission includes drive direction reversing means, a drive direction selector for manual control of the reversing means and having a forward and reverse position, the transmission including ratio changing means, a manual gear selector for operation of the ratio changing means for shifting the transmission into a selected gear, and control means responsive to a control signal for upshifting and downshifting between first and second gears.

  13. Auditory brainstem responses in the Eastern Screech Owl: An estimate of auditory thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F.; Lohr, Bernard; Hahn, D. Caldwell; Dooling, Robert J.

    2005-07-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of neural synchrony, was used to estimate auditory sensitivity in the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The typical screech owl ABR waveform showed two to three prominent peaks occurring within 5 ms of stimulus onset. As sound pressure levels increased, the ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased. With an increasing stimulus presentation rate, ABR peak amplitude decreased and latency increased. Generally, changes in the ABR waveform to stimulus intensity and repetition rate are consistent with the pattern found in several avian families. The ABR audiogram shows that screech owls hear best between 1.5 and 6.4 kHz with the most acute sensitivity between 4-5.7 kHz. The shape of the average screech owl ABR audiogram is similar to the shape of the behaviorally measured audiogram of the barn owl, except at the highest frequencies. Our data also show differences in overall auditory sensitivity between the color morphs of screech owls.

  14. Auditory brainstem responses in the Eastern Screech Owl: An estimate of auditory thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brittan-Powell, E.F.; Lohr, B.; Hahn, D.C.; Dooling, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of neural synchrony, was used to estimate auditory sensitivity in the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The typical screech owl ABR waveform showed two to three prominent peaks occurring within 5 ms of stimulus onset. As sound pressure levels increased, the ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased. With an increasing stimulus presentation rate, ABR peak amplitude decreased and latency increased. Generally, changes in the ABR waveform to stimulus intensity and repetition rate are consistent with the pattern found in several avian families. The ABR audiogram shows that screech owls hear best between 1.5 and 6.4 kHz with the most acute sensitivity between 4?5.7 kHz. The shape of the average screech owl ABR audiogram is similar to the shape of the behaviorally measured audiogram of the barn owl, except at the highest frequencies. Our data also show differences in overall auditory sensitivity between the color morphs of screech owls.

  15. Reciprocity as a Threshold Concept for Faculty Who Are Learning to Teach with Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Barbara; Clayton, Patti H.

    2012-01-01

    Requiring and fostering shifts in perspective, practice, and identity, the counter-normative pedagogy of service-learning can be challenging for faculty to learn. Meyer and Land's (2003, 2005) work on threshold concepts may enhance understanding of the troublesome yet transformative nature of learning to collaborate reciprocally with students and…

  16. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  17. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  18. Transmission shift control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dzioba, D.L.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a transmission shift control assembly mounted on a steering column having a longitudinal axis comprising: bracket means secured to the steering column; transmission shift cable means having a portion secured to the bracket means and a portion linearly movable relative to the secured portion; mounting means on the bracket cable drive arm means having an axis and being rotatably mounted on the rotary axis on the mounting means oblique to the longitudinal axis and including a cable connecting portion secured to the movable portion of the cable means and lever mounting means adjacent the mounting means; operator control means including lever means, pin means for pivotally mounting the lever means on the lever mounting means on an axis substantially perpendicular to the rotary axis and positioning arm means formed on the lever means and extending from the pin means; and detent gate means disposed on the bracket means in position to abut the positioning arm means for limiting the extent of pivotal movement of the lever means.

  19. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  20. Minimal spaser threshold within electrodynamic framework: Shape, size and modes

    PubMed Central

    Hrelescu, Calin; Klar, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known (yet often ignored) from quantum mechanical or energetic considerations, that the threshold gain of the quasi‐static spaser depends only on the dielectric functions of the metal and the gain material. Here, we derive this result from the purely classical electromagnetic scattering framework. This is of great importance, because electrodynamic modelling is far simpler than quantum mechanical one. The influence of the material dispersion and spaser geometry are clearly separated; the latter influences the threshold gain only indirectly, defining the resonant wavelength. We show that the threshold gain has a minimum as a function of wavelength. A variation of nanoparticle shape, composition, or spasing mode may shift the plasmonic resonance to this optimal wavelength, but it cannot overcome the material‐imposed minimal gain. Furthermore, retardation is included straightforwardly into our framework; and the global spectral gain minimum persists beyond the quasi‐static limit. We illustrate this with two examples of widely used geometries: Silver spheroids and spherical shells embedded in and filled with gain materials. PMID:27158151

  1. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  2. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  3. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  4. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  5. Shifting epidemiology of Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lyle R; Marfin, Anthony A

    2005-04-01

    The dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses are important mosquito-borne viruses whose epidemiology is shifting in response to changing societal factors, such as increasing commerce, urbanization of rural areas, and population growth. All four viruses are expanding geographically, as exemplified by the emergence of West Nile virus in the Americas and Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia. The large, recent global outbreaks of severe neurological disease caused by West Nile virus, the increasing frequency of dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the Americas, and the emergence of yellow fever virus vaccination-associated viscerotropic disease, are new clinical epidemiologic trends. These worrisome epidemiologic trends will probably continue in coming decades, as a reversal of their societal and biological drivers is not in sight. Nevertheless, the substantial reductions in Japanese encephalitis virus incidence resulting from vaccination programs and economic development in some Asian countries provide some encouragement within this overall guarded outlook.

  6. Pacific Youth and Shifting Thresholds: Understanding Teen Dating Violence in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Charlene K.; Helm, Susana

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of teen dating violence (TDV) nationally suggests that it is a public health problem in need of intervention. However, there is limited information about what constitutes TDV in the eyes of teens. Equally limited is an understanding of these parameters among diverse cultures. To fill these gaps, the current study conducted…

  7. Thresholds and gradients in a semi-arid grassland: long-term grazing treatments induce slow, continuous, and reversible vegetation change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Semiarid ecosystems can exhibit non-reversible shifts among alternative stable ecosystem states (thresholds and hysteresis), but can also be characterized by slow, continuous, and reversible changes in plant composition (successional gradients). Conceptual state-and-transition models (STMs) attempt ...

  8. Colour thresholding in video imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, C D; Degraw, S

    1995-01-01

    The basic aspects of video imaging are reviewed as they relate to measurements of histological and anatomical features, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of colour and black-and-white imaging modes. In black-and-white imaging, calculations are based on the manipulation of picture elements (pixels) that contain 0-255 levels of information. Black is represented by the absence of light (0) and white by 255 grades of light. In colour imaging, the pixels contain variation of hues for the primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (magenta, yellow, cyan, pink) colours. Manipulation of pixels with colour information is more computer intense than that for black-and-white pixels, because there are over 16 million possible combinations of colour in a system with a 24-bit resolution. The narrow 128 possible grades of separation in black and white often makes distinction between pixels with overlapping intensities difficult. Such difficulty is greatly reduced by colour thresholding of systems that base the representation of colour on a combination of hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) format. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:7559121

  9. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  10. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  11. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  12. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  13. Invasion Threshold in Heterogeneous Metapopulation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2007-10-01

    We study the dynamics of epidemic and reaction-diffusion processes in metapopulation models with heterogeneous connectivity patterns. In susceptible-infected-removed-like processes, along with the standard local epidemic threshold, the system exhibits a global invasion threshold. We provide an explicit expression of the threshold that sets a critical value of the diffusion/mobility rate below, which the epidemic is not able to spread to a macroscopic fraction of subpopulations. The invasion threshold is found to be affected by the topological fluctuations of the metapopulation network. The results presented provide a general framework for the understanding of the effect of travel restrictions in epidemic containment.

  14. Une validation de la forme abrégée de l’Échelle de provisions sociales : l’ÉPS-10 items

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jean

    2016-01-01

    L’Échelle de provisions sociales-10 items (ÉPS-10) est une version abrégée de l’Échelle de provisions sociales (Social Provisions Scale) (Cutrona et Russell, 1987) validée en langue française sur une population québécoise (Caron, 1996) et qui permet de mesurer la disponibilité du soutien social. L’ÉPS-10 conserve cinq des six sous-échelles de l’ÉPS (l’attachement ; l’intégration sociale ; la confirmation de sa valeur ; l’aide matérielle et l’orientation), le besoin de se sentir utile et nécessaire ayant été exclu, et ne garde que les items formulés positivement, soit deux items par dimension du soutien. L’article présente la validation de l’EPS-10 sur un échantillon représentatif de 2433 personnes provenant de la population générale du sud-ouest de Montréal. Elle a une forte validité concomitante avec l’Échelle originelle de 24 items (ÉPS). Tous ces items sont fortement corrélés au score total et sa consistance interne est excellente. Des analyses de corrélation entre les sous-échelles et le score global et une analyse factorielle indiquent que l’ÉPS-10 conserve sa validité de construit. L’ÉPS-10 explique 14,1 % de la variance de la détresse psychologique et 25,4 % de la variance de la qualité de vie et conserve un pouvoir prédictif équivalent à l’ÉPS à 24 items. L’ensemble des analyses suggère que l’ÉPS-10 est un instrument fiable et valide pour mesurer la disponibilité du soutien social avec un temps d’administration réduit de moitié. Il s’avère un excellent choix pour les enquêtes épidémiologiques. PMID:24337002

  15. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  16. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex vs. auditory brainstem response for hearing assessment.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Alghamdi, F; Rosen, M J; Galazyuk, A V

    2016-09-01

    The high prevalence of noise-induced and age-related hearing loss in the general population has warranted the use of animal models to study the etiology of these pathologies. Quick and accurate auditory threshold determination is a prerequisite for experimental manipulations targeting hearing loss in animal models. The standard auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurement is fairly quick and translational across species, but is limited by the need for anesthesia and a lack of perceptual assessment. The goal of this study was to develop a new method of hearing assessment utilizing prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex, a commonly used tool that measures detection thresholds in awake animals, and can be performed on multiple animals simultaneously. We found that in control mice PPI audiometric functions are similar to both ABR and traditional operant conditioning audiograms. The hearing thresholds assessed with PPI audiometry in sound exposed mice were also similar to those detected by ABR thresholds one day after exposure. However, three months after exposure PPI threshold shifts were still evident at and near the frequency of exposure whereas ABR thresholds recovered to the pre-exposed level. In contrast, PPI audiometry and ABR wave one amplitudes detected similar losses. PPI audiometry provides a high throughput automated behavioral screening tool of hearing in awake animals. Overall, PPI audiometry and ABR assessments of the auditory system are robust techniques with distinct advantages and limitations, which when combined, can provide ample information about the functionality of the auditory system. PMID:27349914

  17. Prediction-based threshold for medication alert.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yoshimasa; Miyo, Kengo; Kurahashi, Issei; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a prediction-based approach to determine thresholds for a medication alert in a computerized physician order entry. Traditional static thresholds can sometimes lead to physician's alert fatigue or overlook potentially excessive medication even if the doses are belowthe configured threshold. To address this problem, we applied a random forest algorithm to develop a prediction model for medication doses, and applied a boxplot to determine the thresholds based on the prediction results. An evaluation of the eight drugs most frequently causing alerts in our hospital showed that the performances of the prediction were high, except for two drugs. It was also found that using the thresholds based on the predictions would reduce the alerts to a half of those when using the static thresholds. Notably, some cases were detected only by the prediction thresholds. The significance of the thresholds should be discussed in terms of the trade-offs between gains and losses; however, our approach, which relies on physicians' collective experiences, has practical advantages. PMID:23920550

  18. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  19. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  20. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  1. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  2. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  3. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  4. 40 CFR 98.231 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.231 Section 98.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems § 98.231 Reporting threshold. (a)...

  5. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  6. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.151 Section 98.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under...

  7. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide § 98.441 Reporting threshold. (a... amount of CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations. There is no threshold. (b... that current monitoring and model(s) show that the injected CO2 stream is not expected to migrate...

  8. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  9. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  10. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  11. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  12. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  13. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.71 Section 98.71 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  17. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  18. Network Motif Basis of Threshold Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a long-running debate over the existence of thresholds for adverse effects. The difficulty stems from two fundamental challenges: (i) statistical analysis by itself cannot prove the existence of a threshold, i.e., a dose below which there is no effect; and (ii) the...

  19. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  20. Shift related dietary intake in day and shift workers.

    PubMed

    Lennernäs, M; Hambraeus, L; Akerstedt, T

    1995-12-01

    To study the impact of work hours on eating habits the dietary intake of 96 male industrial workers on day work and two- and three-shift work was investigated using repeated 24 h recall. The intake of energy, 14 nutrients, and coffee and tea was computed, using a nutrient data base, for 8 h work and shifts (day, morning, afternoon, night) and for the 24-h periods including these work shifts. No changes in intake of energy, nutrients and coffee/tea were observed between 8 h morning and afternoon shifts, but there was a reduction in intake during 8 h night shifts. Night shift work caused a redistribution of food and coffee intake, but not an overall 24 h reduction. On the whole, the energy-intake and the quality of food intake (percentages of energy from macronutrients and density of micronutrients) were not affected by shift work, although the intake of carbohydrates was lower in day- and three-shift workers during days off. The intake of alcohol was higher during days off in all groups. In summary, two- and three-shift work in this study affected the circadian distribution of food intakes and coffee consumption, but not the overall 24-h consumption.

  1. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  2. Pain thresholds are elevated during pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gintzler, A R; Bohan, M C

    1990-01-22

    Increases in pain thresholds have been observed during gestation in a variety of laboratory animals and humans. The specific events that occur during pregnancy that are responsible for this increase in maternal pain threshold are not known. In order to investigate whether or not the changes in the peripheral concentration of sex steroids that are known to occur during gestation contribute to the analgesia of pregnancy, the effect of pseudopregnancy on jump thresholds was determined. Pseudopregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the mean jump threshold. In contrast, rats treated chronically with the opioid antagonist naltrexone do not manifest an increase in jump threshold during the pseudopregnant condition. These results suggest that peripheral sex steroids whose peripheral concentration profile is altered during pseudopregnancy might be important modulators of opioid systems that regulate responsiveness to aversive stimuli.

  3. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  4. Living dangerously on borrowed time during slow, unrecognized regime shifts.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Linares, Cristina; Dakos, Vasilis; van de Leemput, Ingrid A; van Nes, Egbert H

    2013-03-01

    Regime shifts from one ecological state to another are often portrayed as sudden, dramatic, and difficult to reverse. Yet many regime shifts unfold slowly and imperceptibly after a tipping point has been exceeded, especially at regional and global scales. These long, smooth transitions between equilibrium states are easy to miss, ignore, or deny, confounding management and governance. However, slow responses by ecosystems after transgressing a dangerous threshold also affords borrowed time - a window of opportunity to return to safer conditions before the new state eventually locks in and equilibrates. In this context, the most important challenge is a social one: convincing enough people to confront business-as-usual before time runs out to reverse unwanted regime shifts even after they have already begun.

  5. Living dangerously on borrowed time during slow, unrecognized regime shifts.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Linares, Cristina; Dakos, Vasilis; van de Leemput, Ingrid A; van Nes, Egbert H

    2013-03-01

    Regime shifts from one ecological state to another are often portrayed as sudden, dramatic, and difficult to reverse. Yet many regime shifts unfold slowly and imperceptibly after a tipping point has been exceeded, especially at regional and global scales. These long, smooth transitions between equilibrium states are easy to miss, ignore, or deny, confounding management and governance. However, slow responses by ecosystems after transgressing a dangerous threshold also affords borrowed time - a window of opportunity to return to safer conditions before the new state eventually locks in and equilibrates. In this context, the most important challenge is a social one: convincing enough people to confront business-as-usual before time runs out to reverse unwanted regime shifts even after they have already begun. PMID:22995893

  6. Portable shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M[sup 3]CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M[sup 3]CA; like the M[sup 3]CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel.

  7. Shift work, safety, and aging.

    PubMed

    Folkard, Simon

    2008-04-01

    It has long been recognized that older shift workers may have shorter and more disturbed day sleeps between successive night shifts than their younger colleagues. This has given rise to considerable concern over the safety of aging shift workers because of the increasing age of the work force and increases in retirement age. Because there have been no direct studies of the combined effects of shift work and age on safety, the present paper begins by reviewing the literature relating safety to features of shift systems. It then considers the general effect of age on occupational injury rates before examining existing evidence of the combined effects of shift work and age on performance capabilities. The results of the literature review indicate that when the a priori risk is constant, there is reasonably clear evidence that injury rates are higher at night, and that they increase over successive night shifts more rapidly than over successive day shifts. Further, although occupational injuries are less frequent in older workers, those that do occur tend to be more serious. Finally, there is some suggestive evidence from studies of objectively measured performance capabilities that older workers may be less able to both maintain their performance over the course of a night shift and cope with longer spans of successive night shifts. It is concluded that it seems possible, even though unproven as yet, that older workers may be at greater risk both to injury and accident on the night shift. There is a strong need for future epidemiological studies of the combined effects of shift work and age on injuries and accidents, and that these should attempt to separate the effects of age per se from those of generation. PMID:18484360

  8. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  9. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  10. Microstructures, percolation thresholds, and rock physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Chelidze, T.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1997-09-01

    The physical properties (transport properties and mechanical properties) of porous/cracked rocks are mainly functions of their microstructure. In this connection the problem of critical (threshold) porosity for transport, elasticity and mechanical strength is especially important. Two dominant mathematical formalisms — effective medium theory (EMT) and percolation theory — pretend to give answers to this problem. Some of the EMT models do not predict any threshold (differential effective medium). Other EMT models (self-consistent models) do predict thresholds, but it is shown that these thresholds are fictitious and result from an extension of a theory beyond its limit of validity. The failure of EMT methods at high pores/crack concentrations is the result of clustering effects. The appropriate formalism to correctly describe the phenomenon of clustering of pores and cracks and the behaviour of a system close to its critical porosity is percolation theory. Percolation thresholds can be predicted in that case from classical site or bond percolation on regular or random lattices. The threshold values depend on the density and average size of pores/cracks so that porosity is not sufficient in general to characterize the threshold for a specific physical property. The general term 'critical porosity' should thus be used with caution and it is preferable to specify which property is concerned and what kind of microstructure is present. This term can be more safely used for a population of rocks which have an identical average shape of pores/cracks and for a given physical property.

  11. Low threshold amplified spontaneous emission from near-infrared dye-doped polymeric waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, K.; Kuro, T.; Oe, K.; Yanagi, H.

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated near-infrared light amplification in a dye-doped polymeric waveguide structure under optical pumping. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at ˜800nm was observed in poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) thin film with organic dye LDS798. The ASE threshold energy was as low as ˜12μJ/cm2, which is about one-tenth of previously reported values for infrared-dye-doped polymeric waveguides. This low threshold ASE comes from a large Stokes shift of LDS798, in which the self-absorption of emission is suppressed.

  12. Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    King, Jacquelynne R.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; Punt, André E.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, fisheries management was based on optimizing yield and maintaining a target biomass, with little regard given to low-frequency environmental forcing. However, this policy was often unsuccessful. In the last two to three decades, fisheries science and management have undergone a shift towards balancing sustainable yield with conservation, with the goal of including ecosystem considerations in decision-making frameworks. Scientific understanding of low-frequency climate–ocean variability, which is manifested as ecosystem regime shifts and states, has led to attempts to incorporate these shifts and states into fisheries assessment and management. To date, operationalizing these attempts to provide tactical advice has met with limited success. We review efforts to incorporate regime shifts and states into the assessment and management of fisheries resources, propose directions for future investigation and outline a potential framework to include regime shifts and changes in ecosystem states into fisheries management.

  13. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  14. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  15. High- and low-threshold genes in the Spo0A regulon of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaya; González-Pastor, José Eduardo; Losick, Richard

    2005-02-01

    The master regulator for entry into sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is the response regulator Spo0A, which directly governs the expression of about 121 genes. Using cells in which the synthesis of Spo0A was under the control of an inducible promoter or in which production of the regulatory protein was impaired by a promoter mutation, we found that sporulation required a high (threshold) level of Spo0A and that many genes in the regulon differentially responded to high and low doses of the regulator. We distinguished four categories of genes, as follows: (i) those that required a high level of Spo0A to be activated, (ii) those that required a high level of Spo0A to be repressed, (iii) those that were activated at a low level of the regulator, and (iv) those that were repressed at a low dose of the regulator. Genes that required a high dose of Spo0A to be activated were found to have low binding constants for the DNA-binding protein. Some genes that were turned on at a low dose of Spo0A either had a high binding constant for the regulatory protein or were activated by an indirect mechanism involving Spo0A-mediated relief of repression by the repressor protein AbrB. We propose that progressive increases in the level of Spo0A leads to an early phase of transcription in which genes that play auxiliary roles in development, such as cannibalism and biofilm formation, are turned on and a later phase in which genes that play a direct role in sporulation are activated. PMID:15687200

  16. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    PubMed

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  17. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Cryer, P E

    1999-09-01

    Ultimately traceable to neural glucose deprivation, symptoms of hypoglycemia include neurogenic (autonomic) and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Neurogenic symptoms (tremulousness, palpitations, anxiety, sweating, hunger, paresthesias) are the results of the perception of physiologic changes caused by the autonomic nervous system's response to hypoglycemia. Neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sensation of warmth, weakness or fatigue, severe cognitive failure, seizure, coma) are the results of brain glucose deprivation itself. Glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia shift to lower plasma glucose concentrations following recent episodes of hypoglycemia, leading to the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness--loss of the warning symptoms of developing hypoglycemia. Thus, patients with recurrent hypoglycemia (e.g., those with tightly controlled diabetes or with an insulinoma) often tolerate abnormally low plasma glucose concentrations without symptoms. PMID:10500927

  18. Nanowire-based ternary transistor by threshold-voltage manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junebeom; Lim, Taekyung; Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Ju, Sanghyun; Kim, Sunkook

    2014-04-07

    We report on a ternary device consisting of two nanowire channels that have different threshold voltage (V{sub th}) values and show that three current stages can be produced. A microscale laser-beam shot was utilized to selectively anneal the nanowire channel area to be processed, and the amount of V{sub th} shift could be controlled by adjusting the laser wavelength. Microscale laser annealing process could control V{sub th} of the individual nanowire transistors while maintaining the other parameters the constant, such as the subthreshold slope, on–off current ratio, and mobility. This result could provide a potential for highly integrated and high-speed ternary circuits.

  19. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  1. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  2. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  3. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  4. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  6. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  7. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  8. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  9. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  10. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  11. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  12. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  13. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  14. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  15. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  16. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  17. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  18. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  19. 40 CFR 98.211 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Miscellaneous Uses of Carbonate § 98.211 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions from miscellaneous uses of carbonate if your facility uses carbonates as defined...

  20. 40 CFR 98.391 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Petroleum Products § 98.391 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of petroleum products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  1. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a MSW landfill and the facility...

  2. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  3. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a nitric acid train and the facility meets...

  4. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  5. 40 CFR 98.191 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.191 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility is a lime manufacturing plant as defined in § 98.190 and...

  6. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  7. 40 CFR 98.31 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources § 98.31 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more stationary...

  8. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  9. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  13. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  14. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  15. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You must... purposes of this subpart, any reference to CO2 emissions in § 98.2(i) shall mean CO2 received....

  16. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  17. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  18. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  19. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....351 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  20. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  1. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  2. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an HCFC-22 production...

  3. Adaptive thresholding of digital subtraction angiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Nong; Li, Heng; Peng, Weixue; Zhang, Tianxu

    2005-10-01

    In clinical practice, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a powerful technique for the visualization of blood vessels in the human body. Blood vessel segmentation is a main problem for 3D vascular reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive thresholding method for the segmentation of DSA images. Each pixel of the DSA images is declared to be a vessel/background point with regard to a threshold and a few local characteristic limits depending on some information contained in the pixel neighborhood window. The size of the neighborhood window is set according to a priori knowledge of the diameter of vessels to make sure that each window contains the background definitely. Some experiments on cerebral DSA images are given, which show that our proposed method yields better results than global thresholding methods and some other local thresholding methods do.

  4. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  6. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  7. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  8. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  9. 40 CFR 98.241 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petrochemical Production § 98.241 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petrochemical process as specified...

  10. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  11. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  12. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  13. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  16. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  17. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  20. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  1. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  2. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  3. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  4. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  5. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  6. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  7. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  8. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  9. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  10. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a lead production process and the facility meets...

  11. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  12. Effective theories and thresholds in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1991-06-07

    The role of effective theories in probing a more fundamental underlying theory and in indicating new physics thresholds is discussed, with examples from the standard model and more speculative applications to superstring theory. 38 refs.

  13. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  16. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  17. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a petroleum refineries process and the facility...

  18. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  1. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  2. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  3. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  4. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  5. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  6. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  7. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  8. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  9. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  10. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  11. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  12. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  13. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  16. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  17. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  18. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  20. No evidence of dioxin cancer threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, David; Liu, Junfeng; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Thomas, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed an estimate of the human cancer risk from dioxin, using the standard low-dose linear extrapolation approach. This estimate has been controversial because of concern that it may overestimate the cancer risk. An alternative approach has been published and was presented to the U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board's Dioxin Review Panel in November 2000. That approach suggests that dioxin is a threshold carcinogen and that the threshold is an order of magnitude above the exposure levels of the general population. We have reexamined the threshold analysis and found that the data have been incorrectly weighted by cohort size. In our reanalysis, without the incorrect weighting, the threshold effect disappears. PMID:12842764

  1. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  2. A new dual threshold time-over-threshold circuit for fast timing in PET.

    PubMed

    Grant, Alexander M; Levin, Craig S

    2014-07-01

    Time-over-threshold (ToT) is attractive as a method of combined timing and energy encoding in positron emission tomography (PET) due to its simplicity in implementation and readout. However, conventional single threshold ToT has a nonlinear response and generally suffers from a tradeoff between timing and energy resolution. The resulting poor performance is not fit for applications requiring fast timing, such as time-of-flight (ToF) PET. In this work it is shown experimentally that by replacing single threshold ToT with a dual threshold method in a new compact circuit, excellent time resolution can be achieved (154 ps FWHM for 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) LYSO crystals), suitable for ToF. Dual threshold ToT timing results have been compared to a similar single threshold design, demonstrating that dual threshold ToT performance is far superior to that of single threshold ToT (154 ps versus 418 ps coincidence time resolution for the dual and single threshold cases, respectively). A method of correcting for nonlinearity in dual threshold ToT energy spectra is also demonstrated.

  3. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is O n Δ · max 1 ≤ i ≤ n { u i } , where u i is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based ( 1 + p m i n ) -approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O ( 1 ) -approximation algorithm with time complexity O ( 1 ) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  4. Computer simulation of the threshold sensitivity determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation study was carried out to evaluate various methods for determining threshold stimulus levels for impact sensitivity tests. In addition, the influence of a number of variables (initial stimulus level, particular stimulus response curve, and increment size) on the apparent threshold values and on the corresponding population response levels was determined. Finally, a critical review of previous assumptions regarding the stimulus response curve for impact testing is presented in the light of the simulation results.

  5. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is OnΔ·max1≤i≤n{ui}, where ui is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based (1+pmin)-approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O(1)-approximation algorithm with time complexity O(1) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  6. Cancellation of nonlinear Zeeman shifts with light shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Acosta, V. M.; Higbie, J. M.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.

    2009-02-01

    Nonlinear Zeeman (NLZ) shifts arising from magnetic-field mixing of the two hyperfine ground states in alkali-metal atoms lead to splitting of magnetic-resonance lines. This is a major source of sensitivity degradation and the so-called “heading errors” of alkali-metal-vapor atomic magnetometers operating in the geophysical field range (B≈0.2-0.7G) . Here, it is shown theoretically and experimentally that NLZ shifts can be effectively canceled by light shifts caused by a laser field of appropriate intensity, polarization, and frequency, a technique that can be readily applied in practical situations.

  7. Interleukin-1beta reduces temperature sensitivity but elevates thermal thresholds in different populations of warm-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, V Y; Petruchuk, T A; Gourine, V N; Pierau, F K

    2000-10-13

    Extracellularly recorded firing rates of neurons in slices of the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH) of the rat were determined during thermal stimulation. Human recombinant interleukin-1beta (20 ng/ml) did not influence temperature-insensitive neurons, but reduced the firing rate and thermosensitivity in linear warm-sensitive neurons, and shifted the thermal thresholds of activation in threshold warm- and cold-sensitive neurons by 1.1-2.3 degrees C to hyperthermic temperatures. The data support the suggestion that endogenous pyrogens may act on different populations of thermosensitive PO/AH neurons to induce fever. The shift of the thermal thresholds of activation of threshold warm- and cold-sensitive neurons in combination with the otherwise maintained temperature sensitivity of these neurons appears to play a major part for the controlled shift of body temperature and the maintenance of the elevated body temperature during cytokine-induced fever.

  8. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  9. Establishing nonlinearity thresholds with ultraintense X-ray pulses

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetko, Jakub; Hoszowska, Joanna; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Błachucki, Wojciech; Kayser, Yves; Sà, Jacinto; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; David, Christian; Smolentsev, Grigory; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.; Patterson, Bruce D.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Knopp, Gregor; Pajek, Marek; Abela, Rafael; Milne, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray techniques have evolved over decades to become highly refined tools for a broad range of investigations. Importantly, these approaches rely on X-ray measurements that depend linearly on the number of incident X-ray photons. The advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is opening the ability to reach extremely high photon numbers within ultrashort X-ray pulse durations and is leading to a paradigm shift in our ability to explore nonlinear X-ray signals. However, the enormous increase in X-ray peak power is a double-edged sword with new and exciting methods being developed but at the same time well-established techniques proving unreliable. Consequently, accurate knowledge about the threshold for nonlinear X-ray signals is essential. Herein we report an X-ray spectroscopic study that reveals important details on the thresholds for nonlinear X-ray interactions. By varying both the incident X-ray intensity and photon energy, we establish the regimes at which the simplest nonlinear process, two-photon X-ray absorption (TPA), can be observed. From these measurements we can extract the probability of this process as a function of photon energy and confirm both the nature and sub-femtosecond lifetime of the virtual intermediate electronic state. PMID:27620067

  10. An approach for probabilistic forecasting of seasonal turbidity threshold exceedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towler, Erin; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Summers, R. Scott; Yates, David

    2010-06-01

    Though climate forecasts offer substantial promise for improving water resource oversight, additional tools are needed to translate these forecasts into water-quality-based products that can be useful to water utility managers. To this end, a generalized approach is developed that uses seasonal forecasts to predict the likelihood of exceeding a prescribed water quality limit. Because many water quality standards are based on thresholds, this study utilizes a logistic regression technique, which employs nonparametric or "local" estimation that can capture nonlinear features in the data. The approach is applied to a drinking water source in the Pacific Northwest United States that has experienced elevated turbidity values that are correlated with streamflow. The main steps of the approach are to (1) obtain a seasonal probabilistic precipitation forecast, (2) generate streamflow scenarios conditional on the precipitation forecast, (3) use a local logistic regression to compute the turbidity threshold exceedance probabilities, and (4) quantify the likelihood of turbidity exceedance corresponding to the seasonal climate forecast. Results demonstrate that forecasts offer a slight improvement over climatology, but that representative forecasts are conservative and result in only a small shift in total exceedance likelihood. Synthetic forecasts are included to show the sensitivity of the total exceedance likelihood. The technique is general and could be applied to other water quality variables that depend on climate or hydroclimate.

  11. Establishing nonlinearity thresholds with ultraintense X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, Jakub; Hoszowska, Joanna; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Błachucki, Wojciech; Kayser, Yves; Sà, Jacinto; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J; David, Christian; Smolentsev, Grigory; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Patterson, Bruce D; Penfold, Thomas J; Knopp, Gregor; Pajek, Marek; Abela, Rafael; Milne, Christopher J

    2016-09-13

    X-ray techniques have evolved over decades to become highly refined tools for a broad range of investigations. Importantly, these approaches rely on X-ray measurements that depend linearly on the number of incident X-ray photons. The advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is opening the ability to reach extremely high photon numbers within ultrashort X-ray pulse durations and is leading to a paradigm shift in our ability to explore nonlinear X-ray signals. However, the enormous increase in X-ray peak power is a double-edged sword with new and exciting methods being developed but at the same time well-established techniques proving unreliable. Consequently, accurate knowledge about the threshold for nonlinear X-ray signals is essential. Herein we report an X-ray spectroscopic study that reveals important details on the thresholds for nonlinear X-ray interactions. By varying both the incident X-ray intensity and photon energy, we establish the regimes at which the simplest nonlinear process, two-photon X-ray absorption (TPA), can be observed. From these measurements we can extract the probability of this process as a function of photon energy and confirm both the nature and sub-femtosecond lifetime of the virtual intermediate electronic state.

  12. Establishing nonlinearity thresholds with ultraintense X-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlachetko, Jakub; Hoszowska, Joanna; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Błachucki, Wojciech; Kayser, Yves; Sà, Jacinto; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; David, Christian; Smolentsev, Grigory; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.; Patterson, Bruce D.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Knopp, Gregor; Pajek, Marek; Abela, Rafael; Milne, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray techniques have evolved over decades to become highly refined tools for a broad range of investigations. Importantly, these approaches rely on X-ray measurements that depend linearly on the number of incident X-ray photons. The advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is opening the ability to reach extremely high photon numbers within ultrashort X-ray pulse durations and is leading to a paradigm shift in our ability to explore nonlinear X-ray signals. However, the enormous increase in X-ray peak power is a double-edged sword with new and exciting methods being developed but at the same time well-established techniques proving unreliable. Consequently, accurate knowledge about the threshold for nonlinear X-ray signals is essential. Herein we report an X-ray spectroscopic study that reveals important details on the thresholds for nonlinear X-ray interactions. By varying both the incident X-ray intensity and photon energy, we establish the regimes at which the simplest nonlinear process, two-photon X-ray absorption (TPA), can be observed. From these measurements we can extract the probability of this process as a function of photon energy and confirm both the nature and sub-femtosecond lifetime of the virtual intermediate electronic state.

  13. Establishing nonlinearity thresholds with ultraintense X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, Jakub; Hoszowska, Joanna; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Błachucki, Wojciech; Kayser, Yves; Sà, Jacinto; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J; David, Christian; Smolentsev, Grigory; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Patterson, Bruce D; Penfold, Thomas J; Knopp, Gregor; Pajek, Marek; Abela, Rafael; Milne, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    X-ray techniques have evolved over decades to become highly refined tools for a broad range of investigations. Importantly, these approaches rely on X-ray measurements that depend linearly on the number of incident X-ray photons. The advent of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is opening the ability to reach extremely high photon numbers within ultrashort X-ray pulse durations and is leading to a paradigm shift in our ability to explore nonlinear X-ray signals. However, the enormous increase in X-ray peak power is a double-edged sword with new and exciting methods being developed but at the same time well-established techniques proving unreliable. Consequently, accurate knowledge about the threshold for nonlinear X-ray signals is essential. Herein we report an X-ray spectroscopic study that reveals important details on the thresholds for nonlinear X-ray interactions. By varying both the incident X-ray intensity and photon energy, we establish the regimes at which the simplest nonlinear process, two-photon X-ray absorption (TPA), can be observed. From these measurements we can extract the probability of this process as a function of photon energy and confirm both the nature and sub-femtosecond lifetime of the virtual intermediate electronic state. PMID:27620067

  14. Health effects of shift work.

    PubMed

    LaDou, J

    1982-12-01

    More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturing the proportion of shift workers is greater than 50 percent. As the popularity of shift work and other "alternative work schedules" grows, concern is increasing over the disturbance created in the lives of workers and their families by these economically and socially useful innovations. Twenty percent of workers are unable to tolerate shift work. Daily physiologic variations termed circadian rhythms are interactive and require a high degree of phase relationship to produce subjective feelings of wellbeing. Disturbance of these activities, circadian desynchronization, whether from passage over time zones or from shift rotation, results in health effects such as disturbance of the quantity and quality of sleep, disturbance of gastrointestinal and other organ system activities, and aggravation of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and thyrotoxicosis. Worker selection can reduce the number of health problems resulting from shift work. The periodic examination of shift workers is recommended.

  15. Health Effects of Shift Work

    PubMed Central

    LaDou, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturing the proportion of shift workers is greater than 50 percent. As the popularity of shift work and other “alternative work schedules” grows, concern is increasing over the disturbance created in the lives of workers and their families by these economically and socially useful innovations. Twenty percent of workers are unable to tolerate shift work. Daily physiologic variations termed circadian rhythms are interactive and require a high degree of phase relationship to produce subjective feelings of wellbeing. Disturbance of these activities, circadian desynchronization, whether from passage over time zones or from shift rotation, results in health effects such as disturbance of the quantity and quality of sleep, disturbance of gastrointestinal and other organ system activities, and aggravation of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and thyrotoxicosis. Worker selection can reduce the number of health problems resulting from shift work. The periodic examination of shift workers is recommended. PMID:6962577

  16. [Shift work and cardiometabolic risk].

    PubMed

    Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Bracci, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Shift work is frequently associated with coronary heart disease. Medical research indicate metabolic disturbance among shift workers, which is characterized by associated modifications in the concentration of serum glucose and serum lipids, hypertension and obesity, especially addominal weight. Atrasversal study has been carried out: 193 (126 females and 67 males) healthcare shift workers were compared with 221 (160 females and 61 males) day workers. Medical history, health examination including anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements were assessed. All participants were submitted a standardized questionnaire on health-related behaviours and biochemical determinations (fasting plasma glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides). Job seniority of shift work resulted at 13.5 +/- 8.2 among shift workers and 19.0 +/- 11.3 among day workers. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome relevance was defined according to the criterions proposed by the International Diabetes Federation. The 20% shift workers (33% males and 13% females) was affected by metabolic syndrome against 12% non shift workers (20% males and 9% females). The most frequently altered parameter, apart from metabolic syndrome, was high abdominal obesity, which occurred in 64% of the sample (70% shift workers vs 58% day workers). The results of multiple logistic regression attested the presence of a higher relative risk among shift workers regarding both the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome (OR 2,1 - 95% Cl 1.15-3.86) and the excess in abdominal obesity (OR 1.8 - 95% Cl 1.16-3.25). After adjusting confusing factors such as smoke, age, alchool, consumption, physical activity, scholastic degree, a OR 2.9 - 95%Cl 1,53-5.53 and a OR 1.9 - 95%.Cl 1.32-3.86 were confirmed. PMID:20066881

  17. Adapting to a changing environment: non-obvious thresholds in multi-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Clare; Wieczorek, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    Many natural and technological systems fail to adapt to changing external conditions and move to a different state if the conditions vary too fast. Such 'non-adiabatic' processes are ubiquitous, but little understood. We identify these processes with a new nonlinear phenomenon-an intricate threshold where a forced system fails to adiabatically follow a changing stable state. In systems with multiple time scales, we derive existence conditions that show such thresholds to be generic, but non-obvious, meaning they cannot be captured by traditional stability theory. Rather, the phenomenon can be analysed using concepts from modern singular perturbation theory: folded singularities and canard trajectories, including composite canards. Thus, non-obvious thresholds should explain the failure to adapt to a changing environment in a wide range of multi-scale systems including: tipping points in the climate system, regime shifts in ecosystems, excitability in nerve cells, adaptation failure in regulatory genes and adiabatic switching in technology. PMID:25294963

  18. Adapting to a changing environment: non-obvious thresholds in multi-scale systems

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, Clare; Wieczorek, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Many natural and technological systems fail to adapt to changing external conditions and move to a different state if the conditions vary too fast. Such ‘non-adiabatic’ processes are ubiquitous, but little understood. We identify these processes with a new nonlinear phenomenon—an intricate threshold where a forced system fails to adiabatically follow a changing stable state. In systems with multiple time scales, we derive existence conditions that show such thresholds to be generic, but non-obvious, meaning they cannot be captured by traditional stability theory. Rather, the phenomenon can be analysed using concepts from modern singular perturbation theory: folded singularities and canard trajectories, including composite canards. Thus, non-obvious thresholds should explain the failure to adapt to a changing environment in a wide range of multi-scale systems including: tipping points in the climate system, regime shifts in ecosystems, excitability in nerve cells, adaptation failure in regulatory genes and adiabatic switching in technology. PMID:25294963

  19. Effects of encapsulation damping on the excitation threshold for subharmonic generation from contrast microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A recent study [Katiyar and Sarkar (2011). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 3137–3147] showed that in contrast to the analytical result for free bubbles, the minimum threshold for subharmonic generation for contrast microbubbles does not necessarily occur at twice the resonance frequency. Here increased damping—either due to the small radius or the encapsulation—is shown to shift the minimum threshold away from twice the resonance frequency. Free bubbles as well as four models of the contrast agent encapsulation are investigated varying the surface dilatational viscosity. Encapsulation properties are determined using measured attenuation data for a commercial contrast agent. For sufficiently small damping, models predict two minima for the threshold curve—one at twice the resonance frequency being lower than the other at resonance frequency—in accord with the classical analytical result. However, increased damping damps the bubble response more at twice the resonance than at resonance, leading to a flattening of the threshold curve and a gradual shift of the absolute minimum from twice the resonance frequency toward the resonance frequency. The deviation from the classical result stems from the fact that the perturbation analysis employed to obtain it assumes small damping, not always applicable for contrast microbubbles. PMID:23145637

  20. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  1. Core-level x-ray photoemission: Deviations from threshold behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Frota, H. O.; Oliveira, L. N.; Wilkins, J. W.

    1985-07-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of core-level x-ray photoemission intensity in metals, with emphasis upon studying the deviations from behavior asymptotically close to threshold. For a model with a contact potential and linear conduction-electron dispersion, we have evaluated the photoemission intensity for core-hole phase shifts δ(0) between 0.05π and 0.5π. We find the following results. (i) The asymptotic regime extends out to 0.01 to 0.1 times the conduction bandwidth (D) from threshold. The range of the asymptotic regime decreases with increasing (absolute) phase shift. (ii) The linear relation between the integrated photoemission intensity and the asymptotic form holds for all phase shifts above ~0.1D. Due to our normalization procedure we cannot say whether it holds below this value. (iii) Discrepancies exist between numerical estimates of the deviations from asymptotic behavior and approximate analytic estimates. (iv) A definition of the frequency-dependent threshold singularity exponent α(ω) in terms of a moment of the photoemission intensity is stable out to the conduction-band edge and may prove useful to experimentalists attempting to extract exponents from their data.

  2. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  3. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals.

  4. Threshold of the precedence effect in noise

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Three effects that show a temporal asymmetry in the influence of interaural cues were studied through the addition of masking noise: (1) The transient precedence effect—the perceptual dominance of a leading transient over a similar lagging transient; (2) the ongoing precedence effect—lead dominance with lead and lag components that extend in time; and (3) the onset capture effect—determination by an onset transient of the lateral position of an otherwise ambiguous extended trailing sound. These three effects were evoked with noise-burst stimuli and were compared in the presence of masking noise. Using a diotic noise masker, detection thresholds for stimuli with lead/lag interaural delays of 0/500 μs were compared to those with 500/0 μs delays. None of the three effects showed a masking difference between those conditions, suggesting that none of the effects is operative at masked threshold. A task requiring the discrimination between stimuli with 500/0 and 0/500 μs interaural delays was used to determine the threshold for each effect in noise. The results showed similar thresholds in noise (10–13 dB SL) for the transient and ongoing precedence effects, but a much higher threshold (33 dB SL) for onset capture of an ambiguous trailing sound. PMID:24815272

  5. Correlations between Brain Cortical Thickness and Cutaneous Pain Thresholds Are Atypical in Adults with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.

    2014-01-01

    temporal/inferior parietal region. Conclusions Unlike healthy control subjects who have a significant negative correlation between cortical thickness in a superior temporal/inferior parietal region with pain thresholds, migraineurs have a non-significant positive correlation between cortical thickness in a superior temporal/inferior parietal region with pain thresholds. Since this region participates in orienting and attention to painful stimuli, absence of the normal correlation might represent a migraineurs inability to inhibit pain sensation via shifting attention away from the painful stimulus. PMID:24932546

  6. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  7. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  8. Viral population dynamics and virulence thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2012-08-01

    Viral factors and host barriers influence virally induced disease, and asymptomatic versus symptomatic infection is governed by a 'virulence threshold'. Understanding modulation of virulence thresholds could lend insight into disease outcome and aid in rational therapeutic and vaccine design. RNA viruses are an excellent system to study virulence thresholds in the context of quasispecies population dynamics. RNA viruses have high error frequencies and our understanding of viral population dynamics has been shaped by quasispecies evolutionary theory. In turn, research using RNA viruses as replicons with short generation times and high mutation rates has been an invaluable tool to test models of quasispecies theory. The challenge and new frontier of RNA virus population dynamics research is to combine multiple theoretical models and experimental data to describe viral population behavior as it changes, moving within and between hosts, to predict disease and pathogen emergence. Several excellent studies have begun to undertake this challenge using novel approaches.

  9. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S M; Battaglia, D; Bell, R E; Chang, C S; Hosea, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Meyer, H; Park, G Y

    2011-09-06

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium vs helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n=3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T{sub e}, n{sub e}, p{sub e}, T{sub i}, v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  10. Starvation drives a threshold triggering communication.

    PubMed

    Mailleux, Anne-Catherine; Detrain, Claire; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    The decision for an ant forager to launch recruitment is governed by an internal response threshold. Here, we demonstrate that this threshold (the desired volume) triggering trail-laying increases under starvation. As a consequence, highly starved foragers lay a recruitment trail and bring back to the nest higher quantities of food from large unlimited resources. In contrast, when the volume of the food source is under their crop capacity, the percentage of trail-communicating foragers is lower following a prolonged period of starvation. Such starvation-dependent changes in the "desired volume" threshold explain how ants optimize recruitment and select liquid food resources in order to prevent collective exploitation of low profitability. PMID:17050837

  11. Predictability of threshold exceedances in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódai, Tamás

    2015-12-01

    In a low-order model of the general circulation of the atmosphere we examine the predictability of threshold exceedance events of certain observables. The likelihood of such binary events-the cornerstone also for the categoric (as opposed to probabilistic) prediction of threshold exceedances-is established from long time series of one or more observables of the same system. The prediction skill is measured by a summary index of the ROC curve that relates the hit- and false alarm rates. Our results for the examined systems suggest that exceedances of higher thresholds are more predictable; or in other words: rare large magnitude, i.e., extreme, events are more predictable than frequent typical events. We find this to hold provided that the bin size for binning time series data is optimized, but not necessarily otherwise. This can be viewed as a confirmation of a counterintuitive (and seemingly contrafactual) statement that was previously formulated for more simple autoregressive stochastic processes. However, we argue that for dynamical systems in general it may be typical only, but not universally true. We argue that when there is a sufficient amount of data depending on the precision of observation, the skill of a class of data-driven categoric predictions of threshold exceedances approximates the skill of the analogous model-driven prediction, assuming strictly no model errors. Therefore, stronger extremes in terms of higher threshold levels are more predictable both in case of data- and model-driven prediction. Furthermore, we show that a quantity commonly regarded as a measure of predictability, the finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponent, does not correspond directly to the ROC-based measure of prediction skill when they are viewed as functions of the prediction lead time and the threshold level. This points to the fact that even if the Lyapunov exponent as an intrinsic property of the system, measuring the instability of trajectories, determines predictability

  12. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  13. Threshold Things That Think: Authorisation for Resharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Roel; Kohlweiss, Markulf; Preneel, Bart

    As we are evolving towards ubiquitous computing, users carry an increasing number of mobile devices with sensitive information. The security of this information can be protected using threshold cryptography, in which secret computations are shared between multiple devices. Threshold cryptography can be made more robust by resharing protocols, which allow recovery from partial compromises. This paper introduces user-friendly and secure protocols for the authorisation of resharing protocols. We present both automatic and manual protocols, utilising a group manual authentication protocol to add a new device. We analyse the security of these protocols: our analysis considers permanent and temporary compromises, denial of service attacks and manual authentications errors of the user.

  14. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    SciTech Connect

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  15. Shifting the Paradigm in Radiation Safety

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The current radiation safety paradigm using the linear no-threshold (LNT) model is based on the premise that even the smallest amount of radiation may cause mutations increasing the risk of cancer. Autopsy studies have shown that the presence of cancer cells is not a decisive factor in the occurrence of clinical cancer. On the other hand, suppression of immune system more than doubles the cancer risk in organ transplant patients, indicating its key role in keeping occult cancers in check. Low dose radiation (LDR) elevates immune response, and so it may reduce rather than increase the risk of cancer. LNT model pays exclusive attention to DNA damage, which is not a decisive factor, and completely ignores immune system response, which is an important factor, and so is not scientifically justifiable. By not recognizing the importance of the immune system in cancer, and not exploring exercise intervention, the current paradigm may have missed an opportunity to reduce cancer deaths among atomic bomb survivors. Increased antioxidants from LDR may reduce aging-related non-cancer diseases since oxidative damage is implicated in these. A paradigm shift is warranted to reduce further casualties, reduce fear of LDR, and enable investigation of potential beneficial applications of LDR. PMID:23304105

  16. Comparison between intensity- duration thresholds and cumulative rainfall thresholds for the forecasting of landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Rosi, Ascanio; Rossi, Guglielmo; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    This work makes a quantitative comparison between the results of landslide forecasting obtained using two different rainfall threshold models, one using intensity-duration thresholds and the other based on cumulative rainfall thresholds in an area of northern Tuscany of 116 km2. The first methodology identifies rainfall intensity-duration thresholds by means a software called MaCumBA (Massive CUMulative Brisk Analyzer) that analyzes rain-gauge records, extracts the intensities (I) and durations (D) of the rainstorms associated with the initiation of landslides, plots these values on a diagram, and identifies thresholds that define the lower bounds of the I-D values. A back analysis using data from past events can be used to identify the threshold conditions associated with the least amount of false alarms. The second method (SIGMA) is based on the hypothesis that anomalous or extreme values of rainfall are responsible for landslide triggering: the statistical distribution of the rainfall series is analyzed, and multiples of the standard deviation (σ) are used as thresholds to discriminate between ordinary and extraordinary rainfall events. The name of the model, SIGMA, reflects the central role of the standard deviations in the proposed methodology. The definition of intensity-duration rainfall thresholds requires the combined use of rainfall measurements and an inventory of dated landslides, whereas SIGMA model can be implemented using only rainfall data. These two methodologies were applied in an area of 116 km2 where a database of 1200 landslides was available for the period 2000-2012. The results obtained are compared and discussed. Although several examples of visual comparisons between different intensity-duration rainfall thresholds are reported in the international literature, a quantitative comparison between thresholds obtained in the same area using different techniques and approaches is a relatively undebated research topic.

  17. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  18. Physiological and behavioral effects of tilt-induced body fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tjernstrom, O.; Ivarsson, A.; Gulledge, W. L.; Poston, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses the 'fluid shift theory' of space motion sickness. The primary purpose of the research was the development of procedures to assess individual differences in response to rostral body fluid shifts on earth. Experiment I examined inner ear fluid pressure changes during head-down tilt in intact human beings. Tilt produced reliable changes. Differences among subjects and between ears within the same subject were observed. Experiment II examined auditory threshold changes during tilt. Tilt elicited increased auditory thresholds, suggesting that sensory depression may result from increased inner ear fluid pressure. Additional observations on rotation magnitude estimation during head-down tilt, which indicate that rostral fluid shifts may depress semicircular canal activity, are briefly described. The results of this research suggest that the inner ear pressure and auditory threshold shift procedures could be used to assess individual differences among astronauts prior to space flight. Results from the terrestrial observations could be related to reported incidence/severity of motion sickness in space and used to evaluate the fluid shift theory of space motion sickness.

  19. Threshold effects in the vegetation response to Holocene climate changes in central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the response of ecosystems to past climate is critical for evaluating the impacts of future climate changes. A relatively abrupt vegetation shift in response to the late Holocene gradual climate changes has been well documented for the Sahara-Sahel ecosystem. However, whether such threshold shift is of universal significance remains to be further addressed. Here, we examine the vegetation-climate relationships in central Asia based on four newly recovered Holocene pollen records and a synthesis on previously published pollen data. The results show that the orbital-induced gradual climate trend during the Holocene led to two major abrupt vegetation shifts, and that the timings of these shifts are highly dependent of the local rainfall conditions. Instead, the mid-Holocene vegetation remained rather stable despite of the changing climate. These new findings demonstrate generally significant threshold and truncation effects of climate changes on vegetation, as are strongly supported by surface pollen data and LPJ-GUESS modeling. The results also imply that using pollen data to reconstruct past climate changes is not always straightforward. Our findings have important implication for understanding the potential effects of global warming on dryland ecosystem change.

  20. On the two steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling of extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Mazas, Franck; Weiss, Jerome; Andreewsky, Marc; Kergadallan, Xavier; Benoit, Michel; Hamm, Luc

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the probability of occurrence of extreme events is traditionally achieved by fitting a probability distribution on a sample of extreme observations. In particular, the extreme value theory (EVT) states that values exceeding a given threshold converge through a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) if the original sample is composed of independent and identically distributed values. However, the temporal series of sea and ocean variables usually show strong temporal autocorrelation. Traditionally, in order to select independent events for the following statistical analysis, the concept of a physical threshold is introduced: events that excess that threshold are defined as "extreme events". This is the so-called "Peak Over a Threshold (POT)" sampling, widely spread in the literature and currently used for engineering applications among many others. In the past, the threshold for the statistical sampling of extreme values asymptotically convergent toward GPD and the threshold for the physical selection of independent extreme events were confused, as the same threshold was used for both sampling data and to meet the hypothesis of extreme value convergence, leading to some incoherencies. In particular, if the two steps are performed simultaneously, the number of peaks over the threshold can increase but also decrease when the threshold decreases. This is logic in a physical point of view, since the definition of the sample of "extreme events" changes, but is not coherent with the statistical theory. We introduce a two-steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling, aiming to discriminate (i) a physical threshold for the selection of extreme and independent events, and (ii) a statistical threshold for the optimization of the coherence with the hypothesis of the EVT. The former is a physical events identification procedure (also called "declustering") aiming at selecting independent extreme events. The latter is a purely statistical optimization

  1. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  2. Anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals.

    PubMed

    Chiang, B Y; Pantalos, G; Burns, G L; Long, J W; Khanwilkar, P S; Everett, S D; Mohammad, S F; Olsen, D B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic threshold represents an objective measure of functional capacity and is useful in assessment of pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction. This study determined the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals and evaluated the performance of the total artificial heart system. Five animals with total artificial hearts were put under incremental exercise testing after exercise training. The intensity of exercise ranged from 2.0 to 4.5 km/hr, with an increment of 0.5 km/hr every 3 min. The anaerobic threshold was 6.72 +/- 0.84 ml/kg/min as detected by the lactate method, and 6.48 +/- 0.79 by the CO2 method. The value of the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals implies that the performance capacity of a total artificial heart is not sufficient to meet the oxygen requirements of vigorously exercising skeletal muscle. The protocol does not allow for driving parameter changes during exercise, and this situation, combined with the manual mode of the control system used, was inadequate to allow the total artificial heart animals to exercise more vigorously. Using an automatic control mode might be helpful, as well as considering the relationship between indices of oxygen metabolism, such as oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction rate, in the control algorithms in total artificial heart control systems.

  3. Speech reception thresholds in various interference conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Suzanne P.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2001-05-01

    Speech intelligibility is integral to human verbal communication; however, our understanding of the effects of competing noise, room reverberation, and frequency range restriction is incomplete. Using virtual stimuli, the dependence of intelligibility threshold levels on the extent of room reverberation, the relative locations of speech target and masking noise, and the available frequency content of the speech and the masking noise is explored. Speech-shaped masking noise and target sentences have three spectral conditions: wideband, high pass above 2-kHz, and low pass below 2-kHz. The 2-kHz cutoff was chosen to approximately bisect the range of frequencies most important in speech, and the high pass noise condition simulates high-frequency hearing loss. Reverberation conditions include a pseudo-anechoic case, a moderately reverberant ``classroom'' case, and a very reverberant ``bathroom'' case. Both binaural and monaural intelligibility are measured. Preliminary results show that source separation decreases thresholds, reverberation increases thresholds, and low frequency noise reverberates more in the rooms, contributing to increasing thresholds along with the effects of the upward spread of masking. The energetic effects of reverberation are explored. [Work supported by NIH DC00100.

  4. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  5. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  6. A Cognitive Approach to Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This paper asks a fundamental question: what is happening inside the mind of the undergraduate during teaching and learning experiences, and how should curricula be designed to support it? A number of concepts lend themselves to providing an answer, principle among which is the relatively recent idea of Threshold Concepts. In this paper we attempt…

  7. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  8. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  9. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  10. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  11. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  12. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  13. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  14. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  15. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  16. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  17. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  18. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  19. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  20. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...