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Sample records for abraded rock surfaces

  1. Ultrasonically Actuated Tools for Abrading Rock Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rainen, Richard; Askin, Steve; Bickler, Donald; Lewis, Donald; Carson, John; Dawson, Stephen; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Peterson, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    An ultrasonic rock-abrasion tool (URAT) was developed using the same principle of ultrasonic/sonic actuation as that of the tools described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. Hence, like those tools, the URAT offers the same advantages of low power demand, mechanical simplicity, compactness, and ability to function with very small axial loading (very small contact force between tool and rock). Like a tool described in the second of the cited previous articles, a URAT includes (1) a drive mechanism that comprises a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator, an amplification horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range and (2) an abrasion tool bit. A URAT tool bit is a disk that has been machined or otherwise formed to have a large number of teeth and an overall shape chosen to impart the desired shape (which could be flat or curved) to the rock surface to be abraded. In operation, the disk and thus the teeth are vibrated in contact with the rock surface. The concentrated stresses at the tips of the impinging teeth repeatedly induce microfractures and thereby abrade the rock. The motion of the tool induces an ultrasonic transport effect that displaces the cuttings from the abraded area. The figure shows a prototype URAT. A piezoelectric-stack/horn actuator is housed in a cylindrical container. The movement of the actuator and bit with respect to the housing is aided by use of mechanical sliders. A set of springs accommodates the motion of the actuator and bit into or out of the housing through an axial range between 5 and 7 mm. The springs impose an approximately constant force of contact between the tool bit and the rock to be abraded. A dust shield surrounds the bit, serving as a barrier to reduce the migration of rock debris to

  2. Abraded Target on Rock 'Champagne' in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this microscopic image of a target called 'Bubbles' on a rock called 'Champagne' after using its rock abrasion tool to grind a hole through the rock's outer surface. The circular area where the rock's interior is exposed is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) across. This rock is different from rocks out on the plains of Gusev Crater but is similar to other rocks in this area of the 'Columbia Hills' in that it rich in phosphorus. Plagioclase, a mineral commonly found in igneous rocks, is also present in these rocks, according to analysis with Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer. By using the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to collect data for multiple martian days, or sols, scientists are also beginning to get measurements of trace elements in the rocks. Spirit took the images that are combined into this mosaic on sol 358 (Jan. 3, 2005).

  3. High Resolution Laser Scanning Techniques for Rock Abrasion and Texture Analyses on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Razdan, A.; Greeley, R.; Laity, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Aeolian abrasion is operative in many arid locations on Earth and is probably the dominant rock erosion process in the current Martian environment. Therefore, understanding the controlling parameters and rates of aeolian abrasion provides 1) insight into the stability of rocks on planetary surfaces and the environments under which the rocks abrade, and 2) a link between ventifact (a rock abraded by windblown particles) morphology and: a) abrasion conditions, b) possible ancient environments under which the rocks were abraded, and c) rock properties. promising and we plan further investigations in the wind tunnel and field. Our intent here is to discuss the basic technique, initial results, and upcoming plans.

  4. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The applications and advantages of abradable coatings as gas path seals in a general aviation turbofan engine were investigated. Abradable materials were evaluated for the high pressure radial compressor and the axial high and low pressure turbine shrouds.

  5. Surface uplift, uplift of rocks, and exhumation of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    England, P. ); Molnar, P. )

    1990-12-01

    Uplift of the surface of mountain belts requires forces that are comparable in magnitude to those associated with plate motion, and therefore determination of rates of surface uplift could provide important information on the dynamics of mountain ranges. Rates of uplift of the surfaces of mountain ranges have not, however, been quantified sufficiently well that they provide useful constraints on those processes. Many reports of surface uplift in mountain ranges are based on mistaking exhumation of rocks or uplift of rocks for surface uplift, and provide no information whatsoever on the rates of surface uplift.

  6. Weathering of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite under UV light and in water bath: impact on abraded particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kianfar, Bahareh; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Wichser, Adrian; Nüesch, Frank; Wick, Peter; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of the abraded particles, and the toxicity of abraded particles, measured by in vitro toxicity tests using the THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. The results showed that weathering by immersion in water had no influence on the properties of abraded particles. The exposure to UV light caused a degradation of the epoxy on the surface, followed by delamination of an approx. 2.5 μm thick layer. An increased quantity of exposed CNTs in abraded particles was not found; on the contrary, longer UV exposure times decreased the released fraction of CNTs from 0.6% to 0.4%. The toxicity tests revealed that abraded particles from the nanocomposites did not induce additional acute cytotoxic effects compared to particles from the neat epoxy.Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of

  7. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough. PMID:25152901

  8. APXS ANALYSES OF BOUNCE ROCK: THE FIRST SHERGOTTITE ON MARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Zipfel, J.; Anderson, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Klingelhoefer, G.

    2005-01-01

    During the MER Mission, an isolated rock at Meridiani Planum was analyzed by the Athena instrument suite [1]. Remote sensing instruments noticed its distinct appearance. Two areas on the untreated rock surface and one area that was abraded with the Rock Abrasion Tool were analyzed by Microscopic Imager, Mossbauer Mimos II [2], and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Results of all analyses revealed a close relationship of this rock with known basaltic shergottites.

  9. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  10. Surface energy characterization of sandstone rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsalan, Naveed; Palayangoda, Sujeewa S.; Burnett, Daniel J.; Buiting, Johannes J.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2013-08-01

    The fundamental forces of adhesion are responsible for the spreading of fluids such as crude oil/brine on the reservoir rock surface. These physico-chemical interactions determine the surface energetics of a reservoir and thus their wetting phenomena. Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) is introduced to characterize the surface energy of sandstones (Ottawa sand and Berea sandstone). The surface chemistry of the sandstone rocks is further elucidated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The behavior of the polar and non-polar interaction forces was investigated at varying water coverage and at different temperatures. The results indicated that in general as the water coverage increased, the Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy decreased to nearly that of the bulk water, while the acid-base component also showed a decreasing trend. The Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy always decreased with increase in temperature, while the acid-base properties showed contrasting trends in line with changes in surface chemistry of the sandstones, due to the change in temperature. Finally, the wetting properties arising in reservoir sandstones were related to the surface chemistry of the reservoir fluids and their interactions with the reservoir rock surface.

  11. Insights on surface spalling of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarokh, Ali; Kao, Chu-Shu; Fakhimi, Ali; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2016-07-01

    Surface spalling is a complex failure phenomenon that features crack propagation and detachment of thin pieces of rock near free surfaces, particularly in brittle rock around underground excavations when large in situ stresses are involved. A surface instability apparatus was used to study failure of rock close to a free surface, and damage evolution was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). Lateral displacement at the free face was used as the feedback signal to control the post-peak response of the specimen. DIC was implemented in order to obtain the incremental displacement fields during the spalling process. Displacement fields were computed in the early stage of loading as well as close to the peak stress. Fracture from the spalling phenomenon was revealed by incremental lateral displacement contours. The axial and lateral displacements suggested that the displacement gradient was uniform in both directions at early loading stages and as the load increased, the free-face effect started to influence the displacements, especially the lateral displacement field. A numerical approach, based on the discrete element method, was developed and validated from element testing. Damage evolution and localization observed in numerical simulations were similar to those observed in experiments. By performing simulations in two- and three-dimensions, it was revealed that the intermediate principal stress and platen-rock interfaces have important effects on simulation of surface spalling.

  12. Martian and Terrestrial Rock Abrasion from Wind Tunnel and Field Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Greeley, R.; Eddlemon, E.; Laity, J. E.; Meyer, C.; Phoreman, J.; White, B. R.

    2003-01-01

    Earth and Mars exhibit ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by saltating sand. Previous theoretical and laboratory studies have determined abrasion susceptibilities of rocks as a function of sand type and impact angle and rock material strengths. For the last two years we have been engaged in wind tunnel and field studies to better understand the fundamental factors which control and influence rock abrasion and ventifact formation on Earth and Mars. In particular, we are examining: 1) What types of rocks (composition, texture, and shape) preferentially erode and what are the relative rates of one type vs. another? 2) What are the controlling factors of the aeolian sand cloud (flux, particle speed, surface roughness, etc) which favor rock abrasion?, 3) How do specific ventifact characteristics tie into their mode of formation and rock properties? We find several important factors: 1) Initial rock shape controls the rate of abrasion, with steeper faces abrading faster than shallower ones. The relationship is partly dependent on angle-dependent flux (proportional to sin[theta]) but exhibits additional non-linear effects from momentum transfer efficiency and rebound effects that vary with incidence angle. 2) Irregular targets with pits or grooves abrade at greater rates than targets with smooth surfaces, with indentations generally enlarging with time. Surfaces become rougher with time. 3) Targets also abrade via slope retreat, which is roughly dependent on the slope of the front face. The formation of basal sills is common, as observed on terrestrial and Martian ventifacts.

  13. Surface conductivity in rocks: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffet, C.; Darot, M.; Guéguen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical properties of rocks depend on composition (i.e. bulk properties of the constituents), micro structure (i.e. geometrical arrangement of the constituents) and interfacial effects. We consider here a rock as a three component system — grains, pores, and interfaces — in order to account for the observed behaviour. We review first the main results relative to DC. conductivity. Surface conductivity effects show up clearly in the case of shaly formations or at low salinities. Although Archies' law (1942) and Waxman and Smits model (1968) are widely used, a more physically based model is that of Johnson and Sen (1988). We review also the variable frequency conductivity (complex conductivity) data and models. The important effect in that case is the enhancement of the dielectric constant at low frequencies (Knight and Nur, 1987) which can be interpreted as a geometrical effect although electrochemical interactions may also play an important role at low frequencies, depending on the rock type.

  14. The surface orientation of some Apollo 14 rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Morrison, D. A.; Hartung, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Detailed stereomicroscopic studies of the distribution of microcraters, soil covers, and glass coatings were performed to reconstruct the most recent surface orientations of selected Apollo 14 rocks. Surface orientations could be established for rocks 14053, 14073, 14301, 14303, 14307, 14310, and 14311 (which includes rock 14308). A tentative orientation of rock 14055 is suggested, and comments concerning the surface history of rocks 14302, 14305, and 14318 are presented. The examination of rocks 14066, 14306, and 14321 indicates that these specimens have complicated surface histories that prevent reconstruction of their orientation by the criteria that were established in these stereomicroscopic studies.

  15. Geochemical and spectral characterization of naturally altered rock surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, L. L. Y.; Sommer, S. E.; Buckingham, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using the visible-near infrared region for compositional analysis of remotely sensed rock surfaces is studied. This would allow mapping rock type both on the Earth's surface and on other planetary surfaces. Reflectance spectroscopy, economic geology, optical depth determination, and X-ray diffraction mineralogy are discussed.

  16. Classification of Mars Pathfinder Rock Surfaces Using Quantitative Morphologic Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the morphology of rocks in two regions of the MPF landing site in terms of location, size and dimensions, sphericity sphericity and elongation, and have correlated this information with spectral data extracted from associated rock surfaces, with the goal of improving the likelihood of discerning between rock and rock surface types. We use four highly diverse Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) images centered on Mini-Matterhorn and the Rock Garden because they are suited to demonstrate the wide morphologic variation of rocks at the site. A sampling of rocks was chosen at these locations that represented a range of shapes, textures and spectral signatures. In this initial analysis we focused upon the largest rocks that are situated in such a way as to allow easy viewing of most of the faces.

  17. Topographic relief driven by variations in surface rock density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean; Simon-Labric, Thibaud; Murray, Kendra E.; Reiners, Peter W.

    2014-07-01

    Earth's surface topography is generated by tectonically induced variations in crustal thickness combined with erosion and, to a lesser degree, by vertical stresses caused by convection in the underlying mantle. Rock hardness and resistance to erosion are also commonly thought to influence topography because hard rocks, such as granites and basalts, usually form topographic highs in the landscape. Here we use analytical and numerical models to simulate the erosion-induced isostatic rebound of rocks. We find that the isostatic rebound that accompanies erosion causes denser rocks to occupy higher elevations in the landscape, thereby creating topographic relief that is proportional to surface rock density differences rather than rock hardness. We quantify this effect, taking into account the flexural strength of the continental lithosphere. We show that in a steady-state erosional setting, density-dependent isostatic rebound can cause the densest rocks to be exhumed at double the rate of surrounding, less-dense rocks and has a stronger effect than typical rock hardness variations. The results imply that denser rock formations should erode faster and therefore be characterized by younger thermochronological ages. Thermochronological data sets from the Kinabalu granite in Borneo and the Shakhdara-Alichur gneiss domes in Pamir confirm this counter-intuitive result. Our findings imply that lateral variations in surface rock density have significant control on the shaping of the large-scale features of Earth's surface.

  18. Aerodynamic performance of conventional and advanced design labyrinth seals with solid-smooth abradable, and honeycomb lands. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, H. L.; Cox, D. M.; Holle, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    Labyrinth air seal static and dynamic performance was evaluated using solid, abradable, and honeycomb lands with standard and advanced seal designs. The effects on leakage of land surface roughness, abradable land porosity, rub grooves in abradable lands, and honeycomb land cell size and depth were studied using a standard labyrinth seal. The effects of rotation on the optimum seal knife pitch were also investigated. Selected geometric and aerodynamic parameters for an advanced seal design were evaluated to derive an optimized performance configuration. The rotational energy requirements were also measured to determine the inherent friction and pumping energy absorbed by the various seal knife and land configurations tested in order to properly assess the net seal system performance level. Results indicate that: (1) seal leakage can be significantly affected with honeycomb or abradable lands; (2) rotational energy absorption does not vary significantly with the use of a solid-smooth, an abradable, or a honeycomb land; and (3) optimization of an advanced lab seal design produced a configuration that had leakage 25% below a conventional stepped seal.

  19. Plasticity analysis of wear phenomena as an aid in the development of abradable materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Hauck, K. E., Jr.; Grotelueschen, L. P.

    1986-01-01

    Plastic deformation accompanying the wear process in fully dense and porous metals was studied in order to develop more abradable gas path seal material systems for turbine engine applications. The finite element method was used to model high-rate viscoplastic deformation in the vicinity of a moving contact. Techniques were developed for studying such deformation in both solid (fully dense) and porous metals. Results of the analysis were verified by comparison with experimental data obtained using a pendulum-type rub test apparatus and a pin-on-disk sliding wear tester. It was found that the near-surface plastic deformation in fully dense solids was different from that for porous materials because of the compressibility of the latter. Both types of materials exhibit deformation features which can be taken advantage of in the design of more abradable material systems.

  20. Morphology and surface mapping. [surface properties of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    Of the many boulders photographed at the Apollo 17 site, boulder 1 from Station 2 is unique in having a strongly developed foliation. Resistant layers form four steeply inclined ridges separated by joint planes or by deeply eroded beds of softer materials. A prominent cleavage, or set of cross joints, is oriented almost normal to the foliation. The cleavage is expressed as subparallel cracks, some of which are open fissures. The entire surface of the boulder is rough and studded by dark colored knobs ranging in diameter from 1 to 15 cm. It is a polymict breccia containing at least one type of rock that has not been recognized in any other lunar sample, and it records an unusual minor element distribution and magnetic history.

  1. LIBSSIM: Simulation of LIBS Sampling on Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosh, P. A.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M.

    2012-03-01

    A Javascript-HTML5 model has been built to simulate LIBS sampling of a rock surface. The model allows construction of arbitrary rock slabs of chosen grain size and laser beam size (both in pixels) and reports mineral and oxide percentages.

  2. Rock Rinds at Meridiani and Surface Weathering Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B.; Knoll, A.; Farrand, W.; Sullivan, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on the Mars rover Opportunity can brush away surface dust and grind away outcrop surface, exposing presumably less altered rock at depths of several mm. Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) and Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) analyses of pre- and post-RAT targets, thus, provide information on the chemical nature of weathering of Meridiani outcrop rocks. To date, Opportunity has analyzed some 25 undisturbed rock surfaces, brushed and then analyzed 7 more, and ground 23 targets for IDD analysis. Panoramic camera images show that outcrop surfaces are typically either buff or purple (as viewed in bands centered at 673, 535, and 432 nm, Farrand et al., JGR, in press). Relatively flat surfaces that are approximately parallel to the ground are typically buff, whereas those that slope steeply tend to be purple. Surfaces of rock interiors ground by the RAT are also commonly purple. Spectrally, these color differences correspond to more oxidized (buff) and less oxidized (purple), and appear to relate to the degree of eolian abrasion. Flat-lying surfaces are not eroded as quickly, thus surfaces chemically weathered by exposure to tenuous atmospheric vapor may be preserved. These observations are consistent with in-situ analyses of rock surfaces and interiors. Compared to interiors, rock surfaces have about 1/3 less S, and in general, surface compositions lie between those of rock interiors and average surface soil. In detail, they differ from soil-rock mixtures as follows: surfaces are relatively depleted in Mg, Fe, Mn, Ti, and Cr, and they are enriched in Al, Na, K, P, Cl, and Si. From MB analyses, surfaces are richer (compared to soil-rock mixtures) in oxidized Fe phases and poorer in magnetite, olivine, and pyroxene. Morphologically, numerous flat-lying rocks and outcrop surfaces that are at or near the ground surface have a rind of erosionally resistant material. Such rinds are also chemically distinct from outcrop interiors. A rind

  3. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. YSZ-Polyester Abradable Coatings Manufactured by APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussavy, Delphine; Bolot, Rodolphe; Montavon, Ghislain; Peyraut, François; Szyndelman, Gregory; Gurt-Santanach, Julien; Selezneff, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Abradable seals are used in aircraft engine compressor and turbine to decrease fuel consumption. Their role is to minimize the clearance between the rotating blades of an engine rotor and the casing to reduce air leakages (compressor) or air-fuel combustion product leakages (turbine). Operating temperatures in turbines (up to 1800 °C) can induce a thermal expansion of the blades and give rise to contacts providing damages to the blades or casing. Thus, in case of contact, the blade should remove the abradable seals applied to the casing without being damaged. Besides, the seal must be resistant to the turbine environment. Direct relationships have been observed between plasma spray operating parameters and abradable coating performances. The aim of this study is to determine those relationships for YSZ-Polyester abradable composite coatings. This study is conducted within the framework of the 7FP European project E-BREAK to reach the environmental objectives of the European Advisory Council for Aviation Research and innovation.

  5. Abradable dual-density ceramic turbine seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, D. L.; Schechter, B.; Cross, K. R.; Cavanagh, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A plasma sprayed dual density ceramic abradable seal system for direct application to the HPT seal shroud of small gas turbine engines. The system concept is based on the thermal barrier coating and depends upon an additional layer of modified density ceramic material adjacent to the gas flow path to provide the desired abradability. This is achieved by codeposition of inert fillers with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to interrupt the continuity of the zirconia struture. The investigation of a variety of candidate fillers, with hardness values as low as 2 on Moh's scale, led to the conclusion that solid filler materials in combination with a YSZ matrix, regardless of their hardness values, have a propensity for compacting rather than shearing as originally expected. The observed compaction is accompanied by high energy dissipation in the rub interaction, usually resulting in the adhesive transfer of blade material to the stationary seal member. Two YSZ based coating systems which incorported hollow alumino silicate spheres as density reducing agents were surveyed over the entire range of compositions from 100 percent filler to 100 percent YSZ. Abradability and erosion characteristics were determined, hardness and permeability characterized, and engine experience acquired with several system configurations.

  6. Modelling surface roughness and rocks in LRO Diviner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.-P.; Hayne, P. O.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) observes radiance in 7 infrared spectral channels from which brightness temperatures of the lunar surface are derived. In general, Diviner's surface footprint contains small scale variations in temperature. This anisothermality results in different observed brightness temperatures in Diviner's individual channels. A three-dimensional heat diffusion model is used to explore anisothermality in Diviner observations resulting from surface roughness and rocks at multiple length-scales and illumination conditions.

  7. Compositions of Spherules and Rock Surfaces at Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Jolliff, B. L.; Clark, B. C.; Gellert, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) have proven extremely valuable for analyzing rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. The precision of their compositional measurements has been shown to be phenomenal through analyses of the compositionally very uniform Meridiani soils. Through combined use of the rock abrasion tool (RAT) and the analytical instruments on the in-situ deployment device (IDD), analyses of the interiors of fine-grained and texturally uniform rocks with surfaces ground flat have been made under conditions that are nearly ideal for this mode of analysis. The APXS has also been used frequently to analyze materials whose characteristics, surface morphologies, and sample-detector geometries are less than ideal, but the analyses of which are nonetheless very useful for understanding the makeup of the target materials. Such targets include undisturbed rocks with irregular and sometimes coated surfaces and mixed targets such as soils that include fine-grained components as well as coarse grains and pieces of rocks. Such target materials include the well known hematite-rich concretions, referred to as blueberries because of their multispectral color, size, and mode of occurrence. In addition to non-ideal target geometry, such mixed materials also present a heterogeneous target in terms of density. These irregularities violate the assumptions commonly associated with analyses done in the laboratory to achieve the highest possible accuracy. Here we acknowledge the irregularities and we examine the inferences drawn from specific chemical trends obtained on imperfect targets in light of one of the potential pitfalls of natural materials on the surface of Mars, namely thin dust coatings.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of an Abradable Seal Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Xu, Cunguan; Lan, Hao; Huang, Chuanbing; Zhou, Yang; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2014-08-01

    A novel NiTi/BN composite abradable coating and two traditional Ni/C and Ni/BN coatings were manufactured with NiAl as the bond layer using thermal spray technology and their corrosion behaviors were investigated. In salt spray corrosion testing of the Ni/BN coating, defective sites of the metal matrix were corroded preferentially. Simulated occlusion experiments and electrochemical tests indicated that migration of ions resulted in pH decrease and Cl- enrichment in defects, and a more aggressive electrolyte led to a decrease of the corrosion potential of the metal inside defects but an increase of the corrosion current density, representing an autocatalytic corrosion process. Moreover, galvanic corrosion between the top and bond coatings of the abradable system was studied via the electrochemical technique. The results showed that, for the NiTi/BN, Ni/BN, and Ni/graphite coatings with a NiAl bond coating, current flow was generated between the anode and cathode. The NiTi/BN coating acted as the cathode due to its passivation, while the Ni/BN and Ni/graphite coatings acted as the anode because of their lower corrosion potential compared with the NiAl coating. The anode suffered serious corrosion damage due to galvanic corrosion, while the cathode corroded only slightly.

  9. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Des Marias, D.J.; Farmer, J.D.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Milam, K.A.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; De Souza, P.A., Jr.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain ???25% megacrysts. Chemical analyses of rocks by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer are consistent with picritic basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mo??ssbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  10. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N. A.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; DesMarais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Gellert, R.; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain rocks by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer are consistent with picritic basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mossbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  11. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater.

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y; Arvidson, R E; Bell, J F; Blaney, D; Cabrol, N A; Christensen, P R; Clark, B C; Crisp, J A; Crumpler, L S; Des Marais, D J; Farmer, J D; Gellert, R; Ghosh, A; Gorevan, S; Graff, T; Grant, J; Haskin, L A; Herkenhoff, K E; Johnson, J R; Jolliff, B L; Klingelhoefer, G; Knudson, A T; McLennan, S; Milam, K A; Moersch, J E; Morris, R V; Rieder, R; Ruff, S W; De Souza, P A; Squyres, S W; Wänke, H; Wang, A; Wyatt, M B; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain rocks by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer are consistent with picritic basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mössbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust. PMID:15297668

  12. Specific surface area determinations on intact drillcores and evaluation of extrapolation methods for rock matrix surfaces.

    PubMed

    André, M; Malmström, M E; Neretnieks, I

    2009-11-01

    Permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel in crystalline bedrock is investigated in several countries. For this storage scenario, the host rock is the third and final barrier for radionuclide migration. Sorption reactions in the crystalline rock matrix have strong retardative effects on the transport of radionuclides. To assess the barrier properties of the host rock it is important to have sorption data representative of the undisturbed host rock conditions. Sorption data is in the majority of reported cases determined using crushed rock. Crushing has been shown to increase a rock samples sorption capacity by creating additional surfaces. There are several problems with such an extrapolation. In studies where this problem is addressed, simple models relating the specific surface area to the particle size are used to extrapolate experimental data to a value representative of the host rock conditions. In this article, we report and compare surface area data of five size fractions of crushed granite and of 100 mm long drillcores as determined by the Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET)-method using N(2)-gas. Special sample holders that could hold large specimen were developed for the BET measurements. Surface area data on rock samples as large as the drillcore has not previously been published. An analysis of this data show that the extrapolated value for intact rock obtained from measurements on crushed material was larger than the determined specific surface area of the drillcores, in some cases with more than 1000%. Our results show that the use of data from crushed material and current models to extrapolate specific surface areas for host rock conditions can lead to over estimation interpretations of sorption ability. The shortcomings of the extrapolation model are discussed and possible explanations for the deviation from experimental data are proposed. PMID:19781807

  13. Magnetic gauge for free surface velocities due to rock blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashuach, Yecheskel; Gissis, Itai; Avinadav, Chen

    2013-06-01

    We developed a simple magnetic gauge for measuring free surface velocities of rock materials in the range of 0.1-20 m/s. The gauge consists of two elements: a NdFeB magnet and a pick-up coil. The coil is attached to the free surface at the point of interest. The magnet is placed a few centimeters away from the coil on its central axis, intact from the rock. Rock surface movement due to blast loading induces current in the coil due to change of the magnetic flux. The coil velocity is deduced from the measured current using a computational code. The gauge was tested and validated in a set of free-falling experiments. We present velocity measurements from various blast experiments in limestone and reinforced concrete, using both the magnetic gauge and a Doppler interferometer. The results obtained from the two measurement techniques were in good agreement during a few milliseconds. The magnetic gauge is cheap and very simple to operate, and therefore favorable for mapping the velocity distribution at multiple points of interest on the surface.

  14. Textures of the soils and rocks at Gusev Crater from Spirit's Microscopic Imager.

    PubMed

    Herkenhoff, K E; Squyres, S W; Arvidson, R; Bass, D S; Bell, J F; Bertelsen, P; Cabrol, N A; Gaddis, L; Hayes, A G; Hviid, S F; Johnson, J R; Kinch, K M; Madsen, M B; Maki, J N; McLennan, S M; McSween, H Y; Rice, J W; Sims, M; Smith, P H; Soderblom, L A; Spanovich, N; Sullivan, R; Wang, A

    2004-08-01

    The Microscopic Imager on the Spirit rover analyzed the textures of the soil and rocks at Gusev crater on Mars at a resolution of 100 micrometers. Weakly bound agglomerates of dust are present in the soil near the Columbia Memorial Station. Some of the brushed or abraded rock surfaces show igneous textures and evidence for alteration rinds, coatings, and veins consistent with secondary mineralization. The rock textures are consistent with a volcanic origin and subsequent alteration and/or weathering by impact events, wind, and possibly water. PMID:15297663

  15. Preservation of Organic Molecules Under Cosmic Rays in Martian Surface Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Glavin, D.; McLain, H.; Dworkin, J.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Eigenbrode, J.

    2016-05-01

    Organic molecules are destroyed in the surface rocks of Mars by cosmic rays at faster rates than was assumed in previous studies. Only surface rocks, with an exposure age of less than 50 million years, might contain unaltered amino acids.

  16. Friction and wear of sintered fibermetal abradable seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Shiembob, L. T.

    1977-01-01

    Three abradable gas-path seal-material systems based on a sintered NiCrAlY fiber metal structure were evaluated under a range of wear conditions representative of those likely to be encountered in various knife-edge seal (labyrinth or shrouded turbine) applications. Conditions leading to undesirable wear of the rotating knife were identified, and a model proposed based on thermal effects arising under different rub conditions. It was found, and predicted by the model, that low incursion (plunge) rates tended to promote smearing of the low-density sintered material with consequent wear to the knife edge. Tradeoff benefits between baseline 19 percent dense material, a similar material of increased density, and a self-lubricating coating applied to the 19 percent dense material were identified on the basis of relative rub tolerance and erosion resistance.

  17. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 1. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The application and advantages of abradable coatings as gas-path seals in a general aviation turbine engine were evaluated for use on the high-pressure compressor, the high-pressure turbine, and the low-pressure turbine shrouds. Topics covered include: (1) the initial selection of candidate materials for interim full-scale engine testing; (2) interim engine testing of the initially selected materials and additional candidate materials; (3) the design of the component required to adapt the hardware to permit full-scale engine testing of the most promising materials; (4) finalization of the fabrication methods used in the manufacture of engine test hardware; and (5) the manufacture of the hardware necessary to support the final full-scale engine tests.

  18. Lunar rock surfaces as detectors of solar processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Lunar rock surfaces exposed at or just below the lunar surface are considered as detectors of the solar wind, solar flares and solar-derived magnetic fields through their interactions with galactic cosmic rays. The degradation of the solar detector capabilities of lunar surface rocks by meteoroid impact erosion, accreta deposition, loose dust, and sputtering, amorphous layer formation and accelerated diffusion due to solar particles and illumination is discussed, and it is noted that the complex interactions of factors affecting the outer micron of exposed surface material has so far prevented the development of a satisfactory model for a particle detector on the submicron scale. Methods for the determination of surface exposure ages based on the accumulation of light solar wind noble gases, Fe and Mg, impact craters, solar flare tracks, and cosmogenic Kr isotopes are examined, and the systematic variations in the ages determined by the various clocks are discussed. It is concluded that a means of obtaining satisfactory quantitative rate or flux data has not yet been established.

  19. 30 CFR 717.15 - Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. 717.15 Section 717.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS § 717.15 Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. Excess rock and...

  20. 30 CFR 717.15 - Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. 717.15 Section 717.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS § 717.15 Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. Excess rock and...

  1. 30 CFR 717.15 - Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. 717.15 Section 717.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS § 717.15 Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. Excess rock and...

  2. 30 CFR 717.15 - Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. 717.15 Section 717.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS § 717.15 Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. Excess rock and...

  3. 30 CFR 717.15 - Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. 717.15 Section 717.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STANDARDS § 717.15 Disposal of excess rock and earth materials on surface areas. Excess rock and...

  4. Concentrations of functional lipids in abraded fractions of hulless barley and effect of storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hulless barley kernels were sequentially abraded to achieve 4, 8, 16, 24, 32 and 40 % removal. Abraded fines, kernels and powered kernels were stored at 35 deg C and 75% relative humidity for three weeks. Stored samples were extracted and levels of oil, free phytosterols, tocopherols (Ts) and toco...

  5. 'Mazatzal' Rock on Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Spirit took this navigation camera image of the 2-meter-wide (6.6-foot-wide) rock called 'Mazatzal' on sol 76, March 21, 2004. Scientists intend to aggressively analyze this target with Spirit's microscopic imager, Moessbauer spectrometer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer before brushing and 'digging in' with the rock abrasion tool on upcoming sols.

    Mazatzal stood out to scientists because of its large size, light tone and sugary surface texture. It is the largest rock the team has seen at the rim of the crater informally named 'Bonneville.' It is lighter-toned than previous rock targets Adirondack and Humphrey. Its scalloped pattern may be a result of wind sculpting, a very slow process in which wind-transported silt and sand abrade the rock's surface, creating depressions. This leads scientists to believe that Mazatzal may have been exposed to the wind in this location for an extremely long time.

    The name 'Mazatzal' comes from a mountain range and rock formation that was deposited around 1.2 billion years ago in the Four Peaks area of Arizona.

  6. Laser abrading of carbon fibre reinforced composite for improving paint adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Cheetham, Simon; Dilworth, Steve; Li, Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface contaminations (originating from manufacturing processes), smooth surface, and poor wettability of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite impair its successful paint adhesion. Surface pre-treatment of composite materials is often required. Previous approaches of using manual sand-papering result in non-uniform surface conditions and occasional damages to the fibres. Furthermore, the process is labour intensive, slow and can be hazardous to the workers if protections are not appropriate. This paper reports an investigation into a new surface treatment method based on laser multi-tasking surface abrading and surface cleaning/texturing for the improvement of paint adhesion. A KrF Excimer laser with a wavelength of 248 nm is used as the laser source. Significant improvement in paint adhesion has been demonstrated compared with as-received and sand-papered samples. This improvement is achieved by eliminating surface contaminants, minimizing chain scission and increasing in surface active functional groups as well as increasing in surface roughness. The former two play dominant roles.

  7. Continued development of abradable gas path seals. [for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    Major program objectives were the continued development of NiCrAlY feltmetal and honeycomb systems for knife edge seal applications in the 1144 to 1366 K temperature range, and to initiate abradable seal material evaluation for blade tip seal applications in the 1366 to 1589 K temperature range. Larger fiber size, higher density feltmetal showed greatly improved erosion resistance with a slight reduction in abradability compared to the baseline feltmetal. Pack aluminide coating of the honeycomb extended the oxidation resistance and slightly improved the abradability of this material. Evaluation through selected abradability, erosion and oxidation testing, and pertinent metallography led to selection of a plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)/CoCrAlY layered system as the system with the most potential to meet the 1589 K requirement for blade tip seals. This system demonstrated structural integrity, erosion resistance, and some degree of abradability.

  8. Surface friction of rock in terrestrial and simulated lunar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roepke, W. W.; Peng, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The conventional probe-on-the rotating-disk concept was used to determine the surface friction in mineral probe/specimen interfaces. Nine rocks or minerals and two stainless steels were tested in both new (NT) and same track (ST) tests under three different pressure environments-atmospheric, UHV, and dry nitrogen. Each environment was further subdivided into two testing conditions, that is, ambient and elevated (135 C) temperatures. In NT tests, friction was the lowest in an atmospheric pressure condition for all rock types and increased to the largest in UHV ambient condition except for pyroxene and stainless steel. Friction values measured in dry nitrogen ambient condition lie between the two extremes. Heating tends to increase friction in atmospheric and dry nitrogen environment but decreases in UHV environment with the exception of stainless steel, basalt, and pyroxene. In ST tests, friction was the lowest in the first run and increased in subsequent runs except for stainless steel where the reverse was true. The increases leveled off after a few runs ranging from the second to the seventh depending on rock types.

  9. Terrestrial analogues of the surface rocks of Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that hisingerite, iddingsite, and several ferric sulfate minerals derived from deuteric alteration of iron-rich basalts on earth may provide clues to the evolutionary history of the surface of Mars. The characteristics of these minerals are pointed out, and their strong compositional and paragenetic similarities to Martian regolith materials are pointed out. These similarities are consistent with a mineral assemblage on Mars consisting of ferric-bearing phyllosilicate, sulfate, and oxyhydroxide phases. These phases could have been derived from postmagmatic deuteric alteration of volatile-rich iron-rich basaltic rocks containing fayalitic olivine, Fe pyroxenes, and accessory pyrrhotite.

  10. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  11. Nuclear microprobe analysis of solar proton implantation profiles in lunar rock surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, M. C.; Padawer, G. M.; D'Agostino, M. D.; Kamykowski, E.; Brandt, W.; Young, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the results of hydrogen (proton) depth profile concentration analyses conducted on selected Apollo 16 rocks. A modeling of solar particle implantation profiles in lunar rocks is shown to trace the evolvement of these profiles under the combined influence of diffusion of atomic particles implanted in the rock, and rock surface erosion. It is also demonstrated that such diffusion may have a significant effect on the shape of the implantation profiles in certain rock materials.

  12. Stimulating rupture surfaces in a finite rock volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, O. S.; Shapiro, S. A.; Dinske, C.

    2012-12-01

    Pore fluids in rocks and pore pressure perturbations can trigger earthquakes. Sometimes fluid injections into boreholes are able to induce potentially damaging seismic events. For instance, this was the case by stimulations at such Enhanced Geothermal Systems like the ones at Basel, in Cooper Basin, at The Geysers field and at Soultz. Fluid-induced microearthquakes in hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs, aftershocks of tectonic earthquakes or seismic emission in rock samples are examples of seismicity resulting from a seismogenic activation of finite volumes of rocks. Such a finiteness can influence frequency-magnitude statistics of the seismicity. Previously we have observed that fluid-induced large-magnitude events at geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs are frequently underrepresented in comparison with the Gutenberg-Richter statistics. This is an indication that the events are much more probable on rupture surfaces contained nearly completely within the stimulated volume. Here we theoretically analyse the influence of the finiteness of a perturbed volume on the frequency-magnitude statistics of induced events. Our analysis is a phenomenological one. It is possibly applicable to different types of the seismicity triggering like a triggering by pore-pressure perturbations or a triggering by rate-and-state processes. We approximate a stimulated volume by an ellipsoid or cuboid, and derive the magnitude statistics of induced events from the statistics of randomly orientated thin flat discs of different sizes, representing the rupture surfaces. We consider different possible scenarios of event triggering: rupture surfaces located completely within the stimulated volume and rupture surfaces which are intersecting with the stimulated volume. We derive lower and upper bounds of the probability to induce a given-magnitude event. The bounds depend on the characteristic scales of the stimulated volume. The minimum principal axis is the most influential geometric

  13. Alternative methods for determination of composition and porosity in abradable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Matejicek, Jiri . E-mail: jmatejic@ipp.cas.cz; Kolman, Blahoslav; Dubsky, Jiri; Neufuss, Karel; Hopkins, Noel; Zwick, Jochen

    2006-07-15

    Materials properties and performance are governed by their composition and structure. These are commonly characterized using materialography and image analysis. However, in abradable materials, obtaining a reliable and representative sample (polished section) for this widespread technique is complicated by their abradable nature and heterogeneity. Therefore, alternative methods are also considered in this paper. They are namely X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis to determine the composition, and mercury intrusion porosimetry, Archimedean porosimetry and helium pycnometry to determine the porosity. These methods, including materialography, were applied on representative abradable materials produced by plasma spraying; their results are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of each method are discussed.

  14. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  15. Fluid-Evaporation Records Preserved in Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Sutton, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown earlier that the high SO3/Cl ratios found in secondary mineral assemblages in shergottite GRIM glasses (Gas-Rich Impact-Melt) likely resulted from interactions of regolith materials with sulfate-rich (and Cl-poor) solutions. The low SO3/Cl ratios determined in secondary salts in nakhalite fracture-fillings presumably formed by rock interactions with chloride-rich (and SO4-poor) solutions near Mars surface. The SO3 and Cl abundances determined by APXS in abraded rocks (RAT) from Endurance, Fram and Eagle craters indicate that these salt assemblages likely formed by evaporative concentration of brine fluids at Meridiani. The SO3/Cl ratios in the abraded rocks are examined here, instead of their absolute abundances, because the abundance ratios might provide better guide-lines for tracking the evolution of evaporating fluids at Meridiani. The SO3/Cl ratios in these samples, in turn, might provide clues for the mobile element ratios of the altering fluids that infiltrated into the Meridiani rocks.

  16. Surface potential and permeability of rock cores under asphaltenic oil flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkafeef, S.F.; Gochin, R.J.; Smith, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The surface properties, wetting behaviour and permeability of rock samples are central to understanding recovery behaviour in oil reservoirs. This paper will present a method new to petroleum engineering to show how area/length ratios for porous systems can be obtained by combining streaming potential and streaming current measurements on rock cores. This has allows streaming current measurements (independent of surface conductivity errors) to be made on rock samples using hydrocarbon solvents with increasing concentrations of asphaltene. Negative surface potentials for the rock became steadily more positive as asphaltene coated the pore surfaces, with permeability reduction agreeing well with petrographic analysis.

  17. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  18. Friction and roughness of a melting rock surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Griffith, W. A.

    2010-07-01

    Under extreme conditions like those encountered during earthquake slip, frictional melt is likely to occur. It has been observed on ancient faults that the melt is mostly extruded toward local extensional jogs or lateral tension cracks. In the case of laboratory experiments with a rotary shear apparatus, melt is extruded from the sample borders. When this happens, a thin and irregular melt layer is formed whereby the normal load is still in part supported by contact asperities under an incipient yield condition (as in dry friction models), but also, in the interstices between asperities, by the pressure of the viscous fluid wetting the interface. In addition, roughness of the surface is dynamically reshaped by the melting process of an inhomogeneous material (polymineralic rock). In particular, we argue that the roughness of the melting surface decreases with melting rate and temperature gradient perpendicular to the fault. Taking into account the above conditions, we obtain an expression for the average melt layer thickness and viscous pressure that may be used in estimates of friction in the presence of melt. We argue that the ratio of melt thickness to roughness depends on sliding velocity; such a ratio may be used as a gauge of slip-rate during fossil earthquakes on faults bearing pseudotachylite (solidified melt). Finally, we derive an improved analytical solution for friction in the presence of melt including the effect of roughness evolution.

  19. Observations, models, and mechanisms of failure of surface rocks surrounding planetary surface loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, R. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Geophysical models of flexural stresses in an elastic lithosphere due to an axisymmetric surface load typically predict a transition with increased distance from the center of the load of radial thrust faults to strike-slip faults to concentric normal faults. These model predictions are in conflict with the absence of annular zones of strike-slip faults around prominent loads such as lunar maria, Martian volcanoes, and the Martian Tharsis rise. We suggest that this paradox arises from difficulties in relating failure criteria for brittle rocks to the stress models. Indications that model stresses are inappropriate for use in fault-type prediction include (1) tensile principal stresses larger than realistic values of rock tensile strength, and/or (2) stress differences significantly larger than those allowed by rock-strength criteria. Predictions of surface faulting that are consistent with observations can be obtained instead by using tensile and shear failure criteria, along with calculated stress differences and trajectories, with model stress states not greatly in excess of the maximum allowed by rock fracture criteria.

  20. Friction and roughness of a melting rock surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Stefan; di Toro, Giulio; Griffith, Ashley

    2010-05-01

    Under extreme conditions like those encountered during earthquake slip, frictional melt is likely to occur. It has been observed on fossil faults that the melt is mostly extruded toward local extensional jogs or lateral tension cracks. A similar condition is reproduced in laboratory experiments with a rotary shear apparatus. When this happens, a thin and irregular melt layer is formed whereby the normal load is still in part supported by contact asperities under an incipient yield condition (as in dry friction models), but also, in the interstices between asperities, by the pressure of the viscous fluid wetting the interface. In addition, roughness of the surface is dynamically reshaped by the melting process of an inhomogeneous material (polymineral rock). In particular, we argue that the roughness decreases with temperature gradient and the melting rate. Taking into account the above conditions, we obtain an expression for the average melt layer thickness and viscous pressure that may be used in estimates of friction in the presence of melt. We argue that the ratio of melt thickness to roughness depends on sliding velocity; such a ratio may be used as a gauge of slip-rate during fossil earthquakes on faults bearing pseudotachylite (solidified melt). Finally, we derive an improved analytical solution for friction in the presence of melt including the effect of roughness evolution.

  1. Aeolian weathering of Venusian surface materials - Preliminary results from laboratory simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, David W.; Pollack, James B.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to duplicate the atmospheric temperature, pressure, and approximate gas composition of all surface elevations on Venus by means of a simulator environment in which particles are impacted against rock targets as a way of studying planetary aeolian processes. While particles are abraded even at the low impact velocities envisioned for Venus, the same particles do not generate basaltic rock abrasion for impact velocities lower than 1 m/sec; comminution debris is instead transferred onto rock surfaces to form an accretion layer. These phenomena are seen as functions of the greater than 660 K temperatures encountered.

  2. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  3. Rock surface roughness measurement using CSI technique and analysis of surface characterization by qualitative and quantitative results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Husneni; Montgomery, Paul; Gianto; Susanto, K.

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop image processing that is widely used in geo-processing and analysis, we introduce an alternative technique for the characterization of rock samples. The technique that we have used for characterizing inhomogeneous surfaces is based on Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI). An optical probe is first used to scan over the depth of the surface roughness of the sample. Then, to analyse the measured fringe data, we use the Five Sample Adaptive method to obtain quantitative results of the surface shape. To analyse the surface roughness parameters, Hmm and Rq, a new window resizing analysis technique is employed. The results of the morphology and surface roughness analysis show micron and nano-scale information which is characteristic of each rock type and its history. These could be used for mineral identification and studies in rock movement on different surfaces. Image processing is thus used to define the physical parameters of the rock surface.

  4. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  5. Chitinophaga qingshengii sp. nov., isolated from weathered rock surface.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Qi; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A novel mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from weathered rock (potassic trachyte) surfaces collected from Nanjing (Jiangsu, PR China). Cells of strain JN246(T) were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile. Strain JN246(T) was aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, and grew optimally at 28 °C and pH 7.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain JN246(T) belonged to the genus Chitinophaga and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Chitinophaga eiseniae YC6729(T) (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Chitinophaga terrae KP01(T) (96.8%), and Chitinophaga jiangningensis JN53(T) (96.3 %). The major respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major polyamine was homospermidine. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, C16:1ω5c, C16:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile of strain JN246(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminolipids and unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain JN246(T) was 48.8 mol%. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness of strain JN246(T) (ranging from 22.6% to 42.4%) to the type strains of other species of the genus Chitinophaga and unique phenotypic characteristics, strain JN246(T) represents a novel species of the genus Chitinophaga, for which the name Chitinophaga qingshengii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JN246(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2014201(T) = JCM 30026(T)). PMID:25342110

  6. Cyanobacterial Inhabitation on Archean Rock Surfaces in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yosuke; George, Simon C

    2015-07-01

    High abundances of 7- and 6-monomethylalkanes as well as C17 n-alkane, indicative of cyanobacteria, have been discovered near the surfaces of Archean carbonate rocks of the Fortescue Group in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. The presence of cyanobacterial biomarkers is mostly limited to the surface layer (<1 cm thickness) of the rocks, indicating that the cyanobacteria are an endolithic species. Biomarkers are found in bitumen I (solvent-extracted rock) and also in bitumen II (solvent-extracted decarbonated rock). The abundance of biomarkers is generally the same between both bitumen fractions in the surface layer, which suggests that the cyanobacteria penetrated into the carbonate minerals. Trace amounts of the biomarkers have also diffused into a deeper part of the rocks, but this influence is only seen in bitumen I. This implies that hydrocarbons moved toward the inside of the rock through pores and fissures in the rock fabric. In contrast, hydrocarbons in bitumen II, which mainly come from within the carbonate minerals, are isolated from the hydrocarbon migration from the outside of the rock and may be ancient indigenous organic matter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the past or modern inhabitation of cyanobacteria on Archean rocks in the Pilbara region for which hydrocarbon biomarker analyses was used. PMID:26153724

  7. Surface and subsurface non-invasive investigations to improve the characterization of a fractured rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, L.; Arosio, D.; Scaioni, M.; Papini, M.; Zanzi, L.; Roncella, R.; Brambilla, D.

    2012-10-01

    Three-dimensional assessment and modelling of fractured rock slopes is a challenging task. The reliability of the fracture network definition is of paramount importance for several engineering and geotechnical applications, and so far, different approaches have been proposed to improve the assessment procedure. A thorough knowledge of the actual fracture system is necessary to construct an accurate geometrical model of the rock mass and to determine block size distribution within the rock body. This paper describes the integration of diverse techniques used to define the rock mass fracture pattern, focusing on the most important fracture features, which are joint orientation, spacing, and persistence. A case study in the north of Italy was selected in order to show the potential of an integrated approach where surface and subsurface investigations are coupled. The rock surface was analysed by means of both standard geological mapping and terrestrial laser scanning. Ground penetrating radar surveys were conducted to image and map the discontinuity planes inside the rock mass and to estimate fracture persistence. The results obtained from the various investigation methodologies were employed to construct a model of the rock mass. This approach may lead to a better understanding of fracture network features, usually observed only on the rock surface. A careful analysis of block size distribution in a rock body can be of valuable help in several engineering and risk mitigation applications.

  8. Undercut Rocks at the MER Gusev Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    On January 3 2004, the NASA Spirit rover landed on the plains inside the Gusev Crater in the southern hemisphere of Mars, and has made observations of the landing site and nearby region in visual and infrared wavelengths, as well as making in-situ measurements of rocks and soil. A number of rocks at the Gusev site are perched, with a significant undercut above the surface; additional rocks show a feature of being eroded or etched at a height of one to three centimeters immediately above the soil line. Some rocks also show terracing, and others show a two-tone pattern of albedo, with a distinct dividing line between a lighter area near the surface and a darker color above the surface. In a small number of cases, the dividing line is correlated with a visible horizontal groove in the rock, most likely indicating an earlier location of burial of the rock. A number of explanations for this undercutting are possible. Perched rocks can be placed on the surface by deflation of the soil from underneath the rock. The surface etching may be abrasion due to reptation. Reptation, or surface creep, occurs as sand moves without leaving the surface, as small (100-200 micron particles) moved by saltation set larger particles in motion. These large particles are effective at abrading the rocks at the surface level. The structure of "ripple" features at the site is evidence to support reptation at the Gusev site. An alternate explanation is etching at the surface by chemically active grit.

  9. Alteration of Lunar Rock Surfaces through Interaction with the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frushour, A. M.; Noble, S. K; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering occurs on all ex-posed surfaces of lunar rocks, as well as on the surfaces of smaller grains in the lunar regolith. Space weather-ing alters these exposed surfaces primarily through the action of solar wind ions and micrometeorite impact processes. On lunar rocks specifically, the alteration products produced by space weathering form surface coatings known as patina. Patinas can have spectral reflectance properties different than the underlying rock. An understanding of patina composition and thickness is therefore important for interpreting re-motely sensed data from airless solar system bodies. The purpose of this study is to try to understand the physical and chemical properties of patina by expanding the number of patinas known and characterized in the lunar rock sample collection.

  10. EVALUATING QUALITY OF YELLOW ALKALINE NOODLES MADE FROM MECHANICALLY ABRADED SPROUTED WHEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five hard red spring wheat genotypes, with initial falling numbers (FN) ranging from 62 to 427 sec, were mechanically abraded for 30, 60, and 120 sec to sequentially reduce alpha-amylase activity in the grain. Mechanical abrasion prior to milling significantly increased FN and reduced amylase activ...

  11. Effect of Simulated High Hydrogen Content Combustion Environments on Abradable Properties of Ceramic Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Majumder, Madhura

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) abradable coatings are used in the turbine hot section to reduce the stator-rotor gap, minimizing gas leakage. These coatings are designed to exhibit controlled removal of material in thin layers when the turbine blades sweep through the coating, which protects the mechanical integrity of the turbine blade. In an effort to lower CO2 emissions, high H2 content fuel is being explored. This change in chemical composition of the fuel may affect the microstructure, abradability and durability of the coatings at turbine operational temperatures. The presence of high water vapor in the combustion chamber leads to accelerated degradation of the sacrificial coating materials. In this work, zirconia based composite materials with a machinable phase and varied porosity have been used to study microstructural evolution, thermal and chemical stability of the phases and abradable characteristics of baseline coating systems in both humid and dry environments. Investigation of the mechanisms that control the removal of materials and performance of abradable coatings through thermo-mechanical tests will be discussed.

  12. Diminishing friction of joint surfaces as initiating factor for destabilising permafrost rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Daniel; Krautblatter, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Degrading alpine permafrost due to changing climate conditions causes instabilities in steep rock slopes. Due to a lack in process understanding, the hazard is still difficult to asses in terms of its timing, location, magnitude and frequency. Current research is focused on ice within joints which is considered to be the key-factor. Monitoring of permafrost-induced rock failure comprises monitoring of temperature and moisture in rock-joints. The effect of low temperatures on the strength of intact rock and its mechanical relevance for shear strength has not been considered yet. But this effect is signifcant since compressive and tensile strength is reduced by up to 50% and more when rock thaws (Mellor, 1973). We hypotheisze, that the thawing of permafrost in rocks reduces the shear strength of joints by facilitating the shearing/damaging of asperities due to the drop of the compressive/tensile strength of rock. We think, that decreasing surface friction, a neglected factor in stability analysis, is crucial for the onset of destabilisation of permafrost rocks. A potential rock slide within the permafrost zone in the Wetterstein Mountains (Zugspitze, Germany) is the basis for the data we use for the empirical joint model of Barton (1973) to estimate the peak shear strength of the shear plane. Parameters are the JRC (joint roughness coefficient), the JCS (joint compressive strength) and the residual friction angle (φr). The surface roughness is measured in the field with a profile gauge to create 2D-profiles of joint surfaces. Samples of rock were taken to the laboratory to measure compressive strength using a high-impact Schmidt-Hammer under air-dry, saturated and frozen conditions on weathered and unweathered surfaces. Plugs where cut out of the rock and sand blasted for shear tests under frozen and unfrozen conditions. Peak shear strength of frozen and unfrozen rocks will be calculated using Barton's model. First results show a mean decrease of compressive

  13. Methods and apparatuses for cutting, abrading, and drilling

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Swainston, Richard C.; Palmer, Gary L.; Ferguson, Russell L.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for treating a surface of a work piece are described. In one implementation, a laser delivery subsystem is configured to direct a laser beam toward a treatment zone on a work surface. A cryogenic material delivery subsystem is operably coupled with the laser delivery subsystem and is configured to direct a stream comprising cryogenic material toward the treatment zone. Both the laser beam and stream cooperate to treat material of the work surface within the treatment zone. In one aspect, a nozzle assembly provides the laser beam and stream of cryogenic material along a common flow axis. In another aspect, the laser beam and stream are provided along different axes.

  14. The surface abundance and stratigraphy of lunar rocks from data about their albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.

    1977-01-01

    The data pf ground-based studies and surveys of the lunar surface by the Zond and Apollo spacecraft have been used to construct an albedo map covering 80 percent of the lunar sphere. Statistical analysis of the distribution of areas with various albedos shows several types of lunar surface. Comparison of albedo data for maria and continental areas with the results of geochemical orbital surveys allows the identification of the types of surface with known types of lunar rock. The aluminum/silcon and magnesium/silicon ratios as measured by the geochemical experiments on the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 spacecraft were used as an indication of the chemical composition of the rock. The relationship of the relative aluminum content to the age of crystalline rocks allows a direct dependence to be constructed between the mean albedo of areas and the age of the rocks of which they are composed.

  15. Evaporation from Near-Drift Fractured Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manepally, C.; Fedors, R. W.; Or, D.; Das, K.

    2007-12-01

    The amount of water entering emplacement drifts from a fractured unsaturated rock is an important variable for performance evaluation of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water entering the drifts as liquid or gas may enhance waste package corrosion rates and transport released radionuclides. Liquid water in form of droplets may emerge from fractures, or flow along the drift wall and potentially evaporate and condense at other locations. Driven by pressure and temperature gradients, vapor may be transported along fractures, or liquid water may evaporate directly from the matrix. Within the drift, heat-driven convection may redistribute the moisture leading to condensation at other locations. The geometry of the evaporation front around the drift is not fully understood and this, in turn, influences processes related to reflux, rewetting as the thermal pulse dissipates. Existing models focus on processes in the porous media (e.g., two-phase dual-permeability models for matrix and fractures), or on processes in the drift (e.g., gas-phase computational fluid dynamics models). This study focuses on the boundary between these two domains, and the corresponding models, where evaporation at the solid rock/drift air interface appears to play an important role. Studies have shown that evaporation from porous media is a complex process sensitive to factors such as (i) hydrological properties of the porous media, (ii) pressure gradients in the porous media, (iii) texture of the interface or boundary, (iv) local vapor and temperature gradients, and (v) convective flow rate and boundary layer transfer. Experimental observations based on passive monitoring at Yucca Mountain have shown that the formation surrounding the drift is able to provide and transport large amounts of water vapor over a relatively short period. This study will examine the basic processes that govern evaporation in the unsaturated rock surrounding drifts for

  16. Gait characteristics of individuals with transtibial amputations walking on a destabilizing rock surface

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Deanna H.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Scott, Shawn J.; Sinitski, Emily H.; Wilken, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA) have a high incidence of falls during walking. Environmental factors, such as uneven ground, often play a contributing role in these falls. The purpose of this study was to quantify the adaptations TTA made when walking on a destabilizing loose rock surface. In this study, 13 young TTA walked over a rock surface and level ground level ground at four controlled speeds. Subjects successfully traversed the rock surface by adopting a conservative gait characterized by shorter and wider steps. They also took shorter steps with their prosthetic limbs and exhibited greater variability in foot placement when stepping onto their intact limb. Between-limb differences in step length and width variability increased at faster walking speeds. TTA increased hip and knee flexion during initial stance, which contributed lowering the whole-body center of mass. TTA also increased hip and knee flexion during swing, enabling them to significantly increase their toe clearance on the rock surface compared to level ground. Toe clearance on the prosthetic side was aided by increased ipsilateral hip flexion. The results suggest that TTA were able to adapt their gait to overcome the challenge imposed by the rock surface. These adaptations were asymmetric and initiated proximally. PMID:22469772

  17. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars: Recording aqueous and surface-atmosphere processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Mustard, John F.; Salvatore, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. However, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water-rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water-rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. Our results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  18. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kenneth M.; Mustard, John F.; Salvatore, Mark R.

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  19. Development and Investigation on New Composite and Ceramic Coatings as Possible Abradable Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardi, U.; Giolli, C.; Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G.; Borgioli, F.; Fossati, A.; Partes, K.; Seefeld, T.; Sporer, D.; Refke, A.

    2008-12-01

    To improve gas turbine performance, it is possible to decrease back flow gases in the high-temperature combustion region of the turbo machine by reducing the shroud/rotor gap. Thick and porous thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems and composite CoNiCrAlY/Al2O3 coatings made by air plasma spray and composite NiCrAlY/graphite coatings made by laser cladding were studied as possible high-temperature abradable seal on shroud. Oxidation and thermal fatigue resistance of the coatings were assessed by means of isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests. Tested CoNiCrAlY/Al2O3 and NiCrAlY/graphite coatings after 1000 h at 1100 °C do not show noticeable microstructural modification. The oxidation resistance of the new composite coatings satisfied original equipment manufacturer (OEM) specifications. Thick and porous TBC systems passed the thermal fatigue test according to the considered OEM procedures. According to the OEM specifications for abradable coatings, the hardness evaluation suggests that these kinds of coatings must be used with abrasive-tipped blades. Thick and porous TBC coating has shown good abradability using tipped blades.

  20. Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Cole, David; Rother, Gernot; Jin, Lixin; Buss, Heather; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the

  1. Spectral Variability among Rocks in Visible and Near Infrared Multispectral Pancam Data Collected at Gusev Crater: Examinations using Spectral Mixture Analysis and Related Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F., III; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit s Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analysed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three endmember mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover s Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional endmembers. In the Columbia Hills there were a number of scenes in which additional rock endmembers were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces, as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are: Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes, but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts.

  2. Use of terrestrial laser scanning to characterize rock glacier surface morphology and deformation, Handcart Gulch, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Caine, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    While there has been extensive, recent research on the kinematics of rock glaciers, few studies have been able to examine surface deformation and strain utilizing terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). TLS captures a high precision, three-dimensional point cloud of X, Y, Z data. We scanned a portion of the Handcart Gulch Rock Glacier (HRG) surface at centimeter scale resolution (standard deviation of 0.64 cm). Although the origins of rock glacier formation and subsequent kinematics are poorly understood, the general consensus is that periglacial rock glaciers are a type of mass-driven permafrost that moves on the order of tens of cm per year. Velocity near the surface is thought to be faster than at depth, producing ridge- or moraine-like structures possibly formed by near-surface, compressional buckling. The HRG, located in Pike National Forest just below the Continental Divide, is multi-lobed and composed of hydrothermally altered Proterozoic metamorphic rock. In addition to commonly observed "compressional ridges", the rock glacier surface shows a number of scarp-like discontinuities that may be indicative of extension. The rock glacier surface has limited vegetative cover and a thin, but laterally extensive, layer of unidentified black lichen and lesser amounts of green Rhizocarpon lichen. The curviplanar scarps are up to about 4 m in height and are marked by discrete discontinuities that cut the lichen-covered rock glacier surface, revealing steeply dipping (> 35°) faces that are not covered with lichen. The lichen-covered surface appears to have been displaced, top-down in the direction of the maximum topographic gradient, and along the relatively lichen-free scarps thus resembling normal faults. Lichenometry is a useful method for providing a relative dating of rock glacial movement. Rhizocarpon is commonly used for dating due to its well documented, slow growth rate and ease of identification. After a century of growth the maximum diameter of Front Range

  3. Pitted rock surfaces on Mars: A mechanism of formation by transient melting of snow and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James W.; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Marchant, David R.

    2011-09-01

    Pits in rocks on the surface of Mars have been observed at several locations. Similar pits are observed in rocks in the Mars-like hyperarid, hypothermal stable upland zone of the Antarctic Dry Valleys; these form by very localized chemical weathering due to transient melting of small amounts of snow on dark dolerite boulders preferentially heated above the melting point of water by sunlight. We examine the conditions under which a similar process might explain the pitted rocks seen on the surface of Mars (rock surface temperatures above the melting point; atmospheric pressure exceeding the triple point pressure of H2O; an available source of solid water to melt). We find that on Mars today each of these conditions is met locally and regionally, but that they do not occur together in such a way as to meet the stringent requirements for this process to operate. In the geological past, however, conditions favoring this process are highly likely to have been met. For example, increases in atmospheric water vapor content (due, for example, to the loss of the south perennial polar CO2 cap) could favor the deposition of snow, which if collected on rocks heated to above the melting temperature during favorable conditions (e.g., perihelion), could cause melting and the type of locally enhanced chemical weathering that can cause pits. Even when these conditions are met, however, the variation in heating of different rock facets under Martian conditions means that different parts of the rock may weather at different times, consistent with the very low weathering rates observed on Mars. Furthermore, as is the case in the stable upland zone of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, pit formation by transient melting of small amounts of snow readily occurs in the absence of subsurface active layer cryoturbation.

  4. Volunteer revegetation of waste rock surfaces at the Bingham Canyon Mine, Utah.

    PubMed

    Borden, Richard K; Black, Rick

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary recolonization of sulfide-bearing waste rock dumps by native vegetation is inhibited by the harsh chemical and physical conditions. The success of volunteer vegetation on the waste rock surfaces at the Bingham Canyon (Utah) porphyry copper deposit is most strongly dependent on the soil pH and salinity, and to a lesser extent on physical characteristics such as compaction and distance from seed source. Vegetation cover and richness both decline below a paste pH of about 6 and above a paste conductivity of about 0.7 dS/m (for a 1:1 soil to water mixture). No significant vegetation establishment occurs below a soil pH of about 4.5. Young sulfide-bearing waste rock surfaces at Bingham Canyon have high salinity, but as reactive pyrite is depleted and salts are flushed from the soil, the salinity eventually declines, allowing volunteer native vegetation to become established on surfaces with a circumneutral pH. Under natural conditions, the pH of older acidic weathered surfaces will recover very slowly, but it can be rapidly raised by adding relatively small amounts of limestone because there are few intact reactive sulfides. For uncompacted waste rock surfaces with favorable chemical conditions, less than 90% gravel content, and that are located near a native seed source, the arithmetic mean volunteer vegetation cover was 56 +/- 24% and the mean species richness was 17 +/- 5. These data indicate that with adequate surface preparation and limestone addition, direct planting of older, acidic, but low salinity waste rock surfaces can greatly accelerate natural revegetation. PMID:16275725

  5. The formation of a yield-surface vertex in rock

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural models of deformation of polycrystalline materials suggest that inelastic deformation leads to the formation of a corner or vertex at the current load point. This vertex can cause the response to non-proportional loading to be more compliant than predicted by the smooth yield-surface idealization. Combined compression-torsion experiments on Tennessee marble indicate that a vertex forms during inelastic flow. An important implication is that strain localization by bifurcation occurs earlier than predicted by bifurcation analysis using isotropic hardening.

  6. Survival Times of Meter-Sized Rock Boulders on the Surface of Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Horz, F.; Ramsley, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the survival times of meter-sized rock boulders on the surfaces of several airless bodies. As the starting point, we employ estimates of the survival times of such boulders on the surface of the Moon by[1], then discuss the role of destruction due to day-night temperature cycling, consider the meteorite bombardment environment on the considered bodies in terms of projectile flux and velocities and finally estimate the survival times. Survival times of meter-sized rocks on lunar surface: The survival times of hand specimen-sized rocks exposed to the lunar surface environment were estimated based on experiments modeling the destruction of rocks by meteorite impacts, combined with measurements of the lunar surface meteorite flux, (e.g.,[2]). For estimations of the survival times of meter-sized lunar boulders, [1] suggested a different approach based on analysis of the spatial density of boulders on the rims of small lunar craters of known absolute age. It was found that for a few million years, only a small fraction of the boulders ejected by cratering process are destroyed, for several tens of million years approx.50% are destroyed, and for 200-300 Ma, 90 to 99% are destroyed. Following [2] and other works, [1] considered that the rocks are mostly destroyed by meteorite impacts. Destruction of rocks by thermal-stress. However, high diurnal temperature variations on the surface of the Moon and other airless bodies imply that thermal stresses may also be a cause of surface rock destruction. Delbo et al. [3] interpreted the observed presence of fine debris on the surface of small asteroids as due to thermal surface cycling. They stated that because of the very low gravity on the surface of these bodies, ejecta from meteorite impacts should leave the body, so formation there of fine debris has to be due to thermal cycling. Based on experiments on heating-cooling of cm-scale pieces of ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites and theoretical modeling of

  7. Modeling Anisothermality in LRO Diviner Observations to Assess Surface Roughness and Rock Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.; Paige, D. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Vasavada, A. R.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) observes radiance in 7 infrared spectral channels from which brightness temperatures of the lunar surface are derived [1]. Multiple temperatures in the instrument's field of view result in variations in brightness temperature in the individual channels, anisothermality, due to the non-linear nature of Planck radiance with respect to wavelength; the warmer temperatures have an increased proportional influence on brightness temperatures at shorter wavelengths. In general, Diviner's surface footprint contains small scale variations in temperature due to surface roughness and rocks. Anisothermality in Diviner nighttime brightness temperatures has been successfully exploited to map rock abundances on the Moon as rocks cool more slowly than the regolith, and therefore are generally warmer at night [2]. A three-dimensional thermal diffusion model that balances incident solar radiation with infrared emission and conduction into the subsurface is employed to model Diviner observations resulting from surface roughness and rocks at multiple length-scales and illumination conditions. The model includes ray tracing of illumination so that slope effects and shadowing at different solar incidence angles can be explored for arbitrary surface geometries. We find that surface roughness and rocks with length scales as small as 5 cm can generate anisothermality in the Diviner thermal channels in both daytime and nighttime observations. At smaller scales, lateral conduction should become important. The length-scale dependence of anisothermality will be explored further in this study. [1] Paige et al. (2010) Space Sci. Rev., 150: 125-160. [2] Bandfield et al. (2011), JGR, 116.

  8. Erosion rates and weathering history of rock surfaces associated with Aboriginal rock art engravings (petroglyphs) on Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia, from cosmogenic nuclide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillans, Brad; Fifield, L. Keith

    2013-06-01

    The Burrup Peninsula and surrounding Dampier Archipelago, in Western Australia, contain the world's largest known gallery of rock art engravings (petroglyphs), estimated to number up to 1 million images. The peninsula is also the site of major industrial development and there are concerns that industrial emissions may adversely affect the stability and longevity of the rock art. We have studied the natural processes and rates of weathering and erosion, including the effects of fire, that affect the stability of rock surfaces and hence the longevity of the rock art, using cosmogenic nuclides. The concentration of 10Be in quartz yields erosion rates in the range 0.15-0.48 mm/1000 years on horizontal rock surfaces and 0.34-2.30 mm/1000 years on vertical rock faces. The former, largely caused by mm-scale surface flaking, are amongst the lowest erosion rates measured by cosmogenic nuclides anywhere in the world. The latter are inferred to represent a combination of mm-scale flaking and very rare centimetre- to metre-scale block falls, controlled by failure along joint planes. Such low erosion rates result from a combination of resistant rocks, low relief and low rainfall, favouring long-term preservation of the petroglyphs - long enough to encompass the known period of human settlement in Australia.

  9. Rock Surfaces as Life Indicators: New Ways to Demonstrate Life and Traces of Former Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbushina, Anna A.; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.; Volkmann, Marc

    2002-06-01

    Life and its former traces can only be detected from space when they are abundant and exposed to the planetary atmosphere at the moment of investigation by orbiters. Exposed rock surfaces present a multifractal labyrinth of niches for microbial life. Based upon our studies of highly stress-resistant microcolonial fungi of stone monument and desert rock surfaces, we propose that microbial biofilms that develop and become preserved on rock surfaces can be identified remotely by the following characteristics: (1) the existence of spectroscopically identifiable compounds that display unique adsorption, diffraction, and reflection patterns characteristic of biogenerated organic compounds (e.g., chlorophylls, carotenes, melanins, and possibly mycosporines), (2) demonstrably biogenic geomorphological features (e.g., biopitting, biochipping, and bioexfoliation), and (3) biominerals produced in association with biofilms that occupy rock surfaces (e.g., oxalates, forsterite, and special types of carbonates, sulfides, and silicates). Such traces or biosignatures of former life could provide macroscopically visible morphotypes and chemically identifiable products uniquely indicative of life.

  10. Producing virtually defect-free nanoscale ripples by ion bombardment of rocked solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Matt P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2016-04-01

    Bombardment of a solid surface with a broad, obliquely incident ion beam frequently produces nanoscale surface ripples. The primary obstacle that prevents the adoption of ion bombardment as a nanofabrication tool is the high density of defects in the patterns that are typically formed. Our simulations indicate that ion bombardment can produce nearly defect-free ripples on the surface of an elemental solid if the sample is concurrently and periodically rocked about an axis orthogonal to the surface normal and the incident beam direction. We also investigate the conditions necessary for rocking to produce highly ordered ripples and discuss how the results of our simulations can be reproduced experimentally. Finally, our simulations show that periodic temporal oscillations of coefficients in the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation can suppress spatiotemporal chaos and lead to patterns with a high degree of order.

  11. New Rock Physical Properties Assessments From the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, P. W.; Basso, B.; Kusack, A.; Wilson, J.; Zacny, K.

    2005-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) serves as the sample preparation device on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) science payload. The RAT grinds a circular area 45 millimeter in diameter, and on the order of a few millimeters deep, into a rock face. This process removes surface fines and weathered layers in preparation for imaging and spectral observations of the rock. As of September 2005, 15 grinding operations have been performed at Gusev Crater and 26 at Meridiani Planum. Since the RAT performs a mechanical operation on a rock, deductions can be made via the RAT's engineering data about the rock's physical properties. For each grinding operation, the energy consumed while grinding is converted to provide a physically relevant Specific Grind Energy (SGE) in terms of Joules per cubic millimeter of rock removed. The calculation is performed over the last 0.25 millimeter of a grinding operation, where it is possible, by taking measurements from Microscopic Imager images of the abraded area, to make an accurate estimate of the volume of rock removed. Progress is presented on recent refinement of the SGE calculation methods including decoupling of artifacts. Environmental factors and differing parameters used to command the RAT operations are among the key artifacts recently analyzed. Progress is also presented on further characterization of the dynamics and wear mechanics involved in the grinding process, and how they influence SGE. A library of Earth rocks has been assembled and it is being used with the RAT Engineering Model to create a set of similar SGE data products that can be compared to Mars rocks in order to contribute to physical properties assessments of the Mars rocks. Initial results indicate that the Martian rocks are analogous to a range of Earth rocks, from gypsum to low-strength basalt in terms of grindability; however, caution needs to be exercised in making a direct comparison of grinding energies. This is because the grindability of rocks was found to

  12. Long-term intact rock strength and critical in situ stresses in near-surface bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, K.; Moore, J.; Amann, F.; Loew, S.

    2012-04-01

    Near-surface in situ stresses in excess of gravitational or tectonic loading are frequently encountered in natural landscapes, although the question of their origin is rarely discussed in detail. These high near-surface stresses are common to both cratonic shield and alpine regions, and their relationship to landscape or landform development has been widely commented on, as they are often associated with the development of exfoliation or sheeting fractures. We suggest these high near-surface stresses originate from the elastic and thermoelastic response of bedrock to exhumation, and reflect a regional stress regime no longer in agreement with either Andersonian stress states or Byerlee's law, but instead limited by the long-term intact rock strength. Although sufficiently rapid extensional strain, or well-oriented Reverse faults are generally assumed to limit the development of such stresses, we suggest that in the absence of these factors, an upper limit to long-term in situ stresses may be defined by the onset of inelastic strain facilitated through micro-cracking, as the rock itself is not able to maintain further increases in differential stress. Recent studies have made significant progress in understanding critical aspects of this system, in particular, the long-term behaviour of bedrock maintaining high differential stresses at shallow depths (100's of m) and the potential for micro-crack development in response to exhumation and thermoelastic relaxation. Our analysis of global in-situ stress measurements indicates good agreement between maximum differential stress magnitudes in compressional regimes and laboratory-derived threshold stresses required to initiate micro-cracking in intact rock. This correlation appears to hold for confining stresses up to 30 MPa (approximately 1 km depth) and indicates that the long-term cohesive component of rock strength may dominate the behaviour of high quality rock masses, and therefore define an upper-bound for in situ

  13. Mechanical effects associated with surface loading of dry rock due to glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Wahi, K.K.; Hunter, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Many scenarios of interest for a repository in the Pasco Basin begin with glaciation. Loading and unloading of joints and fractures due to the weight of ice sheets could affect the hydrologic properties of the host rock and surrounding units. Scoping calculations performed using two-dimensional numerical models with simplifying assumptions predict stress changes and uplift or subsidence caused by an advancing glacier. The magnitudes of surface uplift and subsidence predicted by the study agree well with previous independent predictions. Peak stress unloading near the repository horizon is a small fraction of the ambient stress. Any resultant aperture increase is likewise small. Based on the results of this study, mechanical loading caused by a glacier is expected to have a minimal effect on rock permeability, assuming that the excess compressive loads do not crush the rock. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  15. Survival times of meter-sized rock boulders on the surface of airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Horz, F.; Ramsley, K.

    2015-11-01

    Rock boulders are typical features of the surfaces of many airless bodies, so the possibility of estimating their potential survival times may provide insights into the rates of surface-modification processes. As an opening point of this study we employ estimates of the survival times of meter-sized boulders on the surface of the Moon based on analysis of the spatial density of boulders on the rims of small lunar craters of known absolute age (Basilevsky et al., 2013), and apply them, with necessary corrections, to boulders on other bodies. In this approach the major factor of rock destruction is considered to be impacts of meteorites. However another factor of the rock destruction, thermal fatigue due to day-night cycling, does exist and it was claimed by Delbo et al. (2014) as being more important than meteorite impacts. They concluded this on the basis of known presence of fine material on the surface of small asteroids, claiming that due to extremely low gravity on those bodies, the products of meteorite bombardment should leave these bodies, and thus their presence indicates that the process of thermal fatigue should be much more effective there. Delbo et al. (2014) made laboratory experiments on heating-cooling centimeter-sized samples of chondrites and, applying some assumptions and theoretical modeling concluded that, for example, at 1 AU distance from the Sun, the lifetime of 10 cm rock fragments on asteroids with period of rotation from 2.2 to 6 h should be only ~103 to 104 years (that is ~3.5×106 to 1.5×107 thermal cycles) and the larger the rock, the faster it should be destroyed. In response to those conclusions we assessed the results of earlier laboratory experiments, which show that only a part of comminuted material produced by high-velocity impacts into solid rocks is ejected from the crater while another part is not ejected but stays exposed on the target surface and is present in its subsurface. This means that the presence of

  16. Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in rock matrix and natural fracture surfaces studied by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Muuronen, S.; Kaemaeraeinen, E.L.; Jaakkola, T.; Pinnioja, S.; Lindberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A method based on autoradiography was developed to determine the sorption and diffusion of cesium, strontium, cobalt, nickel, iodine and americium into rock matrix. Samples chosen for this study were filled and unfilled natural fracture surfaces and drill cores having a central drilled hole (drill core cups). Rock types were mica gneiss, tonalite and rapakivi granite, which were selected to represent the common rocks and minerals in Finnish bedrock. Distribution coefficients (K/sub a/-values) of cesium and strontium determined for fissure surfaces and drill core cups were of the same order of magnitude. After three months contact time the greatest penetration depth for cesium was 2.5 mm, for a natural fissure surface sample of rapakivi granite. For strontium the penetration depths of 11 mm in three months and 35 mm in twelve months were found for filled natural fissure surface samples of rapakivi granite. The range of D/sub a/-values was 1.5 x 10/sup -15/ - 3.2 x 10/sup -14/ m/sup 2//s and 1.4 x 10/sup -14/ - 2.1 x 10/sup -13/ m/sup 2//s for cesium and strontium, resp. For cobalt the D/sub a/-values of 5 x 10/sup -16/ m/sup 2//s in tonalite was obtained. In six months the penetration depths of nickel, iodine and americium were too low (<0.5 mm) to allow calculation of D/sub a/.

  17. 10Be surface exposure dating of rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Tyrol, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kerschner, H.; Maisch, M.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Schluchter, C.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of Lateglacial and Holocene climate change research, rock glaciers (creeping mountain permafrost) also play an important role. They are phenomena of discontinuous alpine permafrost and as such good indicators for the mean annual air temperature for the period they are active. We have 10Be surface exposure dated boulders from two relict rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Austria. This is the type area for a postulated mid-Holocene cold period called the Larstig oscillation. The period of activity was suggested to be of similar age as the mid-Holocene Frosnitz advance of glaciers in the Venediger Mountains farther to the east (Patzelt and Bortenschlager, 1973). For rock glaciers of this size to be active at 2200 m a.s.l. in Larstig valley would have required a significant drop in temperatures, thus a marked mid-Holocene cold pulse, for at least several centuries at around 7.0 ka. In contrast, our exposure dates show that the rock glaciers stabilized during the early Preboreal (Ivy-Ochs et al., submitted). We see no distinct pattern with respect to exposure age and boulder location on the rock glaciers. This implies that for our site the blocks did not acquire inherited 10Be during exposure in the free rock face, in the talus at the base of the slope, or during transport on the rock glaciers. Our data point to final stabilization of the Larstigtal rock glaciers in the earliest Holocene and not in the middle Holocene. Combined with data from other archives (Nicolussi et al., 2005), there appears to have been no time window in the middle Holocene long enough for rock glaciers of the size and at the elevation of the Larstig site to have formed. Ivy-Ochs, S., Kerschner, H., Maisch, M., Christl, M., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier variations in the European Alps. Quaternary Science Reviews (submitted). Nicolussi, K., Kaufmann, M., Patzelt, G., van der Plicht, J., Thurner, A., 2005. Holocene tree-line variability in the Kauner

  18. Vitrification darkening of rock powders - Implications for optical properties of the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Conel, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that albedoes as low as those on the moon can be produced by vacuum vitrification and associated chemical fractionation of ordinary terrestrial basaltic material. Vitrification is established as an unequivocal process that can account for the low albedo and apparent local darkening with age of the lunar surface. The spectral reflectance curves of glass powders are significantly different than those of the parent rock mineralogy; thus, the presence of ubiquitous glass in lunar surface material complicates compositional determinations by interpretation of spectral reflectance curves. Vitrification of rocks on the moon may highly modify the chemical composition of the resulting glass; thus, glass fragments found in lunar fines cannot be assumed to represent bulk parent rock material. Progressive impact vitrification of lunar surface material throughout the moon's history may have led to a fine-grain, opaque, refractory-rich material we call 'ultimate glass.' This unidentified and, at this point, hypothetical component may exist in dark regolith material; if found, it may be a useful indicator of regolith maturity.

  19. Geochemical Relations between Surface Water and Groundwater In Fractured Rock In Nevada County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltero, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Sierra Nevada foothills in the South Yuba River basin Nevada County, CA is underlain by plutonic, metabasic rocks of pre-Tertiary age. Fifty-six water samples from five sites were analyzed for spatial and temporal variations using stable isotopes of water and major element chemistry. Hydrogeochemical data from surface water and groundwater indicate site specific, depth related spatial variations. Temporal variations are evident in most surface water data and absent in most groundwater data. Data for 18O and deuterium (D) plot close to the global meteoric water line confirming a meteoric source and minimal subsequent evaporative fractionation or effects of gas-water-rock interactions. An altitude effect presented in surface and groundwater data as a 0.1 per mil decrease in δ 18O and a 0.5- 0.7 per mil decrease in δ D per 30.5 meter (100ft) increase between 305 and 884 meters (1,000 and 2,900 feet) in elevation. Major element chemistry was dominated by sodium, magnesium, and calcium bicarbonate in dilute concentrations. Most groundwater data had higher Ca/Na (1.8:1), Ca/Mg (4:3), and HCO3- /Cl- (3:1) ratios than surface water data from the same site, indicative of local gas-water-rock interactions or mixing of infiltrating water with other groundwater sources. Most deep groundwater data (>91 meters or 300ft) had similar Ca/Na (0.9:1), and higher Ca/Mg (1.6:1) and HCO3- /Cl- (1.6:1) ratios than shallow groundwater data. Most groundwater samples were under saturated or close to saturation with respect to calcite. Aqueous speciation modeling, EQ3NR version 7.2c, adjusted for lab conditions, indicated acceptable charge balance relations. Most water data are consistent with fracture flow in the granitic and metamorphic rocks of the region. Data suggest a precipitation dominated hydrologic regime where local surface waters are related to local groundwaters. Most data indicate that infiltration by way of secondary porosity contributes to groundwater production in

  20. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and reactive surface area of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for CO2 injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. In this study we have created μm resolution 3D images of 3 sandstone and 4 carbonate rocks using x-ray microtomography. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxiliary characterisation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against N2 BET surface area and He porosity measurements of the imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. [1] Maher, Steefel, Depaolo and Vianni (2006) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 70, 337-363 [2] Landrot, Ajo-Franklin, Yang, Cabrini and Steefel (2012) Chemical Geology 318-319, 113-125 [3] Li, Peters and Celia (2007) American Journal of Science 307, 1146

  1. Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a slender delta wing undergoing limit cycle wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slender wing limit cycle motion known as wing rock was investigated using two unique experimental systems. Dynamic roll moment measurements and visualization data on the leading edge vortices were obtained using a free to roll apparatus that incorporates an airbearing spindle. In addition, both static and unsteady surface pressure data was measured on the top and bottom surfaces of the model. To obtain the unsteady surface pressure data a new computer controller drive system was developed to accurately reproduce the free to roll time history motions. The data from these experiments include, roll angle time histories, vortex trajectory data on the position of the vortices relative to the model's surface, and surface pressure measurements as a function of roll angle when the model is stationary or undergoing a wing rock motion. The roll time history data was numerically differentiated to determine the dynamic roll moment coefficient. An analysis of these data revealed that the primary mechanism for the limit cycle behavior was a time lag in the position of the vortices normal to the wing surface.

  2. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Salla T; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment. PMID:25338080

  3. Halophilic Archaea Cultivated from Surface Sterilized Middle-Late Eocene Rock Salt Are Polyploid

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Salla T.; Zerulla, Karolin; Guo, Qinggong; Liu, Ying; Ma, Hongling; Yang, Chunhe; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chen, Xiangdong; Soppa, Jörg; Oksanen, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38–41 million years ago) rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11–14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6–8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment. PMID:25338080

  4. Free surface flow through rock-fill dams analyzed by FEM with level set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, N. H.; Wiberg, N.-E.; Levenstam, M.

    A stabilized-finite element formulation is coupled with a level set technique for computations of incompressible non-linear flow with interfaces between two immiscible fluids. An interface capturing formulation (ICF) for non-linear, free surface, seepage flow in rock-fill dams is proposed. The formulation is derived for two- and three-dimensional flow within a fixed mesh domain. The resulting formulation is general and applicable for various steady and transient two-phase flow problems. FE-refinement is processed for the entire fixed mesh domains. A general solver is also reviewed for large and non-symmetric non-positive definite linear system of equations with the GMRES-update technique based on a Newton-iterative method. The computational procedure has been implemented in MATLAB. A comparison is performed between the 2-D computed test problem for coarse and refined meshes together with some proposed analytical solutions for nonlinear seepage flow with free surface in rock-fill dams. An expansion of the 2-D program code to a 3-D one for a rectangular rock-fill dam is also developed and simulated in MATLAB. The performance of the computations in 3-D is very promising and its opening the future for possible industrial applications using the same simple technique. Computations for a simple 3-D seepage flow problem with free surface in rock-fill dam are included in present paper. A general mesh generator and solver for large scale and complex 3-D flow problems in a real embankment dam is also under construction in C++.

  5. Spectra of volcanic rocks glasses as analogues of Mercury surface spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Capaccioni, F.; de Sanctis, M.; Filacchione, G.; Sgavetti, M.; di Genova, D.; Vona, A.; Visonà, D.; Ammannito, E.

    2010-12-01

    Remote-sensing studies have revealed that most of the inner planets surfaces are composed by magmatic effusive rocks as lava flows or pyroclastic deposits, that are the natural products of magma-rock dynamic systems controlled by T, P, oxygen fugacity and time. These materials generally contain a fair amount of volcanic glass, due to the magma rapid cooling once effused on the surface. The VNIR reflectance spectroscopy is one of the most relevant tools for remote-sensing studies and in the last decades gave important results identifying the presence of different Fe-Mg silicates, such as olivine and pyroxenes, on the planets surfaces. However, the mineralogical interpretation of the observed spectral features of several volcanic areas on the inner Solar System bodies is still matter of debate. In particular the presence of dark volcanic glass, which can dominate or not the rock texture, influences the spectra signatures. In fact samples with a glass-bearing groundmass have lower albedo and reduced band intensity of the spectra of samples with comparable mineral composition and intergranular texture. As a consequence, an important goal for studying the planetary crusts is to understand the spectral behavior of volcanic material, where chemical or physical parameters are different depending on geologic context and effusive processes. We present here preliminary laboratory activity to investigate VNIR reflectance spectra of several volcanic glasses. Reflectance spectra, in the wavelength range between 0.35- 2.50 μm, are measured on powders of magmatic rocks, having different composition and textures, at fine (<60 μm in diameter) and very fine (<10 μm) grain sizes. For each rock sample a corresponding “thermal shocked-sample” is produced by heating at 1300°C and P=1 atm and a glass-sample was produced by melting at 1500°C and P=1 atm, than quenching it in air. Reflectance spectra of powders of shocked and glass-samples were acquired at the same grain size, and

  6. Coseismic landslides reveal near-surface rock strength in a high-relief tectonically active setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallen, Sean F; Clark, Marin K; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We present quantitative estimates of near-surface rock strength relevant to landscape evolution and landslide hazard assessment for 15 geologic map units of the Longmen Shan, China. Strength estimates are derived from a novel method that inverts earthquake peak ground acceleration models and coseismic landslide inventories to obtain material proper- ties and landslide thickness. Aggregate rock strength is determined by prescribing a friction angle of 30° and solving for effective cohesion. Effective cohesion ranges are from 70 kPa to 107 kPa for 15 geologic map units, and are approximately an order of magnitude less than typical laboratory measurements, probably because laboratory tests on hand-sized specimens do not incorporate the effects of heterogeneity and fracturing that likely control near-surface strength at the hillslope scale. We find that strength among the geologic map units studied varies by less than a factor of two. However, increased weakening of units with proximity to the range front, where precipitation and active fault density are the greatest, suggests that cli- matic and tectonic factors overwhelm lithologic differences in rock strength in this high-relief tectonically active setting.

  7. Morphological, physiological, and molecular characterization of actinomycetes isolated from dry soil, rocks, and monument surfaces.

    PubMed

    Eppard, M; Krumbein, W E; Koch, C; Rhiel, E; Staley, J T; Stackebrandt, E

    1996-07-01

    In an extended study on the biodiversity of rock-dwelling bacteria, the colony and cell morphology, physiology, protein patterns, and 16S rDNA sequences of 17 bacterial strains isolated from different surfaces of rocks, stones, and monuments and from various geographical locations were characterized. All except one strain, which was found to be a Bacillus, were members of the order Actinomycetales. The majority of the strains either were closely related to Geodermatophilus obscurus, which was also analyzed in this study, or formed a closely related sister taxon. All of these strains were isolated from the surface of marble in Namibia and Greece and from limestone from the Negev desert, Israel. One strain, G10, of Namibia origin was equidistantly related to Geodermatophilus obscurus, Frankia alni, Sporichthya polymorpha, and Acidothermus cellulolyticus. Three strains from rock varnish in the Mojave desert, California, were found to be highly related to Arthrobacter (formerly Micrococcus) agilis. All clusters could be confirmed from results of studies on morphological and physiological properties and from banding patterns of whole cell proteins. Based on the results of tests, four additional strains were assigned to the lineage defined by strain G10. PMID:8661940

  8. A Bounding Surface Plasticity Model for Intact Rock Exhibiting Size-Dependent Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Hossein; Douglas, Kurt J.; Russell, Adrian R.

    2016-01-01

    A new constitutive model for intact rock is presented recognising that rock strength, stiffness and stress-strain behaviour are affected by the size of the rock being subjected to loading. The model is formulated using bounding surface plasticity theory. It is validated against a new and extensive set of unconfined compression and triaxial compression test results for Gosford sandstone. The samples tested had diameters ranging from 19 to 145 mm and length-to-diameter ratios of 2. The model captures the continuous nonlinear stress-strain behaviour from initial loading, through peak strength to large shear strains, including transition from brittle to ductile behaviour. The size dependency was accounted for through a unified size effect law applied to the unconfined compressive strength—a key model input parameter. The unconfined compressive strength increases with sample size before peaking and then decreasing with further increasing sample size. Inside the constitutive model two hardening laws act simultaneously, each driven by plastic shear strains. The elasticity is stress level dependent. Simple linear loading and bounding surfaces are adopted, defined using the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, along with a non-associated flow rule. The model simulates well the stress-strain behaviour of Gosford sandstone at confining pressures ranging from 0 to 30 MPa for the variety of sample sizes considered.

  9. Experimental Study on Wave Propagation Across a Rock Joint with Rough Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Li, J. C.; Cai, M. F.; Zou, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2015-11-01

    Joints are an important mechanical feature of rock masses. Their effect on wave propagation is significant in characterizing dynamic behaviors of discontinuous rock masses. An experimental study on wave propagation across artificial rock joint was carried out to reveal the relation between the transmission coefficient and the contact situation of the joint surface. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus was used in this study while all the bars and specimens were norite cored from the same site. One surface of the specimens with a number of notches was adopted to simulate the artificial rough joint. Two strain gauges were mounted on each pressure bar at a specific spacing. The incident, reflected and transmitted waves across the joints were obtained using a wave separation method. Comparisons of the transmission coefficients were made under two different conditions: with the same joint thickness but different contact area ratios, and with the same contact area ratio but different joint thicknesses. The results show the effects of contact area ratio and thickness of joints on wave transmission.

  10. Friction and wear of sintered fiber-metal abradable seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Shiembob, L. T.

    1977-01-01

    Three abradable gas path seal material systems based on a sintered NiCrAlY fibermetal structure were evaluated under a range of wear conditions representative of those likely to be encountered in various knife-edge seal (labyrinth or shrouded turbine) applications. Conditions leading to undesirable wear of the rotating knife were identified and a model was proposed based on thermal effects arising under different rub conditions. It was found, and predicted by the model, that low incursion (plunge) rates tended to promote smearing of the low density sintered material with consequent wear to the knife-edge. Tradeoffs benefits between baseline 19 percent dense material, a similar material of increased density, and a self lubricating coating applied to the 19 percent material were identified based on relative rub tolerance and erosion resistance.

  11. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and surface area of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Peter; Moulton, Kevin; Krevor, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. The objective of this study was to quantify heterogeneity in reactive surface and observe the extent of its non-normal character. In this study we describe our work in using micron-scale x-ray imaging and other spectroscopic techniques for the purpose of describing the statistical distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium, and identifying specific mineral phases and their distribution in 3-dimensions. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxilary charactersation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against nitrogen BET surface area and backscattered electron imaging measurements of the CT-imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be

  12. The effects of Concentration and Salinity on Polymer Adsorption Isotherm at Sandstone Rock Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Ben Mahmud, H.

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) polymers on sandstone rock surface was studied by static adsorption experiments. Total of 10 Runs of static experiments were conducted in test tubes by mixing the desired solution with crushed rock sample, at temperature of 25 °C, and salinity range from 0-4 wt%. The results are in conformity with Langmuir's isotherm. Ten different isotherms were generated at each Run. The initial polymer concentration was varied from 0.3-2.1 g/l. The effects of salinity have been studied by observation on Langmuir adsorption coefficients (Y and K). The results show that the adsorption coefficient (Y) was found to have linear relationship with salinity. The adsorption coefficient (K) was found to be related to salinity by a quadratic relationship.

  13. Microstructure and Properties of Porous Abradable Alumina Coatings Flame-Sprayed with Semi-molten Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Zou, Jiao; Huo, Hui-Bin; Yao, Jian-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency gas turbines require high-temperature sealing by use of abradable porous ceramic coatings to increase engine efficiency. In this study, porous Al2O3 coatings were deposited by flame spraying; the coatings were applied in a semi-molten state by controlled melting of the sprayed powder particles. The effects of the degree of melting of the sprayed particles, which depends on spraying conditions, on coating microstructure and porosity were investigated. The degree of melting of the sprayed particles was characterized by use of 3D confocal laser microscopy. The porosity of the coating was estimated by image analysis. The results showed that the degree of melting of alumina particles can be changed from 70 to 30%, and thus coating porosity can be increased from 30% up to over 70%. The standard hardness test yielded no useful data for porous coatings deposited by use of sprayed particles with a degree of melting <60%, and a hardness of 32-75 HR15Y for Al2O3 coatings deposited by use of sprayed particles with a degree of melting >60%. Pin-on-disk abrasion tests, performed at room temperature by use of an Inconel 738 (IN738) nickel-based superalloy pin with a spherical tip 5 mm in diameter, were conducted on the porous alumina coating to evaluate its abrasion behavior. It was found that for coatings of hardness <32 HR15Y and porosity >40% the wear weight loss of the IN738 pin was negligible despite the high rate of wear of the coating. It is evident that flame-sprayed porous alumina coatings of high porosity prepared by this approach have potential for use as abradable coatings for gas turbines operating at high temperatures.

  14. Composition, Alteration, and Texture of Fault-Related Rocks from Safod Core and Surface Outcrop Analogs: Evidence for Deformation Processes and Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kelly K.; Davis, Colter R.; Shervais, John W.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Evans, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the fine-scale variations in mineralogical composition, geochemical alteration, and texture of the fault-related rocks from the Phase 3 whole-rock core sampled between 3,187.4 and 3,301.4 m measured depth within the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole near Parkfield, California. This work provides insight into the physical and chemical properties, structural architecture, and fluid-rock interactions associated with the actively deforming traces of the San Andreas Fault zone at depth. Exhumed outcrops within the SAF system comprised of serpentinite-bearing protolith are examined for comparison at San Simeon, Goat Rock State Park, and Nelson Creek, California. In the Phase 3 SAFOD drillcore samples, the fault-related rocks consist of multiple juxtaposed lenses of sheared, foliated siltstone and shale with block-in-matrix fabric, black cataclasite to ultracataclasite, and sheared serpentinite-bearing, finely foliated fault gouge. Meters-wide zones of sheared rock and fault gouge correlate to the sites of active borehole casing deformation and are characterized by scaly clay fabric with multiple discrete slip surfaces or anastomosing shear zones that surround conglobulated or rounded clasts of compacted clay and/or serpentinite. The fine gouge matrix is composed of Mg-rich clays and serpentine minerals (saponite ± palygorskite, and lizardite ± chrysotile). Whole-rock geochemistry data show increases in Fe-, Mg-, Ni-, and Cr-oxides and hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, and C-rich material, with a total organic content of >1 % locally in the fault-related rocks. The faults sampled in the field are composed of meters-thick zones of cohesive to non-cohesive, serpentinite-bearing foliated clay gouge and black fine-grained fault rock derived from sheared Franciscan Formation or serpentinized Coast Range Ophiolite. X-ray diffraction of outcrop samples shows that the foliated clay gouge is composed primarily of saponite and serpentinite, with localized

  15. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution, Surface Area and Adsorption in Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E. P.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of heterogeneity in chemical transport and reaction is not understood in continuum (Darcy/Fickian) models of reactive transport. This is manifested in well-known problems such as scale dependent dispersion and discrepancies in reaction rate observations made at laboratory and field scales [1]. Additionally, this is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which produces a reactive fluid-rock system particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2, 3]. We use x-ray micro tomography to describe the non-normal 3-dimensional distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium according to distinct mineral groups. Using in-house image processing techniques, thin sections, nitrogen BET surface area, backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we compare the surface area of each mineral phase to those obtained from x-ray CT imagery. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. We combine the mineral specific surface area characterisation to dynamic tomography, imaging the flow of water and solutes, to observe flow dependent and mineral specific adsorption. The observations may contribute to the incorporation of experimentally based statistical descriptions of pore scale heterogeneity in reactive transport into upscaled models, moving it closer to predictive capabilities for field scale

  16. Chemistry and Mineralogy of Rock Surface Coatings from Terrestrial Hot and Dry Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Coatings form on rocks in terrestrial hot and dry deserts that are chemically, mineralogically, and texturally distinct from the underlying rock. They are composed of mixtures of aeolian-derived particles, primarily clays, cemented by authigenic Mn-Fe-bearing materials. The coatings are characteristically laminated at the nanometer to micron scale, with Mn-Fe oxide-rich layers alternating with silicate-rich layers. The junction between the coating and the rock is generally sharp. The laminated coatings form on all rock types, even quartz, although its thickness is usually greatest on Fe-rich rocks. Manganese-rich coatings of 5 microns thickness or less impart a black color to the rock. High resolution TEM (HRTEM) images of the coatings show a predominance of thin clay-like flakes and aggregates of tissue-like particles, with lesser amounts of rounded crystalline grains. Most clay particles exhibit 001 spacings of 10, 12 Å, and intermediate spacings, typical of mica, smectite, and mixed-layer mica-smectite minerals. Many of the Mn-bearing particles have lattice spacings between 5.5 and 7 Å, visible at the edges of folded flakes. These spacings are consistent with a phyllomanganate-like structure, similar to birnessite. The lower values measured in the TEM are consistent with collapse of the layers in the vacuum of the TEM. Also present are occasional elongated Mn-rich particles with a ca. 10 Å spacing consistent with todorokite. Four distinct Mn-rich materials were recognized: (a) Discrete, elongated Ca-Ba-rich Mn-oxides. (b) Tissue-like aggregates with minor Fe and Ba. (c) Fluffy Mn-Fe-rich coatings on clays. (d) An anhedral Mn-Fe spinel-like mineral. Nanometer-sized C aggregates were occasionally encountered in the coatings. These particles contain variable, minor amounts of K, N, and O, as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Their small sizes and the occurrence of K in some of the particles is consistent with C derived from biomass burning

  17. Modelling fault surface roughness and fault rocks thickness evolution with slip: calibration based on field and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Tisato, N.; Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S. B.; Di Toro, G.

    2012-12-01

    The architecture and physical properties of fault zones evolve with slip and time. Such evolution, which progressively modifies the type and thickness of fault rocks, the fault surface roughness, etc., controls the rheology of fault zones (seismic vs. aseismic) and earthquakes (main shock magnitude, coseismic slip distribution, stress drop, foreshock and aftershock sequence evolution, etc.). Seismogenic faults exhumed from 2-10 km depth and hosted in different rocks (carbonates, granitoids, etc.) show a (1) self-affine (Hurst exponent H < 1) surface roughness, indicating that faults are smoother at larger wavelengths, and (2) a roughness anisotropy (surfaces are smoother parallel to slip vector) which progressively develops with slip. The second observation suggests that roughness evolution should be related to the production of fault rocks. We developed a wear model in the spatial frequency domain (for consistency with field measurements and for mathematical convenience) which, given an initial surface roughness, predicts the roughness (power spectral density, anisotropy, root mean square, etc.) and the fault rock thickness after a given slip. The model assumes volume conservation and is based on a very general definition of "wear" (including every process that destroys geometrical asperities and produces fault rocks). The output roughness and fault rock thickness depend on two parameters: (1) wear rate and (2) wear products (fault rocks) accumulation rate. To test the model we used surface roughness, fault rock thickness, and slip data collected in the field (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps) and in the lab (rotary shear experiments on different rocks). The model was successful in predicting the first-order evolution of roughness and of fault rock thickness with slip in both natural and experimental datasets. Differences in best-fit model parameters (wear rate and wear products accumulation rate) were satisfactorily explained in terms of different

  18. Optical modeling of agricultural fields and rough-textured rock and mineral surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.; Vincent, R. K.; Horwitz, H. M.; Erickson, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Review was made of past models for describing the reflectance and/or emittance properties of agricultural/forestry and geological targets in an effort to select the best theoretical models. An extension of the six parameter Allen-Gayle-Richardson model was chosen as the agricultural plant canopy model. The model is used to predict the bidirectional reflectance of a field crop from known laboratory spectra of crop components and approximate plant geometry. The selected geological model is based on Mie theory and radiative transfer equations, and will assess the effect of textural variations of the spectral emittance of natural rock surfaces.

  19. Continuous Monitoring of Pin Tip Wear and Penetration into Rock Surface Using a New Cerchar Abrasivity Testing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaban, Mohammad-Taghi; Memarian, Hossein; Rostami, Jamal

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of rock abrasivity is important when utilizing mechanized excavation in various mining and civil projects in hard rock. This is due to the need for proper selection of the rock cutting tools, estimation of the tool wear, machine downtime for cutter change, and costs. The Cerchar Abrasion Index (CAI) test is one of the simplest and most widely used methods for evaluating rock abrasivity. In this study, a new device for the determination of frictional forces and depth of pin penetration into the rock surface during a Cerchar test is discussed. The measured parameters were used to develop an analytical model for calculation of the size of the wear flat (and hence a continuous measure of CAI as the pin moves over the sample) and pin tip penetration into the rock during the test. Based on this model, continuous curves of CAI changes and pin tip penetration into the rock were plotted. Results of the model were used for introduction of a new parameter describing rock-pin interaction and classification of rock abrasion.

  20. Electrokinetic experimental study on saturated rock samples: zeta potential and surface conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    It is important to know the electrokinetic properties of crustal rocks for interpreting the conductivity mechanisms and seismoelectric phenomena during earthquakes and seismoelectric well logging. In this study, electrokinetic experiments are conducted using a special core-holder by employing an AC lock-in technique. A series of experiments are conducted on 10 sandstone samples to measure the streaming potentials and streaming currents, and the experiments on each sample are done at six different salinities. The streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient are calculated from the measured streaming potentials and streaming currents. The experimental results show that streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient decrease as the salinity increases. The dependence of these two coefficients on permeability and pore radius are analysed and compared with previous works. At low salinities, the streaming potential coefficient and streaming current coefficient increase with the increasing permeability and pore radius. At high salinities, the streaming potential coefficient (streaming current coefficient) almost share a same value for 10 different samples. This conclusion indicates that the differences of rock parameters can only be well recognized at lower salinities, and the electrokinetic signals are invalid at high salinities, which offers a restrictive condition for using the amplitude of electrokinetic signals to estimate rock parameters. The zeta-potential have also been estimated through combined measurements of streaming potential and streaming current. The surface conductivity and its contribution to electrokinetic effects are determined from a comparison of zeta-potentials by two different methods, and then the validation of the Helmholz-Smoluchowski equation for a capillary tube is tested in rocks. We also compare our date with theoretical and experimental works, and set up an expression about the relationship between

  1. Rock Abrasion on Mars: Clues from the Pathfinder and Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Parker, T. J.; Kramer, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    A significant discovery of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission was that many rocks exhibit characteristics of ventifacts, rocks that have been sculpted by saltating particles. Diagnostic features identifying the rocks as ventifacts am elongated pits, flutes, and grooves (collectively referred to as "flutes" unless noted otherwise). Faceted rocks or rock portions, circular pits, rills, and possibly polished rock surfaces are also seen and could be due, to aeolian abrasion. Many of these features were initially identified in rover images, where spatial resolution generally exceeded that of the IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) camera. These images had two major limitations: 1) Only a limited number of rocks were viewed by the rover, biasing flute statistics; and 2) The higher resolution obtained by the rover images and the lack of such pictures at the Viking landing sites hampered comparisons of rock morphologies between the Pathfinder and Viking sites. To avoid this problem, rock morphology and ventifact statistics have been examined using new "super-resolution" IMP and Viking Lander images. Analyses of these images show that: 1) Flutes are seen on about 50% or more of the rocks in the near field at the MPF site; 2) The orientation of these flutes is similar to that for flutes identified in rover images; and 3) Ventifacts are significantly more abundant at the Pathfinder landing site than at the two Viking Landing sites, where rocks have undergone only a limited amount of aeolian abrasion. This is most likely due to the ruggedness of the Pathfinder site and a greater supply of abrading particles available shortly after the Arcs and Tiu Valles outflow channel floods.

  2. Surface roughness of rock faces through the curvature of triangulated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P.; Samson, C.; Bose, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we examine three different measures of roughness based on a geometric property of surfaces known as curvature. These methods were demonstrated using an image of a large rock face made up of a smooth blocky limestone in contact with a rough friable dolostone. The point cloud analysed contained 10,334,288 points and was acquired at a distance of 3 m from the rock face. The point cloud was first decimated using an epsilon-net and then meshed using the Poisson surface reconstruction method before the proposed measures of roughness were applied. The first measure of roughness is defined as the difference in curvature between a mesh and a smoothed version of the same mesh. The second measure of roughness is a voting system applied to each vertex which identifies the subset of vertices which represent rough regions within the mesh. The third measure of roughness uses a combination of spatial partitioning data structures and data clustering in order to define roughness for a region in the mesh. The spatial partitioning data structure allows for a hierarchy of roughness values which is related to the size of the region being considered. All of the proposed measures of roughness are visualised using colour-coded displays which allows for an intuitive interpretation.

  3. Ultrasonic probing of the fracture process zone in rock using surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.; Spetzler, H.

    1984-01-01

    A microcrack process zone is frequently suggested to accompany macrofractures in rock and play an important role in the resistance to fracture propagation. Attenuation of surface waves propagating through mode I fractures in wedge-loaded double-cantilever beam specimens of Westerly granite has been recorded in an attempt to characterize the structure of the fracture process zone. The ultrasonic measurements do not support the generally accepted model of a macroscopic fracture that incrementally propagates with the accompaniment of a cloud of microcracks. Instead, fractures in Westerly granite appear to form as gradually separating surfaces within a zone having a width of a few millimeters and a length of several tens of millimeters. A fracture process zone of this size would necessitate the use of meter-sized specimens in order for linear elastic fracture mechanics to be applicable.

  4. Peculiar Betulia Re-visited: A Near-Earth Asteroid with a Bare-Rock Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.; Delbo, M.; Bus, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    The small C-type asteroid (1580) Betulia is an unusual near-Earth object (NEO) with a lightcurve that changes dramatically with changing solar phase angle, presumably due to a highly irregular shape and/or unusual topographic features. Earlier thermal-infrared observations indicated a surface of high thermal inertia, which is consistent with a lack of thermally insulating regolith. Absence of regolith might be expected in the case of small NEOs with weak gravities, which may be unable to retain collisional debris. However, recent infrared observations of other asteroids of comparable size indicate that regolith is normally present. Knowledge of the thermal properties of NEOs is crucial for meaningful calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, which is invoked to explain the delivery of collisional fragments from the main belt into near-Earth orbits, and apparently has a significant influence on the orbital evolution of potentially hazardous NEOs. We observed Betulia in June 2002 with the 3-m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Our database is sufficiently broad to allow the use of more sophisticated thermal models than were available for earlier radiometric observations. It is important to bear the unusual nature of Betulia in mind when interpreting observational data. Fits to our data obtained with a new thermophysical model imply an effective diameter of 4.57+/-0.46 km and an albedo of 0.077+/-0.015, and indicate a moderate surface thermal inertia of around 180 Jm-2s-0.5K-1. It is difficult to reconcile our results with those of earlier work, which indicate a larger diameter for Betulia and a high-thermal-inertia surface of bare rock. While the thermal inertias of NEOs appear to be significantly higher than those of large main-belt asteroids, to our knowledge no convincing evidence has yet been found for very high-thermal-inertia ``bare-rock" surfaces amongst NEOs: further observations are required to probe smaller objects.

  5. Erosion processes in molassic cliffs: the role of the rock surface temperature and atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Voumard, Jérémie

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of the Swiss Plateau is modeled by numerous steep cliffs of Molasse. These cliffs are mainly composed of sub-horizontal alternated layers of sandstone, shale and conglomerates deposed in the Alps foreland basin during the Tertiary period. These Molasse cliffs are affected by erosion processes inducing numerous rockfall events. Thus, it is relevant to understand how different external factors influence Molasse erosion rates. In this study, we focus on analyzing temperature variation during a winter season. As pilot study area we selected a cliff which is formed by a sub-horizontal alternation of outcropping sandstone and shale. The westward facing test site (La Cornalle, Vaud, Switzerland), which is a lateral scarp of a slow moving landslide area, is currently affected by intense erosion. Regarding data acquisition, we monitored both in-situ rock and air temperatures at 15 minutes time-step since October 2013: (1) on the one hand we measured Ground Surface Temperature (GST) at near-surface (0.1 meter depth) using a GST mini-datalogger M-Log5W-Rock model; (2) On the other hand we monitored atmospheric conditions using a weather station (Davis Vantage pro2 plus) collecting numerous parameters (i.e. temperature, irradiation, rain, wind speed, etc.). Furthermore, the area was also seasonally monitored by Ground-Based (GB) LiDAR since 2010 and monthly monitored since September 2013. In order to understand how atmospheric conditions (such as freeze and thaw effect) influence the erosion of the cliff, we modeled the temperature diffusion through the rock mass. To this end, we applied heat diffusion and radiation equation using a 1D temperature profile, obtaining as a result both temperature variations at different depths together with the location of the 0°C isotherm. Our model was calibrated during a given training set using both in-situ rock temperatures and atmospheric conditions. We then carried out a comparison with the rockfall events derived from the

  6. Predicting the Thermal Conductivity of AlSi/Polyester Abradable Coatings: Effects of the Numerical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Seichepine, Jean-Louis; Qiao, Jiang Hao; Coddet, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The final target of this study is to achieve a better understanding of the behavior of thermally sprayed abradable seals such as AlSi/polyester composites. These coatings are used as seals between the static and the rotating parts in aero-engines. The machinability of the composite coatings during the friction of the blades depends on their mechanical and thermal effective properties. In order to predict these properties from micrographs, numerical studies were performed with different software packages such as OOF developed by NIST and TS2C developed at the UTBM. In 2008, differences were reported concerning predictions of effective thermal conductivities obtained with the two codes. In this article, a particular attention was paid to the mathematical formulation of the problem. In particular, results obtained with a finite difference method using a cell-centered approach or a nodal formulation allow explaining the discrepancies previously noticed. A comparison of the predictions of the computed effective thermal conductivities is thus proposed. This study is part of the NEWAC project, funded by the European Commission within the 6th RTD Framework programm (FP6).

  7. Regional scale mapping of sub-surface water-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derron, M.-H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Rock weathering at regional scale (from catchment to mountain range) is a major player in several environmental concerns, such as atmospheric CO2 consumption, rocks and soils strength reduction or water quality of catchments. In order to get spatial representations of the sub-surface weathering in mountainous areas, a numerical model has been built coupling a low-temperature geochemical calculator to a geographical information system (GIS). The geochemical part of this model is based on the library iPhreeqc (USGS 2011). This library is called by a simple homemade GIS program that takes care of topography, substratum composition and sub-surface water flow. A Darcy law with a D8 flow path is used to describe the water flow on a digital elevation model. Kinetics laws have been implemented to take into consideration dissolution rates of minerals. Input data are: a regional digital elevation model, a "substratum" map with the mineralogical composition of each units, annual rainfall and temperature maps, the chemical composition of the rainwater, O2 and CO2 atmospheric concentrations. At regional scale (low resolution), parameters such as soil thickness, hydraulic transmissivity or reactive surface of minerals are unknown (i.e. they may vary over a wide range of magnitude). That is why electrical conductivities at the outlet of alpine watersheds are used to estimate by back-calculation average values of these parameters. Ouputs of the model are for example catchment maps of: amount of dissolved minerals (g/m2/a), atmospheric CO2 consumption (g/m2/a) or chemical denudation (mm/a). First results, for an alpine catchment, show the major impact of traces of fast dissolved minerals (i.e. calcite and pyrite) on the geochemical budget of a large catchment. Further works will focus on improving the transport model, temperature and atmospheric CO2 changes, integration of isotopes and sulfurs deposits impacts.

  8. Some surface characteristics and gas interactions of Apollo 14 fines and rock fragments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadenhead, D. A.; Wagner, N. J.; Jones, B. R.; Stetter, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Comprehensive survey of the physical surface characteristics of Apollo 14 fines, two fragments of a breccia (14321), and a crystalline rock (14310). The survey was carried out with optical and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy and by studying the adsorption of a variety of gases including nitrogen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Our objective in the optical microscope study was to relate the visible geological and petrological features to the surface properties. Electron microscopy particularly helped relate surface roughness and particle fusion to gas adsorption and pore structure. The fine sample (14163,111) had a surface area of 0.210 sq m/g and a helium density of 2.9 g/cc. Similar values have been observed with breccia fragments. Other observations include physical adsorption of molecular hydrogen at low temperatures and of water vapor at ambient temperatures. It is concluded that these particular lunar materials, while capable of adsorbing water vapor, do not retain it for any significant time at low pressures, nor, under lunar conditions, is there any indication of absorption or penetration.

  9. Reliable Support Design for Excavations in Brittle Rock Using a Global Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, J. Connor; Diederichs, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    Spalling damage can pose significant risks during the construction of underground excavations in brittle rock. While deterministic analyses have traditionally been used in the design of these structures, reliability-based design (RBD) methods provide a more rational approach to quantify spalling risk by directly incorporating input uncertainty into the design process and quantifying variable ground response. This paper presents a new RBD approach to evaluate the excavation response and support performance for a tunnel in brittle ground. Guidance for the selection of appropriate parameters for variable brittle materials is provided using a combination of the damage initiation and spalling limit method and theories of microcrack initiation. System performance is then evaluated using a proposed global response surface method (GRSM) coupled with the first-order reliability method, random sampling and finite element analysis. The proposed GRSM provides a computationally efficient way to evaluate the probability of failure for various limit states, allowing for the selection of appropriate design parameters such as minimum bolt length and required bolt capacity during early stages of design. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, a preliminary design option for a proposed deep geologic repository located in Canada was assessed. Numerical analyses were completed using finite element modeling to determine the depth of spalling around the excavation and support loads over the range of possible rock mass and in situ stress conditions. The results of these analyses were then used to assess support performance and make support recommendations.

  10. Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

    2002-05-09

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

  11. [Quantitative estimation of CaO content in surface rocks using hyperspectral thermal infrared emissivity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fu; Zhang, Xue-Wen; Huang, Zhao-Qiang; Yang, Hang; Zhang, Fei-Zhou

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present paper is to study the quantitative relationship between the CaO content and the thermal infrared emissivity spectra. The surface spectral emissivity of 23 solid rocks samples were measured in the field and the first derivative of the spectral emissivity was also calculated. Multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were modeled and the regression results were compared. The results show that there is a good relationship between CaO content and thermal emissivity spectra features; emissivities become lower when CaO content increases in the 10.3-13 mm region; the first derivative spectra have a better predictive ability compared to the original emissivity spectra. PMID:22242490

  12. Preliminary geologic investigation of the landing site: Appendix A: lunar surface orientations of Apollo 17 rock samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface orientations of some of the Apollo 17 rock samples at the time of their collection (table 6-V) are shown in this appendix (figs. 6-65 to 6-87). These orientations were determined by correlating lunar photographs of samples before collection with shapes and shadow characteristics of the same samples in the LRL under oblique illumination with nearly collimated light. The light source in the laboratory simulates the Sun. It is important to emphasize that the orientations shown are those at the time of collection and do not necessarily apply to the entire history of the exposure of a rock on the lunar surface. Tumbling and turning of some rock fragments on the lunar surface has already been well documented.

  13. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of pyroxene-bearing rocks: New constraints for understanding planetary surface compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Sgavetti, Maria; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe

    Laboratory visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of solid rock slabs, mineral separates and systematic mixtures were simultaneously investigated. We apply an empirical approach to evaluate spectra, in order to achieve qualitative and quantitative information. We use cumulates (mostly norites, leuconorites, melanorites and anorthosites) belonging to the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion, a sequence of genetically related rocks with simple textures. Laboratory spectra are measured on slightly polished rock slabs in the 350- to 2500-nm interval and directional-hemispherical reflectance geometry. Composition is determined using traditional techniques other than reflectance spectroscopy. We find that: (1) band minima measured on rock spectra are strongly influenced by the concurrent effects due to modal abundance of the spectroscopically active mineral and mineral chemistry; (2) band depths can be used for semiquantitative analyses, limited to the set of rocks investigated; (3) the spectral parameters derived from powdered pyroxene are in agreement with previously published calibrations; (4) the mineral mixture systematics can be reasonably considered as linear, when pyroxene is mixed with neutral components; and (5) the empirical evaluation of solid rock surface spectra needs further insights to give a great improvement to planetary researches. In addition, genetic sequences of rocks should be investigated in detail to help the geological interpretation of planetary evolution. Therefore more laboratory and analytical studies are required in order to understand the influence of composition and petrographic textures on the spectral analysis.

  14. Unilateral contact induced blade/casing vibratory interactions in impellers: Analysis for flexible casings with friction and abradable coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batailly, Alain; Legrand, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    This contribution addresses the vibratory analysis of unilateral contact induced structural interactions between a bladed impeller and its surrounding flexible casing. It extends the numerical developments exposed in a previous paper to flexible casings. The casing finite element model and the construction of the associated reduced-order model for efficient computations are first exposed in detail along with an extensive presentation of the smoothing strategy implemented on the contact interface. The proposed algorithms embedding unilateral contact conditions together with abradable coating removal are subsequently introduced and validated through a systematic analysis of (1) the nonlinear procedure for the computation of impeller/casing distances, (2) the treatment of three-dimensional friction and contact forces, (3) the correction of the displacements when unilateral contact or abradable removal arises, and (4) the possible hybrid contact scenarii involving localized total removal of the abradable coating. Finally, two illustrative case studies show that the linear interaction condition, commonly considered for the safe design of impellers and casings in turbomachinery, may be advantageously combined with the presented numerical strategy in order to assess the actual importance of predicted critical speeds.

  15. Greenhouse Gases and Gas-Water-Rock Interactions at the Surface of Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, W. M.; Bass, D. S.

    1998-09-01

    Consideration of multiphase equilibria is required to make realistic speculations of conditions on early Mars and can provide indications of modern exploration targets to aid characterization of that remote environment. Greenhouse gases are proposed to sustain elevated surface temperatures compatible with geomorphologic evidence for the stability of liquid water on early Mars. CO2 is commonly invoked as a greenhouse gas at pressures up to 5 bars or more, e.g., [1]. However, solid-gas equilibria show that CO2 pressure is limited by formation of CO2 ice in the upper atmosphere for surface pressure of 2 bars [2]. Recently, SO2 at 10-7 bar in a 2 bar CO2 atmosphere (0.1 ppmv SO2) has been postulated to augment warming in the upper atmosphere on early Mars [3], which could inhibit CO2 precipitation. However, oxidation of SO2 would produce sulfuric acid which dissolves in liquid water and attacks rock components, producing metal sulfate solutions and precipitating gypsum (CaSO4-2H2O). Occurrence of gypsum in SNC meteorites demonstrates conditions permitting oxidation of SO2 on Mars [4]. Equilibrium aqueous speciation calculations show that at low O2 pressure, 10-11 bar of SO2 (i.e., 4 orders of magnitude less than proposed) at equilibrium with water generates sulfuric acid of pH 0.5. Reaction path calculations indicate that silicate minerals would dissolve rapidly in this solution with precipitation of a silica phase, clay minerals, and gypsum. Precipitation of gypsum would deplete atmospheric SO2. These multiphase interactions demonstrate that greenhouse stabilization of liquid water due to an SO2 pressure of 10-7 bar is incompatible with a realistic water-rock system. In the absence of elevated concentrations of atmospheric SO2, at elevated CO2 pressure, and at near neutral pH, geochemical equilibrium models predict that the mineral nahcolite (NaHCO3) may precipitate as a consequence of gas-water-rock interactions. If observed, this mineral could be used together with

  16. New Approach to Characterize the Configuration of Fractured Rock Surface Indirectly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye Xue; Li, Zheng; Fan, Jian Hui; Jia, Zhi Yong

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach called the YUV dimension method is proposed in this study to indirectly characterize fractured rock surface topography. This model is based on YUV color model theory in iconography and graphics. The process is described in detail as follows. A true-color photo with m pixels is selected. Y is denoted by gray scale, U by hue, and V by the saturation components of the pixel color. These components are applied to create the z, x and y coordinates of the point in the coordinate system that originates from the pixel. A similar method is applied in each pixel. M points are created in the coordinate space. The number of created points is equivalent to one of the pixels. The m points are then connected and a rough YUV surface is established. Otherwise, the calculation method for the self-affine dimension of a n - 1 n-dimensional fractal body is presented by fractal Brownian motion theory and then degenerated to one between the 2D and 3D case. The approach is applied to evaluate the dimension of the YUV surface, i.e. the YUV dimension. To validate the feasibility of YUV dimension theory, numerical studies on the YUV dimension are conducted through a laser profilometer scanning experiment and scanning electron microscopy with the same specimens. The surface characteristics of similar samples are analyzed by probing into the YUV, general and grayscale dimensions of the specimens. The comparison shows that the YUV and general dimensions of similar specimens are fundamentally identical, and the complete trends of the YUV and gray dimensions remain consistent with changing specimens. The result indicates that YUV dimension theory is reasonable and feasible. In short, the YUV dimension is a new method that exhibits more advantages than the general and grayscale dimensions. This method characterizes surface configuration indirectly.

  17. Trajectories and energy transfer of saltating particles onto rock surfaces : application to abrasion and ventifact formation on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.; Phoreman, James; White, Bruce R.; Greeley, Ronald; Eddlemon, Eric E.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Meyer, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between saltating sand grains and rock surfaces is assessed to gauge relative abrasion potential as a function of rock shape, wind speed, grain size, and planetary environment. Many kinetic energy height profiles for impacts exhibit a distinctive increase, or kink, a few centimeters above the surface, consistent with previous field, wind tunnel, and theoretical investigations. The height of the kink observed in natural and wind tunnel settings is greater than predictions by a factor of 2 or more, probably because of enhanced bouncing off hard ground surfaces. Rebounded grains increase the effective flux and relative kinetic energy for intermediate slope angles. Whether abrasion occurs, as opposed to simple grain impact with little or no mass lost from the rock, depends on whether the grain kinetic energy (EG) exceeds a critical value (EC), as well as the flux of grains with energies above EC. The magnitude of abrasion and the shape change of the rock over time depends on this flux and the value of EG > EC. Considering the potential range of particle sizes and wind speeds, the predicted kinetic energies of saltating sand hitting rocks overlap on Earth and Mars. However, when limited to the most likely grain sizes and threshold conditions, our results agree with previous work and show that kinetic energies are about an order of magnitude greater on Mars.

  18. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  19. Micro-topography, rock surface modelling and minerology of notches in Mount Carmel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Ben-Binyamin, Atzmon; Shtober-Zisu, Nurit

    2016-04-01

    Notches are defined as horizontal concaved indentations developed on slopes or cliffs in a basic "C" shape regardless of their location or formation process. Many studies have proclaimed that notches are associated with coastal processes where rocky shore faces are back carved, parallel to sea level by a combination of physical and biological abrasion, and by chemical and biological dissolution. The notches morphologies are various and depend on the lithology, climate, and environment history. These changes involve complex volumetric effects such as weathering and surface mineral dissolution. The main impetus for the present paper is to advance the modeling and the 3D complex pattern reconstruction of notch's cavity surface and detailed shapes and to assess the association between the morphological structures observed upon the notch parts and the fine scale mineralogical composition of the rock. The reconstruction of 3D surfaces using point clouds scanned data is a known problem in computer graphics. Several approaches are based on combinatorial structures, such as Delaunay triangulations, alpha shapes, or Voronoi diagrams. These schemes typically create a triangle mesh that interpolates all or most of the points. In the presence of noisy data, resulting surface is often jagged, and is therefore smoothed or refit to the points in subsequent processing. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a common technique for solving dense, periodic Poisson systems. However, the FFT requires longer time and larger space, quickly becoming prohibitive for fine resolutions. The Poisson approach's key element is the observation that inward normal field of the boundary can be inferred as the gradient of a three dimensional solid indicator function. Thus, the generation of a watertight mesh can be obtained by: (1) transforming the oriented point samples into a continuous vector field referred to as the relationship between the gradient of the indicator function and an integral of surface

  20. Spectral variability among rocks in visible and near-infrared mustispectral Pancam data collected at Gusev crater: Examinations using spectral mixture analysis and related techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J.F.; Johnson, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Soderblom, J.; Ming, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared (VNIR) multispectral observations of rocks made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's Panoramic camera (Pancam) have been analyzed using a spectral mixture analysis (SMA) methodology. Scenes have been examined from the Gusev crater plains into the Columbia Hills. Most scenes on the plains and in the Columbia Hills could be modeled as three end-member mixtures of a bright material, rock, and shade. Scenes of rocks disturbed by the rover's Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) required additional end-members. In the Columbia Hills, there were a number of scenes in which additional rock end-members were required. The SMA methodology identified relatively dust-free areas on undisturbed rock surfaces as well as spectrally unique areas on RAT abraded rocks. Spectral parameters from these areas were examined, and six spectral classes were identified. These classes are named after a type rock or area and are Adirondack, Lower West Spur, Clovis, Wishstone, Peace, and Watchtower. These classes are discriminable based, primarily, on near-infrared (NIR) spectral parameters. Clovis and Watchtower class rocks appear more oxidized than Wishstone class rocks and Adirondack basalts based on their having higher 535 nm band depths. Comparison of the spectral parameters of these Gusev crater rocks to parameters of glass-dominated basaltic tuffs indicates correspondence between measurements of Clovis and Watchtower classes but divergence for the Wishstone class rocks, which appear to have a higher fraction of crystalline ferrous iron-bearing phases. Despite a high sulfur content, the rock Peace has NIR properties resembling plains basalts. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Flow and radionuclide transport from rock to surface systems: characterization and modelling of potential repository sites in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Kent; Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten

    2007-07-01

    The safety assessments of potential geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden are supported by modelling of groundwater flow in rock, to predict locations (exit points) where radionuclides from the deep repository may enter land, surface waters and associated ecosystems above the rock. This modelling includes detailed rock descriptions, but simplifies the upper part of the flow domain, including representations of meteorological processes and interactions with hydrological objects at the surface. Using the Laxemar candidate site as example, this paper investigates some potentially important consequences of these simplifications. Specifically, it compares particle tracking results obtained by a deep-rock groundwater flow model (CONNECTFLOW) and by MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, which contains detailed descriptions of near-surface/surface water flow. Overall, the models predict similar exit point patterns, occurring as clusters along streams in valleys, at a lake, and in sea bays. However, on a detailed level there are some prediction differences, which may be of importance for biosphere-focused safety assessments. CONNECTFLOW essentially predicts flow paths through the repository that follow fractures and deformation zones, outcropping in valleys. In comparison, MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 provides more detailed information on near-surface water flow paths, including the associated exit points and inputs to assessments of radionuclide retention. (authors)

  2. Consequences of Anisotropic Permeability and Surface Tension for Magmatic Segregation in Deforming Mantle Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-West, J.; Katz, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of partially molten regions of the mantle are not well understood--in part due to the inaccessibility of these regions to observation. However it is widely agreed that experiments performed on synthetic mantle rocks [e.g KZK10] act as a reasonable test of theoretical models of magma dynamics. One robust feature of experiments on partially molten mantle rocks deformed under strain is the emergence of high-porosity bands at an angle of between 15° and 20° to the shear plane. A number of theoretical approaches have been made to reproduce the formation of these low angle bands in models. The most recent approaches, for example by Takei and Katz [TK13], have involved the inclusion of anisotropic viscosity in diffusion creep arising from the grain-scale redistribution of melt as formulated in a theoretical model by Takei and Holtzman [TH09]. It is reasonable to assume that this melt-preferred orientation (MPO) that leads to anisotropy in viscosity may also lead to anisotropy in permeability. However, the effect of anisotropic permeability remains unexplored. We investigate its impact on the dynamics of partially molten rock, and specifically on its role in low-angle band formation in deformation under simple shear. We work with the continuum model of two-phase-flow as formulated by McKenzie [M84] with the addition of anisotropic permeability. There are some apparent inconsistencies in this model. Firstly, the model predicts continued segregation of melt into bands of 100% porosity, while experiments report maximum porosities in the region of 30%. Secondly, linear stability analyses find maximal growth-rates for porosity perturbations that vary on arbitrarily small length-scales. We study how the inclusion of surface forces into the model could regulate these effects. REFERENCES: KZK10 = King, Zimmerman, & Kohlstedt (2010), J Pet, 10.1093/petrology/egp062. TK13 = Takei & Katz (2013), JFM, 10.1017/jfm.2013.482. TH09 = Takei & Holtzman (2009a), JGR, 10

  3. Preliminary lithogeochemical map showing near-surface rock types in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Virginia and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peper, John D.; McCartan, Lucy B.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Reddy, James E.

    2001-01-01

    This preliminary experimental lithogeochemical map shows the distribution of rock types in the Virginia and Maryland parts of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The map was produced digitally by classifying geologic-map units according to composition, mineralogy, and texture; rather than by age and stratigraphic relationships as shown on traditional geologic maps. This map differs from most lithologic maps in that the lithogeochemical unit classification distinguishes those rock units having key water-reactive minerals that may induce acid neutralization, or reduction, of hosted water at the weathering interface. The validity of these rock units, however, is independent of water chemistry, because the rock units are derived from geologic maps and rock descriptions. Areas of high soil carbon content, and sulfide metal deposits are also shown. Water-reactive minerals and their weathering reactions yield five lithogeochemical unit classes: 1) carbonate rock and calcareous rocks and sediments, the most acid-neutralizing; 2)carbonaceous-sulfidic rocks and sediments, oxygen-depleting and reducing; 3) quartzofeldspathic rocks and siliciclastic sediments, relatively weakly reactive with water; 4) mafic silicate rocks/sediments, oxygen consuming and high solute-load delivering; and, 5) the rarer calcareous-sulfidic (carbonaceous) rocks, neutralizing and reducing. Earlier studies in some parts of the map area have related solute loads in ground and stream waters to some aspects of bedrock lithology. More recent preliminary tests of relationships between four of the classes of mapped lithogeochemical units and ground water chemistry, in the Mid-Atlantic area using this map, have focused on and verified the nitrate-reducing and acid-neutralizing properties of some bedrock and unconsolidated aquifer rock types. Sulfide mineral deposits and their mine-tailings effects on waters are beginning to be studied by others. Additional testing of relationships among the lithogeochemical units

  4. Groundwater recharge in a hard rock aquifer: A conceptual model including surface-loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodhe, Allan; Bockgård, Niclas

    2006-11-01

    SummaryThe groundwater level in a fractured rock aquifer in Sweden was found to respond quickly to rainfall, although the bedrock was covered by 10-m-thick till soil. A considerable portion of the response was caused by surface loading, i.e., by the weight increase of the soil due to the addition of water from precipitation, whereas the rest reflected recharge. The hypothesis that the bedrock aquifer was recharged by vertical flow from groundwater in the overlying soil was tested with a simple recharge model, in which the bedrock-groundwater levels were simulated from the soil-groundwater and estimated surface-loading variation. The model had three parameters: the ratio between the equivalent vertical hydraulic conductivity governing the recharge and the storage coefficient of the bedrock reservoir, the recession coefficient for the bedrock-groundwater level, and the bedrock-groundwater level at which the outflow ceases. The model could be reasonably well calibrated and validated to head observations in one of two boreholes. The fit to the seasonal variation was similar when calibrating the model with or without surface loading, but surface loading had to be included to properly simulate individual recharge events. The relative temporal variation in the fluxes could be determined by the calibration. The variation in the recharge was from -10% to +25% in relation to the mean flux. The variation in the discharge was only ±1%. By applying a storage coefficient of the reservoir of 5 × 10 -4, the simulated mean recharge was about 20 mm yr -1. The results support the hypothesis that the bedrock-groundwater at the site is fed by local recharge from the overlying soil aquifer.

  5. Rock Abrasion as Seen by the MSL Curiosity Rover: Insights on Physical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Day, M. D.; Le Mouelic, S.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ullan, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is a dry planet, with actively blowing sand in many regions. In the absence of stable liquid water and an active hydrosphere, rates of chemical weathering are slow, such that aeolian abrasion is a dominant agent of landscape modification where sand is present and winds above threshold occur at sufficient frequency. Reflecting this activity, ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles, and wind-eroded outcrops, are common. They provide invaluable markers of the Martian wind record and insight into climate and landscape modification. Ventifacts are distributed along the traverse of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. They contain one or more diagnostic features and textures: Facets, keels, basal sills, elongated pits, scallops/flutes, grooves, rock tails, and lineations. Keels at the junction of facets are sharp enough to pose a hazard MSL's wheels in some areas. Geomorphic and textural patterns on outcrops indicate retreat of windward faces. Moonlight Valley and other depressions are demarcated by undercut walls and scree boulders, with the valley interiors containing fewer rocks, most of which show evidence for significant abrasion. Together, this suggests widening and undercutting of the valley walls, and erosion of interior rocks, by windblown sand. HiRISE images do not show any dark sand dunes in the traverse so far, in contrast to the large dune field to the south that is migrating up to 2 m per year. In addition, ChemCam shows that the rock Bathurst has a rind rich in mobile elements that would be removed in an abrading environment. This indicates that rock abrasion was likely more dominant in the past, a hypothesis consistent with rapid scarp retreat as suggested by the cosmogenic noble gases in Yellowknife Bay. Ventifacts and evidence for bedrock abrasion have also been found at the Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity sites, areas, like the Curiosity traverse so far, that lack evidence for current high sand fluxes. Yardangs

  6. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  7. The information content of high-frequency seismograms and the near-surface geologic structure of "hard rock" recording sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranswick, E.

    1988-01-01

    Due to hardware developments in the last decade, the high-frequency end of the frequency band of seismic waves analyzed for source mechanisms has been extended into the audio-frequency range (>20 Hz). In principle, the short wavelengths corresponding to these frequencies can provide information about the details of seismic sources, but in fact, much of the "signal" is the site response of the nearsurface. Several examples of waveform data recorded at "hard rock" sites, which are generally assumed to have a "flat" transfer function, are presented to demonstrate the severe signal distortions, including fmax, produced by near-surface structures. Analysis of the geology of a number of sites indicates that the overall attenuation of high-frequency (>1 Hz) seismic waves is controlled by the whole-path-Q between source and receiver but the presence of distinct fmax site resonance peaks is controlled by the nature of the surface layer and the underlying near-surface structure. Models of vertical decoupling of the surface and nearsurface and horizontal decoupling of adjacent sites on hard rock outcrops are proposed and their behaviour is compared to the observations of hard rock site response. The upper bound to the frequency band of the seismic waves that contain significant source information which can be deconvolved from a site response or an array response is discussed in terms of fmax and the correlation of waveform distortion with the outcrop-scale geologic structure of hard rock sites. It is concluded that although the velocity structures of hard rock sites, unlike those of alluvium sites, allow some audio-frequency seismic energy to propagate to the surface, the resulting signals are a highly distorted, limited subset of the source spectra. ?? 1988 Birkha??user Verlag.

  8. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  9. Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

  10. A new method for automated discontinuity trace mapping on rock mass 3D surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an automated discontinuity trace mapping method on a 3D surface model of rock mass. Feature points of discontinuity traces are first detected using the Normal Tensor Voting Theory, which is robust to noisy point cloud data. Discontinuity traces are then extracted from feature points in four steps: (1) trace feature point grouping, (2) trace segment growth, (3) trace segment connection, and (4) redundant trace segment removal. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify optimal values for the parameters used in the proposed method. The optimal triangular mesh element size is between 5 cm and 6 cm; the angle threshold in the trace segment growth step is between 70° and 90°; the angle threshold in the trace segment connection step is between 50° and 70°, and the distance threshold should be at least 15 times the mean triangular mesh element size. The method is applied to the excavation face trace mapping of a drill-and-blast tunnel. The results show that the proposed discontinuity trace mapping method is fast and effective and could be used as a supplement to traditional direct measurement of discontinuity traces.

  11. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of natural surfaces: Application to desert varnish coatings on rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Harrison Thliveris, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy has become an increasingly important tool for remote compositional analysis and geologic mapping. Most published laboratory measurements have been obtained in bidirectional reflection or transmission, whereas remotely sensed thermal infrared data are obtained by measuring the emitted energy. Section 2 of this paper describes a laboratory technique for determining calibrated emissivities of natural surfaces. Equations are developed to account for the energy reflected from the environment and to determine directly the sample temperature from measurements of hot and cold blackbody targets. Two methods for determining emissivity are developed: one in which only a hot sample measurement is made and the reflected background energy is removed by modeling, and a second in which the sample is cooled and the reflected energy is measured directly. Relative emissivity can be obtained to approximately 1% and absolute emissivities can be obtained to 2-15%, depending on the validity of the assumption that the emissivity of the sample is unity at some wavelength. The emission data agree well within the hemispherically integrated reflection data but point out probelms associated with bidirectional reflectance measurements. Section 3 applies emissivity measurements to the study of layered surfaces consisting of desert varnish coatings on granite and granodiorite rock suites. Two linear models are developed: the first assumes linear mixing of independent emission from the substrate and varnish (checkerboard model); the second models tansmission through an absorbing/emitting medium. Regardless of whether the varnish is or is not relatively transparant and strongly absorptive, the spectral effect of varnish increases linearly with varnish thickness, indicating that thick patches of varnish dominate the spectral properties. As a result, medium varnish thickness can be determined from spectral measurements. In addition, the composition of a substrate can be

  12. Physical properties of surface outcrop cataclastic fault rocks, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Toy, V.; Marone, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a unified analysis of physical properties of cataclastic fault rocks collected from surface exposures of the central Alpine Fault at Gaunt Creek and Waikukupa River, New Zealand. Friction experiments on fault gouge and intact samples of cataclasite were conducted at 30-33 MPa effective normal stress (σn') using a double-direct shear configuration and controlled pore fluid pressure in a true triaxial pressure vessel. Samples from a scarp outcrop on the southwest bank of Gaunt Creek display (1) an increase in fault normal permeability (k = 7.45 × 10-20 m2 to k = 1.15 × 10-16 m2), (2) a transition from frictionally weak (μ = 0.44) fault gouge to frictionally strong (μ = 0.50-0.55) cataclasite, (3) a change in friction rate dependence (a-b) from solely velocity strengthening, to velocity strengthening and weakening, and (4) an increase in the rate of frictional healing with increasing distance from the footwall fluvioglacial gravels contact. At Gaunt Creek, alteration of the primary clay minerals chlorite and illite/muscovite to smectite, kaolinite, and goethite accompanies an increase in friction coefficient (μ = 0.31 to μ = 0.44) and fault-perpendicular permeability (k = 3.10 × 10-20 m2 to k = 7.45 × 10-20 m2). Comminution of frictionally strong (μ = 0.51-0.57) cataclasites forms weaker (μ = 0.31-0.50) foliated cataclasites and fault gouges with behaviors associated with aseismic creep at low strain rates. Combined with published evidence of large magnitude (Mw ˜ 8) surface ruptures on the Alpine Fault, petrological observations indicate that shear failure involved frictional sliding within previously formed, velocity-strengthening fault gouge.

  13. A Model for Formation of Dust, Soil and Rock Coatings on Mars: Physical and Chemical Processes on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice; Murchie, Scott L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Zent, Aaron P.

    2001-01-01

    This model is one of many possible scenarios to explain the generation of the current surface material on Mars using chemical, magnetic and spectroscopic data From Mars and geologic analogs from terrestrial sites. One basic premise of this model is that the dust/soil units are not derived exclusively from local rocks, but are rather a product of global, and possibly remote, weathering processes. Another assumption in this model is that there are physical and chemical interactions of the atmospheric dust particles and that these two processes create distinctly different results on the surface. Physical processes distribute dust particles on rocks and drift units, forming physically-aggregated layers; these are reversible processes. Chemical reactions of the dust/soil particles create alteration rinds on rock surfaces and cohesive, crusted surface units between rocks, both of which are relatively permanent materials. According to this model the dominant components of the dust/soil particles are derived from alteration of volcanic ash and tephra, and contain primarily nanophase and poorly crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxide phases as well as silicates. These phases are the alteration products that formed in a low moisture environment. These dust/soil particles also contain a smaller amount of material that was exposed to more water and contains crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and clay silicates. These components could have formed through hydrothermal alteration at steam vents or fumeroles, thermal fluids, or through evaporite deposits. Wet/dry cycling experiments are presented here on mixtures containing poorly crystalline and crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and silicates that range in size from nanophase to 1-2 pm diameter particles. Cemented products of these soil mixtures are formed in these experiments and variation in the surface texture was observed for samples containing smectites, non-hydrated silicates or sulfates

  14. Modeling Spatial Structure of Rock Fracture Surfaces Before and After Shear Test: A Method for Estimating Morphology of Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanouri, Nima; Karimi Nasab, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the structural analysis of rock fracture roughness, and accordingly, a method is developed for estimating/predicting the post-shearing 3D geometry of the fracture surface. For this purpose, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variogram analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the topography data. Hence, the spatial variability of the rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to: one deterministic component, characterized by a high-order polynomial representing the large-scale undulations, and one stochastic component, described by the variogram of residuals representing the small-scale roughness. Using an image-processing technique, a total of 343 damage zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and/or asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of the `pseudo-zonal variogram' was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage zones increases due to the asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range is anisotropic and tends to be higher along the shearing. Consequently, the direction of maximum continuity rotates towards the shear direction. After modeling the evolution of the spatial structure with shearing and detecting boundaries of the degraded areas, a methodology was presented to provide a regression-kriging estimate of the morphology of sheared surfaces. The proposed method can be considered as a cost-free and reasonably accurate alternative to expensive techniques of scanning the rock fracture surface after the shear test.

  15. Characterizing the process and quantifying the rate of subaerial rock weathering on desert surfaces using roughness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushkin, Amit; Sagy, Amir; Trabelci, Eran

    2013-04-01

    Subaerial weathering of rocks is a common process observed on desert surfaces on Earth and other planetary terrestrial surfaces such as on Mars. On Earth, this weathering process has been previously identified as one of the key erosion agent driving geomorphic surface evolution and the development of desert pavements. And yet, fundamental aspects of the process, such as the relative contribution of the different weathering modes that drive it (e.g., mechanical breakdown of rocks, chemical weathering, aeolian abrasion and exfoliation) as well as the rate by which this weathering process occurs have not been systematically examined. Here, we present a new approach for quantitatively addressing these fundamental aspects of process geomorphology on desert surfaces. We focus here on co-genetic desert alluvial surfaces of different ages, i.e. alluvial chronosequences, which provide excellent recorders for the evolution of boulder-strewn surfaces into smooth desert pavements through in-situ subaerial weathering of rocks. Our approach combines independent measures of two different surface attributes: High resolution (mm-scale) 3D ground-based laser scanning (LiDAR) of surface micro-topography, and numerical dating of surface age. Roughness analysis of the LiDAR data in power spectral density (PSD) space allows us to characterize the geometric manifestation of rock weathering on the surface and to distinguish between the different weathering modes. Numerical age constraints provide independent estimates for the time elapsed since the process began. Accordingly, we are able to constrain surface roughness evolution on alluvial fan desert chronosequences through time, and present PSD analysis of surface roughness as a new quantitative tool to examine the process of subaerial rock weathering in desert environments. In this study we present results from two late Quaternary alluvial chronosequences along the Dead Sea Transform in the hyper-arid Negev desert of southern Israel. Li

  16. A model for formation of dust, soil, and rock coatings on Mars: Physical and chemical processes on the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Murchie, Scott L.; Pieters, Carlé M.; Zent, Aaron P.

    2002-11-01

    A model is presented here to explain the generation of surface material on Mars using chemical, magnetic, and spectroscopic data from Mars and geologic analogs from terrestrial sites. One basic premise is that the dust/soil units are not derived exclusively from local rocks, but are rather a product of global, and possibly remote, weathering processes. Another assumption in this model is that there are both physical and chemical interactions of the atmosphere with dust particles and that these two processes create distinctly different products. Physical processes distribute dust particles on rocks and drift units, forming physically aggregated layers; these are reversible processes. Chemical reactions of the dust/soil particles create alteration rinds on rock surfaces and cohesive, crusted surface units between rocks, both of which are relatively permanent materials. According to this model the dominant components of the dust/soil particles are derived from alteration of volcanic ash and tephra and contain primarily nanophase and poorly crystalline ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases as well as silicates. These phases are the alteration products that formed in a low-moisture environment. These dust/soil particles also contain a smaller amount of material that was exposed to more water and contains crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates, and clay silicates. These components could have formed through hydrothermal alteration at steam vents or fumeroles, thermal fluids, or through evaporite deposits. Wet/dry cycling experiments are presented here on Mars soil analogue mixtures containing poorly crystalline and crystalline components dominated by nanophase to ~2 μm diameter particles. Cemented products of these soil mixtures are formed in these experiments, and variation in the surface texture was observed for samples containing smectites, nonhydrated silicates, or sulfates. Reflectance spectra were measured of the initial particulate mixtures, the cemented

  17. Rock surface diagenetic biosignatures of fungal-carbonate substrates interaction as an indication of ancient primitive life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolo, K.

    Rock surfaces exposed to microbial attack can produce significant diagenetic biosignatures that can be evaluated by various analytical instruments In this study experimental carbonate substrates dolomites and limestones are exposed in vitro to fungal attack The selected rock samples were dolomites of Terwagne Formation Vis e an Bocahut quarry at Avesnes-sur-Helpe northern France and limestones of Morrone di Pacentro Formation Lower Cretaceous Italy Fungi growing in Petri dishes from airborne spores attacked petrographic thin sections and rock chips Rock surface diagenesis was periodically monitored under the optical microscope using duplicate petrographic thin sections The experiment ended after 15 days The analyses of fungal material samples of mycelia thin sections and chips under optical microscopy scanning electron microscope SEM x-ray diffraction XRD energy dispersive x-ray EDX Raman spectroscopy and stable isotopes C and O revealed the extent of microbial diagenesis The results pointed to strong characteristic diagenetic biosignatures Intense substrate de-micritization and micritization by oxalates grain bridging and cementation void filling formation of inter- and intragranular porosity permeability enhancement and significant mineral neoformations alpha - and beta -glushinskite weddellite whewellite a variation of Calcium oxalate hydrate calcite and possibly struvite This is the first reporting on alpha - and beta -glushinskite co-precipitation through fungal interaction with

  18. Comparison of Acoustic Energy Meter (AEM) and Schmidt hammer 'R' for rapid assessment of rock surface hardness: a preliminary assessment from southeast Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin; Winkler, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    This research focuses on one of the key challenges in geomorphology - quantifying rock surface hardness via in situ measurements, to provide information on rock physical properties. This has been a focus in recent years with the rapid emergence of studies that center on surface and near surface weathering impacts, and rates of material loss. Indeed, a key element to understanding how weathering and erosion processes combine to influence rock surface (and landscape) evolution is the measurement and monitoring of rock surface hardness. We provide results from a preliminary assessment of the applicability of the Acoustic Energy Meter (AEM) to subaerial rock surface hardness, in comparison with an N-Type Schmidt hammer. The AEM apparatus consists of a geophone which is in contact with the rock surface and some electronics. The AEM is held normal to the surface to be tested and the surface is struck with a small hammer (typically 0.75 kg), with the AEM quantifying the decay time of seismically-induced oscillations within the top c. 1-2 m of the rock mass. Previous work using an AEM has focused on measuring roof stability and delamination in South African underground coal, gold and platinum mines, where long AEM reverberation times correlated well with weak rock mass and dense microfracturing. However, the technique has rarely been applied to the assessment of rock surfaces in a subaerial setting. We applied the technique to a range of lithologies at five sites in southeast Queensland in the Brisbane area, each an exposure of phyllite, granite, mudstone, argillite or volcanic tuff. The aims were: (1) quantifying the response of different rock masses to the AEM technique; and (2) assessing the applicability of the AEM as a rapid in situ measure of rock hardness by comparing results with Schmidt hammer 'R' values from the same exposures. Results showed that the AEM is useful in discriminating rock hardness across rocks with different lithological properties. Second, an

  19. World Map Showing Surface and Subsurface Distribution, and Lithologic Character of Middle and Late Neoproterozoic Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The map was prepared to outline the basic information on where Neoproterozoic rocks are present in the World, and of the lithologic character of these rocks. The information provides a better understanding of major Neoproterozoic tectonic subdivisions useful in paleogeographic and plate tectonic reconstructions. The time frame of the map is within the middle and late Neoproterozoic from approximately 870 to 540 Ma and is after widespread Mesoproterozoic Grenville-age collisional events that are considered to have formed the hypothetical supercontinent of Rodinia. Much of the time represented by the map is interpreted to be during the fragmentation of Rodinia. The recognition of Neoproterozoic rocks is commonly difficult because of limited isotopic or paloeontological dating. Thus, some rocks shown on the map could be older or younger than the age indicated. However, at the scale of the map the the problem may be minor. Enough information seems to be available to indicate the general age of the rocks. Many of the successions contain diamictite deposits considered to be glaciogenic and dated as middle or late Neoproterozoic. These deposits thus show a rough correlation of middle and late Neoproterozoic rocks of the world. The map is a Richardson map projection, except for Antarctica which is a polar projection. The map was prepared from about 650 references, shown in the text linked below under 'Sources of Information', used to outline distribution patterns, determine rock types, and provide information on the regional and local geologic framework of the rocks. The focus of the references is on the geologic information needed to prepare the map. Other information, such as plate tectonic reconstructions or paleomagnetic studies is generally not included. The 'Sources of Information' lists references alphabetically for each of 14 regions. In brackets is a code for each area. These codes provide help in locating the specific regions in the references.

  20. Biological Origin of Micro-laminated Calcium Carbonate Deposits on Antarctic Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, M.; Stone, J. O.

    2001-12-01

    We have observed and sampled patchy encrustations of calcium carbonate on rock surfaces in East and West Antarctica. Individual disk-like deposits are up to 1 cm across and a few mm thick, but in places coalesce to form more extensive, colloform coatings. We have observed these deposits on substrates of granite, sandstone, and schist. Their distribution appears similar to that of Antarctic lichens and endolithic algae, extending up to ca. 1000m elevation, but has no consistent relationship to snow drifts, solar radiation, or prevailing winds. The morphology and position of the deposits are distinct from sub-glacial carbonate precipitates. In Marie Byrd Land, the encrustations occur on the surfaces exposed by deglaciation within the past 5000 yrs, and the sample from East Antarctica contains live C-14 (M. Mabin, pers. comm.), suggesting a possible biological origin Electron microprobe and SEM examination of cross-sectioned specimens reveals micron-scale layering of predominantly calcium carbonate, but with a number of bright laminae in SEM images, believed to be calcium fluoride. Sections closely resemble desert varnish in micro-morphology, though not in mineralogy. Isotopic analysis of an organic carbon extract (as opposed to C from the CaCO3 itself) gave a delta C-13 PDB value of -23.3 per mil, similar to values expected in carbon of biological origin. However, we have no proof yet that the carbon analyzed was produced by organisms within the encrustation, rather than being entrapped during an inorganic precipitation process. To investigate the possible biological origin of this material, we attempted to sequence the 16S segment of rRNA in the organic extract, but have not yet completed successful PCR replication. We are continuing attempts to isolate and analyze the pertinent genetic material. The micro-morphology, strongly negative delta C-13 and presence of live C-14 suggest a biological process for precipitation of these calcium carbonate deposits. We hope to

  1. Chromium isotopes in siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a proxy for Earth surface redox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.; Wang, X.; Owens, J. D.; Johnson, T. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging and potentially promising proxy for tracking redox processes at Earth's surface. However, recent efforts to reconstruct the Cr isotope record through time have primarily focused on sporadically deposited iron-rich chemical sediments, with large temporal gaps and limited capacity to explore the Cr isotope record relative to modern and recent marine processes. However, the basic inorganic chemistry of Cr suggests that anoxic marine basins factor prominently in the global Cr cycle, and that likewise sediments deposited within anoxic basins may offer an unexplored Cr isotope archive throughout Earth's history. We present authigenic δ53Cr data from sediments of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela--a ';type' environment on the modern Earth for large, perennially anoxic basins with relatively strong hydrological connections to the global ocean. Combined with currently available constraints on the δ53Cr composition of modern Atlantic seawater, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that anoxic marine basins can serve as a chemical archive of the first-order features of seawater δ53Cr variation. We employ a simple quantitative model to explore the implications of this hypothesis for global Cr isotope mass balance and the possible utility of authigenic δ53Cr in anoxically deposited siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a global paleoredox proxy. Our focus is a basic analysis of the primary controls on seawater δ53Cr as related to both the marine redox landscape and the processes involved in the weathering and aqueous-particulate transport of Cr at Earth's surface. As a case study, we provide analysis of new bulk δ53Cr data through a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2), which shows a well-defined ~1.0‰ negative excursion during the event coupled with evidence for a drawdown of the marine Cr reservoir. We present a conceptual model to explain these observations, and interpret this shift to suggest a shutdown of

  2. The use of surface analytical techniques to measure the loadings of uranium and plutonium sorbed simultaneously from solution onto rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.A.; Bishop, H.E.; Cowper, M.M.; Fozard, P.R.; McMillan, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Small polished blocks of granite, diorite and dolerite were immersed in solutions containing uranium and plutonium at equal initial concentration.The samples were analyzed by the advanced surface analytical techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and nuclear microprobe analysis. The results show that both actinides sorb onto the same minerals in the three rocks. However, SIMS data show that significantly more uranium was sorbed than plutonium.

  3. The new global lithological map database GLiM: A representation of rock properties at the Earth surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Moosdorf, Nils

    2012-12-01

    Lithology describes the geochemical, mineralogical, and physical properties of rocks. It plays a key role in many processes at the Earth surface, especially the fluxes of matter to soils, ecosystems, rivers, and oceans. Understanding these processes at the global scale requires a high resolution description of lithology. A new high resolution global lithological map (GLiM) was assembled from existing regional geological maps translated into lithological information with the help of regional literature. The GLiM represents the rock types of the Earth surface with 1,235,400 polygons. The lithological classification consists of three levels. The first level contains 16 lithological classes comparable to previously applied definitions in global lithological maps. The additional two levels contain 12 and 14 subclasses, respectively, which describe more specific rock attributes. According to the GLiM, the Earth is covered by 64% sediments (a third of which are carbonates), 13% metamorphics, 7% plutonics, and 6% volcanics, and 10% are covered by water or ice. The high resolution of the GLiM allows observation of regional lithological distributions which often vary from the global average. The GLiM enables regional analysis of Earth surface processes at global scales. A gridded version of the GLiM is available at the PANGEA Database (http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.788537).

  4. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Integrated system for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A system for investigating non-linear properties of a rock formation around a borehole is provided. The system includes a first sub-system configured to perform data acquisition, control and recording of data; a second subsystem in communication with the first sub-system and configured to perform non-linearity and velocity preliminary imaging; a third subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and configured to emit controlled acoustic broadcasts and receive acoustic energy; a fourth subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and the third subsystem and configured to generate a source signal directed towards the rock formation; and a fifth subsystem in communication with the third subsystem and the fourth subsystem and configured to perform detection of signals representative of the non-linear properties of the rock formation.

  6. The Research into the Quality of Rock Surfaces Obtained by Abrasive Water Jet Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młynarczuk, Mariusz; Skiba, Marta; Sitek, Libor; Hlaváček, Petr; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, water jet cutting technology has been being used more and more often, in various domains of human activity. Its numerous applications include cutting different materials - among them, rock materials. The present paper discusses the results of the research that aimed at determining - in a quantitative manner - the way in which the water jet cutting parameters (such as the traverse speed of the head, and the distance between the high-pressure inlet of the water jet and the cut material) influence the quality of the processed surface. Additionally, the impact of these parameters on the surface of various materials was investigated. The materials used were three granites differing with respect to the size of grains. In the course of the research, the standard parameters defined by the ISO norms were analyzed. It was also proposed that variograms be used to analyze the quality of the cut surface. Technologia cięcia strumieniem wodnym staje się w ostatnich latach coraz intensywniej wykorzystywana w różnych dziedzinach działalności człowieka. Jest ona wykorzystywana do obróbki różnorodnych materiałów, również materiałów skalnych. W ramach badań analizowano trzy granity różniące się m.in. wielkościami ziarn, które były przecinane przy różnych prędkościach przesuwu głowicy z wlotem strumienia wodnego. Analizowano standardowe parametry zdefiniowane w normach ISO jak również zaproponowano wykorzystanie wariogramów do analizy jakości wyciętej powierzchni. W pracy opisano w sposób ilościowy zmiany jakości powierzchni skał ciętych strumieniem wodnym ze ścierniwem w zależności od prędkości przesuwu głowicy, jak również w zależności od odległości przecinanego fragmentu powierzchni od wlotu strumienia wodnego do materiału. Wyniki uzyskane w pomiarach wskazują też na wpływ wielkości uziarnienia skały na jakość otrzymanej powierzchni. Jest to szczególnie widoczne dla najmniej optymalnych parametrów ci

  7. Fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface trench closed to the Wenchuan Earthquake Surface Rupture Zone imply the different slip dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T. Q.; Sun, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake had induced two major earthquake surface rupture zones, including the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault (Y-B F.) and Guanxian-Anxian earthquake fault (G-A F.) earthquake surface rupture zones. This giant earthquake had caused great human and financial loss. After main shock, the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was co-organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Land and Resources and China Bureau of Seismology, and this project focused on earthquake fault mechanics, earthquake slip process, fault physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical behavior, fluid behavior, fracture energy, and so on. In this study, the fault-rocks in the two trenches close to the two Wenchuan Earthquake surface rupture zone were used to discuss the earthquake slip dynamics, including the Bajiaomiao and Jiulong trenches along the Y-B F. and G-A F. earthquake surface rupture zones, respectively. This study also combined with the recent fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface and WFSD-1. The rock magnetism, from the Bajiaomiao trench and other previous researches, shows that the high susceptibility of the fault gouge along the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault zone was caused by the new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals, such as magnetite and hematite, so the Y-B F. had experienced high temperature and rapid speed thermal pressurization earthquake slip mechanism. The rock magnetism from the Jiulong trench implied that the slightly low average susceptibility of fault gouge was caused by high content of Fe-sulfides than that of fault breccia and Jurassic sandstones, which was possibly induced by earthquake process or earth surface process after the fault rocks exposed to the surface. If the high content of Fe-sulfides was induced by earthquake process, the G-A F. had experienced the low temperature and slow speed machanical lubrication earthquake slip mechanism. The different earthquake slip mechanism was

  8. Estimation of the reactive mineral surface area during CO2-rich fluid-rock interaction: the influence of neogenic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scislewski, A.; Zuddas, P.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions actively participate to control fluid chemistry during water-rock interaction. It is however, difficult to estimate and well normalize bulk reaction rates if the mineral surface area exposed to the aqueous solution and effectively participating on the reactions is unknown. We evaluated the changing of the reactive mineral surface area during the interaction between CO2-rich fluids and Albitite/Granitoid rocks (similar mineralogy but different abundances), reacting under flow-through conditions. Our methodology, adopting an inverse modeling approach, is based on the estimation of dissolution rate and reactive surface area of the different minerals participating in the reactions by the reconstruction the chemical evolution of the interacting fluids. The irreversible mass-transfer processes is defined by a fractional degree of advancement, while calculations were carried out for Albite, Microcline, Biotite and Calcite assuming that the ion activity of dissolved silica and aluminium ions was limited by the equilibrium with quartz and kaolinite. Irrespective of the mineral abundance in granite and albitite, we found that mineral dissolution rates did not change significantly in the investigated range of time where output solution’s pH remained in the range between 6 and 8, indicating that the observed variation in fluid composition depends not on pH but rather on the variation of the parent mineral’s reactive surface area. We found that the reactive surface area of Albite varied by more than 2 orders of magnitude, while Microcline, Calcite and Biotite surface areas changed by 1-2 orders of magnitude. We propose that parent mineral chemical heterogeneity and, particularly, the stability of secondary mineral phases may explain the observed variation of the reactive surface area of the minerals. Formation of coatings at the dissolving parent mineral surfaces significantly reduced the amount of surface available to react

  9. Observation of the Degradation Characteristics and Scale of Unevenness on Three-dimensional Artificial Rock Joint Surfaces Subjected to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Eun-Soo; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Song, Ki-Il; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the degradation characteristics and scale of unevenness (small-scale roughness) on sheared rock joint surfaces at a low-stress regime. While the degradation characteristics of unevenness and the normal stress are mutually interrelated, an understanding of the degradation patterns of the three-dimensional roughness of rock joints is one of the important components needed to identify asperity failure characteristics and to quantify the role of damaged unevenness in establishing a shear strength model. A series of direct shear tests was performed on three-dimensional artificial rock joint surfaces at different normal stress levels. After shearing, the spatial distributions and statistical parameters of degraded roughness were analysed for the different normal stress levels. The length and area of the degraded zones showed bell-shaped distributions in a logarithmic scale, and the dominant scale (or the most frequently occurring scale) of the damaged asperities (i.e., unevenness) ranged from approximately, 0.5 to 5.0 mm in length and 0.1-10 mm2 in area. This scale of the damaged unevenness was consistent regardless of the level of normal stress. It was also found that the relative area of damaged unevenness on a given joint area, and thus the contribution of the mechanical asperity failure component to shear strength increased as normal stress increased.

  10. [Investigation of ultrasonic surface wave interaction with porous saturated rocks]. Progress report, [July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Calculations showed that capillary forces can easily produce closed- pore boundary conditions at interface between nonwetting fluid (air) and a porous solid saturated by a wetting fluid (water). The direct excitation technique was used to measure surface wave velocity and attenuation on both wet and dry rocks. The strong correlation between the observed surface wave velocity change caused by water saturation and the formation permeability can be used for ultrasonic assessment of the dynamic permeability. The experimental system was improved further by introducing laser interferometric detection, which was adapted to surface wave inspection of fluid-saturated permeable materials. In a separate effort, the surface stiffness of different water-saturated porous solids was studied by a novel acoustical method. Areas for further study are described.

  11. Relating MODIS-derived surface albedo to soils and rock types over Northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, C. B.; Gao, F.; Strahler, A. H.; Dickinson, R. E.; Zeng, X.; Lucht, W.

    2002-05-01

    We use the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft to derive surface albedo for the arid areas of Northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula. Albedo in seven MODIS spectral bands for land and three broad bands (for shortwave, near infrared, and visible portions of the spectrum) is produced. Surface albedo is derived from MODIS observations during a sixteen-day period and is analyzed at 1 km spatial resolution. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability of surface albedo in the study region that is related to soil and geological characteristics of the surface. For example, solar shortwave white-sky albedo varies by a factor of about 2.5 from the darkest volcanic terrains to the brightest sand sheets. Vegetation contribution to surface reflectance is essentially negligible since we only considered pixels with under 10 percent fractional canopy cover. Few, if any, coupled land-atmosphere global or regional models capture this observed spatial variability in surface reflectance or albedo. Here we suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, soil classification) and rock types (based on the United States Geological Survey, USGS, geological maps) to MODIS derived surface albedo statistics. This approach is a first step towards the incorporation of the observed spatial variability in surface reflective properties into climate models.

  12. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  13. Rock elastic properties and near-surface structure at Taurus-Littrow. [strain measurement of lunar basalt and breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trice, R.; Warren, N.; Anderson, O. L.

    1974-01-01

    Linear strain measurements are presented for two lunar basalts, 14310,82 and 71055,15 and one breccia, 15498,23 to 5 kb hydrostatic pressure. Compressional and shear acoustic velocities to 5 kb are also presented for the basalts, 14310,82 and 71055,15. These elastic properties, along with geological, seismological and rock mechanics considerations are consistent with a model of the structure of the Taurus-Littrow valley as follows, a thin surface regolith overlying a fractured mixture of basalt flows and ejecta material which in turn overlies a coherent breccia of highland ejecta debris.

  14. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A.; DeAngelo, Michael V.; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A.; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  15. Visible and near-infrared multispectral analysis of rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; Knoll, A. H.; McLennan, S. M.; Squyres, S. W.; Calvin, W. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Morris, R. V.; Soderblom, J.; Thompson, S. D.; Watters, W. A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-04-01

    Multispectral measurements in the visible and near infrared of rocks at Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Pancam are described. The Pancam multispectral data show that the outcrops of the Burns formation consist of two main spectral units which in stretched 673, 535, 432 nm color composites appear buff- and purple-colored. These units are referred to as the HFS and LFS spectral units based on higher and lower values of 482 to 535 nm slope. Spectral characteristics are consistent with the LFS outcrop consisting of less oxidized, and the HFS outcrop consisting of more oxidized, iron-bearing minerals. The LFS surfaces are not as common and appear, primarily, at the distal ends of outcrop layers and on steep, more massive surfaces, locations that are subject to greater eolian erosion. Consequently, the HFS surfaces are interpreted as a weathering rind. Further inherent spectral differences between layers and between different outcrop map units, both untouched and patches abraded by the rover's Rock Abrasion Tool, are also described. Comparisons of the spectral parameters of the Meridiani outcrop with a set of laboratory reflectance measurements of Fe3+-bearing minerals show that the field of outcrop measurements plots near the fields of hematite, ferrihydrite, poorly crystalline goethite, and schwertmannite. Rind and fracture fill materials, observed intermittently at outcrop exposures, are intermediate in their spectral character between both the HFS and LFS spectral classes and other, less oxidized, surface materials (basaltic sands, spherules, and cobbles).

  16. Visible and near-infrared multispectral analysis of rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars, by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J.F., III; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.L.; Knoll, A.H.; McLennan, S.M.; Squyres, S. W.; Calvin, W.M.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Morris, R.V.; Soderblom, J.; Thompson, S.D.; Watters, W.A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Multispectral measurements in the visible and near infrared of rocks at Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Pancam are described. The Pancam multispectral data show that the outcrops of the Burns formation consist of two main spectral units which in stretched 673, 535, 432 nm color composites appear buff- and purple-colored. These units are referred to as the HFS and LFS spectral units based on higher and lower values of 482 to 535 nm slope. Spectral characteristics are consistent with the LFS outcrop consisting of less oxidized, and the HFS outcrop consisting of more oxidized, iron-bearing minerals. The LFS surfaces are not as common and appear, primarily, at the distal ends of outcrop layers and on steep, more massive surfaces, locations that are subject to greater eolian erosion. Consequently, the HFS surfaces are interpreted as a weathering rind. Further inherent spectral differences between layer's and between different outcrop map units, both untouched and patches abraded by the rover's Rock Abrasion Tool, are also described. Comparisons of the spectral parameters of the Meridiani outcrop with a set of laboratory reflectance measurements of Fe3+-bearing minerals show that the field of outcrop measurements plots near the fields of hematite, ferrihydrite, poorly crystalline goethite, and schwertmannite. Rind and fracture fill materials, observed intermittently at outcrop exposures, are intermediate in their spectral character between both the HFS and LFS spectral classes and other, less oxidized, surface materials (basaltic sands, spherules, and cobbles). Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Unsteady rock uplift and erosion in a decaying orogen in response to surface and dynamic mantle processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzaglia, F. J.; Zeitler, P. K.; McKeon, R. E.; Idleman, B. D.; Berti, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States are constructed on a lithosphere that was assembled and modified during a long period of Paleozoic collisional tectonics, and then thinned by erosion and stretching with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Geologic, geomorphic, and geophysical data describe the long term erosion, persistence of mountainous topography, and coupling between surface and tectonic, isostatic, or eperiogenic processes of this ancient, decaying orogen. There are several key observables that must be reconciled to explain Appalachian post-orogenic (post-Triassic) evolution. These include subsidence of the former metamorphic core of the range and topographic inversion of the foreland, a long-term record of unsteady erosion preserved in the sediments of the Atlantic margin shelf-slope basins, the steepening of the longitudinal profiles of Atlantic slope rivers forming a zone of bedrock rapids as they approach the Atlantic, river knickpoints in the foreland with a common elevation that have no apparent relation to rock-type or structure, and evidence that the divide between Atlantic slope and Ohio drainages is not a static feature. The long term rate of Appalachian rock uplift (base level fall) and erosion is ~20-30 m/my., a result consistent with AHe thermochronology and the average sediment flux to the BCT, but misleading in terms of the unsteadiness demonstrated by river incision, growth of the Atlantic slope drainage, and short-term sediment flux to the BCT. This unsteadiness is likely influenced by several factors including climate change, sediment storage in the landscape and the Coastal Plain, and eustasy; however, we propose that the most important factor has been unsteady rock uplift as the result of a lithospheric flexural response to surface loads and sub-lithospheric mantle flow driven by the foundering Farallon slab.

  18. Colour Changes on the Surface of the Rock Materials Due to UV-A and UV-B Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binal, Adil; Ayderman, Aykut; Sel, Aylin

    2015-04-01

    The colour of the rocks used in the current buildings, and historical monuments is an important parameter in architecture and engineering. In addition, engineering geologists use the colour in order to identify the weathering class of rock material. The main colour of the stone, especially, are affected by the mineral size, the colour of the primary minerals and matrix material, as well as the colour of the accessory minerals. Due to atmospheric effects, changes in the outer surface colour of the rocks used as siding materials occur with over time. Factors causing the colour change are carbon dioxide (CO2), ozone (O3), sulphate (SO2, SO3) and nitrate (NOx) from the atmosphere with aerosols as well as UV rays from the sun. There is no more work in the literature on colour changes caused by UV-A and UV-B rays. In this study, the effects of ultraviolet in the colour of the surfaces of basalt, limestone, ignimbrite, travertine and sandstone have been simulated with a new experimental device in the laboratory medium. Lutron colour analyser (RGB-1002) was used for the measurements of RGB colours. Colour differences between the beginning and end of tests were determined with the standard practice for calculation of colour tolerances and colour differences from instrumentally measured colour coordinates (ASTM D2244). As a result of the experiments performed, lighten that seem on dark-grey micritic limestone (colour change ratio, CCR: 17.06) and basalt samples (CCR: 8.24) become even visually noticeable. Black and red ignimbrite samples having high porosity were presented the lower rate of colour changes. Finally, colour darkening has been observed in the light-coloured travertine (CCR: 13.8) and sandstone samples (CCR: 20.99).

  19. Surface Roughness Effects on Fluid Transport Through a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, D.H.

    2008-04-01

    Fluid flow through rock fractures can be orders of magnitude faster than through the adjacent low-permeability rock. Understanding how fluid moves through these pathways is important for the prediction of sequestered CO2 transport in geologic reservoirs. Reservoir-scale, discrete-fracture simulators use simplified models of flow through fractures to determine transport properties in complex fracture networks. A high level of approximation is required in these reservoir-scale simulations due to the number of fractures within the domain of interest and because of the limited amount of information that can be obtained from geophysical well-logs (Long et al. (1996)). For this study, flow simulations through a CT-scanned fracture were performed to evaluate different fluid transport parameters that are important in geological flow analysis. The ‘roughness’ of the fracture was varied to determine the effect of the bumpy fracture walls on the fluid flow. The permeability and effective aperture were determined for flow under a constant pressure head. The fracture roughness is shown to dramatically reduce the flow through the fracture, and various relations are described.

  20. High frequency measurement of P- and S-wave velocities on crystalline rock massif surface - methodology of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Slavík, Lubomír

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of non-destructive monitoring of rock properties in the underground excavation it is possible to perform repeated high-accuracy P- and S-wave velocity measurements. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained during the preparation of micro-seismic long-term monitoring system. The field velocity measurements were made by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock outcrop (granite) in Bedrichov gallery (northern Bohemia). The gallery at the experimental site was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) and it is used for drinking water supply, which is conveyed in a pipe. The stable measuring system and its automatic operation lead to the use of piezoceramic transducers both as a seismic source and as a receiver. The length of measuring base at gallery wall was from 0.5 to 3 meters. Different transducer coupling possibilities were tested namely with regard of repeatability of velocity determination. The arrangement of measuring system on the surface of the rock massif causes better sensitivity of S-transducers for P-wave measurement compared with the P-transducers. Similarly P-transducers were found more suitable for S-wave velocity determination then P-transducers. The frequency dependent attenuation of fresh rock massif results in limited frequency content of registered seismic signals. It was found that at the distance between the seismic source and receiver from 0.5 m the frequency components above 40 kHz are significantly attenuated. Therefore for the excitation of seismic wave 100 kHz transducers are most suitable. The limited frequency range should be also taken into account for the shape of electric impulse used for exciting of piezoceramic transducer. The spike pulse generates broad-band seismic signal, short in the time domain. However its energy after low-pass filtration in the rock is significantly lower than the energy of seismic signal generated by square wave pulse. Acknowledgments: This work was partially

  1. Identification of Rocks on Planetary Surface Using Husar-9 Rover Camera: Field Work Simulations with Hunveyor-9 Space Probe Model System at Eötvös High School, Tata, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, I.; Badics, A.; Bakonyi, I.; Csiszár, Á.; Franko, M.; Gyürki, Á.; Héricz, M.; Marschall, B.; Nagyházi, Á.; Varga, T. N.; Végh, Gy.; Varga, T. P.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2009-03-01

    We studied the rock types along the Husar-9 rover’s path and identified them on the basis of their shape, color and surface textures: komatiite, basalt, granite, conglomerate, schist rock, porphyritic granite, suevite breccia, and vesicular basalt.

  2. Surface processes recorded by rocks and soils on Meridiani Planum, Mars: Microscopic Imager observations during Opportunity's first three extended missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, Ken E.; Grotzinger, John; Knoll, Andrew H.; McLennan, Scott M.; Weitz, Catherine; Yingst, Aileen; Anderson, Robert; Archinal, Brent A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Barrett, Janet M.; Becker, Kris J.; Bell, James F.; Budney, Charles; Chapman, Mary G.; Cook, Debbie; Ehlmann, Bethany; Franklin, Brenda; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Galuszka, Donna M.; Garcia, Patricia A.; Geissler, Paul; Hare, Trent M.; Howington-Kraus, Elpitha; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lanagan, Peter; Lee, Ella Mae; Leff, Craig; Maki, Justin N.; Mullins, Kevin F.; Parker, Timothy J.; Redding, Bonnie L.; Rosiek, Mark R.; Sims, Michael H.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Spanovich, Nicole; Springer, Richard; Squyres, Steve W.; Stolper, Daniel; Sucharski, Robert M.; Sucharski, Tracie; Sullivan, Rob; Torson, James M.

    2008-11-01

    The Microscopic Imager (MI) on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has returned images of Mars with higher resolution than any previous camera system, allowing detailed petrographic and sedimentological studies of the rocks and soils at the Meridiani Planum landing site. Designed to simulate a geologist's hand lens, the MI is mounted on Opportunity's instrument arm and can resolve objects 0.1 mm across or larger. This paper provides an overview of MI operations, data calibration, and analysis of MI data returned during the first 900 sols (Mars days) of the Opportunity landed mission. Analyses of Opportunity MI data have helped to resolve major questions about the origin of observed textures and features. These studies support eolian sediment transport, rather than impact surge processes, as the dominant depositional mechanism for Burns formation strata. MI stereo observations of a rock outcrop near the rim of Erebus Crater support the previous interpretation of similar sedimentary structures in Eagle Crater as being formed by surficial flow of liquid water. Well-sorted spherules dominate ripple surfaces on the Meridiani plains, and the size of spherules between ripples decreases by about 1 mm from north to south along Opportunity's traverse between Endurance and Erebus craters.

  3. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution and Surface Area of Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Peter; Krevor, Sam

    2015-04-01

    An important control on rate of interfacial processes between minerals and aqueous solutions such as nucleation of solids, and mineral dissolution and growth is reactive surface area. In geochemical modelling, the continuum hypothesis is based on the assumption that the system can be represented by a sufficiently large number of representative elemental volumes. There has been recent interest in studying the impact of this assumption on reaction-transport coupled systems. In this study, the impact of pore-scale heterogeneity on the distribution of reactive surface area is discussed. 3D images obtained using x-ray micro-tomography were used to characterise the distribution of reactive surface area. The results were compared to independent observations. Mineral identification using x- ray diffraction and fluorescence suggested general agreement with CT analysis. Nitrogen BET surface areas were one to two orders of magnitude higher than measurements from x-ray imagery. Co- registered images of Berea sandstone from x-ray and energy dispersive spectroscopy imagery suggested that quartz, K-feldspar and most clays could be identified. However, minor minerals such as albite and illite did not exhibit enough contrast. In Berea sandstone, mineral surface area fraction was poorly correlated to the mineral volumetric fraction. Clay and feldspar minerals exhibited higher surface area fractions than bulk mineralogy suggested. In contrast, in the Edwards carbonate samples, modal mineral composition correlated with mineral-specific surface area. Berea sandstone revealed a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. Conversely, the carbonate samples suggested a continuous range of pore sizes across length scales. A comparison with pore network model simulations from the literature was made. First order estimates of mineral specific correlations between geometric area measured in the x-ray images were used to convert the CT

  4. Multiparameter Correction Intensity of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data as AN Input for Rock Surface Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleček, V.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large increase in the creation of 3D models of objects all around us can be observed in the last few years; thanks to the help of the rapid development of new advanced technologies for spatial data collection and robust software tools. A new commercially available airborne laser scanning data in Czech Republic, provided in the form of the Digital terrain model of the fifth generation as irregularly spaced points, enable locating the majority of rock formations. However, the positional and height accuracy of this type of landforms can reach huge errors in some cases. Therefore, it is necessary to start mapping using terrestrial laser scanning with the possibility of adding a point cloud data derived from ground or aerial photogrammetry. Intensity correction and noise removal is usually based on the distance between measured objects and the laser scanner, the incidence angle of the beam or on the radiometric and topographic characteristics of measured objects. This contribution represents the major undesirable effects that affect the quality of acquisition and processing of laser scanning data. Likewise there is introduced solutions to some of these problems.

  5. The effect of pressure on ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in near-surface sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.I.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate laboratory ultrasonic measurements of velocity and attenuation were made on water-saturated samples of limestone, sandstone and siltstone as a function of effective pressure (5--60 MPa) using the pulse-echo method. Core samples were taken from Carboniferous sediments at the Whitchester shallow borehole test site; they were cut perpendicular to the horizontal bedding planes. The compressional- and shear-wave velocities and quality factors of the limestones generally showed negligible increases with pressure, while those of the siltstones and sandstones showed intermediate and significant increases with pressure, respectively. At 60 MPa, the sandstone samples generally showed a range of quality factors attributed to their differing porosities and differing proportions of rigid skeletal minerals (quartz grains) and compliant matrix materials (clay, kerogenic organic matter); at 5 MPa, they generally showed similar quality factors attributed to the presence of microcracks, which occur predominantly at grain contacts. The results show that kerogenic organic matter behaves in a similar way to other compliant matrix minerals in causing high attenuation at ultrasonic frequencies, and that caution must be exercised when applying high pressure geostatistical relationships to reservoir rocks at low effective pressures. The results indicate the presence of two types of squirt flow loss mechanisms: clay squirt flow dominates at high pressures, while microcrack squirt flow dominates at low pressures. Clean sandstones and limestones can be distinguished from those with significant amounts of compliant minerals, and sandstones with cracks can be distinguished from those without cracks.

  6. Size-dependent enrichment of waste slag aggregate fragments abraded from asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Gardner, Kevin; Kida, Akiko

    2011-10-30

    Authors consider the environmental prospects of using melted waste slag as the aggregate for asphalt pavement. In particular, the enrichment of slag-derived fragments in fine abrasion dust particles originated from slag asphalt concrete and its size dependency were concerned. A series of surface abrasion tests for asphalt concrete specimens, containing only natural aggregates as reference or 30 wt% of substituted slag aggregates, were performed. Although two of three slag-asphalt concretes generated 1.5-3.0 times larger amount of abrasion dust than the reference asphalt concrete did, it could not be explained only by abrasion resistance of slag. The enrichment of slag-derived fragments in abrasion dust, estimated on the basis of the peak intensity of quartz and heavy metal concentrations, had size dependency for all slag-asphalt concretes. Slag-derived fragments were enriched in abrasion dust particles with diameters of 150-1000 μm. Enrichment factors were 1.4-2.1. In contrast, there was no enrichment in abrasion dust particles with diameter less than 75 μm. This suggests that prior airborne-size fragmentation of substituted slag aggregates does not need to be considered for tested slag aggregates when environmental risks of abrasion dust of slag-asphalt pavement are assessed. PMID:21868161

  7. Delineating a shallow fault zone and dipping bed rock strata using multichannal analysis of surface waves with a land streamer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Lacombe, P.; Johnson, C.D.; Lane, J.W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) seismic method was used to delineate a fault zone and gently dipping sedimentary bedrock at a site overlain by several meters of regolith. Seismic data were collected rapidly and inexpensively using a towed 30-channel land streamer and a rubberband-accelerated weight-drop seismic source. Data processed using the MASW method imaged the subsurface to a depth of about 20 m and allowed detection of the overburden, gross bedding features, and fault zone. The fault zone was characterized by a lower shear-wave velocity (Vs) than the competent bedrock, consistent with a large-scale fault, secondary fractures, and in-situ weathering. The MASW 2D Vs section was further interpreted to identify dipping beds consistent with local geologic mapping. Mapping of shallow-fault zones and dipping sedimentary rock substantially extends the applications of the MASW method. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  8. Epistemic Uncertainty and Limitations of the Kappa0 model for Near-surface Attenuation at Hard Rock Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The determination of near-surface attenuation for hard rock sites is an important issue in a wide range of seismological applications, particularly seismic hazard analysis. In this article we choose six hard to very-hard rock sites (Vs30 1030 to 3000 m/s) and apply a range of analysis methods to measure the observed attenuation at distance based on a simple exponential decay model with whole-path attenuation operator κ. The κ values are subsequently decoupled from path attenuation (Q) so as to obtain estimates of near-surface attenuation (κ0). Five methods are employed to measure κ which can be split into two groups: broadband methods and high-frequency methods. Each of the applied methods has advantages and disadvantages, which are explored and discussed through the comparison of results from common datasets. In our first step we examine the variability of the individual measured κ values. Some variation between methods is expected due to simplifications of source, path, and site effects. However, we find that significant differences arise between attenuation measured on individual recordings, depending on the method employed or the modelling decisions made during a particular approach. Some of the differences can be explained through site amplification effects: although usually weak at rock sites, amplification may still lead to bias of the measured κ due to the chosen fitting frequency bandwidth, which often varies between methods. At some sites the observed high-frequency spectral shape was clearly different to the typical κ attenuation model, with curved or bi-linear rather than linear decay at high frequencies. In addition to amplification effects this could be related to frequency-dependent attenuation effects (e.g., Q(f)): since the κ model is implicitly frequency independent, κ will in this case be dependent on the selected analysis bandwidth. In our second step, using the whole-path κ datasets from the five approaches, we investigate the

  9. Epistemic uncertainty and limitations of the κ0 model for near-surface attenuation at hard rock sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Ktenidou, Olga-Joan; Cotton, Fabrice; Abrahamson, Norman; Van Houtte, Chris; Fäh, Donat

    2015-09-01

    The determination of near-surface attenuation for hard rock sites is an important issue in a wide range of seismological applications, particularly seismic hazard analysis. In this article we choose six hard to very-hard rock sites (Vs30 1030-3000 m s-1) and apply a range of analysis methods to measure the observed attenuation at distance based on a simple exponential decay model with whole-path attenuation operator κr. The κr values are subsequently decoupled from path attenuation (Q) so as to obtain estimates of near-surface attenuation (κ0). Five methods are employed to measure κr which can be split into two groups: broad-band methods and high-frequency methods. Each of the applied methods has advantages and disadvantages, which are explored and discussed through the comparison of results from common data sets. In our first step we examine the variability of the individual measured κr values. Some variation between methods is expected due to simplifications of source, path, and site effects. However, we find that significant differences arise between attenuation measured on individual recordings, depending on the method employed or the modelling decisions made during a particular approach. Some of the differences can be explained through site amplification effects: although usually weak at rock sites, amplification may still lead to bias of the measured κr due to the chosen fitting frequency bandwidth, which often varies between methods. At some sites the observed high-frequency spectral shape was clearly different to the typical κr attenuation model, with curved or bi-linear rather than linear decay at high frequencies. In addition to amplification effects this could be related to frequency-dependent attenuation effects [e.g. Q( f )]: since the κr model is implicitly frequency independent, κr will in this case be dependent on the selected analysis bandwidth. In our second step, using the whole-path κr data sets from the five approaches, we investigate

  10. Microcracks in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, G.

    1979-01-01

    Lunar samples contain abundant open microcracks that have closure characteristics completely unlike any shocked terrestrial rock; however, the microcracks present in the lunar rocks before the rocks reached the surface of the moon were likely similar to the microcracks in the shocked terrestrial rocks. Because the microcracks present in the lunar rocks in situ inside the moon were different, radically different, from the microcracks present today in returned lunar samples, any property that is sensitive to microcracks measured on the returned lunar samples is inappropriate for predicting that property as a function of depth in the moon. Therefore, many data that have been measured already on lunar samples simply do not apply to rocks in situ inside the moon. A plausible mechanism with which to account for the difference in microcrack characteristics of lunar samples on the surface of the moon and the microcrack characteristics of lunar rock in situ inside the moon is thermal cycling during residence on the moon's surface.

  11. TIR Spectroscopy: Looking for Igneous Rocks on the Surface of Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Maturilli, A.; Carli, C.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.; Nestola, F.; Zorzi, F.; Hiesinger, H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) findings, corroborated by petrologic modeling, reviewed the surface composition of Mercury as mainly constituted by low-Fe and Mg-rich basalts. This interpretation dismisses the previously assessed widespread presence of more felsic materials - as on the Moon's surface - leaving open the question of the crust petrogenesis of Mercury. Assessing the presence of a differentiated crust on the surface of Mercury is among the intrinsic objectives of the next ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. The ESA Mercury Planetary Orbiter will carry the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS, 7-14 µm), which will map the surface mineralogical composition of the planet. The interpretation of spectra collected along a wide range of daily surface temperatures is complicated by the relocation of the band minima depending on the temperature (e.g., Helbert et al. 2013). In addition, the simultaneous presence of different minerals, each one with its characteristic thermal expansion coefficient, results in a more difficult interpretation of the spectra. In this work we examine the spectral variations of linear mixtures of plagioclase and pyroxenes that most likely could be present in the differentiated igneous crust of Mercury, in addition to the T-dependent spectral variations of the single constituents. Furthermore we show how two different thermal expansion coefficients combined in the same sample reveal in a thermal infrared spectrum. To this aim we measure high-T emissivity - up to 725K - of natural binary compositions (e.g., anorthosite, gabbro, norite) and their single-phase components, whose chemistries are provided by microprobe analyses. Besides spectroscopy, all the provided samples are analyzed before and after the heat-treatment using X-Ray Diffraction, in order to verify any possible variation due to the annealing.

  12. Global geologic context for rock types and surface alteration on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyatt, M.B.; McSween, H.Y., Jr.; Tanaka, K.L.; Head, J. W., III

    2004-01-01

    Petrologic interpretations of thermal emission spectra from Mars orbiting spacecraft indicate the widespread occurrence of surfaces having basaltic and either andesitic or partly altered basalt compositions. Global concentration of ice-rich mantle deposits and near-surface ice at middle to high latitudes and their spatial correlation with andesitic or partly altered basalt materials favor the alteration hypothesis. We propose the formation of these units through limited chemical weathering from basalt interactions with icy mantles deposited during periods of high obliquity. Alteration of sediments in the northern lowlands depocenter may have been enhanced by temporary standing bodies of water and ice. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  13. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  14. Surface-groundwater interactions in hard rocks in Sardon Catchment of western Spain: An integrated modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S. M. Tanvir; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-09-01

    The structural and hydrological complexity of hard rock systems (HRSs) affects dynamics of surface-groundwater interactions. These complexities are not well described or understood by hydrogeologists because simplified analyses typically are used to study HRSs. A transient, integrated hydrologic model (IHM) GSFLOW (Groundwater and Surface water FLOW) was calibrated and post-audited using 18 years of daily groundwater head and stream discharge data to evaluate the surface-groundwater interactions in semi-arid, ∼80 km2 granitic Sardon hilly catchment in Spain characterized by shallow water table conditions, relatively low storage, dense drainage networks and frequent, high intensity rainfall. The following hydrological observations for the Sardon Catchment, and more generally for HRSs were made: (i) significant bi-directional vertical flows occur between surface water and groundwater throughout the HRSs; (ii) relatively large groundwater recharge represents 16% of precipitation (P, 562 mm.y-1) and large groundwater exfiltration (∼11% of P) results in short groundwater flow paths due to a dense network of streams, low permeability and hilly topographic relief; deep, long groundwater flow paths constitute a smaller component of the water budget (∼1% of P); quite high groundwater evapotranspiration (∼5% of P and ∼7% of total evapotranspiration); low permeability and shallow soils are the main reasons for relatively large components of Hortonian flow and interflow (15% and 11% of P, respectively); (iii) the majority of drainage from the catchment leaves as surface water; (iv) declining 18 years trend (4.44 mm.y-1) of groundwater storage; and (v) large spatio-temporal variability of water fluxes. This IHM study of HRSs provides greater understanding of these relatively unknown hydrologic systems that are widespread throughout the world and are important for water resources in many regions.

  15. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  16. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  17. Critical hydraulic gradient for nonlinear flow through rock fracture networks: The roles of aperture, surface roughness, and number of intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-02-01

    Transition of fluid flow from the linear to the nonlinear regime has been confirmed in single rock fractures when the Reynolds number (Re) exceeds some critical values, yet the criterion for such a transition in discrete fracture networks (DFNs) has received little attention. This study conducted flow tests on crossed fracture models with a single intersection and performed numerical simulations on fluid flow through DFNs of various geometric characteristics. The roles of aperture, surface roughness, and number of intersections of fractures on the variation of the critical hydraulic gradient (Jc) for the onset of nonlinear flow through DFNs were systematically investigated. The results showed that the relationship between hydraulic gradient (J) and flow rate can be well quantified by Forchheimer's law; when J drops below Jc, it reduces to the widely used cubic law, by diminishing the nonlinear term. Larger apertures, rougher fracture surfaces, and a greater number of intersections in a DFN would result in the onset of nonlinear flow at a lower Jc. Mathematical expressions of Jc and the coefficients involved in Forchheimer's law were developed based on multi-variable regressions of simulation results, which can help to choose proper governing equations when solving problems associated with fluid flow in fracture networks.

  18. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest

  19. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W. ); Stoyer, C.H. ); James, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizons, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. Accomplishments for this past year are presented for the following tasks: (1) site selection and acquisition of high density, 3-component TEM data set over test site; (2) finite element forward modeling; and (3) TEM 2-D subsurface imaging.

  20. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W.; Stoyer, C.H.; James, B.A.

    1992-07-17

    The objectives of this research were to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain Overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizon, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. The work under this contract consisted of three tasks: (1) Selection of a test site and acquisition of a high density, 3-component data set over the test site; (2) development of finite element modeling algorithms for computing 3-D EM fields over 2-D EM fields over 2-D subsurface structures; and development of TEM 2-D subsurface imaging method. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  1. A Model for Generation of Martian Surface Dust, Soil and Rock Coatings: Physical vs. Chemical Interactions, and Palagonitic Plus Hydrothermal Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Murchie, S.; Pieters, C.; Zent, A.

    1999-01-01

    This model is one of many possible scenarios to explain the generation of the current surface material on Mars using chemical, magnetic and spectroscopic data from Mars and geologic analogs from terrestrial sites. One basic premise is that there are physical and chemical interactions of the atmospheric dust particles and that these two processes create distinctly different results. Physical processes distribute dust particles on rocks, forming physical rock coatings, and on the surface between rocks forming soil units; these are reversible processes. Chemical reactions of the dust/soil particles create alteration rinds on rock surfaces or duricrust surface units, both of which are relatively permanent materials. According to this model the mineral components of the dust/soil particles are derived from a combination of "typical" palagonitic weathering of volcanic ash and hydrothermally altered components, primarily from steam vents or fumeroles. Both of these altered materials are composed of tiny particles, about 1 micron or smaller, that are aggregates of silicates and iron oxide/oxyhydroxide/sulfate phases. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. A possible climate signal in the surface morphology and internal structure of Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Eric; Holt, John; Levy, Joseph; Stuurman, Cassie; Nerozzi, Stefano; Cardenas, Benjamin; Pharr, James; Aylward, Dan; Schmidt, Logan; Hoey, William; Prem, Parvathy; Rambo, Jackie; Lim, YeJin; Maharaj, Kian

    2016-04-01

    Galena Creek Rock Glacier (GCRG) has been shown in previous studies to be a debris-covered glacier (e.g. Ackert, Jr., 1998), and is thus a target of interest as a record of climate and an element of the mountain hydrological system. The goal of this study was to investigate possible relationships between surface morphology and internal structure and composition of GCRG. This was achieved using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), time-domain electromagnetic sounding (TEM), and photogrammetry to produce digital terrain models (DTMs). We acquired 6 longitudinal GPR surveys at 50 and 100 MHz, 2 common midpoint GPR surveys, and 28 TEM soundings on GCRG from the head to the toe, and ground-based photogrammetry data were collected to produce a DTM of its cirque at 10 cm resolution. TEM soundings locally constrained the bulk thickness of GCRG to 26-75 meters. Common midpoint and hyperbola analyses of GPR surveys produced dielectric constants in the near subsurface of 4 in the upper glacier to 5-9 in the middle and lower glacier. These are consistent with clean ice and a mélange of rock with air and/or ice, respectively. GPR revealed a pervasive shallow reflector at 1-2.5m depth that we interpret to be the interface between the surface debris layer and glacier ice. There is increased structure and clutter in the GPR data beneath this interface as one moves down glacier. Observations were additionally made of a 40m wide, 4-5m deep circular thermokarst pond located on upper GCRG in the cirque. The walls of the pond revealed a cross-section of the top several meters of GCRG's interior: a dry surface layer of rocky debris 1-1.5m thick overlying pure glacier ice. An englacial debris band was also observed, roughly 50 cm thick and presenting at an apparent up-glacier dip of ~30 degrees, intersecting the surface near a subtle ridge resolved in the photogrammetry DTM. A GPR transect conducted near the pond over 6 similar ridges imaged 6 corresponding up-glacier dipping reflectors that

  3. Zinc Enrichments in the Rocks of Gale Crater, Mars Measured by MSL-APXS Reflect Both High Zn in Jake_M Rocks and the Concentration of Zn in Sedimentary Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Gellert, R.; Fisk, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Zinc enrichments have been discovered by Curiosity's alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) in Gale Crater, Mars. Mugearitic Jake_M class rocks have 80-925 ppm Zn (Zn error in APXS accuracy ~16%), which is higher than shergottites (49-90 ppm) [Meyer, 2012] and abraded Adirondack rocks in Gusev Crater (75-117 ppm) [Gellert et al., 2006], but similar to Irvine and Barnhill class rocks in Gusev (230-422 ppm) [Ming et al., 2008]. The source of Jake_M was enriched in Zn, possibly by partial melting of metasomatized mantle [Stolper et al., 2013; Schmidt et al., 2014]. Relative to Jake_M, most clastic rocks encountered in Gale (sols 0-687) are moderately enriched in Zn (500-1900 ppm). Surface alteration is unlikely to cause elevated Zn because soils have lower Zn (310 to 380 ppm). Excluding soils, veins, very dusty rocks, and high-Ni John Klein rocks, Zn correlates with Fe, Mn, Cr, and Ni (r = 0.83, 0.68, 0.72, and 0.67, respectively). The positive relationships suggest that Zn is mobilized with these metals, possibly precipitating in oxide sedimentary cements with Fe-oxides and/or in the Fe-rich amorphous component. In this subset of rocks, Zn does not correlate with Cl, Br, or S; widespread Zn-halogen salts and Zn-sulfides are unlikely. Notable exceptions are the float rocks Et_Then and Secure, which have high FeO (25-27 wt%) but low Zn (~230-490 ppm) and are interpreted to reflect a distinct cementation or rock coating episode. Two Gale targets <1 m apart at the Kimberly outcrop are highly enriched in Zn, demonstrating the localized nature of Zn enrichments: Windjana drill fines (3430-4680 ppm Zn) have high K2O (3.6 wt%), FeO (~26 wt%), MnO (~0.56 wt%), and Ni (~380 ppm); Stephen (~8150 ppm Zn), interpreted to have a MnO-rich (~4.5 wt%) coating, also has high Ni (~1285 ppm), Cl (~3.2 wt%), and Br (~1850 ppm). An igneous origin of the Zn enrichments in Jake M class rocks is likely, and hydrothermal and/or diagenetic processes probably concentrated Zn in the clastic

  4. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  5. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  6. Surface-groundwater interactions in hard rocks in Sardon Catchment of western Spain: an integrated modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, S.M. Tanvir; Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Zhongbo, Su

    2014-01-01

    The structural and hydrological complexity of hard rock systems (HRSs) affects dynamics of surface–groundwater interactions. These complexities are not well described or understood by hydrogeologists because simplified analyses typically are used to study HRSs. A transient, integrated hydrologic model (IHM) GSFLOW (Groundwater and Surface water FLOW) was calibrated and post-audited using 18 years of daily groundwater head and stream discharge data to evaluate the surface–groundwater interactions in semi-arid, ∼80 km2 granitic Sardon hilly catchment in Spain characterized by shallow water table conditions, relatively low storage, dense drainage networks and frequent, high intensity rainfall. The following hydrological observations for the Sardon Catchment, and more generally for HRSs were made: (i) significant bi-directional vertical flows occur between surface water and groundwater throughout the HRSs; (ii) relatively large groundwater recharge represents 16% of precipitation (P, 562 mm.y−1) and large groundwater exfiltration (∼11% of P) results in short groundwater flow paths due to a dense network of streams, low permeability and hilly topographic relief; deep, long groundwater flow paths constitute a smaller component of the water budget (∼1% of P); quite high groundwater evapotranspiration (∼5% of P and ∼7% of total evapotranspiration); low permeability and shallow soils are the main reasons for relatively large components of Hortonian flow and interflow (15% and 11% of P, respectively); (iii) the majority of drainage from the catchment leaves as surface water; (iv) declining 18 years trend (4.44 mm.y−1) of groundwater storage; and (v) large spatio-temporal variability of water fluxes. This IHM study of HRSs provides greater understanding of these relatively unknown hydrologic systems that are widespread throughout the world and are important for water resources in many regions.

  7. Rock size distributions on lava flow surfaces: New results from a range of compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. P.; Anderson, S. W.; Bulmer, M. H.

    2005-12-01

    We measured block sizes along 15-25m orthogonal transects on 12 lava flows of compositions ranging from basalt to rhyolite. At each site, we stretched a line across the flow surface then measured the length of each block cut by this line that were greater than 3-12cm (depending on composition). The measurements from each site were reduced to cumulative size frequency distribution plots, with block size (D) plotted against the fraction of the line f(D) composed of blocks greater than or equal to that size, and fitted with an exponential curve of the form f(D) = k exp(-qD) where k is the intercept and q is the decay parameter. Average block size and geometric mean were also determined for each site. Our data show no clear trends linking average or mean block size to composition, although there does seem to be relationship between block size and the decay parameter. Block size corresponds with the decay parameter at each site except for the basaltic andesite flow at Paint Pot Crater (CA). Many sites at this flow were covered with secondary spatter deposits. Largest blocks and smallest decay parameters were found for the andesite flows at Sabancaya (Peru), while the basalt flows at Cima (CA) exhibited the smallest blocks and largest decay parameters. The second largest block sizes occurred at the four Inyo domes composed of both crystal-rich and glassy rhyolite, and these domes also showed the second smallest decay parameters. All four of the Inyo domes were emplaced along the same feeder dike trend, and the average and mean sizes and decay parameters at these domes are nearly identical, suggesting that composition, extrusion rate, or eruption history controls the block size distributions. However, values for the two andesitic flows, Mt. Shasta (CA) and Sabancaya, were very different, suggesting that extrusion rate and/or eruption history exert a stronger control over the block size distributions than does composition. LIDAR data sets are capable of detecting sub

  8. Effects of structural setting and rock properties on amplitudes of surface motions in the vicinity of small explosive tests

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.L.; Pearson, D.C.; Baker, D.F.; Aimone-Martin, C.

    1994-12-31

    A series of small-scale explosive experiments were conducted in a perlite mine near Socorro, New Mexico. These experiments were a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Southern Methodist University, and Defense Nuclear Agency. The purpose of these tests was to measure the changes in the shock wave and seismic coupling as a function of depth of burial and structural setting. The size of the explosive charges ranged from 1 to 68 kg. Over 1,150 measurements of velocity and acceleration were made on thirteen experiments using three component sensors. The sensors were placed to maximize the azimuthal coverage as well as to provide data at a variety of ranges from {approximately}1 to 130 m. A few far field measurements were made at ranges of {approximately}2 km. While the bulk of the measurements were made on the surface, high g accelerometers were placed in one instrumentation borehole to provide some free-field measurements. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in the amplitudes of signals can occur when the location of the explosive charges are changed by only meters. Part of the observed difference is attributed to variations in the rock immediately adjacent to the charge affecting the shock coupling; and part to the effects of the site characteristics.

  9. Effects of structural setting and rock peroperties on amplitudes of surface motions in the vicinity of small explosive tests

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.L.; Pearson, D.C.; Baker, D.F.; Aimone-Martin, C.

    1993-12-01

    A series of small-scale explosive experiments were conducted in a perlite mine near Socorro, New Mexico. These experiments were a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico Institute Of Mining and Technology, Southern Methodist University, and Defense Nuclear Agency. The purpose of these tests was to measure the changes in the shock wave and seismic coupling as a function of depth of burial and structural setting. The size of the explosive charges ranged from 1 to 68 kg. Over 1150 measurements of velocity and acceleration were made on thirteen experiments using three component sensors. The sensors were placed to maximize the azimuthal coverage as well as to provide data at a variety of ranges from {approximately}1 to 130 m. A few far field measurements were made at ranges of {approximately}2 km. While the bulk of the measurements were made on the surface, high g accelerometers were placed in one instrumentation borehole to provide some free-field measurements. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in the amplitudes of signals can occur when the location of the explosive charges are changed by only meters. Part of the observed difference is attributed to variations in the rock immediately adjacent to the charge affecting the shock coupling; and part to the effects of the site characteristics.

  10. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  11. Salt efflorescence due to water-rock interaction on the surface of tuff cave in the Yoshimi-Hyakuana Historic Site, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Chiaki T.; Kodama, Shogo; Mohammad, Rajib; Tharanga Udagedara, Dashan

    2016-04-01

    Artificial cave walls in Yoshimi Hyakuana Historic Site have been suffering from salt weathering since 1945 when the caves were made. To consider the processes of weathering and subsequent crystallization of secondary minerals, water-rock experiment using tuff from this area was performed. Rocks, surface altered materials, groundwater and rainwater were collected, and chemical and mineralogical characteristics of those samples were investigated. The XRD and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out for the solid samples and ICP-OES analysis was performed for the solution generated from the experiment, groundwater and rainwater. Gypsum is detected in original tuff, and on grey and whiter coloured altered materials. General chemical changes were observed on this rock. However, it is found that purple and black altered materials were mainly made due to microbiological processes.

  12. Rac1 and ROCK are implicated in the cell surface delivery of GLUT4 under the control of the insulin signal mimetic diDCP-LA-PE.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kanno, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    The phosphatidylethanolamine derivative 1,2-O-bis-[8-{2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl}-octanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (diDCP-LA-PE) promoted GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in differentiated 3T3-L1-GLUT4myc adipocytes through a pathway along a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1)/Akt axis, that mimics insulin signaling. Moreover, diDCP-LA-PE-induced GLUT4 translocation was suppressed by inhibitors of the Rho GTPase Rac1 and Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK) or knocking-down Rac1 and ROCK1. The results of the present study show that Rac1 and ROCK are critical for regulation of GLUT4 trafficking by diDCP-LA-PE as well as insulin. PMID:26238253

  13. On the role of RhoA/ROCK signaling in contact guidance of bone-forming cells on anisotropic Ti6Al4V surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calzado-Martín, A; Méndez-Vilas, A; Multigner, M; Saldaña, L; González-Carrasco, J L; González-Martín, M L; Vilaboa, N

    2011-04-01

    Patterned surfaces direct cell spatial dynamics, yielding cells oriented along the surface geometry, in a process known as contact guidance. The Rho family of GTPases controls the assembly of focal adhesions and cytoskeleton dynamics, but its role in modulating bone-cell alignment on patterned surfaces remains unknown. This article describes the interactions of two human cell types involved in osseointegration, specifically mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts, with submicron- or nano-scale Ti6Al4V grooved surfaces generated by mechanical abrasion. The surface chemistry of the alloy was not affected by grinding, ensuring that the differences found in cellular responses were exclusively due to changes in topography. Patterned surfaces supported cell growth and stimulated mesenchymal stem cell viability. Anisotropic surfaces promoted cell orientation and elongation along the grates. Both cell types oriented on nanometric surfaces with grooves of 150 nm depth and 2 μm width. The number of aligned cells increased by approximately 30% on submicrometric grooves with sizes of about 1 μm depth and 10 μm width. Cells were treated with drugs that attenuate the activities of the GTPase RhoA and one of its downstream effectors, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), and contact guidance of treated cells on the grooved surfaces was investigated. The data indicate that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is a key modulator of both mesenchymal stem cell and osteoblast orientation on nanometric surface features. RhoA and its effector participate in the alignment of mesenchymal stem cells on submicrometric grooves, but not of osteoblasts. These findings show that RhoA/ROCK signaling is involved in contact guidance of bone-related cells on metallic substrates, although to a varying extent depending on the specific cell type and the dimensions of the pattern. PMID:21115140

  14. Chemical Composition of Meridiani Sediments: Traces of Aqueous Past on Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, J.; Gellert, R.; D'Uston, C.; Treguier, E.; Squyres, S. W.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of outcrop samples by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), onboard the NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani, showed strong sulfur peaks in the x-ray spectra. Sulfur concentrations increased from natural (as is) rock surfaces over brushed to abraded rocks that turned out to be sulfur-loaded sediments. Along the 11-kilometer traverse of the rover many abraded surfaces could be measured by the APXS because the softness of the outcrops permitted grinding by the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) until today. All outcrop samples exhibited high sulfur concentrations of more than 6 weight percent; some samples exceeded 10 wt-% making S a major element and indicating a special history of these sediments. Element concentrations of all abraded rocks along the traverse were studied as function of sulfur content. A linear relationship with a negative slope was found for the silicon-sulfur pair. A similar relation holds for Al, Na, K, P, Ti, and Cr versus S. Iron shows a weak correlation with S (only a slight negative slope). Constant concentrations are exhibited by Mn and Ni. Calcium, Mg, and Zn, reveal a slight increase with increasing S contents (positive slope). During the first half of the traverse Mg and S are strongly correlated, later almost none. The formation of the sediments can be described by a two-component mixing model, where sulfur is mainly present in one component. The composition of the other component, the siliciclastic material, was extrapolated from above sample compositions to low S contents. The derived siliciclastic composition differs from encountered basaltic material, such as 'Bounce Rock' at Meridiani or the Adirondack Class rocks at Gusev crater, but, is similar to rocks discovered near Home Plate (Gusev). Best compositional matches are found for 'Masada Clod', 'Raquelme3', and others, which are significantly altered from an original basaltic composition. Apparently this composition type is wider spread on the Martian

  15. Lithologic controls on morphology of pressure-dissolution surfaces (stylolites and dissolution seams) in Paleozoic carbonate rocks from the mideastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, L.B. )

    1993-05-01

    Examination of pressure-dissolution surfaces (stylolites and dissolution seams) in carbonate rocks from the mideastern US demonstrates that the morphology of these surfaces varies with rock fabric. In limestones, pressure dissolution causes suturing of intergranular contacts at the microscopic scale and formation of macroscopic pressure-dissolution surfaces. Pressure dissolution thus modifies limestone fabric, and it contributes to destruction of porosity in two ways, by eliminating intergranular space at sites of dissolution and by providing cement to fill pores elsewhere. In addition to these petrologic effects, pressure-dissolution surfaces (1) can generate bedding planes, (2) can account for significant thicknesses of lost section in stratigraphic reconstructions, and (3) can be of economic significance by modifying reservoir properties, by serving as barriers to petroleum migration, and by acting as seals for reservoirs. This paper examines lithologic controls on morphology of stylolites and dissolution seams in relatively undeformed carbonate rocks. It thus addresses many of the same problems on which Buxton and Sibley (1981) focused, but it quantifies, rather than categorizes, morphology of pressure-dissolution surfaces, and examines a more general sample suite from the mideastern US.

  16. Deep crescentic features caused by subglacial boulder point pressure on jointed rock; an example from Virkisjökull, SE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, M.; Bradwell, T.; Everest, J.

    2012-04-01

    A variety of subglacially formed, erosional crescentic features (e.g. crescentic gouges, lunate fractures) have been widely reported on deglaciated bedrock surfaces. They are characterised by a conchoidal fracture that dips in the same direction as the palaeo-ice flow direction, and a steeper fracture that faces against the ice flow. They are generally interpreted as being formed by point pressure exerted by large boulders entrained in basal ice. They are significant in that they record palaeo-ice flow even if shallower glacial striae are obliterated by post-glacial weathering [1, 2, 3]. This contribution reports on deep scallop-shaped, crescentic depressions observed on abraded surfaces of roche moutonnées and whalebacks recently (<10yrs) exposed beneath the actively retreating Virkisjökull, an outlet glacier of the Oraefajökull ice cap in southeast Iceland. The substrate comprises hard rhyolitic rock (relatively rare in Iceland compared to more common basalt and hyaloclastite) with polygonal, columnar jointing. The crescentic depressions at Virkisjökull are cut into smoothed, abraded surfaces festooned with abundant glacial striae. Differences with previously reported crescentic features are: • The scallop-shaped depressions are considerably deeper (5-20 cm); • The steep fracture facing ice flow coincides in all cases with a pre-existing joint that cuts the entire whaleback. The steep joints developed thus before the conchoidal fracture, whilst in reported crescentic features they develop after the conchoidal fracture. We suggest the following formation mechanism. A boulder encased in basal ice exerts continuous pressure on its contact point as it moves across the ice-bedrock contact. This sets up a stress field in the bedrock that does not necessarily exceed the intact rock strength (other crescentic features are rare to absent at Virkisjökull). However, as the stress field migrates (with the transported boulder) and encounters a subvertical, pre

  17. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  18. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. PMID:22326318

  19. Swedish-German actinide migration experiment at ASPO hard rock laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, B; Vejmelka, P; Römer, J; Fanghänel, E; Jansson, M; Eriksen, T E; Wikberg, P

    2003-03-01

    Within the scope of a bilateral cooperation between Svensk Kärnbränslehantering (SKB) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (FZK-INE), an actinide migration experiment is currently being performed at the Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. This paper covers laboratory and in situ investigations on actinide migration in single-fractured granite core samples. For the in situ experiment, the CHEMLAB 2 probe developed by SKB was used. The experimental setup as well as the breakthrough of inert tracers and of the actinides Am, Np and Pu are presented. The breakthrough curves of inert tracers were analyzed to determine hydraulic properties of the fractured samples. Postmortem analyses of the solid samples were performed to characterize the flow path and the sorbed actinides. After cutting the cores, the abraded material was analyzed with respect to sorbed actinides. The slices were scanned optically to visualize the flow path. Effective volumes and inner surface areas were measured. In the experiments, only breakthrough of Np(V) was observed. In each experiment, the recovery of Np(V) was < or = 40%. Breakthrough of Am(III) and Pu(IV) as well as of Np(IV) was not observed. PMID:12598106

  20. TextureCam Field Test Results from the Mojave Desert, California: Autonomous Instrument Classification of Sediment and Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, R.; Abbey, W. J.; Bekker, D. L.; Cabrol, N. A.; Francis, R.; Manatt, K.; Ortega, K.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

    2013-12-01

    TextureCam is an intelligent camera that uses integrated image analysis to classify sediment and rock surfaces into basic visual categories. This onboard image understanding can improve the autonomy of exploration spacecraft during the long periods when they are out of contact with operators. This could increase the number of science activities performed in each command cycle by, for example, autonomously targeting science features of opportunity with narrow field of view remote sensing, identifying clean surfaces for autonomous placement of arm-mounted instruments, or by detecting high value images for prioritized downlink. TextureCam incorporates image understanding directly into embedded hardware with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This allows the instrument to perform the classification in real time without taxing the primary spacecraft computing resources. We use a machine learning approach in which operators train a statistical model of surface appearance using examples from previously acquired images. A random forest model extrapolates from these training cases, using the statistics of small image patches to characterize the texture of each pixel independently. Applying this model to each pixel in a new image yields a map of surface units. We deployed a prototype instrument in the Cima Volcanic Fields during a series of experiments in May 2013. We imaged each environment with a tripod-mounted RGB camera connected directly to the FPGA board for real time processing. Our first scenario assessed ground surface cover on open terrain atop a weathered volcanic flow. We performed a transect consisting of 16 forward-facing images collected at 1m intervals. We trained the system to categorize terrain into four classes: sediment, basalt cobbles, basalt pebbles, and basalt with iron oxide weathering. Accuracy rates with regards to the fraction of the actual feature that was labeled correctly by the automated system were calculated. Lower accuracy rates were

  1. Hungry for Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  2. Reactions of high-FeO olivine rock with groundwater and redox-sensitive elements studied by surface-analytical methods and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hellmuth, K.H.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Rauhala, E.; Johanson, B.; Zilliacus, R.; Gijbels, R.; Adriaens, A.

    1994-12-31

    The reaction of unaltered olivine rock with groundwater and redox-sensitive elements (Tc, Re, and U) was investigated at elevated temperatures in the laboratory. Olivine was found to react easily with water taking up trace elements in alteration products. The alteration products were characterized using Rutherford backscattering, secondary ion mass spectrometry and electron microprobe analysis. The sample surfaces were studied by autoradiography and digital image processing techniques.

  3. Variations in rock types on alluvial fan surfaces as an indicator of source reach and geomorphic process, Fish Lake Valley, Nevada-California

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Lithologic composition of fan-surface clasts can reflect the source of alluvial fan deposits within those drainages where rock types vary with location in the basin, provided that clasts at the surface resemble the makeup of rocks within the deposit. Interpreting the reach from which deposits were derived may, in turn, be used to infer the relation of fan deposition to causal events and source-area conditions. A multiparameter study of alluvial fans in four drainage basins of Fish Lake Valley, Nevada-California, included assessing modal lithology and the lithologic ratio among three main rock types. The author tallied rock types of 100 surface pebbles described on geomorphic surfaces along 50-m-long transects oriented perpendicular to streamflow direction near the mountain fronts. Source areas for the fan deposits shifted from the Pleistocene to the late Holocene, and may be a result of changes in weathering and transport conditions. The middle and lower reach sources of the two youngest (late Holocene) units (based on 7 transects) suggest that they were deposited in response to events that were only sufficient to transport material from these areas and not the headwaters, or that insufficient material was available for transport from the headwaters. The presence of these units of apparently similar age in the four mapped areas rules out localized storms or isolated faulting events as causes of deposition. The headwater and drainage-basin wide sources of two Pleistocene fan units (based on 13 transects) indicate deposition of these units may have occurred in response to significant climatic events that weathered material in the headwaters areas and transported that material to the fans. Thus, climatic conditions or elapsed time or a combination of the two may control sources of fan deposits.

  4. The Analysis of Seasonally Varying Flow in a Crystalline Rock Watershed and Calibration of an Integrated Groundwater and Surface Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, J. F.; Randall, J. E.; Normani, S. D.

    2005-05-01

    Minimal scientific knowledge is available to describe the interaction of surface water and groundwater flow systems within watersheds in the crystalline rock setting of the Canadian Shield. The surface water and groundwater flow in a small watershed are being investigated using the fully coupled groundwater / surface water model HydroSphere. The watershed has an area of 6.92 square kilometers and contains multiple lakes, the largest with a surface area of 0.94 square kilometers and a maximum depth of 9.0 meters. The surface water drainage system includes wetlands, small streams, and beaver dams while the topographic relief has a range of 50 meters. A bathymetric survey has been completed and lake circulation patterns have been determined for the small lake within the watershed using RMA2. The overburden is thin with granite bedrock outcrops occurring at numerous locations throughout the basin. The conceptual model for the subsurface system includes the surface sediments while three categories are used to characterize the bedrock with these being moderately fractured rock, sparsely fractured rock, and fracture zones. These categories are consistent with those used in the characterization of the crystalline rock at the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. ArcView GIS was used to facilitate data synthesis, analysis, and visualization. Data layers include orthophotos and a digital Ontario Base Map. Hydrologic data for the basin includes 2 rain gauges and a continuous water level recorder for the watershed's largest lake. Additional climate data were obtained from nearby meteorological stations. The HydroSphere model is based on the FRAC3DVS three-dimensional groundwater model and the MODHMS surface water simulator. HydroSphere was used to investigate and calibrate the parameters for groundwater and surface water flow in the basin for a spring to fall time period. Model output is compared to the observed

  5. Determination of Granite Rock Massif Weathering and Cracking of Surface Layers in the Oldest Parts of Medieval Mine Depending on Used Mining Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the use of selected non-destructive testing methods for the purpose of specifying information on weathering and cracking of surface layers of granite rock massif in the medieval Jeroným Mine (the Czech Republic). This mine has been declared the National Heritage Site of the Czech Republic and its opening as a mining museum to the public is gradually prepared. Geological and geomechanical evaluation documents the possibility to find all kinds of weathering grades of rock massif in this mine. Two non-destructive methods have been tested, namely the measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and the measurement of Schmidt hammer rebound value. Field measurements were performed in two selected galleries to verify the application of such methods in specific conditions of underground spaces. Used mining method is one of the parameters later influencing cracking of rock massif. In selected galleries, two different mining methods were used which means that a part of a gallery profile was mined out by hand tools in the Middle Ages and another part of the profile was later mined out by blasting. Measurements in these galleries have enabled to analyse the influence of used mining methods on cracking of rock massif in the impaired zone, and, consequently, on ongoing weathering processes in those zones.

  6. IRTROCK: A MATLAB toolbox for contactless recognition of surface and shallow weakness of a rock cliff by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teza, Giordano; Marcato, Gianluca; Castelli, Eugenio; Galgaro, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) can be used in remote recognition of potential weakening features of a rock cliff like shallow holes, high fracturing, moisture or material inhomogeneities, providing useful information for the corresponding rock mass geo-engineering characterization. A method aimed at such a recognition is proposed here together with its MATLAB implementation (IRTROCK package). It is based on the acquisition of a series of IRT images during the night-time cooling of a rock mass and on the search for possible anomalous thermal transients. The IRT alone is unable to completely characterize a rock mass; a meaningful interpretation of the results requires a geological on-contact survey or other on-contact or contactless techniques. Nevertheless, the results obtained in a portion of the cliff, where a detailed study with other techniques has been carried out, can be advantageously extended to the whole cliff. Moreover, the IRT measurements can be easily and safety repeated over time to evaluate possible changes that affect the studied rock mass. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been verified in two test sites.

  7. Thermal infrared (2.5-13.5-micron) spectroscopic remote sensing of igneous rock types on particulate planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    The compositional significance of outstanding spectral features in the reflectance spectra of particulate igneous rocks was investigated by analyzing directional reflectance spectra, obtained with an FTIR spectrophotometer at 2.17-13.5 microns, of a suite of well-characterized igneous rocks ground to fine particle size. It was found that, using spectral features associated with the principal Christiansen frequency and with a region of relative transparency between the Si-O stretching and bending bands, it is possible to identify general rock type using the Walter and Salisbury (1989) SCFM chemical index, SCFM, defined as SCFM = SiO2/(SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO). It is emphasized, however, that the appearance and the wavelength of these features may be affected by environmental factors.

  8. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  9. Lunar Science Conference, 8th, Houston, Tex., March 14-18, 1977, Proceedings. Volume 1 - The moon and the inner solar system. Volume 2 - Petrogenetic studies of mare and highland rocks. Volume 3 - Planetary and lunar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merril, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Solar system processes are considered along with the origin and evolution of the moon, planetary geophysics, lunar basins and crustal layering, lunar magnetism, the lunar surface as a planetary probe, remote observations of lunar and planetary surfaces, earth-based measurements, integrated studies, physical properties of lunar materials, and asteroids, meteorites, and the early solar system. Attention is also given to studies of mare basalts, the kinetics of basalt crystallization, topical studies of mare basalts, highland rocks, experimental studies of highland rocks, geochemical studies of highland rocks, studies of materials of KREEP composition, a consortium study of lunar breccia 73215, topical studies on highland rocks, Venus, and regional studies of the moon. Studies of surface processes, are reported, taking into account cratering mechanics and fresh crater morphology, crater statistics and surface dating, effects of exposure and gardening, and the chemistry of surfaces.

  10. Rock slope stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kliche, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important new book for your library. It describes the basic rock slope failure modes and methods of analysis--both kinematic and kinetic techniques. Chapters include geotechnical and geomechanical analysis techniques, hydrology, rock slope stabilization techniques, and geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring. Numerous examples, drawings and photos enhance the text.

  11. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  12. Estimation of groundwater flow directions and the tensor of hydraulic conductivity in crystalline massif rocks using information from surface structural geology and mining exploration boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, C.; Romero, M. A.; Ramirez, M. I.; Monsalve, G.

    2013-05-01

    In the elaboration of a hydrogeological conceptual model in regions of mining exploration where there is significant presence of crystalline massif rocks., the influence of physical and geometrical properties of rock discontinuities must be evaluated. We present the results of a structural analysis of rock discontinuities in a region of the Central Cordillera of Colombia (The upper and middle Bermellon Basin) in order to establish its hydrogeological characteristics for the improvement of the conceptual hydrogeological model for the region. The geology of the study area consists of schists with quartz and mica and porphyritic rocks, in a region of high slopes with a nearly 10 m thick weathered layer. The main objective of this research is to infer the preferential flow directions of groundwater and to estimate the tensor of potential hydraulic conductivity by using surface information and avoiding the use of wells and packer tests. The first step of our methodology is an analysis of drainage directions to detect patterns of structural controls in the run-off; after a field campaign of structural data recollection, where we compile information of strike, dip, continuity, spacing, roughness, aperture and frequency, we built equal area hydro-structural polar diagrams that indicate the potential directions for groundwater flow. These results are confronted with records of Rock Quality Designation (RQD) that have been systematically taken from several mining exploration boreholes in the area of study. By using all this information we estimate the potential tensor of hydraulic conductivity from a cubic law, obtaining the three principal directions with conductivities of the order of 10-5 and 10-6 m/s; the more conductive joint family has a NE strike with a nearly vertical dip.

  13. Surface Structuring of CFRP by using Modern Excimer Laser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, F.; Kreling, S.; Dilger, K.

    High demands for lightweight construction can be attained by the use of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) including one major challenge: the joining technology. Adhesive bonding may allow an increased utilization of the lightweight potential of CFRP. But this technology requires a surface pre-treatment because of residues of release agents. This paper describes surface pre-treatment of CFRP specimens by using modern excimer laser and the mechanical tests that compare the achieved strength to manually abraded ones. The laser process is suitable for achieving cohesive failure within the adhesive and bond strengths in the magnitude of the abraded specimen.

  14. Lunar surface dynamics: Some general conclusions and new results from Apollo 16 and 17. [exposure age determination of lunar rocks, boulders, and craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, G.; Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.; Ralston, C.; Walker, R.; Yuhas, D.

    1974-01-01

    Exposure ages of Apollo 17 rocks as measured by tracks and the Kr-Kr rare gas method are reported. Concordant ages of 22 - or + 1 million year (my) are obtained for the station 6 boulder sample 76315. This value is interpreted as the time when the station 6 boulder was emplaced in its present position. Reasonable agreement is also obtained by the two methods for another station 6 boulder, sample 76015. Discordant ages (respectively 5 and 28 my by the track and rare gas methods) are obtained for the station 7 boulder sample, 77135, indicating that the boulder was emplaced at least 5 my ago. The 72 my exposure age of 75035, in general agreement with previous measurements of approximately 85 my for another Camelot boulder, may well date the formation of Camelot. Rock 76015 was split and one surface exposed to the sky through a very small solid angle.

  15. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  16. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  17. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  18. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Walter; Leer, Kristoffer; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Bartlett, Paul; Basso, Brandon; Bell, Jim; Bertelsen, Preben; Binau, Charlotte S.; Chu, Phillip C.; Gorevan, S.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Kinch, Kjartan M.; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Kusack, Alastair; Madsen, Morten B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Mumm, Erik; Myrick, Tom; Olsen, Malte; Squyres, Steven W.; Wilson, Jack; Yen, Albert

    2008-05-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting substantial amounts of magnetic material during RAT activities from rocks throughout both rover missions. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Spirit demonstrates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in Gusev crater rocks, which based on Mössbauer and visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra is interpreted as magnetite. The amount of abraded rock material adhering to the magnets varied strongly during the mission and is correlated in a consistent way to the amount of magnetite inferred from Mössbauer spectra for the corresponding rock. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Opportunity also indicates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in outcrops, such as magnetite or an altered version of magnetite. However, the evidence is weaker than in the case of Spirit. According to data from the α particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) and the Mössbauer spectrometer (MB), the Eagle crater outcrops should not contain magnetite and their magnetization should not exceed 0.03 A m2 kg-1. However, this assertion seems to be in contradiction with the results of the RAT magnet experiment. The evidence for a strongly ferrimagnetic phase at low abundance in the Meridiani outcrops is discussed.

  19. Surface diffusivity of cleaved NaCl crystals as a function of humidity: Impedance spectroscopy measurements and implications for crack healing in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, Paula J.; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Rock salt offers an attractive host rock for geological storage applications, because of its naturally low permeability and the ability of excavation-induced cracks to heal by fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. However, while diffusive transport rates in bulk NaCl solution are rapid and well characterized, such data are not directly applicable to storage conditions where crack walls are coated with thin adsorbed water films. To reliably predict healing times in geological storage applications, data on mass transport rates in adsorbed films are needed. We determined the surface diffusivity in such films for conditions with absolute humidities (AH) ranging from 1 to 18 g/m3 (relative humidities (RH) of 4%-78%) by measuring the surface impedance of single NaCl crystals. We use the impedance results to calculate the effective surface diffusivity S = DδCusing the Nernst-Einstein equation. TheS values obtained lie in the range 1 × 10-27 m3 s-1 at very dry conditions to 1 × 10-19 m3 s-1 for the deliquescence point at 296 K, which is in reasonable agreement with existing values for grain boundary diffusion under wet conditions. Estimates for the diffusivity D made assuming a film thickness δ of 50-90 nm and no major effects of thickness on the solubility C lie in the range of 1 × 10-14 to 8 × 10-12 m2 s-1 for the highest humidities studied (14-18 g/m3 AH, 60%-78% RH). For geological storage systems in rock salt, we predict S values between 1 × 10-22 - 8 × 10-18 m3 s-1. These imply crack healing rates 6 to 7 orders of magnitude lower than expected for brine-filled cracks.

  20. Transport and Deposition of Nanoparticles in the Pore Network of a Reservoir Rock: Effects of Pore Surface Heterogeneity and Radial Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    In this study, transport behavior of nanoparticles under different pore surface conditions of consolidated Berea sandstone is numerically investigated. Micro-CT scanning technique is applied to obtain 3D grayscale images of the rock sample geometry. Quantitative characterization, which is based on image analysis is done to obtain physical properties of the pore network, such as the pore size distribution and the type of each pore (dead-end, isolated, and fully connected pore). Transport of water through the rock is simulated by employing a 3D lattice Boltzmann method. The trajectories of nanopaticles moving under convection in the simulated flow field and due to molecular diffusion are monitored in the Lagrangian framework. It is assumed in the model that the particle adsorption on the pore surface, which is modeled as a pseudo-first order adsorption, is the only factor hindering particle propagation. The effect of pore surface heterogeneity to the particle breakthrough is considered, and the role of particle radial diffusion is also addressed in details. The financial support of the Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC BEG08-022) and the computational support of XSEDE (CTS090017) are acknowledged.

  1. Influence of the Trojan Nickel Mine on surface water quality, Mazowe valley, Zimbabwe: Runoff chemistry and acid generation potential of waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupankwa, Keretia; Love, David; Mapani, Benjamin; Mseka, Stephen; Meck, Maideyi

    The impacts of mining on the environment depend on the nature of the ore body, the type of mining and the size of operation. The focus of this study is on Trojan Nickel Mine which is located 90 km north of Harare, Zimbabwe. It produces nickel from iron, iron-nickel and copper-nickel sulphides and disposes of waste rock in a rock dump. Surface water samples were taken at 11 points selected from a stream which drains the rock dump, a stream carrying underground water and the river into which these streams discharge. Samples were analysed for metals using atomic absorption spectrometry, for sulphates by gravitation and for carbonates and bicarbonates by back titration. Ninteen rock samples were collected from the dump and static tests were performed using the Sobek acid base accounting method. The results show that near neutral runoff (pH 7.0-8.5) with high concentrations of sulphate (over 100 mg/L) and some metals (Pb > 1.0 mg/L and Ni > 0.2 mg/L) emanates from the dump. This suggests that acid mine drainage is buffered in the dump (probably by carbonates). This is supported by the static tests, which show that the fine fraction of dump material neutralises acid. Runoff from the dump flows into a pond. Concentrations of sulphates and metals decrease after the dump runoff enters the pond, but sufficient remains to increase levels of calcium, sulphate, bicarbonate, iron and lead in the Pote River. The drop in concentrations at the pond indicates that the settling process has a positive effect on water quality. This could be enhanced by treating the pond water to raise pH, thus precipitating out metals and decreasing their concentrations in water draining from the pond.

  2. Weird 'Endurance' Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a bizarre, lumpy rock dubbed 'Wopmay' on the inner slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 195 (Aug. 11, 2004). Opportunity will likely travel to this or a similar rock in coming sols for a closer look at the alien surface.

  3. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  4. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  5. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  6. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  7. Astrobiological Implications of Rock Varnish in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsley, David; Dorn, Ronald I.; DiGregorio, Barry

    2009-08-01

    The study of terrestrial geomicrobiology and its relationship to rock weathering processes is an essential tool in developing analogues for similar processes that may have occurred on Mars. Most studies of manganese-enhanced rock varnish have focused on samples taken from warm arid desert regions. Here, we examine samples obtained from eolian-abraded lava flows of the 4700-4800 m high Ashikule Basin in Tibet. Because it receives approximately 300 mm of precipitation annually, this site is nowhere near as dry as Atacama Desert locales. However, the dusty, sulfate-rich, high-altitude and high-UV flux environment of the Tibetan locale offers new insight into rock varnish formation processes in a terrestrial environment that displays some attributes similar to those expected on early Mars. Microprobe measurements reveal that Mn enhancements in varnish are two orders of magnitude above the dust source, but Fe is only enhanced by a factor of three. Manganese-enhancing bacterial forms are not abundant but are still approximately 3 times more common than in Mojave and Sonoran Desert varnishes. In addition to its occurrence in subaerial positions, Tibetan varnish also occurs in micron-scale "pods" enveloped by silica glaze and as remobilized constituents that have migrated into the underlying weathering rind. A lack of surficial Mn-rich varnish, therefore, might not imply the absence of varnish. In contrast to suggestions that silica glaze might be a good source of microbial fossils and a key to varnish formation, we did not observe any clear microfossil forms entombed in silica glaze; further, there is no gradation between varnish and silica glaze but only distinct contacts. %K Analogue, Astrobiology, Bacteria, Biomineralization, Desert varnish, Geomicrobiology, Life on Mars, Manganese enhancement, Rock coating, Rock varnish, Microstromatolite, Tibet, Weathering

  8. Resolving rock exhumation versus surface uplift during arc-continent accretion on the island of Timor by integrating thermochronology and micropaleontology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Bakker, R.; Reiners, P. W.; Willett, S.

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of the island of Timor is the result of active accretion of the Banda volcanic arc to the Australian continent. Since collision began in the latest Miocene, a mountain range over 2,900 m in elevation has been raised, much of the Indonesian throughflow linking the Pacific and Indian Oceans has been closed, and the final accretion stages of slab breakoff and subduction polarity reversal may have begun. New thermochronologic and micropaleontological data from Timor-Leste reveal a detailed history of both rock and surface uplift in the central portion of Timor Island. Micropaleontological data is taken from synorogenic basins in Viqueque near the southern coast and in Caiaco, 120 km to the west of Viqueque and farther to the hinterland. These data indicate surface uplift from lower bathyal depth between 5.5 and 4.4 Ma to upper-middle bathyal depth around 3.3 Ma. Uplift is further suggested by a facies change around 4.4 Ma from deep-marine chalk deposits to clay, turbiditic sandstone and debris flow deposits with fossil wood remains, showing nearby emergence. The data suggest a phase of uplift in these basins of up to 1.4 km in about 1 Myr with an uplift rate of about 1.4 mm/yr. Uplift rates since 3.3 Ma may have dropped to less than 0.2 mm/yr. In the central mountain belt between these synorogenics, thermochronologic data show that rapid exhumation was concurrent with and continued after the rapid surface uplift recorded in the basins. Along the northern coast of Timor, zircon (U-Th)/He ages are 4.4 Ma in the east (at Hilimanu) and young to about 1.5 Ma in the west (at Liquica and Ermera). Thermal models suggest exhumation that was possibly as fast as 6.4 mm/yr from as deep as 9 km. To the south and east of the higher grade zircon (U-Th)/He data, apatite (U-Th)/He ages indicate notably less exhumation. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the northern and southern foothills in the east (Manatuto district) vary from 3.5 to 5.5 Ma while ages cluster around 2.0 Ma in

  9. Rock Size-Frequency Distributions at the Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites: Impact Hazard and Accessibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Matijevic, J. R.; DiMaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Viking and Mars Pathfinder landing sites and a wide variety of rocky locations on the Earth show size-frequency distributions that follow an exponential when expressed in cumulative fractional area covered by rocks of a given diameter or larger versus diameter plots. Mars lander rock distributions have been fit by an equation of the form: Fk(D) = k exp [-q(k) D], where Fk(D) is the cumulative fractional area covered by rocks of diameter D or larger, k is the total area covered by all rocks, and an exponential q(k) = 1.79 + 0.152/k, which governs how abruptly the area covered by rocks decreases with increasing diameter. These distributions form a family of noncrossing curves that flatten out at small rock diameter at a total rock abundance of 5-40%. Model rock size-frequency distributions indicate a low probability of impacting hazardous rocks during MER landing. Rocks large enough to analyze and abrade by the rover should be plentiful within an easy Sol's drive.

  10. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  11. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  12. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  13. The role of near-surface plastic deformation in the wear of lamellar solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E.; Hartman, L. A.; Hauck, K. E.; Surprenant, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown in this paper that the role of surface and near-surface plastic deformation is especially significant in both sliding and abrasive wear of lamellar composites. Lamellar structures were produced artificially from alternate layers of pure copper and pure tin or lead foils. The resulting composites were tested in three different wear tests: single-pass abrasion by a sharp, hard abrader; multiple-pass rubbing by a hard, rounded abrader; and pin-on-disk sliding. In each case the counterface was a hard alloy steel. Tests were run with the composite lamellae in two orientations: perpendicular and parallel to the sliding direction. It was found that the composites had much less wear resistance and greater abradability when oriented perpendicular to the rub direction. The mechanisms for wear particle removal and the role of plastic deformation in the process were studied by plasticity analysis and by microscopic (SEM and optical) observation.

  14. Mineralization on the moon? Theoretical considerations of Apollo 16 'rusty rocks', sulfide replacement in 67016, and surface-correlated volatiles on lunar volcanic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical considerations of vapor-rock interactions in the lunar environment are a useful supplement to petrologic studies of mineralization or alteration in rocks from the moon. They also provide insights into the potential for the existence of more extensive mineralization on the moon than is found in the limited sample set. Discussed in this paper are the coexistence and textural association in 66095 of the phases lawrencite, troilite, schreibersite, iron metal, and sphalerite; the replacement of olivine in certain clasts of 67016 by troilite and enstatite; and the existence of Zn + S deposits on the surfaces of volcanic glass beads. Particular attention is given in each case to whether the observed mineralization implies that metals, as well as S, P, or Cl, have been mobilized in the vapor. Vapor species that might mobilize metals in the absence of H2O are considered. Most importantly, the suggestion is made that in the dry lunar environment carbonyl species may be important carriers of S and metals. The implications of this possibility are discussed.

  15. 'They of the Great Rocks'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows 'Adirondack,' the rover's first target rock. Spirit traversed the sandy martian terrain at Gusev Crater to arrive in front of the football-sized rock on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2004, just three days after it successfully rolled off the lander. The rock was selected as Spirit's first target because its dust-free, flat surface is ideally suited for grinding. Clean surfaces also are better for examining a rock's top coating. Scientists named the angular rock after the Adirondack mountain range in New York. The word Adirondack is Native American and means 'They of the great rocks.'

  16. Abradability testing of Bn-Nextel{trademark} 312/Blackglas{trademark} 3-D woven composites and the effect on retained strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.; Khandelwal, P.

    1996-12-31

    The low pressure (LP) turbine interstage seal for the Allison Engine Company AE 3007 turbofan engine is the component selected for the Low Cost Ceramic Composite (LC{sup 3}) program. The AE 3007 engine is a 7200 lb thrust turbofan engine with both military and commercial applications. The goals of the LP turbine interstage seal design are to provide a directly interchangeable design that will meet the 12,000 hours service life requirement with an approximate 74% weight reduction as well as initial acquisition cost and life cycle cost savings. The current LP turbine interstage seal design is comprised of a Hastelloy X honeycomb compliant seal member brazed to an INCO 718 structural member. Two approaches were used for the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) version of the interstage seal. The first approach entailed developing a process for brazing the Hastelloy X honeycomb material to the CMC with provisions for accommodating the differential thermal expansion ratio of 4:1. The second approach was to evaluate the abradability/conformability of the CMC material by conducting high speed, high temperature, rub rig testing as well as mechanical testing of the rub specimens to evaluate the retained mechanical strength. In the event the direct rub testing proved to be successful, the need for the Hastelloy X honeycomb and braze joint would be eliminated, resulting in a significant component fabrication cost reduction.

  17. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  18. Grinding into Soft, Powdery Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This hole in a rock dubbed 'Clovis' is the deepest hole drilled so far in any rock on Mars. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this view with its microscopic imager on martian sol 217 (Aug. 12, 2004) after drilling 8.9 millimeters (0.35 inch) into the rock with its rock abrasion tool. The view is a mosaic of four frames taken by the microscopic imager. The hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter. Clovis is key to a developing story about environmental change on Mars, not only because it is among the softest rocks encountered so far in Gusev Crater, but also because it contains mineral alterations that extend relatively deep beneath its surface. In fact, as evidenced by its fairly crumbly texture, it is possibly the most highly altered volcanic rock ever studied on Mars.

    Scientific analysis shows that the rock contains higher levels of the elements sulfur, chlorine, and bromine than are normally encountered in basaltic rocks, such as a rock dubbed 'Humphrey' that Spirit encountered two months after arriving on Mars. Humphrey showed elevated levels of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine only in the outermost 2 millimeters (less than 0.1 inch) of its surface. Clovis shows elevated levels of the same elements along with the associated softness of the rock within a borehole that is 4 times as deep. Scientists hope to compare Clovis to other, less-altered rocks in the vicinity to assess what sort of water-based processes altered the rock. Hypotheses include transport of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine in water vapor in volcanic gases; hydrothermal circulation (flow of volcanically heated water through rock); or saturation in a briny soup containing the same elements.

    In this image, very fine-grained material from the rock has clumped together by electrostatic attraction and fallen into the borehole. NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS

  19. The Texture of Mars: Observations of Rock and Outcrop Targets Over 360 Martian Sols at the Gale Field Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Edgett, Kenneth; Williams, Rebecca; Hamilton, Victoria; Mangold, Nicolas; Bridges, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Lithology (typically features 0.5-5 mm in scale, including sedimentary structure, texture, sorting, grain and crystal morphology) is a fundamental identifier for the field geologist, as it serves as a key indicator of rock-forming environments. Over the first 360 sols on the martian surface, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover interrogated geologic targets at this grain-size scale to identify and interpret the lithologic and textural clues to processes that formed and modified the geologic record. Its primary tool in this task was the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI). MAHLI is a 2-megapixel focusable macro lens color camera on the turret on Curiosity's robotic arm. MAHLI acquires focused images at working distances of 2.1 cm to infinity; at 2.1 cm the scale is 14 µm/pixel; at 6.9 cm it is 31 µm/pixel, like the Spirit and Opportunity Microscopic Imagers (MI). The Remote Microscopic Imager (RMI) also acquired non-color images at sub-mm scales; these images were also examined for clues to rock texture. Although because of dust and sand obscuration, the observables can sometimes be unclear, fine-grained rock textures are still informative and can be used to assess paleoenvironment. Rock targets observed up to sol 360 can be classified very broadly by texture as: (1) rocks or outcrop composed of poorly-sorted sand-sized grains with larger grains (0.5-1.0 µm) of varying morphology making up 2-5% of the rock by volume (e.g., the target informally named Gillespie Lake); (2) very fine-grained (below MAHLI resolution) dark rocks or outcrop, some of which have larger (0.5-1.5 µm across) round or rounded grains entrained (e.g. the target Wernecke); (3) dark gray fine- to coarse-grained rocks mantled with dust and fine/very fine sand, currently interpreted as igneous (e.g., targets Jake Matijevic, Matthew, and Bathurst Inlet); (4) porphyritic rocks; and (5) rocks abraded by windborne particles (ventifacts), with sub-mm to cm-scale abrasion textures. This last class

  20. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  1. Temporal changes in VOC discharge to surface water from a fractured rock aquifer during well installation and operation, Greenville, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Robertson, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the vapor in passive vapor samplers retrieved from a streambed in fractured rock terrain implied that volatile organic carbon (VOC) discharge from ground water to surface water substantially increased following installation of a contaminant recovery well using air rotary drilling. The air rotary technique forced air into the aquifer near the stream. The injection produced an upward hydraulic gradient that appears to have transported water and contaminants from deeper parts of the aquifer through fractures into shallow parts of the aquifer. Once in the shallow flow regime, the contamination was transported to the stream, where it discharged during the next several weeks following well installation. After the recovery well was activated and began continuously pumping contaminated ground water to a treatment facility, the VOC concentrations in the stream bottom passive vapor samplers decreased to below detectable concentrations, suggesting that the withdrawal had captured the contaminated ground water that previously had discharged to the stream.

  2. Rock magnetism constrain response thickness on earth surface to large earthquake: Evidence from the Bajiaomiao Outcrop of the Wenchuan Earthquake Rupture Zone, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T.; Song, S.; Sun, Z.; Wang, X.; Chou, Y.; Chevalier, M.; Si, J.; Wang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake has raptured along two fault zones, the Yingxiu-Beichuan f and the Anxian-Guanxian fault zones. The Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) funded by the Chinese government, drilled five holes close to the two seismic fault zones. Fault gouge with various thicknesses were found in the drill holes and at the earth surface outcrops. In general, one such large earthquake creates several centimeters-thick fault gouge, i.e. the repeated large earthquakes must have taken place in the Longmen Shan region in order to accumulate the amount of gouge observed here. Rock magnetism is an economic, easy-access and non-destructive method for deciphering the magnetic mineral assemblage during large earthquake slip process, which can give us more information about this intercontinental earthquake dynamics, thanks to the occurrence of many large earthquakes as well as to the thick fault gouge present here. The Bajiaomiao outcrop, crossing to the Yingxiu-Beichuan seismic fault rapture zone, consisted of fault breccia and gouge in the hanging wall and Quaternary conglomerate in the footwall. The samples from the hanging wall of this outcrop were used to study rock magnetic porperties. Basing on the in-situ field magnetic susceptibility measurement, high magnetic susceptibility values were found in the fault gouge, possibly induced by more new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals. We apply other rock magnetic methods (such as Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM), high-temperature thermomagnetism (K-T)) to the samples from the Bajiaomiao outcrop. The IRM results show that the magnetite was present in the gouge and fault breccia of the hand hall of the Yingxiu-Beichuan seismic fault rapture zone. Basing on the K-T results, magnetite and other ferromagnetic minerals existed in the gouge and fault breccia; the <2 cm thick gouge close to the fault rapture zone had existed the only magnetic mineral of magnetite. This < 2cm gouge was most

  3. Development of Rock Engineering Systems-Based Models for Flyrock Risk Analysis and Prediction of Flyrock Distance in Surface Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Farhad; Mansouri, Hamid; Farsangi, Mohammad Ali Ebrahimi

    2014-07-01

    The environmental effects of blasting must be controlled in order to comply with regulatory limits. Because of safety concerns and risk of damage to infrastructures, equipment, and property, and also having a good fragmentation, flyrock control is crucial in blasting operations. If measures to decrease flyrock are taken, then the flyrock distance would be limited, and, in return, the risk of damage can be reduced or eliminated. This paper deals with modeling the level of risk associated with flyrock and, also, flyrock distance prediction based on the rock engineering systems (RES) methodology. In the proposed models, 13 effective parameters on flyrock due to blasting are considered as inputs, and the flyrock distance and associated level of risks as outputs. In selecting input data, the simplicity of measuring input data was taken into account as well. The data for 47 blasts, carried out at the Sungun copper mine, western Iran, were used to predict the level of risk and flyrock distance corresponding to each blast. The obtained results showed that, for the 47 blasts carried out at the Sungun copper mine, the level of estimated risks are mostly in accordance with the measured flyrock distances. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the results of the flyrock distance predictive RES-based model, the multivariate regression analysis model (MVRM), and, also, the dimensional analysis model. For the RES-based model, R 2 and root mean square error (RMSE) are equal to 0.86 and 10.01, respectively, whereas for the MVRM and dimensional analysis, R 2 and RMSE are equal to (0.84 and 12.20) and (0.76 and 13.75), respectively. These achievements confirm the better performance of the RES-based model over the other proposed models.

  4. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  5. A study of the depth of weathering and its relationship to the mechanical properties of near-surface rocks in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierman, Donald J.; Healy, John H.

    1984-03-01

    Weathered granite extends 70 m deep at Hi Vista in the arid central Mojave Desert of southern California. The low strength of this granite is due to the alteration of biotite and chlorite montmorillonite. Deep weathering probably occurs in most granites, although we cannot rule out some anomalous mechanisms at Hi Vista. Geophysical instruments set in these slightly altered rocks are limited by the unstable behavior of the rocks. Thus, tectonic signals from instruments placed in shallow boreholes give vague results. Geophysical measurements of these weathered rocks resemble measurements of granitic rocks near major faults. The rheology of the rocks in which instruments are placed limits the useful sensitivity of the instruments.

  6. Three classes of Martian rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this portion of the 360-degree color gallery pan, looking to the northeast, the colors have been exaggerated to highlight the differences between rocks and soils. Visible are the downwind sides of rocks, not exposed to wind scouring like Barnacle Bill (which faces upwind). There is a close correspondence between the shapes and colors of the rocks. Three general classes of rocks are recognized: large rounded rocks with weathered coatings, small gray angular rocks lacking weathered coatings, and flat white rocks. The large rounded rocks in the distance, marked by the red arrows, are comparable to Yogi. Spectral properties show that these rocks have a highly weathered coating in addition to a distinctive shape. A second population of smaller, angular rocks (blue arrows) in the foreground have unweathered surfaces even on the downwind side, except where covered on their tops by drift. These are comparable to Barnacle Bill. They may have been emplaced at the site relatively recently, perhaps as ejecta from an impact crater, so they have not had time to weather as extensively as the larger older rocks. The third kind of rock (white arrows) is white and flat, and includes Scooby Doo in the foreground and a large deposit in the background called Baker's Bank. The age of the white rock relative to the other two classes is still being debated. One representative rock of each class (Yogi, Barnacle Bill, and Scooby Doo) has been measured by the rover.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  7. The use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detecting molecular evidence of life in rocks, sediments, and sedimentary deposits.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Stephen A; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M; Parnell, John

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile analytical technique capable of characterizing the composition of both inorganic and organic materials. Consequently, it is frequently suggested as a payload on many planetary landers. Only approximately 1 in every 10(6) photons are Raman scattered; therefore, the detection of trace quantities of an analyte dispersed in a sample matrix can be much harder to achieve. To overcome this, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) both provide greatly enhanced signals (enhancements between 10(5) and 10(9)) through the analyte's interaction with the locally generated surface plasmons, which occur at a "roughened" or nanostructured metallic surface (e.g., Cu, Au, and Ag). Both SERS and SERRS may therefore provide a viable technique for trace analysis of samples. In this paper, we describe the development of SERS assays for analyzing trace amounts of compounds present in the solvent extracts of sedimentary deposits. These assays were used to detect biological pigments present in an Arctic microoasis (a small locale of elevated biological productivity) and its detrital regolith, characterize the pigmentation of microbial mats around hydrothermal springs, and detect fossil organic matter in hydrothermal deposits. These field study examples demonstrate that SERS technology is sufficiently mature to be applied to many astrobiological analog studies on Earth. Many current and proposed imaging systems intended for remote deployment already posses the instrumental components needed for SERS. The addition of wet chemistry sample processing facilities to these instruments could yield field-deployable analytical instruments with a broadened analytical window for detecting organic compounds with a biological or geological origin. PMID:20735253

  8. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  9. Geochemical characterization of surface water and spring water in SE Kashmir Valley, western Himalaya: Implications to water-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeelani, Gh; Bhat, Nadeem A.; Shivanna, K.; Bhat, M. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Water samples from precipitation, glacier melt, snow melt, glacial lake, streams and karst springs were collected across SE of Kashmir Valley, to understand the hydrogeochemical processes governing the evolution of the water in a natural and non-industrial area of western Himalayas. The time series data on solute chemistry suggest that the hydrochemical processes controlling the chemistry of spring waters is more complex than the surface water. This is attributed to more time available for infiltrating water to interact with the diverse host lithology. Total dissolved solids (TDS), in general, increases with decrease in altitude. However, high TDS of some streams at higher altitudes and low TDS of some springs at lower altitudes indicated contribution of high TDS waters from glacial lakes and low TDS waters from streams, respectively. The results show that some karst springs are recharged by surface water; Achabalnag by the Bringi stream and Andernag and Martandnag by the Liddar stream. Calcite dissolution, dedolomitization and silicate weathering were found to be the main processes controlling the chemistry of the spring waters and calcite dissolution as the dominant process in controlling the chemistry of the surface waters. The spring waters were undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite in most of the seasons except in November, which is attributed to the replenishment of the CO2 by recharging waters during most of the seasons.

  10. Active microwave remote sensing research program plan. Recommendations of the Earth Resources Synthetic Aperture Radar Task Force. [application areas: vegetation canopies, surface water, surface morphology, rocks and soils, and man-made structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A research program plan developed by the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications to provide guidelines for a concentrated effort to improve the understanding of the measurement capabilities of active microwave imaging sensors, and to define the role of such sensors in future Earth observations programs is outlined. The focus of the planned activities is on renewable and non-renewable resources. Five general application areas are addressed: (1) vegetation canopies, (2) surface water, (3) surface morphology, (4) rocks and soils, and (5) man-made structures. Research tasks are described which, when accomplished, will clearly establish the measurement capabilities in each area, and provide the theoretical and empirical results needed to specify and justify satellite systems using imaging radar sensors for global observations.

  11. Ready to Rock and Roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard-identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet)toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  12. Pyroclastic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.

    Most of the advances in volcanology during the past 20 years have concerned the recognition, interpretation, and mode of emplacement of pyroclastic rocks. The literature on pyroclastic rocks is widely scattered, in part because the field draws from sedimentology, igneous petrology, physics, and fluid mechanics, and there have been few review papers on the topic. Fisher and Schmincke have done the discipline of volcanology and all field-oriented geologists a great service in assembling material from a wide range of sources in this comprehensive treatment of pyroclastic rocks. With its introduction to the petrology of magmas involved in explosive eruptions in chapter 2 and a complete treatment of magma rheology and the behavior of dissolved and exsolving magmatic volatiles in chapter 3, they lay sufficient groundwork that anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of geology can understand the book.

  13. VNIR Spectral Differences on Natural and Brushed/Wind-abraded Surfaces on Home Plate, Gusev Crater, Mars: Spirit Pancam and HiRISE Color Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Schmidt, M. E.; Bell, J. F.

    2008-03-01

    Color differences between the eastern and western rims of Home Plate are examined using Spirit Pancam and HiRISE color observations. Differences between near-field and remote observations are considered.

  14. A Study of the Connection Among Basin-Fill Aquifers, Carbonate-Rock Aquifers, and Surface-Water Resources in Southern Snake Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The Secretary of the Interior through the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act approved funding for research to improve understanding of hydrologic systems that sustain numerous water-dependent ecosystems on Federal lands in Snake Valley, Nevada. Some of the streams and spring-discharge areas in and adjacent to Great Basin National Park have been identified as susceptible to ground-water withdrawals (Elliott and others, 2006) and research has shown a high potential for ground-water flow from southern Spring Valley into southern Snake Valley through carbonate rocks that outcrop along a low topographic divide known as the Limestone Hills (Welch and others, 2007). Comprehensive geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information will be collected and analyzed to assess the hydraulic connection between basin-fill aquifers and surface-water resources, water-dependent ecological features, and the regional carbonate-rock aquifer, the known source of many high-discharge springs. Understanding these connections is important because proposed projects to pump and export ground water from Spring and Snake Valleys in Nevada may result in unintended capture of water currently supplying springs, streams, wetlands, limestone caves, and other biologically sensitive areas (fig. 1). The methods that will be used in this study may be transferable to other areas in the Great Basin. The National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service submitted the proposal for funding this research to facilitate science-based land management. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources and Geologic Disciplines, and the University of Nevada, Reno, will accomplish four research elements through comprehensive data collection and analysis that are concentrated in two distinct areas on the eastern and southern flanks of the Snake Range (fig. 2). The projected time line for this research is from July 2008 through September 2011.

  15. Geology and physical properties of the near-surface rocks of Mesita de los Alamos, Los Alamos County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1967-01-01

    The surface of Mesita de los Alamos is formed by units 2b and 3 of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff. These units dip gently east-southeastward at 3 to 6 degrees. The units are faulted near the center of the mesa by a north-south trending normal strike slip fault, that is downthrown about 14 feet to the east. The units east of the fault have moved about 14 feet south relative to the units on the west side of the fault. Units 2b and 3 have bulk density values ranging from 80 to 120 pounds per cubic foot. The moisture content of the tuff below the soil zone and near surface tuff was less than 5 percent by volume in five of the 25 test holes drilled during a foundation investigation for the Meson Facility. The temperature of the tuff in the bottom of three test holes (depth 16 to 43 feet) varied from 50?F to 54?F. Temperature variations were a function of density and amount of solar radiation.

  16. Locating VOC contamination in a fractured-rock aquifer at the ground-water/surface-water interface using passive vapor collectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Rhodes, L.C.; Robertson, J.F.; Harrigan, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents introduced to unlined lagoons at an industrial waste-water treatment plant in the Inner Piedmont of South Carolina resulted in ground-water contamination of a fractured-rock aquifer. Part of the ground-water contamination discharges to Little Rocky Creek, downgradient from the waste-water treatment plant. Passive vapor collectors were buried in the bottom sediment of the creek to locate areas where ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds was discharging to the creek. High concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found in passive vapor collectors in an area where VOCs were known to be discharging from ground water to surface water. This area was also a site where very low frequency electromagnetic anomalies (interpreted as fracture zones) intersected the creek or converged near the creek. The data show that passive vapor collectors in bottom sediment of Little Rocky Creek provided information on the location of fractures that were discharging contaminated ground water to surface water.

  17. Astrobiological implications of rock varnish in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Krinsley, David; Dorn, Ronald I; DiGregorio, Barry

    2009-01-01

    The study of terrestrial geomicrobiology and its relationship to rock weathering processes is an essential tool in developing analogues for similar processes that may have occurred on Mars. Most studies of manganese-enhanced rock varnish have focused on samples taken from warm arid desert regions. Here, we examine samples obtained from eolian-abraded lava flows of the 4700-4800 m high Ashikule Basin in Tibet. Because it receives approximately 300 mm of precipitation annually, this site is nowhere near as dry as Atacama Desert locales. However, the dusty, sulfate-rich, high-altitude and high-UV flux environment of the Tibetan locale offers new insight into rock varnish formation processes in a terrestrial environment that displays some attributes similar to those expected on early Mars. Microprobe measurements reveal that Mn enhancements in varnish are two orders of magnitude above the dust source, but Fe is only enhanced by a factor of three. Manganese-enhancing bacterial forms are not abundant but are still approximately 3 times more common than in Mojave and Sonoran Desert varnishes. In addition to its occurrence in subaerial positions, Tibetan varnish also occurs in micron-scale "pods" enveloped by silica glaze and as remobilized constituents that have migrated into the underlying weathering rind. A lack of surficial Mn-rich varnish, therefore, might not imply the absence of varnish. In contrast to suggestions that silica glaze might be a good source of microbial fossils and a key to varnish formation, we did not observe any clear microfossil forms entombed in silica glaze; further, there is no gradation between varnish and silica glaze but only distinct contacts. PMID:19663762

  18. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Dipping Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 May 2004 The central peak of Oudemans Crater, located at the edge of the Labyrinthus Noctis trough system, consists of steeply-dipping rock layers that were uplifted and tilted by the meteor impact that formed the crater. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The banded features are layers of light-toned, possibly sedimentary, rock that were brought to the surface and uplifted by the impact process that formed the crater and its central peak. Oudemans Crater's central peak serves as a means for probing the nature of rock that lies beneath the plains cut by the Labyrinthus Noctis troughs, which are part of the vast Valles Marineris system. This March 2004 picture is located near 10.2oS, 92.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  20. System and method for generating 3D images of non-linear properties of rock formation using surface seismic or surface to borehole seismic or both

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt Toshimi; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-06-07

    A system and method of characterizing properties of a medium from a non-linear interaction are include generating, by first and second acoustic sources disposed on a surface of the medium on a first line, first and second acoustic waves. The first and second acoustic sources are controllable such that trajectories of the first and second acoustic waves intersect in a mixing zone within the medium. The method further includes receiving, by a receiver positioned in a plane containing the first and second acoustic sources, a third acoustic wave generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic waves in the mixing zone; and creating a first two-dimensional image of non-linear properties or a first ratio of compressional velocity and shear velocity, or both, of the medium in a first plane generally perpendicular to the surface and containing the first line, based on the received third acoustic wave.

  1. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has been…

  2. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  3. Properties of Halococcus salifodinae, an Isolate from Permian Rock Salt Deposits, Compared with Halococci from Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Legat, Andrea; Denner, Ewald B. M.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Pfeiffer, Peter; Knopf, Burkhard; Claus, Harald; Gruber, Claudia; König, Helmut; Wanner, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Halococcus salifodinae BIpT DSM 8989T, an extremely halophilic archaeal isolate from an Austrian salt deposit (Bad Ischl), whose origin was dated to the Permian period, was described in 1994. Subsequently, several strains of the species have been isolated, some from similar but geographically separated salt deposits. Hcc. salifodinae may be regarded as one of the most ancient culturable species which existed already about 250 million years ago. Since its habitat probably did not change during this long period, its properties were presumably not subjected to the needs of mutational adaptation. Hcc. salifodinae and other isolates from ancient deposits would be suitable candidates for testing hypotheses on prokaryotic evolution, such as the molecular clock concept, or the net-like history of genome evolution. A comparison of available taxonomic characteristics from strains of Hcc. salifodinae and other Halococcus species, most of them originating from surface waters, is presented. The cell wall polymer of Hcc. salifodinae was examined and found to be a heteropolysaccharide, similar to that of Hcc. morrhuae. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules were present in Hcc. salifodinae, suggesting a possible lateral gene transfer before Permian times. PMID:25371342

  4. Properties of Halococcus salifodinae, an Isolate from Permian Rock Salt Deposits, Compared with Halococci from Surface Waters.

    PubMed

    Legat, Andrea; Denner, Ewald B M; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Pfeiffer, Peter; Knopf, Burkhard; Claus, Harald; Gruber, Claudia; König, Helmut; Wanner, Gerhard; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Halococcus salifodinae BIpT DSM 8989T, an extremely halophilic archaeal isolate from an Austrian salt deposit (Bad Ischl), whose origin was dated to the Permian period, was described in 1994. Subsequently, several strains of the species have been isolated, some from similar but geographically separated salt deposits. Hcc. salifodinae may be regarded as one of the most ancient culturable species which existed already about 250 million years ago. Since its habitat probably did not change during this long period, its properties were presumably not subjected to the needs of mutational adaptation. Hcc. salifodinae and other isolates from ancient deposits would be suitable candidates for testing hypotheses on prokaryotic evolution, such as the molecular clock concept, or the net-like history of genome evolution. A comparison of available taxonomic characteristics from strains of Hcc. salifodinae and other Halococcus species, most of them originating from surface waters, is presented. The cell wall polymer of Hcc. salifodinae was examined and found to be a heteropolysaccharide, similar to that of Hcc. morrhuae. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules were present in Hcc. salifodinae, suggesting a possible lateral gene transfer before Permian times. PMID:25371342

  5. Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov., a γ-proteobacterium isolated from the surface of potassium-bearing rock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Guo, Xin-qi; Wang, Peng; He, Lin-yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-fang

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile with one polar flagellum γ-proteobacterium, designated strain SBZ3-12(T), was isolated from surfaces of weathered potassic trachyte. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was most closely related to Dyella japonica XD53(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Dyella terrae JS14-6(T) (97.7%), Dyella soli JS12-10(T) (97.5%) and Dyella koreensis BB4(T) (97.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain SBZ3-12(T) was 64.0 mol%. In addition, iso-C(17:1)ω9c, iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0) were the major cellular fatty acids and ubiquinone Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The low DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain SBZ3-12(T) and recognized species of the genus Dyella and the many phenotypic properties supported the classification of strain SBZ3-12(T) as a representative of a novel species of the genus Dyella, for which the name Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBZ3-12(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2012160(T) =KACC 16539(T) =DSM 26119(T)). PMID:23435246

  6. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  7. Rapid degradation of the complex organic molecules in Martian surface rocks due to exposure to cosmic rays. Implications to the search of 'extinct' life on Mars by MSL and ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; Floyd, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Until recently, long-term exposure to cosmic rays has not been recognized as a major environmental factor, which can alter and destroy organic molecules in the Martian surface rocks. Recent modeling studies (e.g. Pavlov et al., 2012) suggested that organic molecules with masses >100 amu would be degraded in less than 1 billion years in the top 5 cm of the Martian rocks. That poses a serious challenge to the search of ancient molecules in the shallow subsurface of Mars. However, Pavlov et al. calculated the fraction of the survived organic molecules using conservative radiolysis constants derived from the gamma irradiation experiments on pure dry amino acid mixtures (Kminek and Bada, 2006). In this study we conducted a series of gamma irradiations of amino acids and carboxylic acids mixed with silica powder. We report that the addition of silicates dramatically increased the rate of organic degradation under gamma radiation. Using the newly derived radiolysis constants for amino acids and carboxylic acids in mineral mixtures, we recalculated the rate of organic degradation in the Martian rocks as a function of rocks' depth, chemical composition and weathering rates. Our results suggest that isolated organic molecules (acids) are likely to be altered or fully degraded in the surface rocks on Mars by cosmic rays in less than 10 million years unless some additional protective mechanisms are in place. We will discuss possible strategies for the MSL's search of the elusive ancient organic molecules to overcome the adverse effects of cosmic rays in the surface Martian rocks. References. Pavlov et al., 2012 GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, doi:10.1029/2012GL052166 Kminek, G., and J. Bada (2006), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 1-5, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.03.008.

  8. 'They of the Great Rocks'-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D perspective image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows 'Adirondack,' the rover's first target rock. Spirit traversed the sandy martian terrain at Gusev Crater to arrive in front of the football-sized rock on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2004, just three days after it successfully rolled off the lander. The rock was selected as Spirit's first target because it has a flat surface and is relatively free of dust - ideal conditions for grinding into the rock to expose fresh rock underneath. Clean surfaces also are better for examining a rock's top coating.Scientists named the angular rock after the Adirondack mountain range in New York. The word Adirondack is Native American and means 'They of the great rocks.' Data from the panoramic camera's red, green and blue filters were combined to create this approximate true color image.

  9. Rock physics properties of some lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, N.; Trice, R.; Anderson, O. L.; Soga, N.

    1973-01-01

    Linear strains and acoustic velocity data for lunar samples under uniaxial and hydrostatic loading are presented. Elastic properties are presented for 60335,20; 15555,68; 15498,23; and 12063,97. Internal friction data are summarized for a number of artificial lunar glasses with compositions similar to lunar rocks 12009, 12012, 14305, 15021, and 15555. Zero porosity model-rock moduli are calculated for a number of lunar model-rocks, with mineralogies similar to Apollo 12, 14, and 16 rocks. Model-rock calculations indicate that rock types in the troctolitic composition range may provide reasonable modeling of the lunar upper mantle. Model calculations involving pore crack effects are compatible with a strong dependence of rock moduli on pore strain, and therefore of rock velocities on nonhydrostatic loading. The high velocity of rocks under uniaxial loading appears to be compatible with, and may aid in, interpretation of near-surface velocity profiles observed in the active seismic experiment.

  10. Digital surfaces and hydrogeologic data for the Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain in parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Debra M.; Bellino, Jason C.; Williams, Lester J.

    2012-01-01

    A digital dataset of hydrogeologic data for Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain was developed using data from five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports published between 1951 and 1996. These reports contain maps and data depicting the extent and elevation of the Southeast Coastal Plain stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units in Florida and parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. The reports are: Professional Paper 1410-B (Renken, 1996), Professional Paper 1088 (Brown and others, 1979), Professional Paper 524-G (Applin and Applin, 1967), Professional Paper 447 (Applin and Applin, 1965), and Circular 91 (Applin, 1951). The digital dataset provides hydrogeologic data for the USGS Energy Resources Program assessment of potential reservoirs for carbon sequestration and for the USGS Groundwater Resource Program assessment of saline aquifers in the southeastern United States. A Geographic Information System (ArcGIS 9.3.1) was used to construct 33 digital (raster) surfaces representing the top or base of key stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. In addition, the Geographic Information System was used to generate 102 geo-referenced scanned maps from the five reports and a geo-database containing structural and thickness contours, faults, extent polygons, and common features. The dataset also includes point data of well construction and stratigraphic elevations and scanned images of two geologic cross sections and a nomenclature chart.

  11. A Val85Met mutation in melanocortin-1 receptor is associated with reductions in eumelanic pigmentation and cell surface expression in domestic rock pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Guernsey, Michael W; Ritscher, Lars; Miller, Matthew A; Smith, Daniel A; Schöneberg, Torsten; Shapiro, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) is associated with pigmentation diversity in wild and domesticated populations of vertebrates, including several species of birds. Among domestic bird species, pigmentation variation in the rock pigeon (Columbalivia) is particularly diverse. To determine the potential contribution of Mc1r variants to pigment diversity in pigeons, we sequenced Mc1r in a wide range of pigeon breeds and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms, including a variant that codes for an amino acid substitution (Val85Met). In contrast to the association between Val85Met and eumelanism in other avian species, this change was associated with pheomelanism in pigeons. In vitro cAMP accumulation and protein expression assays revealed that Val85Met leads to decreased receptor function and reduced cell surface expression of the mutant protein. The reduced in vitro function is consistent with the observed association with reduced eumelanic pigmentation. Comparative genetic and cellular studies provide important insights about the range of mechanisms underlying diversity among vertebrates, including different phenotypic associations with similar mutations in different species. PMID:23977400

  12. A Val85Met Mutation in Melanocortin-1 Receptor Is Associated with Reductions in Eumelanic Pigmentation and Cell Surface Expression in Domestic Rock Pigeons (Columba livia)

    PubMed Central

    Guernsey, Michael W.; Ritscher, Lars; Miller, Matthew A.; Smith, Daniel A.; Schöneberg, Torsten; Shapiro, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) is associated with pigmentation diversity in wild and domesticated populations of vertebrates, including several species of birds. Among domestic bird species, pigmentation variation in the rock pigeon (Columbalivia) is particularly diverse. To determine the potential contribution of Mc1r variants to pigment diversity in pigeons, we sequenced Mc1r in a wide range of pigeon breeds and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms, including a variant that codes for an amino acid substitution (Val85Met). In contrast to the association between Val85Met and eumelanism in other avian species, this change was associated with pheomelanism in pigeons. In vitro cAMP accumulation and protein expression assays revealed that Val85Met leads to decreased receptor function and reduced cell surface expression of the mutant protein. The reduced in vitro function is consistent with the observed association with reduced eumelanic pigmentation. Comparative genetic and cellular studies provide important insights about the range of mechanisms underlying diversity among vertebrates, including different phenotypic associations with similar mutations in different species. PMID:23977400

  13. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  14. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  15. A study of the depth of weathering and its relationship to the mechanical properties of near-surface rocks in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stierman, D.J.; Healy, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Weathered granite extends 70 m deep at Hi Vista in the arid central Mojave Desert of southern California. The low strength of this granite is due to the alteration of biotite and chlorite montmorillonite. Deep weathering probably occurs in most granites, although we cannot rule out some anomalous mechanisms at Hi Vista. Geophysical instruments set in these slightly altered rocks are limited by the unstable behavior of the rocks. Thus, tectonic signals from instruments placed in shallow boreholes give vague results. Geophysical measurements of these weathered rocks resemble measurements of granitic rocks near major faults. The rheology of the rocks in which instruments are placed limits the useful sensitivity of the instruments. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  17. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  18. 'Mister Badger' Pushing Mars Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking's soil sampler collector arm successfully pushed a rock on the surface of Mars during the afternoon of Friday, October 8. The irregular-shaped rock was pushed several inches by the Lander's collector arm, which displaced the rock to the left of its original position, leaving it cocked slightly upward. Photographs and other information verified the successful rock push. Photo at left shows the soil sampler's collector head pushing against the rock, named 'Mister Badger' by flight controllers. Photo at right shows the displaced rock and the depression whence it came. Part of the soil displacement was caused by the collector s backhoe. A soil sample will be taken from the site Monday night, October 11. It will then be delivered to Viking s organic chemistry instrument for a series of analyses during the next few weeks. The sample is being sought from beneath a rock because scientists believe that, if there are life forms on Mars, they may seek rocks as shelter from the Sun s intense ultraviolet radiation.

  19. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Investigation of the relationship between CO2 reservoir rock property change and the surface roughness change originating from the supercritical CO2-sandstone-groundwater geochemical reaction at CO2 sequestration condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Wang, Sookyun; Kim, Seyoon; Park, Jinyoung

    2015-04-01

    Lab scale experiments were performed to investigate the property changes of sandstone slabs and cores, resulting from the scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction for 180 days under CO2 sequestration conditions (100 bar and 50 °C). The geochemical reactions, including the surface roughness change of minerals in the slab, resulted from the dissolution and the secondary mineral precipitation for the sandstone reservoir of the Gyeongsang basin, Korea were reproduced in laboratory scale experiments and the relationship between the geochemical reaction and the physical rock property change was derived, for the consideration of successful subsurface CO2 sequestration. The use of the surface roughness value (SRrms) change rate and the physical property change rate to quantify scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction is the novel approach on the study area for CO2 sequestration in the subsurface. From the results of SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope) analyses, the SRrms for each sandstone slab was calculated at different reaction time. The average SRrms increased more than 3.5 times during early 90 days reaction and it continued to be steady after 90 days, suggesting that the surface weathering process of sandstone occurred in the early reaction time after CO2 injection into the subsurface reservoir. The average porosity of sandstone cores increased by 8.8 % and the average density decreased by 0.5 % during 90 days reaction and these values slightly changed after 90 days. The average P and S wave velocities of sandstone cores also decreased by 10 % during 90 days reaction. The trend of physical rock property change during the geochemical reaction showed in a logarithmic manner and it was also correlated to the logarithmic increase in SRrms, suggesting that the physical property change of reservoir rocks originated from scCO2 injection directly comes from the geochemical reaction process. Results suggested that the long-term estimation of the physical property change for reservoir rocks in CO2

  1. Rock strength reductions during incipient weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Anderson, S. P.; Blum, A.

    2012-12-01

    Patrick Kelly, Suzanne Anderson, Alex Blum In rock below the surface, temperature swings are damped, water flow is limited, and biota are few. Yet rock weathers, presumably driven by these environmental parameters. We use rock strength as an indicator of rock weathering in Gordon Gulch in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, a watershed at 2500 m underlain by Proterozoic gneiss intruded by the Boulder Creek granodiorite. Fresh rock is found at depths of 8-30 m in this area, and the thickness of the weathered rock zone imaged with shallow seismic refraction is greater on N-facing slopes than S-facing slopes (Befus et al., 2011, Vadose Zone J.). We use the Brazilian splitting test to determine tensile strength of cores collected with a portable drilling rig. Spatial variations in rock strength that we measure in the top 2 m of the weathered rock mantle can be connected to two specific environmental variables: slope aspect and the presence of a soil mantle. We find weaker rock on N-facing slopes and under soil. There is no clear correlation between rock strength and the degree of chemical alteration in these minimally weathered rocks. Denudation rates of 20-30 microns/yr imply residence times of 105-106 years within the weathered rock layers of the critical zone. Given these timescales, rock weathering is more likely to have occurred under glacial climate conditions, when periglacial processes prevailed in this non-glaciated watershed. Incipient weathering of rock appears to be controlled by water and frost cracking in Gordon Gulch. Water is more effectively delivered to the subsurface on N-facing slopes, and is more likely held against rock surfaces under soil than on outcrops. These moisture conditions, and the lower surface temperatures that prevail on N-facing slopes also favor frost cracking as an important weathering process.

  2. Entrainment of radio frequency chaff by wind as a function of surface aerodynamic roughness.

    PubMed

    Gillies, John A; Nickling, William G

    2003-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) chaff (approximately 2-cm x 25-microm diameter aluminum-coated glass silicate cylinders) released by military aircraft during testing and training activities has the potential to become entrained by wind upon settling to the Earth's surface. Once entrained from the surface there is the potential for RF chaff to be abraded and produce PM10 and PM2.5, which are regulated pollutants and pose health concerns. A series of portable wind tunnel tests were carried out to examine the propensity of RF chaff to become entrained by wind by defining the relationship between the threshold friction velocity of RF chaff (u(*t RF chaff)) and aerodynamic roughness (z(o)) of surfaces onto which it may deposit. The test surfaces were of varying roughness including types near the Naval Air Station (NAS), Fallon, NV, where RF chaff is released. The u(*t) of this fibrous material ranged from 0.14 m/sec for a smooth playa to 0.82 m/sec for a rough crusted playa surface with larger cobble-sized (approximately 6-26-cm diameter) rocks rising above the surface. The u(*t RF chaff) is dependent on the z(o) of the surface onto which it falls as well as the physical characteristics of the roughness. The wind regime of Fallon would allow for chaff suspension events to occur should it settle on typical surfaces in the area. However, the wind climatology of this area makes the probability of such events relatively low. PMID:12617294

  3. Analysis of Inflatable Rock Bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Charlie C.

    2016-01-01

    An inflatable bolt is integrated in the rock mass through the friction and mechanical interlock at the bolt-rock interface. The pullout resistance of the inflatable bolt is determined by the contact stress at the interface. The contact stress is composed of two parts, termed the primary and secondary contact stresses. The former refers to the stress established during bolt installation and the latter is mobilized when the bolt tends to slip in the borehole owing to the roughness of the borehole surface. The existing analysis of the inflatable rock bolt does not appropriately describe the interaction between the bolt and the rock since the influence of the folded tongue of the bolt on the stiffness of the bolt and the elastic rebound of the bolt tube in the end of bolt installation are ignored. The interaction of the inflatable bolt with the rock is thoroughly analysed by taking into account the elastic displacements of the rock mass and the bolt tube during and after bolt installation in this article. The study aims to reveal the influence of the bolt tongue on the contact stress and the different anchoring mechanisms of the bolt in hard and soft rocks. A new solution to the primary contact stress is derived, which is more realistic than the existing one in describing the interaction between the bolt and the rock. The mechanism of the secondary contact stress is also discussed from the point of view of the mechanical behaviour of the asperities on the borehole surface. The analytical solutions are in agreement with both the laboratory and field pullout test results. The analysis reveals that the primary contact stress decreases with the Young's modulus of the rock mass and increases with the borehole diameter and installation pump pressure. The primary contact stress can be easily established in soft and weak rock but is low or zero in hard and strong rock. In soft and weak rock, the primary contact stress is crucially important for the anchorage of the bolt, while

  4. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of layered, sedimentary rock in eastern Gale Crater. North-central Gale Crater is the site of a mound that is more than several kilometers thick and largely composed of sedimentary rocks that record a complex history of deposition and erosion. At one time, Gale Crater might have been completely filled and buried beneath the martian surface.

    Location near: 4.9oS, 221.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  5. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  6. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  7. Altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface, December 6, 1994, in the carbonate rocks in part of East Whiteland and Charlestown townships, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McManus, B.C.; Sloto, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A map showing ground-water levels in the carbonate rocks in part of East Whiteland and Charlestown Townships, Chester County, Pennsylvania, was constructed from water levels measured in 64 wells on December 6, 1994. Observed water-level altitudes range from 226 feet above sea level near Morehall Road to 400 feet above sea level near State Route 401 in East Whiteland Township.

  8. Effects of Palagonitic Dust Coatings on Thermal Emission Spectra of Rocks and Minerals: Implications for Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Surface by MGS-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R.; Christensen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements on dust-coated rocks and minerals show that a 300 5m thick layer is required to mask emission from the substrate and that non-linear effects are present. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. 'They of the Great Rocks'-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows 'Adirondack,' the rover's first target rock. Spirit traversed the sandy martian terrain at Gusev Crater to arrive in front of the football-sized rock on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2004, just three days after it successfully rolled off the lander. The rock was selected as Spirit's first target because its dust-free, flat surface is ideally suited for grinding. Clean surfaces also are better for examining a rock's top coating. Scientists named the angular rock after the Adirondack mountain range in New York. The word Adirondack is Native American and is interpreted by some to mean 'They of the great rocks.'

  10. Unusual July 10, 1996, rock fall at Happy Isles, Yosemite National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Snyder, J.B.; Waitt, R.B.; Morrissey, M.M.; Uhrhammer, R.A.; Harp, E.L.; Norris, R.D.; Bursik, M.I.; Finewood, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of the July 10, 1996, rock fall at Happy Isles in Yosemite National Park, California, were unusual compared to most rock falls. Two main rock masses fell about 14 s apart from a 665-m-high cliff southeast of Glacier Point onto a talus slope above Happy Isles in the eastern part of Yosemite Valley. The two impacts were recorded by seismographs as much as 200 km away. Although the impact area of the rock falls was not particularly large, the falls generated an airblast and an abrasive dense sandy cloud that devastated a larger area downslope of the impact sites toward the Happy Isles Nature Center. Immediately downslope of the impacts, the airblast had velocities exceeding 110 m/s and toppled or snapped about 1000 trees. Even at distances of 0.5 km from impact, wind velocities snapped or toppled large trees, causing one fatality and several serious injuries beyond the Happy Isles Nature Center. A dense sandy cloud trailed the airblast and abraded fallen trunks and trees left standing. The Happy Isles rock fall is one of the few known worldwide to have generated an airblast and abrasive dense sandy cloud. The relatively high velocity of the rock fall at impact, estimated to be 110-120 m/s, influenced the severity and areal extent of the airblast at Happy Isles. Specific geologic and topographic conditions, typical of steep glaciated valleys and mountainous terrain, contributed to the rock-fall release and determined its travel path, resulting in a high velocity at impact that generated the devastating airblast and sandy cloud. The unusual effects of this rock fall emphasize the importance of considering collateral geologic hazards, such as airblasts from rock falls, in hazard assessment and planning development of mountainous areas.

  11. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations and Implications for Landing Hazards on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks represent an obvious potential hazard to a landing spacecraft. They also represent an impediment to rover travel and objects of prime scientific interest. Although Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images are of high enough resolution to distinguish the largest rocks (an extremely small population several meters diameter or larger), traditionally the abundance and distribution of rocks on Mars have been inferred from thermal inertia and radar measurements, our meager ground truth sampling of landing sites, and terrestrial rock populations. In this abstract, we explore the effective thermal inertia of rocks and rock populations, interpret the results in terms of abundances and populations of potentially hazardous rocks, and conclude with interpretations of rock hazards on the Martian surface and in extremely high thermal inertia areas.

  12. New eyes on eastern California rock varnish

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsley, D.H.; Dorn, R.I. )

    1991-05-01

    This article presents findings from recent investigations of how rock varnish forms and describes the manner in which this understanding can aid researchers. Rock varnish is typically a glossy-brown to black coating that commonly develops on rock surfaces in arid climates. It may take tens of thousands of years to form a complete coating over rock surfaces. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of rock varnish. The following explanations originated during examination of rock varnishes in the Mojave Desert: (1) the role of pollen in providing manganese, (2) the role of lichens in somehow catalyzing varnish accretion, (3) physical and chemical changes at the rock surface, and (4) the role of bacteria in concentrating manganese. Recent findings using backscatter electron microscopy are given researchers additional insights into this phenomenon. This technology permits researchers to view rock varnish chemistry and texture simultaneously and permits sources of varnish constituents, origin of manganese enhancement in varnish, reliable rock varnish dating, and new microscopic textures to be studied in great detail. It is now apparent that a number of varnish accretion processes occur other than deposition in even layers.

  13. Erosion and the rocks of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the surface of Venus returned by the Venera 9 and 10 spacecraft have revealed the presence of smooth and angular rockline forms. Two mechanisms previously suggested (Sagan, 1975) for erosion of crater ramparts on the surface of Venus might also explain the erosion of rocks. Chemical weathering by the hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, and sulfuric acids present in the atmosphere of Venus may have been sufficient to erode angular projections of silicous rocks. Alternatively, the contours of rocks containing such low-melting materials as NaOH, KOH, HgS and KNO2 may have softened as the result of exposure to the high surface temperatures of the planet.

  14. Coal-rock interface detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, S. D.; Crouch, C. E.; Jones, E. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coal-rock interface detector is presented which employs a radioactive source and radiation sensor. The source and sensor are separately and independently suspended and positioned against a mine surface of hydraulic pistons, which are biased from an air cushioned source of pressurized hydraulic fluid.

  15. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  16. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Calef, F. J.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Lanza, N. L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Pablo, M. A.; Kocurek, G. A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K. W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N. O.; Rice, M. S.; Richardson, M. E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R. S.; Wiens, R. C.; Yingst, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from "Bradbury Landing" to "Rocknest," they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  17. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J., III; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  18. Rayleigh wave studies in lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    1972-01-01

    An ultrasonic surface wave technique described by the author (1971) is used to verify a hypothesis that links the seismic wave propagation velocities in lunar crust, much too low as compared to those on earth, to the extensive fracturing of lunar rock in the absence of liquids and gases which changed drastically the elastic and inelastic properties of lunar rock. Measurements on lunar rock samples and synthetic analogs suggest that the presence of microfractures have influence on both the wave velocity and Q factor in lunar rocks.

  19. Dust Emissions from Undisturbed and Disturbed, Crusted Playa Surfaces: Cattle Trampling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; van Pelt, R.; Fredrickson, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    Dry playa lake beds can be a significant source of fine dust emissions during high wind events in arid and semiarid landscapes. The physical and chemical properties of the playa surface control the amount and properties of the dust emitted. In this study, we use a field wind tunnel to quantify the dust emissions from a bare, fine-textured playa surface located in the Chihuahua Desert at the Jornada Experimental Range, near Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. We tested natural, undisturbed crusted surfaces and surfaces that had been subjected to two levels of domestic animal disturbance. The animal disturbance was provided by trampling produced from one and ten passes along the length of the wind tunnel by a 630 kg Angus-Hereford cross cow. The trampling broke the durable crust and created loose erodible material. Each treatment (natural crust, one pass, and ten passes) was replicated three times. A push-type wind tunnel with a 6 m long, 0.5 m wide, and 1 m high test section was used to generate dust emissions under controlled conditions. Clean medium sand was dropped onto the playa surface to act as an abrader material. The tunnel wind speed was equivalent to 15 m/s at a height of 2 m over a smooth soil surface. The tunnel was initially run for ten minutes, with no abrader added. A second 30 minute run was subsequently sampled as abrader was added to the wind stream. Dust and saltating material were collected using an isokinetic slot sampler at the end of the tunnel. Total airborne dust was collected on two 25 cm x 20 cm glass fiber filters (GFF) and measured using a GRIMM particle monitor every 6 sec throughout each test run. Disturbance by trampling generated increased saltating material and airborne dust. The amount of saltating material measured during the initial (no abrader added) run was approximately 70% greater and 5.8 times the amount of saltating material measured on the one pass and ten pass plots, respectively, compared with that observed on the undisturbed

  20. Correlation of Rock Spectra with Quantitative Morphologic Indices: Evidence for a Single Rock Type at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Biedermann, K. L.; Pierre, N. M.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Johnson, J. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) landing site was predicted to contain a broad sampling of rock types varying in mineralogical, physical, mechanical and geochemical characteristics. Although rocks have been divided into several spectral categories based on Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) visible/near-infrared data, efforts in isolating and classifying spectral units among MPF rocks and soils have met with varying degrees of success, as many factors influencing spectral signatures cannot be quantified to a sufficient level to be removed. It has not been fully determined which spectral categories stem from intrinsic mineralogical differences between rocks or rock surfaces, and which result from factors such as physical or chemical weathering. This has made isolation of unique rock mineralogies difficult. Morphology, like composition, is a characteristic tied to the intrinsic properties and geologic and weathering history of rocks. Rock morphologies can be assessed quantitatively and compared with spectral data, to identify and classify rock types at the MPF landing site. They can also isolate actual rock spectra from spectral types that are surficial in origin, as compositions associated with mantling dust or chemical coatings would presumably not influence rock morphology during weathering events. We previously reported on an initial classification of rocks using the quantitative morphologic indices of size, roundness, sphericity and elongation. Here, we compare this database of rock characteristics with associated rock surface spectra to improve our ability to discriminate between spectra associated with rock types and those from other sources.

  1. Altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface in the crystalline and metasedimentary rocks in Valley and West Brandywine townships, Chester County, Pennsylvania, May 1992 through August 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGovern, J.E.; Bossert, April; Wettstein, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A map showing ground-water levels in crystalline and metasedimentary rocks in Valley and West Brandywine Townships, Chester County, Pennsylvania, was constructed from water levels measured in wells from May 1992 through August 1993. Pre-1992 measurements were incorporated on the map to provide control in areas where more recent data were not available. Because little ground-water development has occurred in the areas where pre-1992 water levels were used, levels are assumed to be the same in 1992 and 1993 as they were when the measurement was made.

  2. Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markun, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks, clastic and nonclastic, should represent a high priority target in any future return-sample mission. The discovery of such materials and their subsequent analysis in terrestrial laboratories, would greatly increase the understanding of the Martian paleoclimate. The formation of Martian clastic sedimentary rocks, under either present, low-pressure, xeric conditions or a postulated, high-pressure, hydric environment, depends upon the existence of a supply of particles, various cementing agents and depositional basins. A very high resolution (mm-cm range) photographic reconnaissance of these areas would produce a quantum jump in the understanding of Martian geological history. Sampling would be confined to more horizontal (recent) surfaces. Exploration techniques are suggested for various hypothetical Martian sedimentary rocks.

  3. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  4. Thermal infrared (2.5-13.5 μm) spectroscopic remote sensing of igneous rock types on particulate planetary surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, John W.; Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamental molecular vibration bands are significantly diminished by scattering. Thus such bands in spectra of fine particulate regoliths (i.e., dominated by <5-μm particles), or regoliths displaying a similar scale of porosity, are difficult to use for mineralogical or rock type identification. Consequently, other spectral features have been sought that may be more useful in spectroscopic remote sensing of composition. We find that mineralogical information is retained in overtones and combination tones of the fundamental molecular vibrations in the 3.0- to 7.0-μm region, but that relatively few minerals have a sufficiently distinctive band structure to be unambiguously identified with currently available techniques. More significantly, identification of general rock type, as defined by the SCFM chemical index (SCFM = SiO2/SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), is possible using spectral features associated with the principal Christiansen frequency and with a region of relative transparency between the Si-O stretching and bending bands. However, environmental factors may affect the appearance and wavelengths of these features. Finally, prominent absorption bands may result from the presence of relatively small amounts of water, hydroxyl or carbonate, because absorption bands exhibited by these materials in the 2.7- to 4.0-μm region, where silicate spectra are otherwise featureless, increase strongly in spectral contrast with decreasing particle size. Such materials are thus detectable in very small amounts in a particulate regolith composed predominantly of silicate minerals.

  5. Results of analyses performed on basalt adjacent to penetrators emplaced into volcanic rock at Amboy, California, April 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M.; Bunch, T.; Davis, A.; Shade, H.; Erlichman, J.; Polkowski, G.

    1977-01-01

    The physical and chemical modifications found in the basalt after impact of four penetrators were studied. Laboratory analyses show that mineralogical and elemental changes are produced in the powdered and crushed basalt immediately surrounding the penetrator. Optical microscopy studies of material next to the skin of the penetrator revealed a layer, 0-2 mm thick, of glass and abraded iron alloy mixed with fractured mineral grains of basalt. Elemental analysis of the 0-2 mm layer revealed increased concentrations of Fe, Cr, Ni, No, and Mn, and reduced concentrations of Mg, Al, Si, and Ca. The Fe, Cr, Ni, and Mo were in fragments abraded from the penetrator. Mineralogical changes occurring in the basalt sediment next to the penetrator include the introduction of micron-size grains of alpha-iron, magnetite, and hematite. The newly formed silicate minerals include metastable phases of silica (tridymite and cristobalite). An increased concentration of Fe, Cr, Ni, and Mo occurred in the 2-mm to 1-cm layer of penetrator no. 1, which impacted at the highest velocity. No elemental concentration increase was noted for penetrators nos. 2 and 3 in the 2-mm to 1-cm layer. Contaminants introduced by the penetrator occur up to 1 cm away from the penetrator's skin. Although volatile elements do migrate and new minerals are formed during the destruction of host minerals in the crushed rock, no changes were observed beyond the 1-cm distance.

  6. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  7. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    We study out Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are not on top of a mountain may once have been on the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of the Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  8. Microcrater populations on Apollo 17 rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E.; Hoerz, F.

    1974-01-01

    Approximately 6000 microcraters were investigated using binocular microscope techniques on Apollo 17 rocks 70215, 72215, 72235, 72395, 72435, 73216, 73218, 73275, 74275, 76135, 76136, and 79155. The crater populations observed have identical characteristics to those obtained from previous missions. Special emphasis was placed on assessing the influence of target properties on the observable crater populations. Although these properties cannot be quantitatively evaluated at present, the empirical results indicate that crater populations on glass, breccia, and crystalline rock surfaces may differ fundamentally. As a consequence, lunar surface exposure ages of individual rocks based on micrometeoroid craters may be subject to criticism.

  9. From stones to rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  10. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    PubMed

    Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice. PMID:25162535

  11. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  12. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  13. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  14. Preparation for Moving a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander enlarged a trench beside a rock called 'Headless' during the mission's 115th Martian day (Sept. 20, 2008) in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image later that afternoon, showing the enlarged trench and the rock.

    The robotic arm successfully moved the rock two days later.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape. The trench, called 'Neverland,' was excavated to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep near the rock. The ground surface between the rock and the lip of the trench slopes downward about 3 degrees toward the trench.

    This image was taken at about 4:35 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  16. Fission-track dating of volcanically derived sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kowallis, B.J.; Heaton, J.S.; Bringhurst, K.

    1986-01-01

    Depositional ages of sedimentary rocks can be determined using fission-track single grain ages on zircons from layers of volcanic ash or bentonite, even when the layers have been contaminated by older grains. This is done by compiling an age probability distribution or age spectrum for a sample from individual grain ages. An age spectrum is a simple and unambiguous way of testing for contamination and extracting useful age information. The youngest peak in the age spectrum approximates the time of deposition. In most contaminated samples, 30 or more grains should be counted to produce a reliable spectrum. However, useful, reproducible ages can be obtained by counting less than 10 grains in samples where most of the older, contaminating grains can be removed. The few older grains that remain after removing the obviously abraded ones may then be eliminated by examining the age spectrum. Although ages determined in this way are probably not precise enough for use in defining stratigraphic boundaries, they still provide a means of obtaining an isotopic age in sediments that cannot be dated by other radiometric methods. 18 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  17. SEM analysis of rock varnish chemistry: A geomorphic age discriminator

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.D.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1989-07-01

    Rock varnish, a manganese- and iron-rich coating commonly found on rock surfaces in arid and semiarid regions, has long been of interest as a potential age indicator. Rock varnish has been shown to be an effective medium for dating of geomorphic surfaces over a time range of several thousand to over a million years, utilizing a ratio among minor cations ((K + Ca)/Ti) for the total volume of rock varnish. We have recently, developed a technique using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDAX) to analyze the chemistry of rock varnish. This technique has several advantages over the earlier cation ratio technique.

  18. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  19. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Rock sample brought to earth from the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A scientist's gloved hand holds one of the numerous rock samples brought back to Earth from the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. This sample is a highly shattered basaltic rock with a thin black-glass coating on five of its six sides. Glass fills fractures and cements the rock together. The rock appears to have been shattered and thrown out by a meteorite impact explosion and coated with molten rock material before the rock fell to the surface.

  1. First Grinding of a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The round, shallow depression in this image resulted from history's first grinding of a rock on Mars. The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Spirit rover ground off the surface of a patch 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter on a rock called Adirondack during Spirit's 34th sol on Mars, Feb. 6, 2004. The hole is 2.65 millimeters (0.1 inch) deep, exposing fresh interior material of the rock for close inspection with the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers on the robotic arm. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera, providing a quick visual check of the success of the grinding. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  2. Surface property modification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The main emphasis of this work has been to determine the wear rate of silicon in fluid environments and the parameters that influence wear. Three tests were carried out on single crystal Czochralski silicon wafers: circular and linear multiple-scratch tests in fluids by a pyramidal diamond simulated fixed-particle abrasion; microhardness and three-point bend tests were used to determine the hardness and fracture toughness of abraded silicon and the extent of damage induced by abrasion. The wear rate of (100) and (111) n and p-type single crystal Cz silicon abraded by a pyramidal diamond in ethanol, methanol, acetone and de-ionized water was determined by measuring the cross-sectional areas of grooves of the circular and linear multiple-scratch tests. The wear rate depends on the loads on the diamond and is highest for ethanol and lowest for de-ionized water. The surface morphology of the grooves showed lateral and median cracks as well as a plastically deformed region. The hardness and fracture toughness are critical parameters that influence the wear rate. Microhardness tests were conducted to determine the hardness as influenced by fluids. Median cracks and the damage zone surrounding the indentations were also related to the fluid properties.

  3. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the past two-and-a-half years of traversing the central part of Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has analyzed the brushed and ground-into surfaces of multiple rocks using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which measures the abundance of major chemical elements. In the process, Spirit has documented the first example of a particular kind of volcanic region on Mars known as an alkaline igneous province. The word alkaline refers to the abundance of sodium and potassium, two major rock-forming elements from the alkali metals on the left-hand side of the periodic table.

    All of the relatively unaltered rocks -- those least changed by wind, water, freezing, or other weathering agents -- examined by Spirit have been igneous, meaning that they crystallized from molten magmas. One way geologists classify igneous rocks is by looking at the amount of potassium and sodium relative to the amount of silica, the most abundant rock-forming mineral on Earth. In the case of volcanic rocks, the amount of silica present gives scientists clues to the kind of volcanism that occurred, while the amounts of potassium and sodium provide clues about the history of the rock. Rocks with more silica tend to erupt explosively. Higher contents of potassium and sodium, as seen in alkaline rocks like those at Gusev, may indicate partial melting of magma at higher pressure, that is, deeper in the Martian mantle. The abundance of potassium and sodium determines the kinds of minerals that make up igneous rocks. If igneous rocks have enough silica, potassium and sodium always bond with the silica to form certain minerals.

    The Gusev rocks define a new chemical category not previously seen on Mars, as shown in this diagram plotting alkalis versus silica, compiled by University of Tennessee geologist Harry McSween. The abbreviations 'Na2O' and 'K2O' refer to oxides of sodium and potassium. The abbreviation 'SiO2' refers to silica. The abbreviation 'wt

  4. Surface properties of bacillus subtilis determined by acid/base titrations, and the implications for metal adsorption in fluid-rock systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, J.B.; Davis, T.A.

    1996-10-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in low temperature aqueous systems, but quantifying their effects on aqueous mass transport remains a problem. Numerous studies have qualitatively examined the metal binding capacity of bacterial cell walls. However, quantitative thermodynamic modeling of metal-bacteria-mineral systems requires a detailed knowledge of the surface properties of the bacterial functional groups. In this study, we have conducted acid/base titrations of suspensions of B. subtilis, a common subsurface species whose surface properties are largely controlled by carboxyl groups. Titrations were conducted between pH 2 and 11 at several ionic strengths. The data are analyzed using a constant capacitance model to account for the surface electric field effects on the acidity constant. The pK{sub a} value that best fits the titration data is 3.9 {plus_minus} 0.3. This result represents the first step toward quantifying bacteria-metal and mineral-bacteria-metal interactions using equilibrium thermodynamics.

  5. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  6. Nonmarine upper cretaceous rocks, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Griesbach, F.B.; Egbert, R.M.

    1980-08-01

    A section of Upper Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) nonmarine sandstone, conglomerate, and siltstone with associated coal is exposed near Saddle mountain on the northwest flank of Cook Inlet basin, the only known surface exposure of nonmarine Upper Cretaceous rocks in the Cook Inlet area. The section, at least 83.3 m thick, unconformably overlies the Upper Jurassic Naknek Formation and is unconformably overlain by the lower Tertiary West Foreland Formation. These upper Cretaceous rocks correlate lithologically with the second or deeper interval of nonmarine Upper Cretaceous rocks penetrated in the lower Cook Inlet COST 1 well.

  7. Quantitative Morphologic Analysis of Boulder Shape and Surface Texture to Infer Environmental History: A Case Study of Rock Breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (approximately 120 degrees) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  8. Quantitative morphologic analysis of boulder shape and surface texture to infer environmental history: A case study of rock breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-05-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (~120°) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  9. The Rock Physics Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gary; Mukerji, Tapan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2003-10-01

    The Rock Physics Handbook conveniently brings together the theoretical and empirical relations that form the foundations of rock physics, with particular emphasis on seismic properties. It also includes commonly used models and relations for electrical and dielectric rock properties. Seventy-six articles concisely summarize a wide range of topics, including wave propagation, AVO-AVOZ, effective media, poroelasticity, pore fluid flow and diffusion. The book contains overviews of dispersion mechanisms, fluid substitution, and Vp-Vs relations. Useful empirical results on reservoir rocks and sediments, granular media, tables of mineral data, and an atlas of reservoir rock properties complete the text. This distillation of an otherwise scattered and eclectic mass of knowledge is presented in a form that can be immediately applied to solve real problems. Geophysics professionals, researchers and students as well as petroleum engineers, well log analysts, and environmental geoscientists will value The Rock Physics Handbook as a unique resource.

  10. Bounce Rock Dimple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of 'tailings' or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  11. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  12. Ventifacts on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to the Pathfinder mission, rocks on the Martian surface appeared relatively unaffected by physical weathering processes. A major discovery of Pathfinder was the finding that numerous rocks exhibit features characteristic of ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles. Initial studies have shown that: 1) at least half the rocks at the landing site are abraded, 2) ventifacts are more abundant at the Pathfinder site than at the Viking sites, and 3) most of the rock erosion appears to have occurred in a climatic regime different from that of today. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Rock avalanches: significance and progress (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    1. The probability distribution of landslide volumes follows a power-law indicating that large rock avalanches dominate the terrestrial sediment supply from mountains, and that their source area morphologies dominate mountain topography. 2. Large rock slope failures (~ 106 m3 or greater) often mobilise into rock avalanches, which can travel extraordinarily long distances with devastating effect. This hypermobility has been the subject of many investigations; we have demonstrated that it can be explained quantitatively and accurately by considering the energetics of the intense rock fragmentation that always occurs during motion of a large rock mass. 3. Study of rock avalanche debris psd shows that the energy used in creating new rock surface area during fragmentation is not lost to surface energy, but is recycled generating a high-frequency elastic energy field that reduces the frictional resistance to motion during runout. 4. Rock avalanches that deposit on glaciers can eventually form large terminal moraines that have no connection with any climatic event; unless these are identified as rock-avalanche-influenced they can confuse palaeoclimatic inferences drawn from moraine ages. Rock-avalanche-derived fines, however, can be identified in moraine debris up to ten thousand years old by the characteristic micron-scale agglomerates that form during intense fragmentation, and which are absent from purely climatically-induced moraines; there is thus a strong case for re-examining existing palaeoclimatic databases to eliminate potentially rock-avalanche-influenced moraine ages. 5. Rock avalanches (especially coseismic ones) are a serious hazard, being very destructive in their own right; they also block river valleys, forming landslide dams and potentially devastating dambreak floods, and subsequent severe decade-scale aggradation of downstream fans and floodplains. Rock avalanches falling into lakes or fiords can cause catastrophic tsunami that pose a serious risk to

  14. The fracture criticality of crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampin, Stuart

    1994-08-01

    The shear-wave splitting observed along almost all shear-wave ray paths in the Earth's crust is interpreted as the effects of stress-aligned fluid-filled cracks, microcracks, and preferentially oriented pore space. Once away from the free surface, where open joints and fractures may lead to strong anisotropy of 10 per cent or greater, intact ostensibly unfractured crustal rock exhibits a limited range of shear-wave splitting from about 1.5 to 4.5 per cent differential shear-wave velocity anisotropy. Interpreting this velocity anisotropy as normalized crack densities, a factor of less than two in crack radius covers the range from the minimum 1.5 per cent anisotropy observed in intact rock to the 10 per cent observed in heavily cracked almost disaggregated near-surface rocks. This narrow range of crack dimensions and the pronounced effect on rock cohesion suggests that there is a state of fracture criticality at some level of anisotropy between 4.5 and 10 per cent marking the boundary between essentially intact, and heavily fractured rock. When the level of fracture criticality is exceeded, cracking is so severe that there is a breakdown in shear strength, the likelihood of progressive fracturing and the dispersal of pore fluids through enhanced permeability. The range of normalized crack dimensions below fracture criticality is so small in intact rock, that any modification to the crack geometry by even minor changes of conditions or minor deformation (particularly in the presence of high pore-fluid pressures) may change rock from being essentially intact (below fracture criticality) to heavily fractured (above fracture criticality). This recognition of the essential compliance of most crustal rocks, and its effect on shear-wave splitting, has implications for monitoring changes in any conditions affecting the rock mass. These include monitoring changes in reservoir evolution during hydrocarbon production and enhanced oil recovery, and in monitoring changes before

  15. Permanganate diffusion and reaction in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Towne, Rachael M; Fischer, Timothy B; Schaefer, Charles E

    2014-04-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate has frequently been used to treat chlorinated solvents in fractured bedrock aquifers. However, in systems where matrix back-diffusion is an important process, the ability of the oxidant to migrate and treat target contaminants within the rock matrix will likely determine the overall effectiveness of this remedial approach. In this study, a series of diffusion experiments were performed to measure the permanganate diffusion and reaction in four different types of sedimentary rocks (dark gray mudstone, light gray mudstone, red sandstone, and tan sandstone). Results showed that, within the experimental time frame (~2 months), oxidant migration into the rock was limited to distances less than 500 μm. The observed diffusivities for permanganate into the rock matrices ranged from 5.3 × 10(-13) to 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(2)/s. These values were reasonably predicted by accounting for both the rock oxidant demand and the effective diffusivity of the rock. Various Mn minerals formed as surface coatings from reduction of permanganate coupled with oxidation of total organic carbon (TOC), and the nature of the formed Mn minerals was dependent upon the rock type. Post-treatment tracer testing showed that these Mn mineral coatings had a negligible impact on diffusion through the rock. Overall, our results showed that the extent of permanganate diffusion and reaction depended on rock properties, including porosity, mineralogy, and organic carbon. These results have important implications for our understanding of long-term organic contaminant remediation in sedimentary rocks using permanganate. PMID:24566296

  16. Modelling Fracture Propagation in Anisotropic Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baotang; Siren, Topias; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-05-01

    Anisotropic rock mass is often encountered in rock engineering, and cannot be simplified as an isotropic problem in numerical models. A good understanding of rock fracturing processes and the ability to predict fracture initiation and propagation in anisotropic rock masses are required for many rock engineering problems. This paper describes the development of the anisotropic function in FRACOD—a specialized fracture propagation modelling software—and its recent applications to rock engineering issues. Rock anisotropy includes strength anisotropy and modulus anisotropy. The level of complexity in developing the anisotropic function for strength anisotropy and modulus anisotropy in FRACOD is significantly different. The strength anisotropy function alone does not require any alteration in the way that FRACOD calculates rock stress and displacement, and therefore is relatively straightforward. The modulus anisotropy function, on the other hand, requires modification of the fundamental equations of stress and displacement in FRACOD, a boundary element code, and hence is more complex and difficult. In actual rock engineering, the strength anisotropy is often considered to be more pronounced and important than the modulus anisotropy, and dominates the stability and failure pattern of the rock mass. The modulus anisotropy will not be considered in this study. This paper discusses work related to the development of the strength anisotropy in FRACOD. The anisotropy function has been tested using numerical examples. The predicted failure surfaces are mostly along the weakest planes. Predictive modelling of the Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment was made. The model suggests that spalling is very sensitive to the direction of anisotropy. Recent observations from the in situ experiment showed that shear fractures rather than tensile fractures occur in the holes. According to the simulation, the maximum tensile stress is well below the tensile strength, but the maximum

  17. Promoting research in rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Steve

    In response to informal discussions at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md., a dinner colloquium was held December 5, 1988, in San Francisco. Our purpose was to explore ways of promoting basic research in rock deformation, for which no professional organization exists that spans the full range of research interests. In spite of an informal distribution of announcements of the meeting, 54 people attended.Rock deformation is the materials science of the crystalline and amorphous materials that make up the solid Earth. As such, it includes not only the physical processes responsible for brittle and ductile deformation but also the important chemical processes that influence time-dependent inelastic deformation. Consequently, there is a continuing need to engage interest and collaboration from materials scientists, mineral physicists, metallurgists, surface chemists, and geochemists in the study of the inelastic mechanical behavior of these complex materials.

  18. Application of rock varnish dating of quaternary surficial deposits in determining times of fault movement

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Rock varnish, a coating commonly found on rock surfaces in arid and semiarid regions, has a significant potential in paleoseismic studies, as a wide variety of Quaternary surfaces and surficial deposits can be dated with the rock varnish technique. If the formation of geomorphic surfaces or surficial deposits can be related to times of faulting or if faulting has broken or deformed such features, then rock varnish dating can be used to constrain maximum and minimum times of motion on the related fault.

  19. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  1. Welcome to Rock Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Benhart, Jeaneen

    2004-01-01

    At the beginning of the school year, the authors, a first-grade teacher and a teacher educator, worked together to "spice up" the first-grade science curriculum. The teacher had taught the unit Rocks, Sand, and Soil several times, conducting hands-on explorations and using books to help students learn about properties of rocks, but she felt the…

  2. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  3. Spirit Studies Rock Outcrop at 'Home Plate'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this false-color image at 11:48 local true solar time on Mars on the rover's 746th Martian day, or sol (Feb. 26, 2006), after using the rock abrasion tool to brush the surfaces of rock targets informally named 'Stars' (left) and 'Crawfords' (right). Small streaks of dust extend for several centimeters behind the small rock chips and pebbles in the dusty, red soils. Because the rover was looking southwest when this image was taken, the wind streaks indicate that the dominant wind direction was from the southeast.

    The targets Stars and Crawfords are on a rock outcrop located on top of 'Home Plate.' The outcrop is informally named 'James 'Cool Papa' Bell,' after a Negro Leagues Hall of Famer who played for both the Pittsburgh Crawfords and the Kansas City Stars. To some science team members, the two brushed spots resemble the eyes of a face, with rocks below and between the eyes as a nose and layered rocks at the bottom of the image as a mouth.

    The image combines frames taken by Spirit's panoramic camera through the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters. It is enhanced to emphasize color differences among the rocks, soils and brushed areas. The blue circular area on the left, Stars, was brushed on 761 (Feb. 22, 2006). The one on the right, Crawfords, was brushed on sol 763 (Feb. 25, 2006).

  4. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  5. A rock-/ice mechanical model for the destabilisation of permafrost rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Funk, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    The destabilisation of permafrost rocks is commonly attributed to changes in ice-mechanical properties (Davies et al. 2001). The effect of low temperatures on intact rock strength and its mechanical relevance for shear strength and brittle fracture propagation has not been considered yet. But this effect is significant since compressive and tensile strength are reduced by up to 50% and more when rock thaws (Mellor, 1973). Here we show, that the reduction of the shear resistance of rock-rock contacts in joints plays a key role for the onset of larger instabilities in thawing permafrost rocks. Based on a Mohr-Coulomb assumption, we defined a failure criterion of an ice-filled rock cleft, with cohesive rock bridges, contact of rough fracture surfaces, ductile creep of ice and with a representation of rock-ice "failure" mechanisms along the surface and inside the ice body. The synoptic models are based on the principle of superposition, i.e. that shear stress "absorbed" by one component reduces the amount of shear stress applied to the other components. Failure along existing sliding planes can be explained by the impact of temperature on shear stress uptake by creep deformation of ice, the propensity of failure along rock-ice fractures and reduced total friction along rough rock-rock contacts. This model may account for the rapid response of rockslides to warming (reaction time). In the long term, brittle fracture propagation is initialised. Warming reduces the shear stress uptake by total friction and decreases the critical fracture toughness along rock bridges. The latter model accounts for slow subcritical destabilisation of whole rock slopes over decades to millennia, subsequent to the warming impulse (relaxation time). To test the importance of reduced friction, we conducted shearing tests on homogeneous fine-grained limestone specimen taken from a permafrost site (Zugspitze, Germany). In a temperature-controlled shearing box, we repeatedly tested mechanical

  6. Cosmogenic nuclides in football-sized rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlen, M.; Honda, M.; Imamura, M.; Fruchter, J. S.; Finkel, R. C.; Kohl, C. P.; Arnold, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The activity of long- and short-lived isotopes in a series of samples from a vertical column through the center of rock 14321 was measured. Rock 14321 is a 9 kg fragmental rock whose orientation was photographically documented on the lunar surface. Also investigated was a sample from the lower portion of rock 14310, where, in order to study target effects, two different density fractions (mineral separates) were analyzed. A few nuclides in a sample from the comprehensive fines 14259 were measured. This material has been collected largely from the top centimeter of the lunar soil. The study of the deep samples of 14321 and 14310 provided values for the activity of isotopes at points where only effects produced by galactic cosmic rays are significant.

  7. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  8. Correlation between roughness and porosity in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Hogert, E. N.; Albano, J.; Raffo, C. A.; Gaggioli, N. G.

    1996-02-01

    The porosity of rocks is a very important parameter in the determination of the performance of oil wells. Optical methods allow us to study surface roughness and different materials that have surface properties with random characteristics. Therefore, we have extended these applications to porosity analysis. In our method, we have used the speckle produced by the scattered light from a porous rock, illuminated by a laser beam, and found a linear relationship between the decorrelation of the speckle intensity distribution and the porosity magnitude. In this paper we present the results for samples extracted from oil wells in Argentina.

  9. Lunar highland rock types: Their implications for impact induced fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first step in a petrologic study must be a classification based on observed textures and mineralogy. Lunar rocks, may be classified into three major groups: (1) coarse-grained igneous rocks, (2) fine-grained igneous rocks and (3) breccias. Group 1 is interpreted as primitive lunar crustal rocks that display various degrees of crushing and/or annealing. Group 2 is interpreted as volcanic rocks. Group 3 is interpreted as resulting from impacts on the lunar surface and is subdivided on the basis of matrix textures into fragmental breccias, crystalline breccias that have been annealed, and crystalline breccias with igneous matrices. A synthesis of the relevant data concerning lunar highlands polymict breccias from the fields of petrography, chemistry, photogeology, and impact studies compels the prediction that the breccias should have homogeneous matrices from rock to rock within regions of the highlands of limited size where impact mixing has been efficient and extensive.

  10. Semi-Automated Identification of Rocks in Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin; Castano, Andres; Anderson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rock Identification Toolkit Suite is a computer program that assists users in identifying and characterizing rocks shown in images returned by the Mars Explorer Rover mission. Included in the program are components for automated finding of rocks, interactive adjustments of outlines of rocks, active contouring of rocks, and automated analysis of shapes in two dimensions. The program assists users in evaluating the surface properties of rocks and soil and reports basic properties of rocks. The program requires either the Mac OS X operating system running on a G4 (or more capable) processor or a Linux operating system running on a Pentium (or more capable) processor, plus at least 128MB of random-access memory.

  11. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  12. Rock Moved by Mars Lander Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander slid a rock out of the way during the mission's 117th Martian day (Sept. 22, 2008) to gain access to soil that had been underneath the rock.The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took the two images for this stereo view later the same day, showing the rock, called 'Headless,' after the arm pushed it about 40 centimeters (16 inches) from its previous location.

    'The rock ended up exactly where we intended it to,' said Matt Robinson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, robotic arm flight software lead for the Phoenix team.

    The arm had enlarged the trench near Headless two days earlier in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The trench was dug to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep. The ground surface between the rock's prior position and the lip of the trench had a slope of about 3 degrees downward toward the trench. Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    This image was taken at about 12:30 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Rocks in motion: a one parameter description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, O. T.; Rosenau, M.; Leever, K.; Oncken, O.

    2013-12-01

    Rock fall, slide and avalanches are dynamically different phenomena of rocks in motion: falls are mostly dominated by free fall and elastic impacts, slides by friction at their base and avalanches by granular flow. Despite these dynamical differences, the properties of the material involved can be viewed similar, and the main (and only?) difference is typically the size of the systems (falls: 10 meters, slides: 102 meters, avalanches: 103 meters). If only size matters: can gravitational rock movements be described in a simple quantitative framework without losing any underlying physics? To explore the dynamics of gravitational rock movements we performed a dimensional analysis combined with experimental validation. Dimensional analysis suggests 9 dimensionless parameters that describe the system, one of which is Π = C/ρgh, where ρ is density, h height and C cohesion of the material and g is the gravitational acceleration. This dimensionless number describes how strong the material is compared to its size, and varies from < 103 for rock falls to > 10-4 for rock avalanches. Can this parameter be used to describe the spectrum of dynamics for rocks in motions in a physically meaningful way? To test this, we performed experiments using labscale rock analogues. Gravitational rock movements are modeled under normal gravity conditions, by releasing material down a 1 meter planar slope at an angle of 45°. The material used is a cemented granular material, the cohesion of which can be controlled over several order of magnitude (101 to 106 Pa). The experiments are monitored using a 50 Hz digital camera. Surface velocities are quantified using a Particle Image Velocimetry while other physical parameters (fragment size distribution, position, friction) are measured using optical image analysis. We perform experiments where the initial value of Π (Π0) is varied over 7 orders of magnitude (10-2 to 104), mapping a parameters space large enough to study a wide range of

  14. Extreme Rock Distributions on Mars and Implications for Landing Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the landing of Mars Pathfinder, the size-frequency distribution of rocks from the two Viking landing sites and Earth analog surfaces was used to derive a size-frequency model, for nomimal rock distributions on Mars. This work, coupled with extensive testing of the Pathfinder airbag landing system, allowed an estimate of what total rock abundances derived from thermal differencing techniques could be considered safe for landing. Predictions based on this model proved largely correct at predicting the size-frequency distribution of rocks at the Mars Pathfinder site and the fraction of potentially hazardous rocks. In this abstract, extreme rock distributions observed in Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images are compared with those observed at the three landing sites and model distributions as an additional constraint on potentially hazardous surfaces on Mars.

  15. Dirty Rotten Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a collection of rocks (upper right) at Gusev Crater that have captured the attention of scientists for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of the rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's 'Eagle Crater.' This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  16. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  18. Hydrogeochemical processes governing the origin, transport and fate of major and trace elements from mine wastes and mineralized rock to surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Mobility of potential or actual contaminants from mining and mineral processing activities depends on (1) occurrence: is the mineral source of the contaminant actually present? (2) abundance: is the mineral present in sufficient quantity to make a difference? (3) reactivity: what are the energetics, rates, and mechanisms of sorption and mineral dissolution and precipitation relative to the flow rate of the water? and (4) hydrology: what are the main flow paths for contaminated water? Estimates of relative proportions of minerals dissolved and precipitated can be made with mass-balance calculations if minerals and water compositions along a flow path are known. Combined with discharge, these mass-balance estimates quantify the actual weathering rate of pyrite mineralization in the environment and compare reasonably well with laboratory rates of pyrite oxidation except when large quantities of soluble salts and evaporated mine waters have accumulated underground. Quantitative mineralogy with trace-element compositions can substantially improve the identification of source minerals for specific trace elements through mass balances. Post-dissolution sorption and precipitation (attenuation) reactions depend on the chemical behavior of each element, solution composition and pH, aqueous speciation, temperature, and contact-time with mineral surfaces. For example, little metal attenuation occurs in waters of low pH (2, and redox-sensitive oxyanions (As, Sb, Se, Mo, Cr, V). Once dissolved, metal and metalloid concentrations are strongly affected by redox conditions and pH. Iron is the most reactive because it is rapidly oxidized by bacteria and archaea and Fe(III) hydrolyzes and precipitates at low pH (1–3) which is related directly to its first hydrolysis constant, pK1 = 2.2. Several insoluble sulfate minerals precipitate at low pH including anglesite, barite, jarosite, alunite and basaluminite. Aluminum hydrolyzes near pH 5 (pK1 = 5.0) and provides buffering and removal

  19. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  20. Rock Climbing Robot for Exploration and Sample Acquisition at Lava Tubes, Steep Slopes, and Cliff Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parness, A.; Frost, M.; Boston, P.; Cutkosky, M.

    2012-06-01

    The rock climbing robot utilizes a unique technology, microspines, that enables gravity-independent access to some of the most interesting locations on the Martian surface. Inverted rock coring has also been demonstrated with this technology.

  1. Our World: Lunar Rock

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about NASA'€™s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

  2. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  3. Focus on the Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes historical accounts of the manipulation and importance of the Earth and its mineral resources. A foldout, "Out of the Rock," provides a collection of activities and information that helps make integration of the aforementioned concepts easy. (ZWH)

  4. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  5. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  6. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  7. Layered Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Now that solar conjunction is over so that communication between Earth and Mars is no longer blocked by the Sun, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is continuing its trek through the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. Straight ahead, in the foreground of this image, is a horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl,' which scientists hope to investigate. Layering can be either volcanic or sedimentary in origin; researchers aim to determine which of these processes created this rock. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba,' just to the right, toward the middle of this image. Spirit took this image with its navigation camera on its 263rd martian day, or sol (Sept. 28, 2004).

  8. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  9. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  10. Effects of atmospheric moisture on rock resistivity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.

    1973-01-01

    This study examines the changes in resistivity of rock samples as induced by atmospheric moisture. Experiments were performed on samples of hematitic sandstone, pyrite, and galena. The sandstone underwent a change in resistivity of four orders of magnitude when it was measured in a vacuum of 500 ntorr and in air of 37% relative humidity. Pyrite and galena showed no variations in resistivity when they were measured under the same conditions. These results, plus others obtained elsewhere, indicate that rocks of the resistive type are affected in their electrical properties by atmospheric moisture, whereas rocks of the conductive type are not. The experimental evidence obtained is difficult to reconcile with a model of aqueous electrolytic conduction on the sample surface. It is instead suggested that adsorbed water molecules alter the surface resistivity in a manner similar to that observed in semiconductors and insulators.

  11. Rock shape, restitution coefficients and rockfall trajectory modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bühler, Yves; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Restitution coefficients are used in rockfall trajectory modelling to describe the ratio between incident and rebound velocities during ground impact. They are central to the problem of rockfall hazard analysis as they link rock mass characteristics to terrain properties. Using laboratory experiments as a guide, we first show that restitution coefficients exhibit a wide range of scatter, although the material properties of the rock and ground are constant. This leads us to the conclusion that restitution coefficients are poor descriptors of rock-ground interaction. The primary problem is that "apparent" restitution coefficients are applied at the rock's centre-of-mass and do not account for rock shape. An accurate description of the rock-ground interaction requires the contact forces to be applied at the rock surface with consideration of the momentary rock position and spin. This leads to a variety of rock motions including bouncing, sliding, skipping and rolling. Depending on the impact configuration a wide range of motions is possible. This explains the large scatter of apparent restitution coefficients. We present a rockfall model based on newly developed hard-contact algorithms which includes the effects of rock shape and therefore is able to reproduce the results of different impact configurations. We simulate the laboratory experiments to show that it is possible to reproduce run-out and dispersion of different rock shapes using parameters obtained from independent tests. Although this is a step forward in rockfall trajectory modelling, the problem of parametersing real terrain remains.

  12. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  13. Geoelectric investigations into sandstone moisture regimes: Implications for rock weathering and the deterioration of San Rock Art in the Golden Gate Reserve, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, L.; Viles, H. A.

    2010-06-01

    The Clarens sandstone in the Golden Gate Reserve, South Africa, is the canvas for a collection of San (Bushmen) Rock Art, dating from Neolithic times until as recently as 150 years ago. This Rock Art is under threat from human interference but also, to a greater degree, from weathering processes on the rock surface. The dominant weathering processes occurring in the rock shelters which host the Rock Art are flaking and honeycombing. Two rock shelter sites in the Reserve have been investigated using electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and supportive methods for measuring surface moisture (Protimeter) and surface hardness (Equotip). These non-destructive techniques can be used in situ to assess the extent of weathering within a rock outcrop and are especially suited for investigations in sensitive areas such as Rock Art sites. Moisture movement has been mapped and related to the weathering processes observed on the surface. The aim of the study is to aid Rock Art conservation in the Golden Gate Reserve through a better understanding of the driving processes of surface weathering. The evidence shows that the extensive flaking and honeycombing found in the rock shelters is most likely caused by water pockets in the near-surface zone, which are replenished through internal moisture transport, driving the superficial weathering processes. These weathering processes pose a significant problem: Rock Art in the Golden Gate Reserve shows severe deterioration due to flaking. Conservation strategies should therefore take internal processes into account as much as their superficial expression.

  14. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks observed by the Viking Landers and Pathfinder Lander/Sojourner rover exhibit a suite of perplexing rock textures. Among these are pits, spongy textures, penetrative flutes, lineaments, crusts, and knobs Fluvial, impact, chemical alteration, and aeolian mechanisms have been proposed for many of these. In an effort to better understand the origin and characteristics of Martian rock textures, abraded rocks in the Mojave Desert and other regions have been studied. We find that most Martian rock textures, as opposed to just a few, bear close resemblance to terrestrial aeolian textures and can most easily be explained by wind, not other, processes. Flutes, grooves, and some pits on Mars are consistent with abrasion by saltating particles, as described previously. However, many other rock textures probably also have an aeolian origin. Sills at the base of rocks that generally lie at high elevations, such as Half Dome, are consistent with such features on Earth that are related to moats or soil ramps that shield the basal part of the rock from erosion. Crusts consisting of fluted fabrics, such as those on Stimpy and Chimp, are similar to fluted crusts on Earth that spall off over time. Knobby and lineated rocks are similar to terrestrial examples of heterogeneous rocks that differentially erode. The location of specific rock textures on Mars also gives insight into their origin. Many of the most diagnostic ventifacts found at the Pathfinder site are located on rocks that lie near the crests or the upper slopes of ridges. On Earth, the most active ventifact formation occurs on sloped or elevated topography, where windflow is accelerated and particle kinetic energy and flux are increased. Integrated 0 together, these observations point to significant aeolian 0 modification of rocks on Mars and cast doubt on whether many primary textures resulting from other processes are preserved. Experimental simulations of abrasion in the presence of abundant sand indicate that

  15. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 56.3203 Section 56.3203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and...

  16. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 56.3203 Section 56.3203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and...

  17. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 56.3203 Section 56.3203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and...

  18. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 56.3203 Section 56.3203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and...

  19. 30 CFR 56.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 56.3203 Section 56.3203 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and...

  20. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  1. LONGWAVE THERMAL INFRARED SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN INDIVIDUAL ROCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6 - 11.6 µm) with a spatial resolution less than 5 mm at a range of 10 m was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra of individual rock surfaces. The rocks were obtained commercially, were ...

  2. Influence of Carbon on the Electrical Properties of Crustal Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, E. A.

    2002-11-19

    The report summarizes work to determine the nature and distribution of carbon on microcracks in crystalline rocks by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. It also summarizes the results of a workshop devoted to investigating how carbon in rocks influences electrical conductivity and whether carbon on fracture surfaces can account for the electrical conductivity structure of the crust.

  3. Finished surface texture, abrasion resistance, and porosity of Aspa glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Smales, R; Joyce, K

    1978-11-01

    1. With the finishing agents tested Concise had a smoother surface texture than Aspa. 2. The smoothest surface was on Concise polymerized against a Mylar matrix strip. The smoothest surface for Aspa was obtained with a silicon carbide disk. 3. Aspa abraded about three times as rapidly by volume as Concise when tested by a two-body abrasion method. 4. Significantly more air bubbles were entrapped by hand mixing within Aspa than within Concise. 5. Controlled clinical studies of the glass-ionomer cements are needed before they can be fully evaluated as restorative materials. PMID:281506

  4. Copolyimide Surface Modifying Agents for Particle Adhesion Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Marine biofouling, insect adhesion on aircraft surfaces, microbial contamination of sterile environments, and particle contamination all present unique challenges for which researchers have adopted an array of mitigation strategies. Particulate contamination is of interest to NASA regarding exploration of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.1 Lunar dust compromised seals, clogged filters, abraded visors and space suit surfaces, and was a significant health concern during the Apollo missions.2 Consequently, NASA has instituted a multi-faceted approach to address dust including use of sacrificial surfaces, active mitigation requiring the use of an external energy source, and passive mitigation utilizing materials with an intrinsic resistance to surface contamination. One passive mitigation strategy is modification of a material s surface energy either chemically or topographically. The focus of this paper is the synthesis and evaluation of novel copolyimide materials with surface modifying agents (SMA, oxetanes) enabling controlled variation of surface chemical composition.

  5. Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergrift, T.L.

    1995-06-01

    To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

  6. A Refined Model for Solid Particle Rock Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure for the estimation of distribution parameters of a Weibull distribution model K 1 = f( K Ic 12/4 / σ C 23/4 ) for solid particle erosion, as recently suggested in Rock Mech Rock Eng, doi: 10.1007/s00603-014-0658-x, 2014, is derived. The procedure is based on examinations of elastic-plastically responding rocks (rhyolite, granite) and plastically responding rocks (limestone, schist). The types of response are quantified through SEM inspections of eroded surfaces. Quantitative numbers for the distribution parameter K 1 are calculated for 30 rock materials, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties. The ranking according to the parameter K 1 is related to qualitative rock classification schemes. A modified proposal for the erosion of schist due to solid particle impingement at normal incidence is introduced.

  7. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  8. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  9. West Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock exposures in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Most of west Candor's interior includes exposures of layered rock with very few superimposed impact craters. The rock may be very ancient, but the lack of craters suggests that the erosion of these materials is on-going.

    Location near: 6.3oS, 76.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  10. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-439, 1 August 2003

    Gale Crater, located in the Aeolis region near 5.5oS, 222oW, contains a mound of layered sedimentary rock that stands higher than the rim of the crater. This giant mound suggests that the entire crater was not only once filled with sediment, it was also buried beneath sediment. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the eroded remains of the sedimentary rock that once filled Gale Crater. The layers form terraces; wind has eroded the material to form the tapered, pointed yardang ridges seen here. The small circular feature in the lower right quarter of the picture is a mesa that was once a small meteor impact crater that was filled, buried, then exhumed from within the sedimentary rock layers exposed here. This image is illuminated from the left.

  11. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  12. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  13. Digital carbonate rock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  14. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  15. Layered Rocks In Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), image shows exposures of finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in western Melas Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Rocks similar to these occur in neighboring west Candor Chasma, as well. The picture is located near 9.1oS, 74.5oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  16. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Rock Outcrops near Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in a pitted and eroded region just northeast of Hellas Planitia. The light-toned materials are most likely sedimentary rocks deposited early in martian history (but long after the Hellas Basin formed by a giant asteroid or comet impact). The scene also includes a plethora of large dark-toned, windblown ripples. The image is located near 27.2oS, 280.7oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  18. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  20. Layered Rocks in Ritchey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 May 2004 This March 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light- and dark-toned layered rock outcrops on the floor of Ritchey Crater, located near 28.9oS, 50.8oW. Some or all of these rocks may be sedimentary in origin. Erosion has left a couple of buttes standing on a more erosion-resistant plain. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  1. Remnant Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    29 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of small yardangs -- wind eroded hills -- on the plains immediately west of Meridiani Planum. These yardangs are the remains of layered, sedimentary rock that once covered this area. The few craters visible in this 3 km (1.9 mi) -wide scene are all exhumed from beneath the rocks that comprise the yardang hills. The image is located near 0.4oS, 7.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the picture from the lower left.

  2. Layered Rocks of Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    04 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops exposed by erosion in southern Melas Chasma, one of the major Valles Marineris troughs. Such outcrops are common in southern Melas; they resemble the rock outcrops seen in some of the chaotic terrains and other Valles Marineris chasms. This image is located near 11.9oS, 74.6oW, and is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Diverse Rock Named Squash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image from the Sojourner rover's right front camera was taken on Sol 27. The Pathfinder lander is seen at middle left. The large rock at right, nicknamed 'Squash', exhibits a diversity of textures. It looks very similar to a conglomerate, a type of rock found on Earth that forms from sedimentary processes.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  4. Mars Exploration Rovers' Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorevan, S.; Myrick, T.; Davis, K.; Ji, J.; Bartlett, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Arafat, T.

    2003-04-01

    Each of the twin 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers will be equipped with a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) designed and tested by Honeybee Robotics. The RAT is a robotic grinding tool and science instrument about the size of a soda can and weighing less than 690 grams that is carried by the robotic arm or Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) of the rover. The primary purpose of the RAT is to remove the dust and surface rind from Mars rock targets to reveal the underlying petrographic features. After the RAT is placed and preloaded against the target rock by the IDD, all operations of the RAT are performed autonomously. Using three small motors to drive the rotation, revolve and z-axis subassemblies the RAT removes a 45 mm diameter, 5 mm deep patch of rock. The RAT has a resin-bonded diamond abrasion wheel and two brushes to provide a clean observation surface for the three surface instruments - APXS, Microscopic Imager and Moessbauer Spectrometer. Detailed design and operation descriptions, as well as recent qualification and operational testing results will be presented.

  5. Variability of visible and near-infrared spectra of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofang; Wang, Runsheng; Cheng, Jicheng; Zhang, Zonnggui

    1998-08-01

    Although characteristics of visible and near-infrared spectra (0.4 - 2.5 micrometer) of rocks are dominated by electronic processes and molecular vibration processes that is related to chemical composition and structure of rocks, external behavior of spectra of rocks is adjusted by some factors, such as environmental conditions, physical structure of surface and viewing geometry, etc. The spectra of rocks can vary with the changes of these factors to a certain extent. It is obvious that variability of spectra of ground objects would degrade the interpretability of remote sensing images, and especially degrade the effectiveness of techniques of discriminating rocks based on remote sensing spectral features and spectral indexes to a large extent. To discriminate earth surface mineralogy and lithology more effectively and efficiently by remote sensing, especially by hyperspectral remote sensing, requires a good knowledge of variability of spectra of rocks. This paper describes and analyzes variability of reflectance spectra of rocks sampled in Zhangjiakou district of Hebei Province of China, under different light incident direction and incident angle, viewing direction and viewing angle, surface forms of rocks, grades of samples, and types and extents of weathering, etc.

  6. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  7. An engineering rock classification to evaluate seismic rock-fall susceptibility and its application to the Wasatch front

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, E.L.; Noble, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The authors examine the characteristics of rock slopes that make them susceptible to failures caused by earthquakes. They discuss these characteristics, namely the fracture and joint properties that define the structural behavior of a rock mass at the surface, and then present an empirical engineering classification or ranking system that rates the relative seismic susceptibility of rock masses. They next apply the engineering classification in a case study of seismically-triggered rock falls in the Mammoth Lakes area. The engineering classification is correlated with the concentration of seismically-triggered rock falls, and the resulting statistical model can be used to predict the probability of a rock fall for a given magnitude earthquake. Finally, they apply the classification and probability analysis to similar slopes in the Wasatch Range near Salt Lake City and evaluate the relative susceptibility of slopes in this area to seismically-induced failure.

  8. Detection of anorthosite rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Flahaut, J.; Ody, A.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of Mars is primarily made up of basaltic (volcanic) rocks comprised of pyroxene, olivine and intermediate felsic plagioclase minerals [e.g. 1,2] and additionally a smaller fraction of sedimentary rocks, at times composed of hydrated salt and clay minerals [3,4]. A few localized eruptive sequences may indicate some compositional evolution from basaltic to dacitic rocks [1], but these remain in essence volcanic rocks. Using the CRISM (Compact Imaging Reconnaissance Spectrometer for Mars) near-infrared imaging spectrometer orbiting Mars [5], we report the detection of a new rock type on Mars, anorthosite. Anorthosite is a highly felsic (>90% plagioclase, <10% mafic minerals) non-volcanic igneous rock which peculiar composition requires very specific formation processes. On Earth, anorthosite is a rare rock found mostly in plutonic rocks in continental areas sharing locations with granitoid rocks. Anorthosite is also a major component of the lunar crust and ubiquitous in the lunar highlands where it is interpreted to be the result of the crystallisation of the primordial magma ocean of the Moon > 4.3 Gyrs ago [6]. At least 8 anorthosite exposures have been found scattered over the southern highlands of Mars. These are found in the rims of large (D > 50 km) craters or as outcrops in massif units. The unit age for these anorthosite exposures places their formation early in the planet's history (> 4 Gyrs). The massifs exposures are interpreted as deep crustal material uplifted from the Hellas basin forming event [7], which together with the crater rim exposures, suggest a formation at depth in all cases. The preferential co-occurrence of Al-rich clays mixed with several anorthosite exposures also suggests that these rocks were later altered by water at or near the surface. On Mars, there are several reasons to explain why such rocks would not have been formed during its primordial differentiation. In particular, the production of significant quantities of

  9. Fiber Bragg grating strain sensor for hard rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Caicedo, Alvaro; Nieto-Callejas, María. J.; Torres, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    Strain is an important property to be measured in rock structures such as tunnels, slopes, dams, and mining. However, commercial surface mountable fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors are packaged in planar configuration, which is not appropriate for the irregular surface of the rocks since an unacceptable bonding layer fails to transfer the strain from the rock to the FBG. As a first approach to this problem, in this work we analyze packaged FBG sensors for cylindrical samples of hard rocks. A calibration process was carried out to evaluate the performance of the packaging and bonding layer as compared to electrical resistance strain gage methods. We show the importance of both packaging and bonding layer in FBG sensor technology for measuring strain in hard rocks.

  10. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  11. Rocks of the early lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.

    1980-01-01

    Data are summarized which suggest a model for the early evolution of the lunar crust. According to the model, during the final stages of accretion, the outer part of the moon melted to form a magma ocean approximately 300 km deep. This ocean fractionated to form mafic and ultramafic cumulates at depth and an overlying anorthositic crust made up of ferroan anorthosites. Subsequent partial melting in the primitive mantle underlying the crystallized magma ocean produced melts which segregated, moved upward, intruded the primordial crust, and crystallized to form layered plutons consisting of Mg-rich plutonic rocks. Intense impact bombardment at the lunar surface mixed and melted the rocks of the two suites to form a thick layer of granulated debris, granulitic breccias, and impact-melt rocks.

  12. Exploring fault rocks at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of a fault are strongly dependent on mineralogy and microstructure of the fault rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, combined with optical and scanning electron microscopies (OM and SEM, respectively), are the conventional tools to investigate bulk mineralogy and microstructures of the fault rocks. However, fault rocks are often formed by ultrafine-grained minerals (below 1 - 2 microns, i.e., below the resolution limits of OM and SEM), requiring the use of a high-resolution technique, such as the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that combines images, diffraction and chemical data, down to the nanoscale. Here, I summarize a few examples of TEM study on fault rocks, obtained from both nature and deformation experiments and covering different kinds of rocks, from carbonates to ultramafics and quartz-feldspatic rocks. In particular: 1) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of fault core samples from the Zuccale low-angle normal fault (Elba Island, Italy; carbonatic protolite). TEM investigation showed large amounts of oriented and interconnected talc lamellae, affected by intense interlayer delamination, giving rise to "sublamellae" down to 10 - 20 nm thick. This peculiar nanotexture suggests easy frictional sliding along an almost infinite number of sliding surfaces, thus explaining the weakness of this fault. 2) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural characterization of the slip zones produced by high-velocity friction experiments on carbonatic and ultramafic rocks. TEM investigation of the slip zones revealed thermal decomposition (by frictional heating) of the starting minerals (dolomite and antigorite, respectively), and allowed the accurate characterization of the high-temperature, ultrafine-grained mineral assemblages (grain size from a few nm to 200 nm). 3) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of a natural pseudotachylite in quartz-feldspatic rocks (northern Victoria land, Antarctica), showing thermal

  13. Modeling Transport of Viruses in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Mondal, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are frequently used for water supply for human consumption. In many instances the fractured rock aquifers are vulnerable to contamination by pathogens, including viruses, due to co-location of on-site septic systems, wastewater discharges, biosolids and agricultural activities. Approximately half of the illnesses associated with groundwater consumption in the Unites States have been attributed to viral contamination. A number of these cases have been related to transport of viruses from septic systems to drinking water wells. Despite the potential for rapid transport of viruses through rock fractures to drinking water wells, the understanding of virus transport in fractured rock is limited. In particular, the impacts of virus size, fracture aperture variability and roughness, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and geochemical conditions have not been well studied. In this study, a multidimensional model for virus transport in variable aperture fractures is presented. The model is applied to laboratory experiments on transport of virus-sized latex microspheres (0.02 and 0.2 microns) and bacteriophages (MS2 and PR772) in artificially fractured dolomite rocks. In these experiments significant impacts of particle size, fracture characteristics, groundwater velocity, and geochemistry were observed. Given the variability in aperture distribution and associated spatial variation in groundwater flow field, one-dimensional models were not suitable for a comprehensive evaluation of the mechanisms governing the microsphere and bacteriophage transport. Various relationships for virus retention (attachment and detachment) are evaluated to provide insight into the governing processes in virus transport in fractured rock. In addition, the role of virus size, fracture aperture variability, fracture roughness, fracture surface charge, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and ionic strength in virus transport are evaluated. Scale-up to the field is

  14. Electrical properties of dry rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, H.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism by which atmospheric moisture affects the conductivity and dielectric constant of rock specimens was studied in time and frequency domains. It is suggested that adsorbed water molecules alter the surface conductivity in a manner similar to that observed in semiconductors and insulators. Powdered basalts show a low-frequency dispersion produced by the atmospheric moisture remaining in the pore system of the sample in a high vacuum; this effect is attributed to isolated adsorption centers. Simulated lunar permafrost at 100 K and a vacuum of 10 to the -8th power torr together with data on lunar samples contaminated with atmospheric moisture and the dielectric properties of ice at various temperatures indicate that, if permafrost exists in the moon it should present a relaxation peak at approximately 300 Hz; for temperatures up to 263 K it may go up to 20 KHz. It is concluded that in order to have electrical steady state conditions in rock samples it is necessary to have volume charge accumulations at interfaces within the sample and at the electrode sample interface. A method for measuring heterogeneous dielectrics with non-negligible ohmic and dielectric conductivities is proposed and experimentally verified.

  15. Multisensor classification of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane

    1988-01-01

    A comparison is made between linear discriminant analysis and supervised classification results based on signatures from the Landsat TM, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and airborne SAR, alone and combined into extended spectral signatures for seven sedimentary rock units exposed on the margin of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Results from a linear discriminant analysis showed that training-area classification accuracies based on the multisensor data were improved an average of 15 percent over TM alone, 24 percent over TIMS alone, and 46 percent over SAR alone, with similar improvement resulting when supervised multisensor classification maps were compared to supervised, individual sensor classification maps. When training area signatures were used to map spectrally similar materials in an adjacent area, the average classification accuracy improved 19 percent using the multisensor data over TM alone, 2 percent over TIMS alone, and 11 percent over SAR alone. It is concluded that certain sedimentary lithologies may be accurately mapped using a single sensor, but classification of a variety of rock types can be improved using multisensor data sets that are sensitive to different characteristics such as mineralogy and surface roughness.

  16. Automated igneous rock identifiers for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Gazis, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Alena, R.; Hart, S. D.; Horton, A.

    2003-04-01

    A key task for human or robotic explorers on the surface of Mars is choosing which particular rock or mineral samples should be selected for more intensive study. The usual challenges of such a task are compounded by the lack of sensory input available to a suited astronaut or the limited downlink bandwidth available to a rover. Additional challenges facing a human mission include limited surface time and the similarities in appearance of important minerals (e.g. carbonates, silicates, salts). Yet the choice of which sample to collect is critical. To address this challenge we are developing science analysis algorithms to interface with a Geologist's Field Assistant (GFA) device that will allow robotic or human remote explorers to better sense and explore their surroundings during limited surface excursions [1]. We aim for our algorithms to interpret spectral and imaging data obtained by various sensors. Our algorithms, for example, will identify key minerals, rocks, and sediments from mid-IR, Raman, and visible/near-IR spectra as well as from high-resolution and microscopic images to help interpret data and to provide high-level advice to the remote explorer. A top-level system will consider multiple inputs from raw sensor data output by imagers and spectrometers (visible/near-IR, mid-IR, and Raman) as well as human opinion to identify rock and mineral samples. Our prototype image analysis system identifies some igneous rocks from texture and color information. Spectral analysis algorithms have also been developed that successfully identify quartz, silica polymorphs, calcite, pyroxene, and jarosite from both visible/near-IR and mid-IR spectra. We have also developed spectral recognizers that identify high-iron pyroxenes and iron-bearing minerals using visible/near-IR spectra only. We are building a combined image and spectral database of rocks and minerals with which to continue development of our algorithms. Future plans include developing algorithms to identify

  17. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical and…

  18. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  19. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  20. The River Rock School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  1. Prestressed rock truss

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.F.

    1981-06-23

    A roof support system for mines in which prestressed rock trusses are bolted to the roof of the mine with roof bolts which each extend beyond the width of the mine gallery and the method of installing said trusses into position.

  2. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of Repaired Composites Using Surface Treatments and Repair Materials: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Hemadri, M; Saritha, G; Rajasekhar, V; Pachlag, K Amit; Purushotham, R; Reddy, Veera Kishore Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhancement of bond strength between new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness of old composite to promote mechanical interlocking and subsequent coating with bonding agents to improve surface wetting and chemical bonding. So this study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface treatments and repair materials on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite repairs The mode of failure of repaired composites whether cohesive or adhesive was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: The substrates for 60 composite specimens were fabricated and aged with water treatment and subjected to various surface treatments. The surface treatment regimens used in the study were: No surface treatment, abraded with diamond bur, air abraded (sandblasted) with 50 µ aluminum oxide particles. Specimens were then repaired with fresh composite using either Clearfil™ repair or all-bond two adhesive systems. Specimens were water stored, thermocycled and tested for SBS using universal testing machine. Fractured specimens were then examined under stereomicroscope to determine the mode of failure. Results: It was clearly showed that surface roughening of the aged composite substrate with air abrasion, followed by the application of Clearfil™ repair adhesive system (Group IIIa) yielded the highest repair bond strength (32.3 ± 2.2 MPa). Conclusion: Surface treatment with air abrasion followed by bonding with Clearfil™ repair adhesive system can be attempted clinically for the repair of composite restorations. PMID:25628478

  4. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  5. Endolithic pedogenesis and rock varnish on massive crystalline rocks in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelov, N. S.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Shorkunov, I. G.; Zazovskaya, E. P.; Cherkinsky, A. E.

    2012-10-01

    Desert varnish and endolithic organisms are two widespread phenomena that have been studied in detail separately; their interaction and their genetic relationships have virtually escaped the attention of researchers. Both phenomena are of indubitable interest for pedology: endolithic organisms as an agent of soil formation and rock varnish as a probable product of pedogenesis. It is argued that the system of endolithic organisms, their functioning products, and the rock has all the features inherent to soils: the rock layer subjected to the influence of external abiogenic factors and living organisms dwelling in the rock and synthesizing and decomposing organic substances. The action of biogenic and abiogenic agents leads to the in situ transformation of the rock with the accumulation and removal of the products of this transformation and with the development of vertical heterogeneity in the form of microhorizons composing the soil microprofile. Instrumental measurements indicate that the carbon content in the endolithic horizons developed by biota in granitoid rocks of the Larsemann Hills oasis varies from 0.2 to 3.3%, the nitrogen content in these horizons varies from 0.02 to 0.47%, and the radiocarbon age of their organic matter reaches 480 ± 25 yrs. The products of the pedogenesis are represented by fine earth materials and by abundant and often multilayered films and coatings on the rock surface and on the lower sides of the desquamation (spalling) plates. Scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microprobe analysis indicates that the major elements composing these films are O, C, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, and S. It is shown that the films of the rock varnish and the organomineral films in the fissured zone of the rock under the plate with endolithic communities have certain similarity in their morphology and composition: the films of the rock varnish also contain biota (dead cells or cells in the dormant state), and their botryoidal structure is similar to the

  6. Rock preference of planulae of jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus 1758) for settlement in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won Duk; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Han, Changhoon; Park, Won Gyu

    2014-06-01

    Planulae of Aurelia aurita were exposed to 11 types of rocks (basalt, gabbro, granite, rhyolite, sandstone, limestone, conglomerate, gneiss, quartzite, marble and schist) to examine their attachment preference among rock material and position. Numbers of attached polyps was the highest on marble and the least on limestone. Their preference with regard to settling position was the same among the rocks, showing the highest density of polyps on the underside (88.5%) compared to upper (23.6%) and perpendicular sides (10.3%) of rock. The results showed that while position preference is more important than rock property, higher numbers of polyps were observed in rocks with a medium surface hardness.

  7. 30 CFR 816.73 - Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.73 Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills. The regulatory authority may approve the alternative method of disposal of excess durable rock spoil by gravity placement...

  8. 30 CFR 816.73 - Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.73 Disposal of excess spoil: Durable rock fills. The regulatory authority may approve the alternative method of disposal of excess durable rock spoil by gravity placement...

  9. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.L.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Gorevan, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.; Kusack, A.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Ruff, S.W.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Radionuclide transport and retardation in rock fracture and crushed rock column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltä, P.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hakanen, M.; Huitti, T.; Hautojärvi, A.; Lindberg, A.

    1997-04-01

    Transport and retardation of non-sorbing tritiated water and chloride and slightly sorbing sodium was studied in Syyry area SY-KR7 mica gneiss, in altered porous tonalite and in fresh tonalite. Experiments were performed using dynamic fracture and crushed rock column methods. Static batch method for sodium was introduced to compare retardation values from static and dynamic experiments. The 14C-PMMA method was used to study the pore structure of matrices. The pore aperture distribution was evaluated from Hg-porosimetry determinations and the surface areas were determined using the B.E.T. method. The flow characteristics and transport behavior of tracers were interpreted using a numerical compartment model for dispersion. The effect of matrix diffusion was calculated using an analytical solution to the advection-matrix diffusion problem in which surface retardation was taken into account. Radionuclide transport behavior in rock fractures was explained on the basis of rock structure.

  11. Effects of bioleaching on the mechanical and chemical properties of waste rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Sheng-Hua; Wu, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Shao-Yong; Ai, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Bioleaching processes cause dramatic changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of waste rocks, and play an important role in metal recovery and dump stability. This study focused on the characteristics of waste rocks subjected to bioleaching. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of rock properties during the bioleaching process. Mechanical behaviors of the leached waste rocks, such as failure patterns, normal stress, shear strength, and cohesion were determined through mechanical tests. The results of SEM imaging show considerable differences in the surface morphology of leached rocks located at different parts of the dump. The mineralogical content of the leached rocks reflects the extent of dissolution and precipitation during bioleaching. The dump porosity and rock size change under the effect of dissolution, precipitation, and clay transportation. The particle size of the leached rocks decreased due to the loss of rock integrity and the conversion of dry precipitation into fine particles.

  12. Preparation for Moving a Rock on Mars, Stereo View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander enlarged a trench beside a rock called 'Headless' during the mission's 115th Martian day (Sept. 20, 2008) in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image later that afternoon, showing the enlarged trench and the rock.

    The robotic arm successfully moved the rock two days later.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape. The trench, called 'Neverland,' was excavated to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep near the rock. The ground surface between the rock and the lip of the trench slopes downward about 3 degrees toward the trench.

    The left-eye and right-eye images combined into this stereo view were taken at about 4:35 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The scene appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses. The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Alkaline volcanic rocks from the Columbia Hills, Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Ruff, S.W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F., III; Herkenhoff, K.; Gellert, Ralf; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Squyres, S. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; McCoy, T.J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Irvine, Backstay, and Wishstone are the type specimens for three classes of fine-grained or fragmental, relatively unaltered rocks with distinctive thermal emission spectra, found as float on the flanks of the Columbia Hills. Chemical analyses indicate that these rocks are mildly alkaline basalt, trachybasalt, and tephrite, respectively. Their mineralogy consists of Na- and K-rich feldspar(s), low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, ferroan olivine, Fe-Ti (and possibly Cr) oxides, phosphate, and possibly glass. The texture of Wishstone is consistent with a pyroclastic origin, whereas Irvine and Backstay are lavas or possibly dike rocks. Chemical compositions of these rocks plot on or near liquid lines of descent for most elements calculated for Adirondack class rocks (olivine-rich basalts from the Gusev plains) at various pressures from 0.1 to 1.0 GPa. We infer that Wishstone-, Backstay-, and Irvine-class magmas may have formed by fractionation of primitive, oxidized basaltic magma similar to Adirondack-class rocks. The compositions of all these rocks reveal that the Gusev magmatic province is alkaline, distinct from the subalkaline volcanic rocks thought to dominate most of the planet's surface. The fact that differentiated volcanic rocks were not encountered on the plains prior to ascending Husband Hill may suggest a local magma source for volcanism beneath Gusev crater. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. The initiation of brittle faults in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.

    2015-08-01

    Faults in the upper crust initiate from pre-existing (inherited) or precursory (early-formed) structures and typically grow by the mechanical interaction and linkage of these structures. In crystalline rock, rock architecture, composition, cooling, and exhumation influence the initiation of faults, with contrasting styles observed in plutonic rocks, extrusive igneous rocks, and foliated metamorphic rocks. Brittle fault growth in granitic rock is commonly controlled by the architecture of inherited joints or preexisting dikes. In basalt, abundant joints control the surface expression of faulting, and enhanced compliance due to abundant joints leads to folding and deformation asymmetry in the fault zone. Highly reactive mafic minerals likely become rapidly evolving fault rocks. In foliated metamorphic rocks, fault initiation style is strongly influenced by strength anisotropy relative to the principal stress directions, with fracturing favored when the foliation is aligned with the directions of principal stress. The continuity of micas within the foliation also influences the micromechanics of fault initiation. Brittle kink bands are an example of a strain-hardening precursory structure unique to foliated rock. Each of these fault initiation processes produces different initial fault geometry and spatial heterogeneity that influence such properties as fault permeability and seismogenesis.

  15. Joint Commission on rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A joint commission on Rock Properties for Petroleum Engineers (RPPE) has been established by the International Society of Rock Mechanics and the Society of Petroleum Engineers to set up data banks on the properties of sedimentary rocks encountered during drilling. Computer-based data banks of complete rock properties will be organized for sandstones (GRESA), shales (ARSHA) and carbonates (CARCA). The commission hopes to access data sources from members of the commission, private companies and the public domain.

  16. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  17. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: A case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-06-01

    presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is a controversial issue. The formations of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principal tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is composed of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here it is shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e., ≤ 0.1 GPa), mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites, whereas anhydrous models suggest that there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as "continental nucleation" sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  18. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: a case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is debated. The formation of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principle tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is comprised of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here is it shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e. ≤ 0.1 GPa) mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites whereas anhydrous models suggest there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as ';continental nucleation' sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  19. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  20. Chemistry of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater from the alpha particle x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gellert, R; Rieder, R; Anderson, R C; Brückner, J; Clark, B C; Dreibus, G; Economou, T; Klingelhöfer, G; Lugmair, G W; Ming, D W; Squyres, S W; D'Uston, C; Wänke, H; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater. PMID:15297665

  1. Mechanical changes in thawing permafrost rocks and their influence on rock stability at the Zugspitze summit, Germany - a research concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamot, Philipp; Scandroglio, Riccardo; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    strength tests as well as P-wave velocity measurements of dozens of frozen and unfrozen Zugspitze limestone samples. Our future tasks are as follows: i) To assess the spatial permafrost distribution in the slope we plan to conduct further laboratory-calibrated ERT and SRT. A dense rock temperature measuring network as well as nearby weather stations will supply input data for a simple thermal model of the rock slope. ii) To assess the spatial and temporal pattern of rock instability at the test site we will continue measuring discontinuity movements. iii) Undertaking rock-mechanical laboratory tests on Zugspitze limestone and to focus on temperature related changes of friction along rock discontinuities without ice infill and fracture toughness KIIc of intact rock bridges. These tests will be carried out with a direct shear box in unfrozen and frozen state. The measurement of P-wave velocity of the same rock samples will help to upscale rock toughness values to the rock slope at the study site. We aim at developing and calibrating a discontinuum mechanical model of stability changes in thawing permafrost rocks. Krautblatter, M., Funk, D., Günzel, F. K. (2013): Why permafrost rocks become unstable: a rock-ice-mechanical model in time and space. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 876-887.

  2. Realistic Expectations for Rock Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerback, Mary Elizabeth; Azer, Nazmy

    1991-01-01

    Presents a rock classification scheme for use by beginning students. The scheme is based on rock textures (glassy, crystalline, clastic, and organic framework) and observable structures (vesicles and graded bedding). Discusses problems in other rock classification schemes which may produce confusion, misidentification, and anxiety. (10 references)…

  3. A look at carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, A.I. )

    1994-03-01

    Important ore deposits are found in carbonate rocks, and large volumes of oil and gas are also produced from carbonate rocks on a worldwide basis. Reservoir types and productive capability are most often related to rock type and the facies to which the rock belongs. Broad new understanding of carbonate rocks came with the publication of Classification of Carbonate Rocks-A Symposium (AAPG Memoir 1, 1962). The principal parameters of carbonate rocks are (1) chemical composition, (2) grade size, (3) sorting and packing, (4) identification of grains in the rock, (5) cement, (6) color, (7) alteration of recrystallization, and (8) porosity. Original porosity in carbonate rocks relates to kind and packing of original particles. Secondary porosity is reduced by infilling that usually relates to some particles, or is enhanced because some types of grains are dissolved. Carbonate sediments are organic detritus. The range of solubility of organic detritus is very large. Fossils present in the carbonates are clues as to the source of the detritus in the rock. Additional research is needed in faunal relations of facies and of rock types. Ore recovery, well completion, and EOR are more successful when the parameters of carbonate rocks are extensively studied. A simplified approach to carbonate description is discussed.

  4. Soil and rock 'Yogi'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several possible targets of study for rover Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 2. The smaller rock at left has been dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' while the larger rock at right, approximately 3-4 meters from the lander, is now nicknamed 'Yogi.' Barnacle Bill is scheduled to be the first object of study for the APXS. Portions of a petal and deflated airbag are also visible at lower right.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  5. Sedimentary Rock Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    16 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded layered rock outcrops in a crater north of Meridiani Planum near 2.7oN, 359.1oW. The dozens and dozens of sedimentary rock layers of repeated thickness and similar physical properties at this location suggest that they may have been deposited in a lacustrine (lake) setting. The crater in which these layers occur may once have been completely filled and buried, as is the case for many craters in the Sinus Meridiani region. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  6. Sedimentary Rock Near Coprates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003

    This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the books of martian history is found. This picture is located near 15.2oS, 60.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  7. Schiaparelli's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 October 2004 Schiaparelli Basin is a large, 470 kilometer (292 miles) impact crater located east of Sinus Meridiani. The basin might once have been the site of a large lake--that is, if the sedimentary rocks exposed on its northwestern floor were deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meter per pixel (5 ft per pixel) view of some of the light-toned, finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in northwestern Schiaparelli. The image is located near 1.0oS, 346.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  8. Poroelasticity of rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.

    1992-03-01

    The research program is an experimental study of static and dynamic poroelastic behavior of rocks. Measurements of Skempton's coefficient and undrained Poisson's ratio together with drained bulk modulus and shear modulus will provide a complete set of the four poroelastic moduli. Stress coupling to fluid flow in fractured rock can occur also through changes of fracture permeability due to fracture compressibility. Numerical models that include this effect will be compared with standard double porosity models of fluid extraction from oil reservoirs. Wave velocity and attenuation measurements will be made from seismic to ultrasonic frequencies to establish a phenomenological model of the effects of permeability, porosity and saturation for seismic exploration of oil and gas and for seismic characterization of an aquifer for environmental restoration and waste remediation.

  9. Terby Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 December 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Terby Crater, located near 27.7oS, 285.4oW. The layered sediments in Terby are several kilometers thick, attesting to a long history of deposition in this ancient basin. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  10. Eroded Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-372, 26 May 2003

    This high resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, layered sedimentary rock exposures in an unnamed western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. The dark material is windblown sand; much of the erosion of these layers may have also been caused by wind. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  11. Ripples and Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rock outcrops and large dark-toned, windblown ripples in Aram Chaos.

    Location near: 3.0oN, 20.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Northern Summer

  12. Iani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    23 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rocks exposed by erosion in the Iani Chaos region of Mars.

    Location near: 4.2oS, 18.7oW Image width: 1 km (0.6 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  13. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in southwestern Melas Chasma, one of the troughs of the vast Valles Marineris system. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left; it is located near 9.8oS, 76.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  14. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  15. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  16. Experiments and Spectral Studies of Martian Volcanic Rocks: Implications for the Origin of Pathfinder Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Mustard, Jack; Weitz, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The composition and spectral properties of the Mars Pathfinder rocks and soils together with the identification of basaltic and andesitic Mars terrains based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data raised interesting questions regarding the nature and origin of Mars surface rocks. We have investigated the following questions: (1) are the Pathfinder rocks igneous and is it possible these rocks could have formed by known igneous processes, such as equilibrium or fractional crystallization, operating within SNC magmas known to exist on Mars? If it is possible, what P (depth) and PH2O conditions are required? (2) whether TES-based interpretations of plagioclase-rich basalt and andesitic terrains in the south and north regions of Mars respectively are unique. Are the surface compositions of these regions plagioclase-rich, possibly indicating the presence of old AI-rich crust of Mars, or are the spectra being affected by something like surface weathering processes that might determine the spectral pyroxene to plagioclase ratio?

  17. Salty Martian Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which produces a spectrum, or fingerprint, of chemicals in martian rocks and soil. The instrument contains a radioisotope, curium-244, that bombards a designated area with alpha particles and X-rays, causing a cascade of reflective fluorescent X-rays. The energies of these fluorescent X-rays are unique to each atom in the periodic table, allowing scientists to determine a target's chemical composition.

    Both 'Tarmac' and 'McKittrick' are located within the small crater where Opportunity landed. The full spectra are expressed as X-ray intensity (logarithmic scale) versus energy. When comparing two spectra, the relative intensities at a given energy are proportional to the elemental concentrations, however these proportionality factors can be complex. To be precise, scientists extensively calibrate the instrument using well-analyzed geochemical standards.

    Both the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer and the rock abrasion tool are located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm.

  18. Example of fracture characterization in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, R.K.

    1981-03-01

    A detailed study of geologic discontinuities for an underground heater test in highly fractured granitic rock is reported. Several prominent shear fractures were delineated within a 6 x 30 x 15 m rock mass by correlating surface mapping and borehole fracture logs. Oblique-reverse faulting is suspected on at least one of the surfaces, and its inferred borehole intercepts appear to be collinear in the direction of slickensiding observed in the field. Four distinct joint sets were identified, one of which coincides with the shear fractures. Another lies nearly horizontal, and two others are steeply inclined and orthogonal. Fracture lengths and spacings for the four joint sets are represented by lognormal probability distributions.

  19. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, Lee K; Gillespie, Alan; French, Andrew; Danilina, Iryna

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  20. Spirit's First Grinding of a Rock on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The round, shallow depression in this image resulted from history's first grinding of a rock on Mars. The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Spirit rover ground off the surface of a patch 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter on a rock called Adirondack. The hole is 2.65 millimeters (0.1 inch) deep, exposing fresh interior material of the rock for close inspection with the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers on the robotic arm. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera, providing a quick visual check of the success of the grinding. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  1. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2000-01-01

    Resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM) and luminous signals prior to or during earthquakes have been reported, in addition to ground uplift and tilt, and to changes in the seismic wave propagation parameters. However, no physical model exists that ties these diverse phenomena together. Through time-resolved impacts experiments it has been observed that, when igneous rocks (gabbro, diorite, granite) are impacted at low velocities (approx. 100 m/sec), highly mobile electronic charge carriers are generated, spreading from a small volume near the impact point, causing electric potentials, EM and light emission. The rock becomes momentarily conductive. When impacted at higher velocities (approx. 1.5 km/sec), the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. At the same time, the rock volume is filled with mobile charge carriers, and a positive surface potential is registered. During the next 1-2 msec the surface potential oscillates, due to electron injection from ground. These observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g. defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, that can travel via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals at the speed of a phonon-mediated charge transfer. Before activation, the positive hole charge carriers lay dormant in form of positive hole pairs, PHP, electrically inactive, chemically equivalent to peroxy links in the structures of constituent minerals. PHPs are introduced by way of hydroxyl (O3Si-OH) incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals when they crystallize in water-laden environments. Given that sound waves of even relatively low intensity appear to cause PHPs dissociation, thus generating mobile positive holes, it is proposed that microfracturing during rock deformation cause PHP dissociation. Depending on where and how much the rock volume is stressed, the positive holes are expected to form fluctuating charge clouds in the

  2. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  3. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite. However, rock as any other material if exposed to exogenous processes starts to deteriorate. Especially mechanical weathering can be very intensive if rock with unsuitable rock properties is used. For long it had been believed that repeated freezing and thawing in relation to high absorption is the main reason of the rock deterioration. In Slovakia for many years the high water absorption was set as exclusion criterion for use of rocks and stones in building industry. Only after 1989 the absorption was accepted as merely informational rock property and not exclusion. The reason of the change was not the understanding of the relationship between the porosity and rock deterioration, but more or less good experiences with some high porous rocks used in constructions exposed to severe weather conditions and proving a lack of relationship between rock freeze-thaw resistivity and water absorption. Results of the recent worldwide research suggest that understanding a resistivity of rocks against deterioration is hidden not in the absorption but in the structure of rock pores in relation to thermodynamic properties of pore water and tensile strength of rocks and rock minerals. Also this article presents some results of research on rock deterioration and pore structure performed on 88 rock samples. The results divide the rocks tested into two groups - group N in which the pore water does not freeze

  4. Subsidence and collapse sinkholes in soluble rock: a numerical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko; Hiller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, anhydrite, and salt are prone to subsidence and the sudden creation of collapse sinkholes. The reason for this behaviour stems from the solubility of the rock: Water percolating through fissures and bedding partings can remove material from the rock walls and thus increase the permeability of the host rock by orders of magnitudes. This process occurs on time scales of 1,000-100,000 years, resulting in enlarged fractures, voids and cavities, which then carry flow efficiently through the rock. The enlargement of sub-surface voids to the meter-size within such short times creates mechanical conditions prone to collapse. The collapse initiates at depth, but then propagates to the surface. By means of numerical modelling, we discuss the long-term evolution of secondary porosity in gypsum rocks, resulting in zones of sub-surface voids, which then become mechanically unstable and collapse. We study two real-world case scenarios, in which we can relate field observations to our numerical model: (i) A dam-site scenario, where flow around the dam caused widespread dissolution of gypsum and subsequent subsidence of the dam and a nearby highway. (ii) A natural collapse sinkhole forming as a result of freshwater inflow into a shallow anhydrite formation with rapid evolution of voids in the sub-surface.

  5. Device Acquires and Retains Rock or Ice Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Backes, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    The Rock Baller is a sample acquisition tool that improves sample retention. The basic elements of the Rock Baller are the tool rotation axis, the hub, the two jaws, and the cutting blades, which are located on each of the jaws. The entire device rotates about the tool rotation axis, which is aligned parallel to the nominal normal direction of the parent rock surface. Both jaws also rotate about the jaw axis, which is perpendicular to the tool rotation axis, at a rate much slower than the rotation about the tool rotation axis. This movement gradually closes the jaws into a nearly continuous hemispherical shell that encloses the sample as it is cut from the parent rock. When required the jaws are opened to release the sample. The hemispherical cutting method eliminates the sample retention problems associated with existing sample acquisition methods that employ conventional cylindrical cutting. The resulting samples are hemispherical, or nearly hemispherical, and as a result the aspect ratio (sample depth relative to sample radius) is essentially fixed. This fixed sample aspect ratio may be considered a drawback of the Rock Baller method, as samples with a higher aspect ratio (more depth, less width) may be considered more scientifically valuable because such samples would allow for a broader inspection of the geological record. This aspect ratio issue can be ameliorated if the Rock Baller is paired with a device similar to the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) used on the Mars Exploration Rovers. The RAT could be used to first grind into the surface of the parent rock, after which the Rock Baller would extract a sample from a depth inside the rock that would not have been possible without first using the RAT. Other potential applications for this technology include medical applications such as the removal of tissue samples or tumors from the body, particularly during endoscopic, laparoscopic, or thoracoscopic surgeries.

  6. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    a mean value of 119.4 kN. However, the axial pull-load obtained from resin grouted rock bolts ranged from 2.9 to 110.9 kN with a mean value of 45.7 kN. Achieving relatively lower axial pull loads for resin grouted rock bolts were attributed to the tendency of resin to flow easily throughout surfaces of discontinuities. During site investigation, it was concluded that 27 of 72 resin grouted rock bolts and 8 of 56 cement grouted rock bolts were determined to lose their support capacities. According to these observations, it was found that while support recovery of cement grouted increase to 85.7%, this ratio decreased to about 62.5% for resin grouted rock bolts. When these observations and pull-out test results are considered, it can be concluded that installing cement grouted rock bolts can be more effective than resin grouted rock bolts to support mining operated in weak and heavily jointed rock masses.

  7. Helium Isotopic Compositions of Antarctic High-Mg Rocks Related to the Karoo Continental Flood Basalts: Evidence for a Depleted Upper Mantle Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, J. S.; Kurz, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The isotopic composition of helium is often considered to be one of the key elements in resolving deep mantle plume vs. upper mantle origin of hotspot-related volcanic rocks. High 3He/4He values, greater than 10 times atmospheric (Ra), are generally thought to indicate plume-related sources in the lower mantle. The use of helium isotopes in continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces has been limited by the lack of fresh rock material, poor exposures, time-integrated ingrowth of radiogenic 4He, and strong lithospheric overprinting. Vestfjella mountain range at western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, is comprised of lava flows and intrusive rocks that belong to the Jurassic (~180 Ma) Karoo continental flood basalt province, the bulk of which is exposed in southern Africa. The Karoo CFBs and related rocks show strong lithospheric influence in their geochemistry in general, but some high-Mg dikes from Vestfjella show geochemical evidence of derivation from sublithospheric sources. In an attempt to determine the first estimate for the helium isotopic composition of the Karoo mantle sources, we performed He isotopic measurements on six primitive Vestfjella dike samples collected from variably exposed nunataks. Helium was extracted by in-vacuo stepwise crushing and melting of separated and carefully hand-picked olivine phenocrysts (Ø = 0.25-1 mm; ~10 000 grains in total; abraded and unabraded fractions). The results of coupled crushing and melting measurements show evidence of both cosmogenic and radiogenic helium contributions within the olivines (i.e. by having high He contents and anomalously low or high 3He/4He released by melting), which complicates interpretation of the data. As a best estimate for the mantle isotopic composition, we use the sample with the highest amount of He released (> 50%) during the first crushing step of an abraded coarse fraction, which gave 3He/4He of 7.03 ± 0.23 (2σ) Ra. This value is indistinguishable from those measured from Southwest

  8. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  9. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-09-01

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff (Nevada Test Site).

  10. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, J.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    For almost a century, it has been recognized that the present-day thickness and areal extent of Phanerozoic sedimentary strata increase progressively with decreasing geologic age. This pattern has been interpreted either as reflecting an increase in the rate of sedimentation toward the present (Barrell, 1917; Schuchert, 1931; Ronov, 1976) or as resulting from better preservation of the younger part of the geologic record ( Gilluly, 1949; Gregor, 1968; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971a; Veizer and Jansen, 1979, 1985).Study of the rocks themselves led to similarly opposing conclusions. The observed secular (=age) variations in relative proportions of lithological types and in chemistry of sedimentary rocks (Daly, 1909; Vinogradov et al., 1952; Nanz, 1953; Engel, 1963; Strakhov, 1964, 1969; Ronov, 1964, 1982) were mostly given an evolutionary interpretation. An opposing, uniformitarian, approach was proposed by Garrels and Mackenzie (1971a). For most isotopes, the consensus favors deviations from the present-day steady state as the likely cause of secular trends.This chapter attempts to show that recycling and evolution are not opposing, but complementary, concepts. It will concentrate on the lithological and chemical attributes of sediments, but not deal with the evolution of sedimentary mineral deposits (Veizer et al., 1989) and of life ( Sepkoski, 1989), both well amenable to the outlined conceptual treatment. The chapter relies heavily on Veizer (1988a) for the sections dealing with general recycling concepts, on Veizer (2003) for the discussion of isotopic evolution of seawater, and on Morse and Mackenzie (1990) and Mackenzie and Morse (1992) for discussion of carbonate rock recycling and environmental attributes.

  11. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  12. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  13. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-12-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical , 2 and others are purely descriptive. It is surprising that there is still no simple physical explanation. By that, I mean an explanation that can be given to a high school student and one that does not involve an obscure set of complicated equations.

  14. Sedimentary Rocks in Ganges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows portions of two massifs composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock in Ganges Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris trough system. On the steeper slopes in this vista, dry talus shed from the outcrop has formed a series of dark fans. Surrounded by dark, windblown sand, these landforms are located near 8.6oS, 46.8oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  15. Aram Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of light-toned, sedimentary rock among darker-toned mesas in Aram Chaos. Dark, windblown megaripples -- large ripples -- are also present at this location.

    Location near: 3.0oN, 21.6oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  16. Sedimentary Rocks in Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a butte and several other landforms eroded into light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock in southern Melas Chasma. Melas is part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 11.8oS, 74.6oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  17. Sedimentary Rock in Candor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dozens of light- and a few dark-toned sedimentary rock layers exposed by faulting and erosion in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 6.5oS, 77.0oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  18. Ganges Rocks and Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 January 2004 The top half of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows wind-eroded remnants of sedimentary rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma, one of the troughs of the Valles Marineris system. The lower half shows a thick accumulation of dark, windblown sand. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. These features are located near 7.6oS, 49.4oW.

  19. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 August 2004 Light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops are common within the vast martian Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a recent example from southern Melas Chasma at 1.5 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) resolution. The image is located near 11.3oS, 73.9oW, and covers an area about 1.8 km (1.1 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. A dynamic ball compression test for understanding rock crushing.

    PubMed

    Huang, S; Liu, H; Xia, K

    2014-12-01

    During crushing, rock particles are subjected to complicated loading. It is desired to establish the relation between the loading and the fragmentation parameters for better understanding rock crushing mechanism. In this work, a split Hopkinson pressure bar system in combination with high speed cameras is utilized in the dynamic ball compression test, in which the spherical rock sample is adopted to avoid the shape effect. Using elasticity theory, the loading rate and the dynamic indirect tensile strength are first calculated. With the aid of the moment-trap technique and high speed cameras, the surface energy is determined for each sample. The relations between the loading rate and the fragmentation parameters, i.e., the number of fragments and the surface energy are established. The application of this method to a granitic rock shows that it is flexible and can be applied to the crushing study of generic brittle solids. PMID:25554304