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Sample records for abraham pais prize

  1. Abraham Pais Prize: Physics, History, and Biography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2014-03-01

    Each of these fields differs in obvious and not so obvious ways from the others in terms of goals, methods, purposes, and perspectives. Yet each also holds much in common with the others. Having worked in these fields and crossed the boundaries between them, I will explore in this talk not only the similarities and differences I have encountered on this journey, but also my growing appreciation of how these fields together provide a unified perspective on physics as a science and a disciple and as a vital component of our broader human culture.

  2. Abraham Pais Prize Talk: The Joy of History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, Roger H.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists and historians of physics share a common goal, the quest for understanding, but their objects are different: Physicists attempt to understand Nature, while historians attempt to understand the past, finding both the challenge and joy of history in exploring the contingencies of historical events, their dependence on scientific, biographical, sociopolitical, cultural, and other factors, and shaping them into a coherent narrative. My first example will focus on the history of the photon concept, in particular on the work of Arthur Holly Compton between 1916 and 1922 that led to his discovery of the Compton effect, whose understanding ultimately rested on a close examination of his laboratory notebooks. I will then turn to two episodes in the history of nuclear physics. The first deals with a controversy between 1922 and 1927 between Ernest Rutherford and James Chadwick at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge and Hans Pettersson and Gerhard Kirsch at the Institute for Radium Research in Vienna that involved their fundamentally different experimental observations and theoretical interpretations of the artificial disintegration of nuclei whose resolution could only be understood after uncovering crucial correspondence between the protagonists. The second episode traces George Gamow's creation and development of the liquid-drop model of the nucleus in 1928 and 1929 and its subsequent development in two stages, first by Werner Heisenberg and Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker from 1933 to 1936, and second by Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar in 1936 and 1937, both of which merged in the minds of Lise Meitner and Otto Robert Frisch at the end of 1938 to yield the correct interpretation of nuclear fission, an act of creation whose understanding rested on a detailed analysis of the published literature.

  3. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Talk: Henry Cavendish, John Michell, Weighing the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2010-03-01

    This talk is about an interaction between two 18th-century natural philosophers (physical scientists), Henry Cavendish and John Michell, and its most important outcome, the experiment of weighing the world (their name for it) using a torsion balance (our name for it). Michell was the most inventive of the 18th century English natural philosophers, and Cavendish was the first of his countrymen to possess abilities at all comparable with Newton's. By their interests and skills, they were drawn to one another. Both were universal natural philosophers, equally adept at building scientific instruments, performing experiments, constructing theory, and using mathematics; both had a penchant for exacting, quantitative work. Both also had fitful habits of publication, which did not begin to reveal the range of their work, to the mystification of later scientists and historians. Late in life, Cavendish and Michell turned their attention to the force that Newton had examined most completely, a singular triumph of his natural philosophy, the force of universal gravitation. Over the course of the 18th century, abundant evidence of attraction had been gathered from the motions of the earth, moon, planets, and comets, phenomena which span the intermediate range of masses, sizes, and distances. But in three domains of experience, involving the extreme upper and lower limits of masses and dimensions, the universality of gravitation remained an article of faith. These were the gravity of the ``fixed'' stars, the mutual attraction of terrestrial bodies, and the gravitation of light and other special substances. Michell took on himself the task of deducing observable consequences from each of these prospective instances of universal gravitation. Cavendish encouraged Michell, and he followed up the resulting observational and experimental questions. The experiment of weighing the world was the last experiment Mitchell planned and the last experiment Cavendish published. The capstone of two distinguished careers, the experiment outlived the world in which it was conceived and carried out. Today gravitation is at the center of the physics of the very small and the very large, and experiments that followed in Michell and Cavendish's footsteps find a place in it. The ``most important advance in experiments on gravitation,'' to quote an authority, ``was the introduction of the torsion balance'' by Michell and Cavendish and independently by Coulomb; ``it has been the basis of all the most significant experiments on gravitation ever since.'' Another authority traces the ``noble tradition of precision measurement to which we are heirs'' to Cavendish's experiment, which he calls the ``first modern physics experiment.''

  4. The Abraham Pais Prize Lecture: The historical Development of the Physical Concept of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammer, Max

    2007-04-01

    The Irish physicist and mathematician John Lighton Synge once (1959) proclaimed that of all physical measurements that of time is the most fundamental and its theory ``the most basic theory of all.'' Twenty years later the Belgian physicist and chemist Ilya Prigogine declared that ``the concept of time is much more complex than we thought.'' Indeed, having studied the basic notions in physics like space, mass, force, simultaneity and written on each of them a detailed monograph, I always postponed a similar treatment of the concept of time because I realized that just by being the ``most basic'' it is also the most ``complex'' of all notions in physics and therefore a rather complicated subject of research. In fact, time, as perceived by us, is both ``flowing'' and ``enduring'' and its ``passing'' always ``lasts.'' If I venture nevertheless to offer herewith a survey of the conceptual development of the notion of time, I do so because I delimit myself to the role of time only in physics and ignore as far as possible general metaphysical, psychological or biological issues. The presentation thus ignores the history of the notion of time as conceived in the myths and religions of ancient civilizations and begins, after some brief remarks about the Pythagoreans, with the theories of time as proposed by the Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle. After a critical discourse on the early proponents of an idealistic interpretation of the notion of time, like that of St. Augustine, medieval theories of time, like those which proposed the atomicity of time, are discussed. After a presentation of sixteenth century discussions of time, like that by Bruno or Gassendi, Isaac Barrow's and Isaac Newton's theories of physical time are critically analyzed. This is followed by a brief study of the conceptions of time by Locke and Berkeley and subsequently by Leibniz, who is often regarded as the first proponent of a relational or causal theory of time. Following some brief remarks about Hume's conception of time Kant's critical investigation of the notion of time is analyzed and followed by the theories of an ``arrow if time'' as a result of the existence of irreversible thermodynamic processes. After a brief discussion of Poincar'e's thesis of the conventional status of temporal metric, Einstein's interpretation of distant simultaneity and consequently his definition of time via simultaneity, as presented in his famous 1905 paper on relativity, are discussed. This is followed by some remarks on the concept of time in the general theory of relativity. A brief outline of the role of the concept of time in modern cosmology and, in particular, Hawking's notion of ``imaginary time'' conclude this essay.

  5. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics: Physics Textbooks Don't Always Tell the Truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Allan

    2016-03-01

    Anyone who studies the history of physics quickly realizes that the history of physics presented in physics textbooks is often inaccurate. This is not necessarily a bad thing. The purpose of textbooks is to help students learn physics. An inaccurate history may serve a pedagogical purpose. It may help to explain concepts more clearly than the actual history. I believe, however, that it is important for those of us who teach physics to know the accurate history. In this talk I will discuss two episodes from the history of modern physics, Millikan's experiments on the photoelectric effect and the Ellis-Wooster experiment on the energy spectrum in β decay. Everyone knows that Millikan's work established the photon theory of light. The problem is that what everyone knows is wrong. The Ellis-Wooster experiment, on the other hand, is rarely discussed in physics texts, but it should be. In this talk I will present a more accurate history of these experiments.

  6. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Lecture: Big, Bigger, Too Big? From Los Alamos to Fermilab and the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2012-03-01

    The modern era of big science emerged during World War II. Oppenheimer's Los Alamos laboratory offered the quintessential model of a government-funded, mission-oriented facility directed by a strong charismatic leader. The postwar beneficiaries of this model included the increasingly ambitious large laboratories that participated in particle physics--in particular, Brookhaven, SLAC, and Fermilab. They carried the big science they practiced into a new realm where experiments eventually became as large and costly as entire laboratories had been. Meanwhile the available funding grew more limited causing the physics research to be concentrated into fewer and bigger experiments that appeared never to end. The next phase in American high-energy physics was the Superconducting Super Collider, the most costly pure physics project ever attempted. The SSC's termination was a tragedy for American science, but for historians it offers an opportunity to understand what made the success of earlier large high-energy physics laboratories possible, and what made the continuation of the SSC impossible. The most obvious reason for the SSC's failure was its enormous and escalating budget, which Congress would no longer support. Other factors need to be recognized however: no leader could be found with directing skills as strong as those of Wilson, Panofsky, Lederman, or Richter; the scale of the project subjected it to uncomfortable public and Congressional scrutiny; and the DOE's enforcement of management procedures of the military-industrial complex that clashed with those typical of the scientific community led to the alienation and withdrawal of many of the most creative scientists, and to the perception and the reality of poor management. These factors, exacerbated by negative pressure from scientists in other fields and a post-Cold War climate in which physicists had little of their earlier cultural prestige, discouraged efforts to gain international support. They made the SSC crucially different from its predecessors and sealed its doom.

  7. Improbable Research and the Ig Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, then make them think. Marc Abrahams, father of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony and editor of the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, will show us some of the most outstanding Ig Nobel winners. He will also discuss why Ohio has been such a good producer of Ig Nobel Prize winners, and of improbable research.

  8. Searching for Abraham Flexner.

    PubMed

    Bonner, T N

    1998-02-01

    Although Abraham Flexner (1866-1959) is well known as the author of Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching--so well known that this publication's better-known shorthand title is "the Flexner Report"--for many the "real" Flexner remains something of a mystery. Many today believe that he was overly rigid in his goals for medical education and that he did not adequately champion the rights of women and African Americans, harsh criticisms in late-20th-century America. But who really was Abraham Flexner? The author discusses Flexner the education reformer and the man, highlighting his early years in Louisville and his relationship with his family and his wife, his later graduate work and associations with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the General Education Board, and his then-radical proposals for the reshaping of American medical education. Flexner's attitudes toward women and African Americans are also reviewed, and the author shows that Flexner encouraged both women and blacks to pursue higher education in general and medical careers in particular. Finally, the author discusses Flexner's feelings about his own Jewishness and anti-Semitism, his political beliefs, and his personal attributes as described both by the press and by his friends.

  9. Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg illness.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S; Schmalstieg, Frank C

    2007-05-01

    When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, he was weak and dizzy; his face had a ghastly colour. That evening on the train to Washington, DC, he was febrile and weak, and suffered severe headaches. The symptoms continued; back pains developed. On the fourth day of the illness, a widespread scarlet rash appeared that soon became vesicular. By the tenth day, the lesions itched and peeled. The illness lasted three weeks. The final diagnosis, a touch of varioloid, was an old name for smallpox that was later used in the 20th century to denote mild smallpox in a partially immune individual. It was unclear whether Lincoln had been immunized against smallpox. Indeed, this review suggests that Lincoln had unmodified smallpox and that Lincoln's physicians tried to reassure the public that Lincoln was not seriously ill. Indeed, the successful conclusion of the Civil War and reunification of the country were dependent upon Lincoln's presidency.

  10. Pais Prize Lecture: History and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2006-04-01

    Modern history and experimental physics entered the university together, in the course of the eighteenth century. They shared several practices and projects. Historians began to emphasize physical factors, and so drew on, and occasionally contributed to, meteorology and physical geography; and they developed ancillary disciplines, like numismatics, diplomatics, and paleography, which required the analysis of metals, paper, and inks, and the careful comparison of material objects. In physics, historical reviews of newer subject matters, such as electricity, optics, and pneumatics, guided instruction where neither the facts nor their interpretation compelled consensus. The inherently historical science, geology, was a favorite subject of the age: the earth received a history, and the cosmos, too; evolutionary ideas found applications everywhere. The new physics and the new history became potent weapons of Enlightenment. A product of their collaboration is the lengthiest history of physics ever written, J.G. Fischer's Geschichte der Physik (8 vols., 1801-1808). It appeared within a series edited by Johnn Gottfried Eichhorn, Germany's leading exponent of the ``higher criticism,'' the corrosive application of historical and literary considerations to the stories of the Old Testament. The writings of historians like Eichhorn were more subversive than the work reported by Fischer in so far as humans are more concerned with their place in the world than with the details of its behavior. The coincidental matriculation of modern history and experimental physics, and its consequences, will be discussed.

  11. Premonitory Awareness in Stuttering Scale (PAiS).

    PubMed

    Cholin, Joana; Heiler, Sabrina; Whillier, Alexander; Sommer, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Anticipation of stuttering events in persistent developmental stuttering is a frequent but inadequately measured phenomenon that is of both theoretical and clinical importance. Here, we describe the development and preliminary testing of a German version of the Premonitory Awareness in Stuttering Scale (PAiS): a 12-item questionnaire assessing immediate and prospective anticipation of stuttering that was translated and adapted from the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS) (Woods, Piacentini, Himle, & Chang, 2005). After refining the preliminary PAiS scale in a pilot study, we administered a revised version to 21 adults who stutter (AWS) and 21 age, gender and education-matched control participants. Results demonstrated that the PAiS had good internal consistency and discriminated the two speaker groups very effectively, with AWS reporting anticipation of speech disruptions significantly more often than adults with typical speech. Correlations between the PAiS total score and both the objective and subjective measures of stuttering severity revealed that AWS with high PAiS scores produced fewer stuttered syllables. This is possibly because these individuals are better able to adaptively use these anticipatory sensations to modulate their speech. These results suggest that, with continued refinement, the PAiS has the potential to provide clinicians and researchers with a practical and psychometrically sound tool that can quantify how a given AWS anticipates upcoming stuttering events.

  12. Premonitory Awareness in Stuttering Scale (PAiS).

    PubMed

    Cholin, Joana; Heiler, Sabrina; Whillier, Alexander; Sommer, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Anticipation of stuttering events in persistent developmental stuttering is a frequent but inadequately measured phenomenon that is of both theoretical and clinical importance. Here, we describe the development and preliminary testing of a German version of the Premonitory Awareness in Stuttering Scale (PAiS): a 12-item questionnaire assessing immediate and prospective anticipation of stuttering that was translated and adapted from the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS) (Woods, Piacentini, Himle, & Chang, 2005). After refining the preliminary PAiS scale in a pilot study, we administered a revised version to 21 adults who stutter (AWS) and 21 age, gender and education-matched control participants. Results demonstrated that the PAiS had good internal consistency and discriminated the two speaker groups very effectively, with AWS reporting anticipation of speech disruptions significantly more often than adults with typical speech. Correlations between the PAiS total score and both the objective and subjective measures of stuttering severity revealed that AWS with high PAiS scores produced fewer stuttered syllables. This is possibly because these individuals are better able to adaptively use these anticipatory sensations to modulate their speech. These results suggest that, with continued refinement, the PAiS has the potential to provide clinicians and researchers with a practical and psychometrically sound tool that can quantify how a given AWS anticipates upcoming stuttering events. PMID:27638191

  13. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  14. Abraham-Lorentz versus Landau-Lifshitz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, David J.; Proctor, Thomas C.; Schroeter, Darrell F.

    2010-04-01

    The classical Abraham-Lorentz formula for the radiation reaction on a point charge suffers from two notorious defects: runaways and preacceleration. Recently, several authors have advocated as an alternative the Landau-Lifshitz formula, which has neither fault. The latter formula is often presented as an approximation to Abraham-Lorentz, raising the delicate question of how an approximation can be considered more accurate than the original. For a spherical shell of finite size, the equation for the radiation reaction is noncontroversial. We begin there, obtain the Abraham-Lorentz and Landau-Lifshitz expressions as limiting cases, and undertake some numerical studies to determine which is superior.

  15. [Salzburg 1908. Karl Abraham caught between Freud and Jung].

    PubMed

    van Schoonheten, Anna Bentinck

    2010-01-01

    The first psychoanalytic congress in Salzburg has often been described as a great success with one blemish: a conflict between Jung and Abraham, mainly caused by the rivalry in Abraham's behaviour. A new study of the material, and taking Abraham's perspective, provides a different view. Abraham, still a beginner in psychoanalysis, got in the way of Freud and Jung who at that time had a deep theoretical disagreement. In the end they both blamed Abraham.

  16. Abraham Flexner and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ludmerer, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization. Abraham Flexner, a brilliant educator, had the background to understand and popularize the meaning of this new view of education, and he took the unprecedented step of relating the developments in medical education to the ideas of John Dewey and the progressive education movement. Although the Flexner Report is typically viewed as a historical document--due to an understandable tendency to refer only to the second half of the report, where Flexner provides his famous critiques of the medical schools that existed at the time--this article argues that the Flexner Report is actually a living educational document of as much significance to medical educators today as in Flexner's time. The article analyzes Flexner's discussion of medical education and shows that his message--the importance of academic excellence, professional leadership, proper financial support, and service and altruism--is timeless, as applicable to the proper education of physicians today and tomorrow as in the past.

  17. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Nomination Archive Ceremonies Ceremonies Ceremony Archive Nobel ...

  18. Prize Recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    The John Bardeen Prize is awarded for theoretical work that has provided significant insights on the nature of superconductivity and has led to verifiable predictions. It is sponsored by the Dresdner Bank.

  19. Famous Americans: George Washington & Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    Introducing students in grade 1-3 to George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, this book presents thematic units that present biographical information, and literature links such as poems, songs, stories, cross-curricular activities, and hands-on reproducibles. Chapters in the book are: (1) Getting to Know George; (2) The Father and His Country; (3)…

  20. Famous Americans: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    This book provides background information and ideas for teaching about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln at the primary grade level. Cross-curricular activities include work in music, writing, art, research, plays, and games. A pull-out poster with a poem on "President's Day" is stapled in the center of the book. Chapters in the book are: (1)…

  1. Abraham Lincoln: American Lawyer-President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirck, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the most experienced trial lawyer Americans have ever placed in the White House. While more than half of the United State's presidents have been attorneys, none possessed Lincoln's extensive courtroom experience: approximately 3,800 known cases, litigated during a quarter century at the Illinois bar. However, the law's…

  2. Updated Abraham solvation parameters for polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Paul C M; Haftka, Joris J H; Parsons, John R

    2010-09-15

    This study shows that the recently published polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Abraham solvation parameters predict PCB air-n-hexadecane and n-octanol-water partition coefficients very poorly, especially for highly ortho-chlorinated congeners. Therefore, an updated set of PCB solvation parameters was derived from four PCB properties and associated Abraham solvation equations. Additionally, the influence of ortho-chlorination on PCB solvent accessible volume and surface area was investigated. The updated PCB solvation parameters were tested on partitioning between five other phase combinations. Compared to the original PCB solvation parameter set, the updated PCB solvation parameters resulted in substantially improved estimates from Abraham solvation equations for (subcooled) liquid vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, HPLC capacity factors, and for coefficients of air-n-hexadecane, air-water, organic carbon-water, and n-octanol-water partitioning. For water to polydimethyl siloxane and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) partitioning, the updated PCB solvation parameters yielded no improvement compared to the original data set. The main difference between the updated and the original parameter set is that updated PCB McGowan specific volumes depend on the degree of ortho-chlorination, which is qualitatively confirmed by trends in the PCB solvent accessible volumes and surface areas. The use of the updated PCB solvation parameters instead of the original values is therefore recommended.

  3. PAI-1 and kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Jun; Fogo, Agnes B.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence demonstrates a link of increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and glomerulosclerosis and kidney fibrosis, providing a novel therapeutic option for prevention and treatment of chronic kidney diseases. Several mechanisms contributing to increased PAI-1 will be addressed, including classic key profibrotic factors such as the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and novel molecules identified by proteomic analysis, such as thymosin- β4. The fibrotic sequelae caused by increased PAI-1 in kidney depend not only on its classic inhibition of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA), but also its influence on cell migration. PMID:19273183

  4. Differing to Agree: A Reply to Hammersley and Abraham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtz, Sharon; Cribb, Alan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper Gewirtz and Cribb offer a response to Hammersley and Abraham's criticisms of their arguments about the place of values in social research published in this issue of BJSE. In doing so, they make clear that most of the positions that Hammersley and Abraham attribute to them are ones that they do not identify with and that, like…

  5. View southwest, buildings of the Abraham Cyrus Farmstead. (Left to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest, buildings of the Abraham Cyrus Farmstead. (Left to right in photograph: hen house, chicken shed, equipment shed, large tree at center foreground, barn, evergreen in yard, wash house, farmhouse - Abraham Cyrus Farmstead, 3271 Cyrus Road (County Road 1/6), Cyrus, Wayne County, WV

  6. Neutralization of plasminogen activator inhibitor I (PAI-1) by the synthetic antagonist PAI-749 via a dual mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Stephen J; Krueger, Julie A; Antrilli, Thomas A; Elokdah, Hassan; Mayer, Scott; Orcutt, Steven J; Crandall, David L; Vlasuk, George P

    2007-10-01

    PAI-749 is a potent and selective synthetic antagonist of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) that preserved tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activities in the presence of PAI-1 (IC(50) values, 157 and 87 nM, respectively). The fluorescence (Fl) of fluorophore-tagged PAI-1 (PAI-NBD119) was quenched by PAI-749; the apparent K(d) (254 nM) was similar to the IC(50) (140 nM) for PAI-NBD119 inactivation. PAI-749 analogs displayed the same potency rank order for neutralizing PAI-1 activity and perturbing PAI-NBD119 Fl; hence, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 and inactivation of PAI-1 activity are tightly linked. Exposure of PAI-1 to PAI-749 for 5 min (sufficient for full inactivation) followed by PAI-749 sequestration with Tween 80 micelles yielded active PAI-1; thus, PAI-749 did not irreversibly inactivate PAI-1, a known metastable protein. Treatment of PAI-1 with a PAI-749 homolog (producing less assay interference) blocked the ability of PAI-1 to displace p-aminobenzamidine from the uPA active site. Consistent with this observation, PAI-749 abolished formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. PAI-749-mediated neutralization of PAI-1 was associated with induction of PAI-1 polymerization as assessed by native gel electrophoresis. PAI-749 did not turn PAI-1 into a substrate for tPA; however, PAI-749 promoted plasmin-mediated degradation of PAI-1. In conclusion, PAI-1 inactivation by PAI-749 using purified components can result from a dual mechanism of action. First, PAI-749 binds directly to PAI-1, blocks PAI-1 from accessing the active site of tPA, and abrogates formation of the SDS-stable tPA/PAI-1 complex. Second, binding of PAI-749 to PAI-1 renders PAI-1 vulnerable to plasmin-mediated proteolytic degradation. PMID:17622579

  7. Lorentz Abraham Force and Power Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    Toward the end of the nineteenth century Lorentz modeled the electron (“vibrating charged particle,” as he called it) by a spherical shell of uniform surface charge density and set about the difficult task of deriving the equation of motion of this electron model by determining, from Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force law, the retarded self electromagnetic force that the fields of the accelerating charge distribution exert upon the charge itself [1]. (This initial work of Lorentz in 1892 on a moving charged sphere appeared five years before J.J. Thomson's “discovery” of the electron. It is summarized in English by J.Z. Buchwald [2, app. 7].) With the help of Abraham,1 a highly successful theory of the moving electron model was completed by the early 1900's [3, 4]. Before Einstein's papers [5, 6] on special relativity appeared in 1905, they had derived the following force equation of motion

  8. Abraham Lincoln and the insanity plea.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D

    1994-06-01

    A confederate civilian physician shot and killed a white Union officer who was drilling Negro troops in Norfolk, Virginia. With no question as to guilt, President Abraham Lincoln decided to have a medical expert conduct a professional sanity/insanity examination. Documentation indicates that legal and political factors may have influenced Lincoln's decision. As a lawyer, Lincoln prosecuted a case where the insanity plea was used as a defense. Two influential Cabinet members, William H. Seward and Edwin M. Stanton, also had legal experience involving the insanity plea. Politically, Lincoln faced serious issues such as the draft riots, the military necessity to recruit slaves into the army, the impact of Union Negro soldiers upon the border states, the morale and discipline of the army and the upcoming presidential election. Upon Seward's recommendation, Lincoln chose a physician who had a reputation for finding the accused sane and who did so in this case. As the southern physician was hanged, Lincoln's means achieved the desired legal and political ends.

  9. Abraham Lincoln and the global economy.

    PubMed

    Hormats, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Abraham Lincoln would have well understood the challenges facing many modern emerging nations. In Lincoln's America, as in many developing nations today, sweeping economic change threatened older industries, traditional ways of living, and social and national cohesion by exposing economies and societies to new and powerful competitive forces. Yet even in the midst of the brutal and expensive American Civil war--and in part because of it--Lincoln and the Republican Congress enacted bold legislation that helped create a huge national market, a strong and unified economy governed by national institutions, and a rising middle class of businessmen and property owners. Figuring out how to maximize the benefits of globalization while minimizing its disruptions is a formidable challenge for policy makers. How do you expand opportunities for the talented and the lucky while making sure the rest of society doesn't fall behind? It may be helpful to look at the principles that informed the policies that Lincoln and the Republican Congress instituted after they came to power in 1861: Facilitate the upward mobility of low- and middle-income groups to give them a significant stake in the country. Emphasize the good of the national economy over regional interests. Affirm the need for sound government institutions to temper the dynamics of the free enterprise system. Tailor policies to the national situation. Realize that a period of turmoil may present a unique opportunity for reform. These principles drove the reforms that helped Americans cope with and benefit from rapid technological advances and the fast integration of the American economy in the nineteenth century. They may be instructive to today's policy makers who are struggling to help their own citizens integrate into the fast-changing global economy of the twenty-first century.

  10. Abraham Lincoln and the global economy.

    PubMed

    Hormats, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Abraham Lincoln would have well understood the challenges facing many modern emerging nations. In Lincoln's America, as in many developing nations today, sweeping economic change threatened older industries, traditional ways of living, and social and national cohesion by exposing economies and societies to new and powerful competitive forces. Yet even in the midst of the brutal and expensive American Civil war--and in part because of it--Lincoln and the Republican Congress enacted bold legislation that helped create a huge national market, a strong and unified economy governed by national institutions, and a rising middle class of businessmen and property owners. Figuring out how to maximize the benefits of globalization while minimizing its disruptions is a formidable challenge for policy makers. How do you expand opportunities for the talented and the lucky while making sure the rest of society doesn't fall behind? It may be helpful to look at the principles that informed the policies that Lincoln and the Republican Congress instituted after they came to power in 1861: Facilitate the upward mobility of low- and middle-income groups to give them a significant stake in the country. Emphasize the good of the national economy over regional interests. Affirm the need for sound government institutions to temper the dynamics of the free enterprise system. Tailor policies to the national situation. Realize that a period of turmoil may present a unique opportunity for reform. These principles drove the reforms that helped Americans cope with and benefit from rapid technological advances and the fast integration of the American economy in the nineteenth century. They may be instructive to today's policy makers who are struggling to help their own citizens integrate into the fast-changing global economy of the twenty-first century. PMID:12884668

  11. Inhibition of PAI-1 Via PAI-039 Improves Dermal Wound Closure in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rebalka, Irena A; Raleigh, Matthew J; D'Souza, Donna M; Coleman, Samantha K; Rebalka, Alexandra N; Hawke, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes impairs the ability to heal cutaneous wounds, leading to hospitalization, amputations, and death. Patients with diabetes experience elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), regardless of their glycemic control. It has been demonstrated that PAI-1-deficient mice exhibit improved cutaneous wound healing, and that PAI-1 inhibition improves skeletal muscle repair in mice with type 1 diabetes mellitus, leading us to hypothesize that pharmacologically mediated reductions in PAI-1 using PAI-039 would normalize cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (STZ-diabetic) mice. To simulate the human condition of variations in wound care, wounds were aggravated or minimally handled postinjury. Following cutaneous injury, PAI-039 was orally administered twice daily for 10 days. Compared with nondiabetic mice, wounds in STZ-diabetic mice healed more slowly. Wound site aggravation exacerbated this deficit. PAI-1 inhibition had no effect on dermal collagen levels or wound bed size. PAI-039 treatment failed to improve angiogenesis in the wounds of STZ-diabetic mice and blunted angiogenesis in the wounds of nondiabetic mice. Importantly, PAI-039 treatment significantly improved epidermal cellular migration and wound re-epithelialization compared with vehicle-treated STZ-diabetic mice. These findings support the use of PAI-039 as a novel therapeutic agent to improve diabetic wound closure and demonstrate the primary mechanism of its action to be related to epidermal closure.

  12. Possibility of measuring the Abraham force using whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brevik, I.; Ellingsen, S. A.

    2010-06-15

    Critical experimental tests of the time-dependent Abraham force in phenomenological electrodynamics are scarce. In this paper, we analyze the possibility of making use of intensity-modulated whispering gallery modes in a microresonator for this purpose. Systems of this kind appear attractive, as the strong concentration of electromagnetic fields near the rim of the resonator serves to enhance the Abraham torque exerted by the field. We analyze mainly spherical resonators, although as an introductory step we consider also the cylinder geometry. The orders of magnitude of the Abraham torques are estimated by inserting reasonable and common values for the various input parameters. As expected, the predicted torques turn out to be very small, although probably not beyond reach experimentally. Our main idea is essentially a generalization of the method used by G. B. Walker et al.[Can. J. Phys. 53, 2577 (1975)] for low-frequency fields, to the optical case.

  13. "Happy Birthday, Mr. President!" New Books for Abraham Lincoln's Bicentennial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrell A.; Ward, Barbara A.; Day, Deanna

    2009-01-01

    Stories about Abraham Lincoln have captivated children for generations. The Lincoln story has taken on almost mythic proportions, making it difficult to separate fact from fiction or exaggeration. Young readers never tire of talking about Lincoln's early days--from his birth in a log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky to his childhood in…

  14. The Enigmatic Savior of the Union: Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Ronald L.; Diamond, Linda W.

    Abraham Lincoln rose from the depths of obscurity to guide the United States successfully through the turbulent and menacing years of the Civil War. Laborer, businessman, postmaster, politician, and lawyer were some of the vocations, not all successful, that Lincoln tried during the years leading to his ascent to the Presidency. This review of the…

  15. Association between PAI-1 polymorphisms and plasma PAI-1 level with sepsis in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y F; Chai, J K; Yu, Y M; Luo, H M; Zhang, Q X; Feng, R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) polymorphisms and plasma PAI-1 level with sepsis in severely burned patients. A total of 182 patients with burn areas lager than 30% of the body surface area were enrolled in this study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 103 patients with sepsis (sepsis group) and 79 patients without sepsis (control group). An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay was used to determine PAI-1 polymorphism 4G/5G distribution. Plasma PAI-1 levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The frequency of the 4G/4G genotype and the 4G allele frequency in the sepsis group were 42.7 and 62.1% respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Sepsis patients had a significantly higher plasma PAI-1 level than the control group (P < 0.05). Compared with the 5G/5G genotype, PAI-1 concentrations were significantly higher in the 4G/4G genotype (P < 0.05). The study indicates that the 4G/5G promoter polymorphism of PAI-1 gene may be related to the susceptibility to burn sepsis and that the 4G/4G genotype may be an important genetic risk factor of burn sepsis. Additionally, PAI-1 concentrations in the serum are increased in patients with burn sepsis.

  16. Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator and negative energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavšič, Matej

    2016-09-01

    We review the occurrence of negative energies in Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator. We point out that in the absence of interactions, negative energies are not problematic neither in the classical nor in the quantized theory. However, in the presence of interactions that couple positive and negative energy degrees of freedom, the system is unstable, unless the potential is bounded from below and above. We review some approaches in the literature that attempt to avoid the problem of negative energies in the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator.

  17. Energy conservation equation for a radiating pointlike charge in the context of the Abraham-Lorentz versus the Abraham-Becker radiation-reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, U.; Bornatici, M.

    1997-12-01

    With reference to a radiating pointlike charge, the energy conservation equation comprising the effect of the Abraham-Lorentz radiation-reaction force is contrasted with the incorrect energy conservation equation obtained by Hartemann and Luhmann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1107 (1995)] on considering instead the Abraham-Becker force that accounts only for a part of the instantaneous radiation-reaction force.

  18. Abraham Lincoln, psychotherapist to the nation: the use of metaphors.

    PubMed

    Leetz, K L

    1997-01-01

    Metaphors are widely utilized in psychotherapy to effect change in patients. Psychotherapeutic metaphors, in their various versions, may offer new choices and ways of viewing oneself to the patient which are more palatable than straight discussions or sterile insights. By addressing resistances indirectly, metaphors can be an effective tool for the therapist to use, regardless of theoretical orientation. Abraham Lincoln, a master of metaphor, utilized this tool effectively in dealing with crises and the ultimate fragmentation, disunion of the national identity. The author argues that Lincoln was able to address complex issues (such as slavery, liberty, nationhood, union, and conduct of the war) with metaphors, much as a skilled psychotherapist addresses complex issues within his or her purview. Abraham Lincoln effectively disarmed his critics, established a means of communication with the people, and sought to make his points in an understandable nonconfrontational fashion. These are skills highly valued by psychotherapists. One might say that Abraham Lincoln conducted psychotherapy on a national scale. Without formal training, he was ultimately able to create a new and more stable sense of national self using a metaphorical approach.

  19. Our Own Pulitzer Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmon, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    A school board member in Gilman, Wisconsin, started a literary awards program to improve student writing. Students compete for prizes, and at the end of each year the winning entries are published in a literary magazine. (MLF)

  20. Abraham and Minkowski momenta in the optically induced motion of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2014-09-01

    Does the Abraham or the Minkowski momentum describe the momentum transport of light in media? Here we show that this is a question of fluid dynamics. In momentum transport, neither the Abraham nor the Minkowski momentum is fundamental, but they emerge depending on the fluid-mechanical response of the medium on the light. If the fluid is not brought into motion, the Minkowski momentum emerges, if it moves the Abraham momentum appears.

  1. Citations Prize 2010 Citations Prize 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2010 Citations Prize winners The winning authors Fernando Rannou (left), George Alexandrakis (holding the Rotblat Medal) and Arion Chatziioannou (right). The winner of the 2010 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2005-2009) is Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Authors: George Alexandrakis, Fernando R Rannou and Arion F Chatziioannou Reference: George Alexandrakis et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/44334). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  2. [Unilateral nasal obstruction in children: Pai syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zanetta, Adrián; Cuestas, Giselle; Oviedo, Maricruz; Tiscorni, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Unilateral obstruction of the nasal cavity in children is mainly caused by the introduction of foreign bodies further stated with rhinorrhea and fetid odor. Less commonly, it can be traumatic, neoplastic, due to congenital malformation or iatrogenic. Symptoms of congenital intranasal mass may present at birth, or go unnoticed and be a finding in a routine pediatric examination. Patient evaluation should include imaging studies to guide the diagnosis and rule out intracranial extension. A syndrome associated with congenital nasal tumor should be suspected when other abnormalities are present. Pai syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. Its manifestations are craniofacial being congenital nasal polyp his main marker. We present a patient with unilateral nasal respiratory failure secondary to congenital nasal lipoma, with craniofacial anomalies belonging to Pai syndrome. Nasal obstruction was successfully surgically resolved. PMID:22042063

  3. Karl Abraham, Sigmund Freud, and the fate of the seduction theory.

    PubMed

    Good, M I

    1995-01-01

    Even after Freud had turned his attention away from the seduction theory of neurosogenesis, his close pupil and colleague, Karl Abraham, initially sought to investigate child sexual trauma further. In two of the very first articles on child sexual molestation, Abraham proposed that sexual abuse was particularly common among neurotic and psychotic patients as a result of a "traumatophilic diathesis," a trauma-related conceptual precursor of the repetition compulsion. In their correspondence, Freud trenchantly criticized many aspects of Abraham's papers on the subject of sexual trauma, in contrast to his public endorsement of Abraham's work in this area. For largely transferential reasons that this paper attempts to elucidate, Abraham did not encourage dialogue regarding persistent questions on the seduction issue, ceased publishing on that topic, and for some time controlled his apparently deep rankle over Freud's criticisms and failure to acknowledge Abraham's contribution to the concept of the repetition compulsion. Despite their close friendship and shared intellectual enthusiasm, Freud's response to Abraham's 1907 papers, as well as Abraham's almost uniformly positive disposition toward Freud, apparently prevented Abraham from further developing his observations and ideas on seduction and also lent background to their later clash. Subsequently, there was virtually no further psychoanalytic investigation of the subject of child sexual abuse until the issue arose briefly with Ferenczi in the early 1930s, and only occasionally after that for the next fifty years. The death of Abraham, and then Ferenczi, shortly after disputes with Freud may be among the factors that had an inhibiting effect on an earlier reconsideration of the seduction theory by others. Abraham's previously unheralded concept of traumatophilia has relevance to current clinical controversy regarding constitution and sexual trauma.

  4. Abraham Flexner and the black medical schools. 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd

    2006-01-01

    "Abraham Flexner and the Black Medical Schools" first appeared in Beyond Flexner: Medical Education in the Twentieth Century, Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz, eds. Copyright 1992 by Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz. Reproduced with permission of Greenwood Publishing Group Inc., Westport, CT. The article will be reprinted in a collection of the author's writings on African-American medical history called Race and Medicine in Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century America, to be published in December 2006 by Kent State University Press and published here with permission of the Kent State University Press. PMID:17019906

  5. Unilateral coronal craniosynostosis in Abraham Lincoln and his family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2010-09-01

    Premature closure of one coronal skull suture produces a characteristic arching or relative elevation of the superior orbital rim on the involved side. This sign is associated with facial asymmetry, and both signs are usually the most conspicuous features in patients with mild unilateral coronal craniosynostosis. Photographs suggest that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family had premature closure of 1 coronal suture. In 8 males, there was involvement of the left side; in 1 female, there was involvement of the right side.

  6. Comments on initial conditions for the Abraham-Lorentz(-Dirac) equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Ofek

    2015-01-01

    An accelerating electric charge coupled to its own electromagnetic field both emits radiation and experiences the radiation's reaction as a (self-)force. Considering the system from an Effective Field Theory perspective, and using the physical initial conditions of no incoming radiation can help resolve many of the problems associated with the often considered "notorious" Abraham-Lorentz/Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equations.

  7. Citations Prize 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  8. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    PubMed Central

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-01-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity. Replacement of the ring O by S in the homoserine lactone moiety can be tolerated. Tritium-labelled PAI ([3H]PAI) was synthesized and used to demonstrate the association of [3H]PAI with cells overexpressing LasR. The PAI analogs were also tested for their ability to compete with [3H]PAI for binding of LasR. Results from the competition assays suggest that once again the length of the acyl side chain appears to be crucial for antagonist activity. The presence of the 3-oxo moiety also plays a significant role in binding since analogs which lacked this moiety were much less effective in blocking binding of [3H]PAI. All analogs demonstrating competition with PAI in binding to LasR also exhibited the ability to activate lasB expression, suggesting that they are functional analogs of PAI. PMID:8830697

  9. Citations Prize 2012 Citations Prize 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The authors of the winning paper. The authors of the winning paper. The winner of the 2012 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2007-2011) is Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization Authors: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan Reference: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4777-807 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/51868). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Simon Cherry Editor-in-Chief Jon Ruffle Publisher

  10. Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  11. The 2010 Broad Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  12. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  13. Abraham Lincoln did not have type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2009-10-20

    An autosomal dominant genetic disorder, type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA5), occurs in multiple descendants of one paternal uncle and one paternal aunt of President Abraham Lincoln. It has been suggested that Lincoln himself had the disease and that his DNA should be tested for an SCA5-conferring gene. Herein, I review the pertinent phenotypes of Lincoln, his father, and his paternal grandmother, and conclude that 1) Lincoln's father did not have SCA5, and, therefore, that Lincoln was not at special risk of the disease; 2) Lincoln had neither subclinical nor visible manifestations of SCA5; 3) little evidence suggests SCA5 is a "Lincolnian" disorder; and 4) without additional evidence, Lincoln's DNA should not be tested for SCA5.

  14. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  15. Theory and Experiment in the Quantum-Relativity Revolution (Pais History of Physics Prize 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Does new scientific knowledge come from theory (whose predictions are confirmed by experiment) or from experiment (whose results are explained by theory)? Either can happen, depending on whether theory is ahead of experiment or experiment is ahead of theory at a particular time. In the first case, new theoretical hypotheses are made and their predictions are tested by experiments. But even when the predictions are successful, we can't be sure that some other hypothesis might not have produced the same prediction. In the second case, as in a detective story, there are already enough facts, but several theories have failed to explain them. When a new hypothesis plausibly explains all of the facts, it may be quickly accepted before any further experiments are done. In the quantum- relativity revolution there are examples of both situations. Because of the two-stage development of both relativity (``special,'' then ``general'') and quantum theory (``old,'' then ``quantum mechanics'') in the period 1905-1930, we can make a double comparison of acceptance by prediction and by explanation. A curious anti-symmetry is revealed and discussed. )

  16. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  17. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  18. 2013 Lush Science Prize.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Rob

    2014-12-01

    The annual Lush Science Prize is designed to reward outstanding contributions to 21st Century Toxicology Research. A Background Paper is prepared each year prior to the judging process, in order to provide the judging panel with a brief overview of current developments in the field of Replacement alternatives, particularly those relevant to the concept of toxicity pathways. The Background Paper includes information on some key institutional developments in the area--such as the OECD's Adverse Outcome Pathway Project, the Hamner Institute's work, and the Human Toxome Project, and on the phenomenon of collaborative computer systems relevant to the field. From the literature review that was also performed as part of the background research, the two papers receiving the highest score were recommended for consideration by the judges for the 2013 Science Prize.

  19. Prizing Diversity. From Our President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    1993-01-01

    Addresses three questions related to the topic of diversity. Questions are how can citizens and professionals accept and prize cultural, ethnic, racial, and lifestyle diversity; how should commitment to prizing diversity be implemented in curricula and teaching practices; and what should be the role of the National Association for the Education of…

  20. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  1. Interactive effect of PAI-1 4G/5G genotype and salt intake on PAI-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Brown, N J; Murphey, L J; Srikuma, N; Koschachuhanan, N; Williams, G H; Vaughan, D E

    2001-06-01

    Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is associated with increased circulating PAI-1 antigen and increased risk of thrombotic cardiovascular events. A 4G/5G polymorphism located 675 bp upstream from the transcription start site of the PAI-1 gene affects PAI-1 antigen concentrations. To test the hypothesis that PAI-1 4G/5G genotype influences the effect of activation of the RAAS on PAI-1 expression, we measured morning PAI-1 antigen concentrations in 76 subjects with essential hypertension during low (10 mmol/d) and high (200 mmol/d) salt intake. Low salt intake was associated with activation of the RAAS as measured by plasma renin activity (2.3+/-0.2 versus 0.5+/-0.0 ng angiotensin I. mL(-1). h(-1), P<0.001) and aldosterone (529+/-40 versus 145+/-12 pmol/L). PAI-1 antigen concentrations were 17.9+/-2.7, 19.2+/-2.5, and 27.8+/-4.0 ng/mL during high salt intake and 19.2+/-2.7, 21.6+/-2.9, and 38.9+/-7.2 ng/mL during low salt intake in the 5G/5G (n=14), 4G/5G (n=40), and 4G/4G (n=22) groups, respectively. There was a significant effect of both salt intake (F=6.0, P=0.017) and PAI-1 4G/5G genotype (F=7.6, P=0.001) on PAI-1 antigen. More importantly, there was a significant interactive effect (F=7.8, P=0.001) of salt intake and PAI-1 4G/5G genotype on PAI-1 antigen. PAI-1 4G/5G genotype influenced the relationship between serum triglycerides and PAI-1 antigen such that the relationship was significant only in 4G homozygotes during either high (R(2)=0.31, P=0.014) or low (R(2)=0.37, P=0.006) salt intake. This study identifies an important gene-by-environment interaction that may influence cardiovascular morbidity and the response to pharmacological therapies that interrupt the RAAS.

  2. In Brief: Trieste Prize nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    Nominations for the 2008 Trieste Science Prize in Earth, space, ocean, and atmospheric sciences and in engineering sciences are being accepted through 31 January 2008. The prize has been established to give international recognition and visibility to outstanding scientific achievements made by scientists from developing countries. Candidates must be nationals of developing countries, and the prizes will only be awarded to individuals for scientific research of outstanding international merit carried out at institutions in developing countries. The prizes, each of which carries a US$50,000 monetary award, are administered by the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) and funded by Illycaffè in collaboration with the Trieste (Italy) Town Council and the Trieste International Foundation for Scientific Progress and Freedom. For more information, contact the TWAS Secretariat at prizes@twas.org.

  3. Legends about Legends: Abraham Eleazar's Adaptation of Nicolas Flamel.

    PubMed

    Priesner, Claus

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the relationship between three illustrated alchemical treatises, all of which are associated with Jewish adepts: the famous Le Livre des figures hieroglyphiques attributed to Nicolas Flamel, and two treatises published in 1735 in Erfurt-the Uraltes Chymisches Werckh and the Donum Dei. The Werckh is supposedly written by Rabbi Abraham Eleazar, while the Donum Dei is attributed to an ancient alchemist-cabalist, Rabbi Samuel Baruch. I argue that these authors are fictitious, and that both works were in fact written in the early eighteenth century by their supposed editor, the probably pseudonymous Julius Gervasius. Gervasius connects the Werckh with the legend of Nicolas Flamel by suggesting that it is based on the original, Jewish manuscript which helped Flamel to find the Stone of the Sages. Gervasius used various strategies to confer a sense of Jewish "authenticity" on these works, borrowing from contemporary (non-Jewish) perceptions of Jewish ritual, Hebrew language, and Christian Cabala. The Werckh also borrows and adapts a sequence of allegorical illustrations from those in pseudo-Flamel's Livre, and I compare the two sets of figures and, where possible, interpret them. I conclude that the later works in fact teach us far more about the state of alchemy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries than they do about either medieval alchemy or Judaism. PMID:27376176

  4. The Brain Prize 2011

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation awarded the inaugural Brain Prize 2011 to Péter Somogyi, Tamás Freund and György Buzsáki ‘for their wide-ranging, technically and conceptually brilliant research on the functional organization of neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex, especially in the hippocampus, a region that is crucial for certain forms of memory’. The present article highlights key findings and major conceptual contributions by these three scientists that were recognized by the award. PMID:21917323

  5. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards.

  6. Optics pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Three physicists who carried out pioneering work in former industrial research labs have picked up this year's Nobel Prize for Physics. One half of the SEK 10m prize has been awarded to Charles Kao, 75, for his work at the UK-based Standard Telephones and Cables (STC) on the transmission of light in optical fibres, which underpinned the telecommunications revolution. The other half of the prize is shared between Willard Boyle, 85, and George Smith, 79, of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, US, for inventing the charge-coupled device (CCD) - an imaging semiconductor circuit that forms the basis of most digital cameras.

  7. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  8. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  9. Ponderomotive forces in electrodynamics of moving media: The Minkowski and Abraham approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    In the general setting of the problem, the explicit compact formulae are derived for the ponderomotive forces in the macroscopic electrodynamics of moving media in the Minkowski and Abraham approaches. Taking account of the Minkowski constitutive relations and making use of a special representation for the Abraham energy-momentum tensor enable one to obtain a compact expression for the Abraham force in the case of arbitrary dependence of the medium velocity on spatial coordinates and the time and for nonstationary external electromagnetic field. We term the difference between the ponderomotive forces in the Abraham and Minkowski approaches as the Abraham force not only under consideration of media at rest but also in the case of moving media. The Lorentz force is found which is exerted by external electromagnetic field on the conduction current in a medium, the covariant Ohm law, and the constitutive Minkowski relations being taken into account. The physical argumentation is traced for the definition of the 4-vector of the ponderomotive force as the 4-divergence of the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetic field in a medium.

  10. Symmetric energy-momentum tensor: The Abraham form and the explicitly covariant formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We compare the known in literature, explicitly covariant 4-dimensional formula for the symmetric energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetic field in a medium and the energy-momentum tensor derived by Abraham in the 3-dimensional vector form. It is shown that these two objects coincide only on the physical configuration space Γ ¯ , formed by the field vectors and the velocity of the medium, which satisfy the Minkowski constitutive relations. It should be emphasized that the 3-dimensional vector formulae for the components of the energy-momentum tensor were obtained by Abraham only on Γ ¯ , and the task of their extension to the whole unconditional configuration space Γ was not posed. In order to accomplish the comparison noted above, we derive the covariant formula a new by another method, namely, by generalizing the Abraham reasoning. The comparison conducted enables one to treat the explicitly covariant formula as a unique consistent extension of the Abraham formulae to the whole configuration space Γ. Thus the question concerning the relativistic covariance of the original 3-dimensional Abraham formulae defined on Γ ¯ is solved positively. We discuss in detail the relativistic covariance of the 3-dimensional vector formulae for individual components of the 4-dimensional tensors in electrodynamics which is manifested in the form-invariance of these formulae under Lorentz transformations.

  11. Nobel Prize 2012: Haroche & Wineland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Iulia

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

  12. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  13. Haagen-Smit Prize 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2014 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  14. Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchet, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science is awarded annually. Through the Prize, Europlanet aims to recognise achievements in engaging European citizens with planetary science and to raise the profile of outreach within the scientific community. It is awarded to individuals or groups who have developed innovative practices in planetary science communication and whose efforts have significantly contributed to a wider public engagement with planetary science.

  15. Non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials à la Abraham-Moses

    SciTech Connect

    Odake, Satoru; Sasaki, Ryu

    2013-10-15

    Abraham-Moses transformations, besides Darboux transformations, are well-known procedures to generate extensions of solvable potentials in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. Here we present the explicit forms of infinitely many seed solutions for adding eigenstates at arbitrary real energy through the Abraham-Moses transformations for typical solvable potentials, e.g., the radial oscillator, the Darboux-Pöschl-Teller, and some others. These seed solutions are simple generalisations of the virtual state wavefunctions, which are obtained from the eigenfunctions by discrete symmetries of the potentials. The virtual state wavefunctions have been an essential ingredient for constructing multi-indexed Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials through multiple Darboux-Crum transformations. In contrast to the Darboux transformations, the virtual state wavefunctions generate non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials through the Abraham-Moses transformations.

  16. Non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials à la Abraham-Moses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odake, Satoru; Sasaki, Ryu

    2013-10-01

    Abraham-Moses transformations, besides Darboux transformations, are well-known procedures to generate extensions of solvable potentials in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. Here we present the explicit forms of infinitely many seed solutions for adding eigenstates at arbitrary real energy through the Abraham-Moses transformations for typical solvable potentials, e.g., the radial oscillator, the Darboux-Pöschl-Teller, and some others. These seed solutions are simple generalisations of the virtual state wavefunctions, which are obtained from the eigenfunctions by discrete symmetries of the potentials. The virtual state wavefunctions have been an essential ingredient for constructing multi-indexed Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials through multiple Darboux-Crum transformations. In contrast to the Darboux transformations, the virtual state wavefunctions generate non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials through the Abraham-Moses transformations.

  17. Genetic structure and distribution of four pathogenicity islands (PAI I(536) to PAI IV(536)) of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536.

    PubMed

    Dobrindt, Ulrich; Blum-Oehler, Gabriele; Nagy, Gabor; Schneider, György; Johann, André; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg

    2002-11-01

    For the uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (O6:K15:H31), the DNA sequences of three pathogenicity islands (PAIs) (PAI I(536) to PAI III(536)) and their flanking regions (about 270 kb) were determined to further characterize the virulence potential of this strain. PAI I(536) to PAI III(536) exhibit features typical of PAIs, such as (i) association with tRNA-encoding genes; (ii) G+C content differing from that of the host genome; (iii) flanking repeat structures; (iv) a mosaic-like structure comprising a multitude of functional, truncated, and nonfunctional putative open reading frames (ORFs) with known or unknown functions; and (v) the presence of many fragments of mobile genetic elements. PAI I(536) to PAI III(536) range between 68 and 102 kb in size. Although these islands contain several ORFs and known virulence determinants described for PAIs of other extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates, they also consist of as-yet-unidentified ORFs encoding putative virulence factors. The genetic structure of PAI IV(536), which represents the core element of the so-called high-pathogenicity island encoding a siderophore system initially identified in pathogenic yersiniae, was further characterized by sample sequencing. For the first time, multiple PAI sequences (PAI I(536) to PAI IV(536)) in uropathogenic E. coli were studied and their presence in several wild-type E. coli isolates was extensively investigated. The results obtained suggest that these PAIs or at least large fragments thereof are detectable in other pathogenic E. coli isolates. These results support our view that the acquisition of large DNA regions, such as PAIs, by horizontal gene transfer is an important factor for the evolution of bacterial pathogens.

  18. U.S. Medical Education Reformers Abraham Flexner (1866-1959) and Simon Flexner (1863-1946).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin; Parker, Betty J.

    This paper (in the form of a dialogue) tells the stories of two members of a remarkable family of nine children, the Flexners of Louisville, Kentucky. The paper focuses on Abraham and Simon, who were reformers in the field of medical education in the United States. The dialogue takes Abraham Flexner through his undergraduate education at Johns…

  19. The odd-order Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterov, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We consider a Hamiltonian formulation of the (2 n + 1)-order generalization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator with distinct frequencies of oscillation. This system is invariant under time translations. However, the corresponding Noether integral of motion is unbounded from below and can be presented as a direct sum of 2n one-dimensional harmonic oscillators with an alternating sign. If this integral of motion plays a role of a Hamiltonian, a quantum theory of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator faces a ghost problem. We construct an alternative canonical formulation for the system under study to avoid this nasty feature.

  20. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation between Historical and Fantasy Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Kim, Angie L.; Schwalen, Courtney E.; Harris, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children…

  1. An Interview with Abraham J. Tannenbaum: Innovative Programs for the Gifted and Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Sandra I.

    2002-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Abraham Tannenbaum, an author and leader of numerous research projects concerning gifted and talented students, discusses homeschooling, the impact of charter schools, magnet schools, and school choice on gifted education, the Ganiech psychosocial definition of giftedness, and the development of gifted programs. (Contains 7…

  2. Paul Abraham: A Forgotten Scholar of the Prussian Academy of Sciences and Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiel, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Paul Abraham, one of the Berlin Academy's most experienced researchers, was deported to Auschwitz in 1943. The fate of this Jewish scholar reveals much about the inner life of the Academy, and its treatment of Jewish staff, during the World War II. This paper describes his life, against a backdrop of war, revolution, and dictatorship, and in the…

  3. 76 FR 12821 - 150th Anniversary of the Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Lincoln By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation President Abraham Lincoln is... from slavery. His words are memorized by America's schoolchildren, and his name is synonymous with... an unfinished dome of the United States Capitol, with the storm clouds of civil war...

  4. Abraham's discovery of the 'bad mother'. A contribution to the history of the theory of depression.

    PubMed

    May, U

    2001-04-01

    The author shows how, after Freud struggled in vain from the 1890s to develop a theory of depression, Abraham succeeded for the first time in finding an approach to the understanding of depression a few years before the publication of Freud's 'Mourning and melancholia'. It is contained in his study of the painter Giovanni Segantini (1911), which also includes a description, imbued with a new atmospheric quality, of the mother-son relationship that centres on the concept of the 'bad mother'. The author points out that Abraham's 'good/bad' dimension is effectively absent from Freud's published work up to 1911 and is also at variance with his view of the relationship between son and mother. In later contributions, too, Abraham maintained that unconscious hate directed at the mother, who is experienced as 'bad' but longed for as 'good', was a central factor in the aetiology of depression, a view he had to defend vis-à-vis Freud. The author contends that in the Segantini paper Abraham was describing an inner world similar to that evinced by the work of Melanie Klein and significantly different from Freud's. It is characterised by hate, revenge, death wishes and guilt feelings on the one hand and tranquillity and inner peace on the other.

  5. Technology Staff-Development and Support Programs: Applying Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Pownell, David

    1998-01-01

    Presents Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs (physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, self-actualization) as a model for developing technology training and support for teachers, identifies basic technology-related needs that must be met before higher levels of technology integration can be achieved, and offers seven implications to help…

  6. Anatomy of a Masterpiece: A Close Textual Analysis of Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slagell, Amy R.

    1991-01-01

    States that Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address is a recognized rhetorical masterpiece. Accounts for this recognition by examining the text microscopically. Uses the method of close textual analysis that explores the inner workings of the text to discover the complexity of Lincoln's masterwork. (PRA)

  7. Electromagnetic Momentum in Magnetic Media and the Abraham-Minkowski Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Lopez-Marino, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the consequences of a force density, [image omitted], studied by some authors, for the device designed by Lai (1980 "Am. J. Phys. 48" 658) to analyse which definition of electromagnetic momentum density, either Minkowski's or Abraham's, is consistent with mechanical torques that arise from the change in time of a magnetic field, which…

  8. Hereditary premature closure of a coronal suture in the Abraham Lincoln family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2013-10-01

    The most easily recognized facial features of unilateral premature closure of a coronal suture in the skull are an upward arching of the superior orbital rim and a smaller face on the involved side. Photographs indicate that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family showed this anomaly.

  9. Abraham's discovery of the 'bad mother'. A contribution to the history of the theory of depression.

    PubMed

    May, U

    2001-04-01

    The author shows how, after Freud struggled in vain from the 1890s to develop a theory of depression, Abraham succeeded for the first time in finding an approach to the understanding of depression a few years before the publication of Freud's 'Mourning and melancholia'. It is contained in his study of the painter Giovanni Segantini (1911), which also includes a description, imbued with a new atmospheric quality, of the mother-son relationship that centres on the concept of the 'bad mother'. The author points out that Abraham's 'good/bad' dimension is effectively absent from Freud's published work up to 1911 and is also at variance with his view of the relationship between son and mother. In later contributions, too, Abraham maintained that unconscious hate directed at the mother, who is experienced as 'bad' but longed for as 'good', was a central factor in the aetiology of depression, a view he had to defend vis-à-vis Freud. The author contends that in the Segantini paper Abraham was describing an inner world similar to that evinced by the work of Melanie Klein and significantly different from Freud's. It is characterised by hate, revenge, death wishes and guilt feelings on the one hand and tranquillity and inner peace on the other. PMID:11341063

  10. Particle theorists scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Every year the award of the Nobel Prize for Physics goes through a familiar pattern - a few days' heightened speculation, a warm congratulation and, more often than not, a trailing dispute. This year has been no exception. The three new laureates, whose predictions and concepts on symmetry breaking have become cornerstones of the Standard Model, had long been tipped to win at some point. Makoto Kobayashi, 64, of the KEK lab, and Toshihide Maskawa, 68, of the University of Kyoto, both in Japan, share one half of the SwKr 10m (about £800 000) prize for their work in 1972 on the mechanism of broken symmetry, which led to the prediction of a new family of quarks. Yoichiro Nambu, 87, of the University of Chicago in the US, wins the other half of the prize for realizing in 1960 how to apply spontaneous symmetry breaking to particle physics.

  11. In black South Africans from rural and urban communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphism influences PAI-1 activity, but not plasma clot lysis time.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R; Jerling, Johann C; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  12. In Black South Africans from Rural and Urban Communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 Polymorphism Influences PAI-1 Activity, but Not Plasma Clot Lysis Time

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C.; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R.; Jerling, Johann C.; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  13. [Two Nobel prizes for psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Knezević, Aleksandar; Knezević, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    It was pointed out that both Nobel prizes for medicine in the field of psychiatry have lost their importance in contemporary medicine. Modern achievements in psychiatry have suppresed both psychosurgery of Egas Moniz and malaria treatment of Wagner-Jauregg as methods in the treatment of mental diseases. PMID:19368289

  14. 1993 Gordon Bell Prize Winners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, Alan H.; Simon, Horst; Heller, Don; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Gordon Bell Prize recognizes significant achievements in the application of supercomputers to scientific and engineering problems. In 1993, finalists were named for work in three categories: (1) Performance, which recognizes those who solved a real problem in the quickest elapsed time. (2) Price/performance, which encourages the development of cost-effective supercomputing. (3) Compiler-generated speedup, which measures how well compiler writers are facilitating the programming of parallel processors. The winners were announced November 17 at the Supercomputing 93 conference in Portland, Oregon. Gordon Bell, an independent consultant in Los Altos, California, is sponsoring $2,000 in prizes each year for 10 years to promote practical parallel processing research. This is the sixth year of the prize, which Computer administers. Something unprecedented in Gordon Bell Prize competition occurred this year: A computer manufacturer was singled out for recognition. Nine entries reporting results obtained on the Cray C90 were received, seven of the submissions orchestrated by Cray Research. Although none of these entries showed sufficiently high performance to win outright, the judges were impressed by the breadth of applications that ran well on this machine, all nine running at more than a third of the peak performance of the machine.

  15. Cosmic pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US, Adam Riess at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Brian Schmidt from the Australian National University, Weston Creek, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  16. A Prize for Membrane Magic

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells”. I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  17. Intracellular Expression of PAI-1 Specific Aptamers Alters Breast Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Brandal, Stephanie M.; Carpentier, Gilles; Hemani, Malvi; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is elevated in various cancers, where it has been shown to effect cell migration and invasion and angiogenesis. While, PAI-1 is a secreted protein, its intercellular levels are increased in cancer cells. Consequently, intracellular PAI-1 could contribute to cancer progression. While various small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 are currently being investigated, none specifically target intracellular PAI-1. A class of inhibitors, termed aptamers, has been used effectively in several clinical applications. We previously generated RNA aptamers that target PAI-1 and demonstrated their ability to inhibit extracellular PAI-1. In the current study we explored the effect of these aptamers on intracellular PAI-1. We transiently transfected the PAI-1 specific aptamers into both MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and studied their effects on cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Aptamer expressing MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a decrease in cell migration and invasion. Additionally, intracellular PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) protein levels decreased, while the PAI-1/uPA complex increased. Moreover, a significant decrease in endothelial tube formation in HUVECs transfected with the aptamers was observed. In contrast, conditioned media from aptamer transfected MDA-MB-231 cells displayed a slight pro-angiogenic effect. Collectively, our study shows that expressing functional aptamers inside breast and endothelial cells is feasible and may exhibit therapeutic potential. PMID:27755560

  18. Can the Abraham Light Momentum and Energy in a Medium Constitute a Lorentz Four-Vector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbiao

    2013-08-01

    By analyzing the Einstein-box thought experiment with the principle of relativity, it is shown that Abraham's light momentum and energy in a medium cannot constitute a Lorentz four-vector, and they consequentially break global momentum and energy conservation laws. In contrast, Minkowski's momentum and energy always constitute a Lorentz four-vector no matter whether in a medium or in vacuum, and the Minkowski's momentum is the unique correct light momentum. A momentum-associated photon mass in a medium is exposed, which explains why only the Abraham's momentum is derived in the traditional "center-of-mass-energy" approach. The EM boundary-condition matching approach, combined with Einstein light-quantum hypothesis, is proposed to analyze this thought experiment, and it is found for the first time that only from Maxwell equations without resort to the relativity, the correctness of light momentum definitions cannot be identified. Optical pulling effect is studied as well.

  19. A small molecule PAI-1 functional inhibitor attenuates neointimal hyperplasia and vascular smooth muscle cell survival by promoting PAI-1 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Stephen P; Archambeault, Jaclyn; Higgins, Craig E; Ginnan, Roman G; Singer, Harold; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the primary inhibitor of urokinase-and tissue-type plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA), is an injury-response gene implicated in the development of tissue fibrosis and cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in the balloon catheter-injured carotid and in the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-enriched neointima of ligated arteries. PAI-1/uPA complex formation and PAI-1 antiproteolytic activity can be inhibited, via proteolytic cleavage, by the small molecule antagonist tiplaxtinin which effectively increased the VSMC apoptotic index in vitro and attenuated carotid artery neointimal formation in vivo. In contrast to the active full-length serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN), elastase-cleaved PAI-1 (similar to tiplaxtinin) also promoted VSMC apoptosis in vitro and similarly reduced neointimal formation in vivo. The mechanism through which cleaved PAI-1 (CL-PAI-1) stimulates apoptosis appears to involve the TNF-α family member TWEAK (TNF-α weak inducer of apoptosis) and it's cognate receptor, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (FN14). CL-PAI-1 sensitizes cells to TWEAK-stimulated apoptosis while full-length PAI-1 did not, presumably due to its ability to down-regulate FN14 in a low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent mechanism. It appears that prolonged exposure of VSMCs to CL-PAI-1 induces apoptosis by augmenting TWEAK/FN14 pro-apoptotic signaling. This work identifies a critical, anti-stenotic, role for a functionally-inactive (at least with regard to its protease inhibitory function) cleaved SERPIN. Therapies that promote the conversion of full-length to cleaved PAI-1 may have translational implications.

  20. Special issue: Culham Thesis Prize winners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Culham Thesis Prize is awarded annually to the nominee who has displayed an excellence in the execution of the scientific method as witnessed by the award of Doctor of Philosophy in Plasma Science from a UK or Irish university. The thesis content should exhibit significant new work and originality, clearly driven by the nominee, be well explained and demonstrate a good understanding of the subject. The prize is awarded at the Institute of Physics Plasma Physics Group Spring Conference and the prize winner gives an invited talk about their thesis work. The prize is sponsored by Culham Centre for Fusion Energy.

  1. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists.

  2. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists. PMID:24008752

  3. BOS MOrth cases prize 2008.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Padhraig S

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the clinical orthodontic treatment of two cases that were successfully entered for the 2008 intercollegiate MOrth cases prize. The first case describes the management of a 12-year-old female with an increased overjet treated using a Dynamax functional appliance followed by fixed appliances. The second case involves the management of a class II division I malocclusion complicated by an unerupted maxillary central incisor and a mandibular first molar of poor prognosis. PMID:20805348

  4. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He had laid foundations for our understanding of quantum matter like superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi liquid. Here we present some Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  5. Tissue-specific PAI-1 gene expression and glycosylation pattern in insulin-resistant old rats.

    PubMed

    Serrano, R; Barrenetxe, J; Orbe, J; Rodríguez, J A; Gallardo, N; Martínez, C; Andrés, A; Páramo, J A

    2009-11-01

    Increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been associated with obesity, aging, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, conditions that contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. PAI-1 is expressed in a variety of tissues, but the cellular origin of plasma PAI-1 is unknown. To link insulin resistance, aging, and cardiovascular disease, we examined the expression and glycosylation pattern of PAI-1 in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) from adult (3 mo) and insulin-resistant old (24 mo) Wistar rats. Glycosylated PAI-1 protein was also purified by affinity chromatography from endothelial culture supernatans to analyze its inhibitory activity. We also analyzed the contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells from WAT to PAI-1 levels with aging. Aging caused a significant increase of PAI-1 mRNA (P < 0.001) in WAT that was predominantly due to the adipocytes and not to stroma-vascular cells, while there was no modification in liver from aged rats. Moreover, PAI-1 expression increased during preadipocyte differentiation (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we found a tissue-dependent PAI-1 glycosylation pattern: adipose tissue only expresses the glycosylated PAI-1 form, whereas the liver mainly expresses the nonglycosylated form. Finally, we also found evidences suggesting that the glycosylated PAI-1 form shows higher inhibitory activity than the nonglycosylated. Our data suggest that WAT may be a major source of the elevated plasma levels of PAI-1 in insulin-resistant old rats. Additionally, the high degree of PAI-1 glycosylation and activity, together with the significant increase in visceral fat in old rats, may well contribute to an increased cardiovascular risk associated with insulin-resistant states.

  6. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  7. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  8. The 2006 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education is the nation's largest award in K-12 public education. The Broad Prize is given annually by The Broad Foundation in the form of scholarships to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing achievement gaps among ethnic…

  9. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population

    PubMed Central

    White, Marquitta J.; Kodaman, Nuri M.; Harder, Reed H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Brown, Nancy J.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10−7). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway’s effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL). PMID:26322636

  10. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population.

    PubMed

    White, Marquitta J; Kodaman, Nuri M; Harder, Reed H; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Vaughan, Douglas E; Brown, Nancy J; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10(-7)). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway's effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL).

  11. PAI-1 and TNF-α profiles of adipose tissue in obese cardiovascular disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic Gazioglu, Sema; Akan, Gokce; Atalar, Fatma; Erten, Gaye

    2015-01-01

    Obesity as a leading preventable cause of death worldwide is closely linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, a potent inhibitor of plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis, is increased in many clinical situations associated with high incidence of CVD. In the obesity-linked elevation of PAI-1, evidence points to TNF-α as an important regulator of PAI-1 expression in adipose tissue. Background: This study aims to evaluate mediastinal PAI-1 and TNF-α mRNA levels in adipose tissues (AT) and compare serum levels in obesity with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients and methods: Obese patients with (n=37) and without CAD (n=20) were included in the study. Results: The serum levels of PAI-1 and TNF-α were significantly higher in obese patients with CAD compared to obese patients without CAD. PAI-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of obese patients with CAD compared to those without CAD, TNF-α mRNA expressions were found to be higher in EAT (epicardial AT), MAT and SAT (subcutaneous AT) of obese patients with CAD. Conclusions: The study demonstrated a close direct relationship between TNF-α and PAI-1. PAI-1 mRNA expression strongly correlated positively with serum TNF-α in MAT, and TNF-α expressions with PAI-1 serum levels. PMID:26884864

  12. Resveratrol suppresses PAI-1 gene expression in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NF κ B pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NF κ B inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity. PMID:23819014

  13. Axiomatic Geometrical Optics, Abraham-Minkowski Controversy, and Photon Properties Derived Classically

    SciTech Connect

    L.Y. Dodin and N.J. Fisch

    2012-06-18

    By restating geometrical optics within the eld-theoretical approach, the classical concept of a photon in arbitrary dispersive medium is introduced, and photon properties are calculated unambiguously. In particular, the canonical and kinetic momenta carried by a photon, as well as the two corresponding energy-momentum tensors of a wave, are derived straightforwardly from rst principles of Lagrangian mechanics. The Abraham-Minkowski controversy pertaining to the de nitions of these quantities is thereby resolved for linear waves of arbitrary nature, and corrections to the traditional formulas for the photon kinetic quantities are found. An application of axiomatic geometrical optics to electromagnetic waves is also presented as an example.

  14. Health at the dawn of development: the thought of Abraham Horwitz.

    PubMed

    Pires-Alves, Fernando A; Maio, Marcos Chor

    2015-01-01

    The article explores the ideas of Pan American Health Organization director Abraham Horwitz on the relations between health and development at the time the Alliance for Progress was established, in 1961. Taking development discourse as a public philosophy of international cooperation, the discussion centers on how Horwitz worked to mediate between health and development. Horwitz endeavored to establish arguments that highlighted the importance of social policy, especially in health; he also strove to reach different audiences and drew connections between elements like health, illness, and labor productivity, without ignoring the humanistic considerations so dear to the public health tradition.

  15. The role of Abraham Lincoln in securing a charter for a homeopathic medical college.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2002-10-01

    In 1854, Abraham Lincoln was retained to prepare a state legislative proposal to charter a homeopathic medical college in Chicago. This was a complex task in view of the deep-seated animosity between allopathic or orthodox medical practitioners and irregular healers. Homeopathy was regarded as a cult by the nascent American Medical Association. In addition, the poor reputation of medical education in the United States in general, further complicated the project. Lincoln and influential individuals in Illinois lobbied legislators and succeeded in securing the charter. Subsequently, the Hahnemann Homeopathic Medical College accepted its first class in 1860 and with its successors remained in existence for almost sixty-five years.

  16. PERIOD2 is a circadian negative regulator of PAI-1 gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Wakabayashi, Miyuki; Doi, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Juzo; Ishida, Norio

    2009-04-01

    An increased level of obesity-induced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To determine whether the circadian clock component PERIOD2 (PER2) is involved in the regulation of PAI-1 gene expression, we performed transient transfection assays in vitro, and generated transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing PER2. We then compared PAI-1 expression in Tg and wild-type (WT) mice with or without obesity induced by a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. PER2 suppressed CLOCK:BMAL1- and CLOCK:BMAL2-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear translocation is dispensable for PER2 to suppress CLOCK:BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the PAI-1 promoter, because functional loss of the nuclear localization domain did not affect either the interaction with BMAL1 or the suppressive role of PER2. The diurnal expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was disrupted in a gene-specific manner, whereas that of PAI-1 mRNA was significantly damped in the hearts of PER2 Tg mice fed with a normal diet. Obesity-induced plasma PAI-1 increase was significantly suppressed in Tg mice in accordance with cardiac PAI-1 mRNA levels, whereas body weight gain and changes in metabolic parameters were identical between WT and Tg mice. Endogenous PAI-1 gene expression induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly attenuated in embryonic fibroblasts derived from Tg mice compared with those from WT mice. Our results demonstrated that PER2 represses PAI-1 gene transcription in a BMAL1/2-dependent manner. The present findings also suggest that PER2 attenuates obesity-induced hypofibrinolysis by downregulating PAI-1 expression independently of metabolic disorders.

  17. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2002-05-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded shares of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2001 to three scientists for their development of methods for the efficient catalytic production of just one member of a pair of enantiomers. One-half of the prize was divided equally between William S. Knowles and Ryoji Noyori. The other half of the prize was awarded to K. Barry Sharpless. This paper briefly discusses their discoveries and the significance of the discoveries. It includes an annotated bibliography of their most relevant and easily obtained publications.

  18. [Karl Sudhoff and the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on files in the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, this paper illuminates the Nobel Prize nominations for and by Karl Sudhoff from 1918 to 1923. He was nominated by Max Cloetta and Max Neuburger, and Sudhoff himself put forward Julius Hirschberg, Erwin Payr and Georg Sticker. Even though none of the proposals led to a prize, the nomination letters offer insights in the relationships between leading historians of medicine in the immediate post-war years. The study is part of a project exploring the construction and enactment of scientific excellence. PMID:26821496

  19. [Karl Sudhoff and the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on files in the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, this paper illuminates the Nobel Prize nominations for and by Karl Sudhoff from 1918 to 1923. He was nominated by Max Cloetta and Max Neuburger, and Sudhoff himself put forward Julius Hirschberg, Erwin Payr and Georg Sticker. Even though none of the proposals led to a prize, the nomination letters offer insights in the relationships between leading historians of medicine in the immediate post-war years. The study is part of a project exploring the construction and enactment of scientific excellence.

  20. Schmidt receives 2011 Climate Communication Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Kim; deMenocal, Peter; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Vermeer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Gavin A. Schmidt was awarded the 2011 Climate Communication Prize at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The Climate Communication Prize is funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo. The prize honors an "AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science, and highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respected and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change."

  1. Schmidt receives 2011 Climate Communication Prize: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2012-01-01

    Gavin A. Schmidt was awarded the 2011 Climate Communication Prize at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The Climate Communication Prize is funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo. The prize honors an "AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science, and highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respected and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change."

  2. Application of Long-Acting VLHL PAI-1 during Sutureless Partial Nephrectomy in Mice Reduces Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shahrour, Khaled; Keck, Rick; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    PAI-1 prevents lysis of blood clot by inhibiting the urokinase and tPA induced conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. VLHL PAI-1 protein mutant was created to extend half-life over 700 hours. The objective of this paper was to test VLHL PAI-1 effects on bleeding during partial nephrectomy in mice. All animals had a left partial nephrectomy after intravenous infusion of saline or tPA. The animals were divided into four groups. Group 1 was infused with saline and kidney was exposed to saline too; Group 2 was infused with saline and kidney was exposed to PAI-1. Group 3 was infused with tPA and kidney was exposed to saline, while Group 4 was infused with tPA and kidney was exposed to PAI-1. Preweighed gauze containing PAI-1 or saline was then applied to the kidney for 30 minutes. The gauze was afterward weighed and blood loss was measured by subtracting the preweight of gauze from the final weight. We have observed a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction of bleeding in PAI-1-treated group in comparison to saline and tPA-treated groups. Based on these results we propose that VLHL PAI-1 can be used therapeutically in limiting the flow of blood from renal wounds. PMID:25883959

  3. Increased Umbilical Cord PAI-1 Levels in Placental Insufficiency Are Associated with Fetal Hypoxia and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seferovic, Maxim D.; Gupta, Madhulika B.

    2016-01-01

    In intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a subset of pregnancies undergoes placental vascular dysregulation resulting in restricted blood flow and fetal hypoxemia. Altered transcription of hypoxic regulated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with pregnancy complications and angiogenic regulation. Here we assessed circulating PAI-1 as an indicator of placental insufficiency. Venous umbilical PAI-1 of hypoxemic (VpO2 20 versus 35 mmHg, p < 0.0001) placental insufficient pregnancies (resistance index 0.9 versus 0.63, p < 0.05) (n = 18) was compared to controls (n = 12). PAI-1 was increased (~10-fold, p < 0.001) and had a positive predictive ratio of 6.7. Further, PAI-1 levels correlated to blood oxygen (r = −0.68, p < 0.0001). The plasma's angiogenic potency measured in vitro was associated with umbilical cord blood PAI-1 levels (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). This association was attenuated by PAI-1 inhibiting antibody (p < 0.001). The results demonstrate PAI-1 as a potential marker of placental insufficiency and identify its close association with pathological hypoxia and angiogenesis in a subset of growth restricted pregnancies. PMID:26903689

  4. Application of axiomatic formal theory to the Abraham-Minkowski controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, Michael

    Continuum electrodynamics is an axiomatic formal theory whose axioms are the macroscopic Maxwell equations. We demonstrate that valid theorems of the formal theory are inconsistent with conservation laws and with special relativity because continuum electrodynamics allows transformations of the Maxwell equations that constitute an improper tensor transformation that changes the conservation properties, the relativity properties, and the space-time embedding of the coupled equations of motion. The inconsistencies are resolved by a reformulation of physical principles in a flat non-Minkowski material spacetime in which the timelike coordinate corresponds to ct/n. Applying Lagrangian field theory, we derive equations of motion for the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields in a simple dielectric medium. We construct a new formal theory of continuum electrodynamics and we derive a tensor energy-momentum continuity theorem that trivially resolves the century-old Abraham-Minkowski momentum controversy. We derive the theory of special relativity in a dielectric, including the material Lorentz factor and the material Lorentz transformation. We derive the momentum of a polariton in the context of material special relativity to confirm the resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski debate.

  5. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis. PMID:27476618

  6. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis.

  7. Fishman Receives the Shaw Prize for Astronomy

    NASA Video Gallery

    In the video, Dr. Jerry Fishman discusses his career as a scientist, his lifelong interest in science and his recognition as the 2011 Shaw Prize Recipient for Astronomy. Fishman is being recognized...

  8. Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Celebrating optical nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrit, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the pioneers of various optical schemes capable of achieving super-resolution and single-molecule detection is recognition of a revolution in optical imaging.

  9. Plyler Prize and APS Fellow Introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Physics is delighted to announce the 2013 APS Fellows sponsored by DCP and to honor the 2014 Earl K. Plyler Prize Award winner. The new APS Fellows are: Ilan Benjamin, Hua Guo, Manos Mavrikakis, Josef Paldus, Joern Siepmann, Hans-Peter Steinrueck, Douglas Tobias, Angela Wilson, and Yijing Yan. The citations for each awardee will be read out loud. I will also introduce Prof. Lai-Sheng Wang of the Department of Chemistry at Brown University, who was awarded the 2014 Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics. Please come learn about these extraordinary scientists during this prize session. Prof. Wang's Plyler Prize talk will follow immediately after this introduction. For more information, see http://www.aps.org/units/dcp/.

  10. Nobel Prize 2014: Akasaki, Amano & Nakamura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources."

  11. Nobel Prize 2011: Perlmutter, Schmidt & Riess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  12. Scientists share nobel prize for "nanoscopy".

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    Three scientists were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to developing super-resolved fluorescence microscopy, which allows biologists to study cells on a nanometer scale. PMID:25477087

  13. Fullerene discoverers win nobel prize

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-10-16

    Two Rice University (Houston) chemists, Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley, and a scientist at the University of Sussex (Brighton, U.K.), Harold W. Kroto, have won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the joint discovery of buckminsterfullerenes - soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules. The novel form of carbon, which was initially synthesized by the scientists in 1985 as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} has led to the development of {open_quotes}an entirely new branch of chemistry... with consequences in such diverse areas as astrochemistry, superconductivity, and material chemistry/physics,{close_quotes} according to the Swedish Academy of Sciences (Stockholm). For chemists, the structure is {open_quotes}uniquely beautiful and satisfying,{close_quotes} the academy says.

  14. Sheeley Receives 2009 Hale Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2009-05-01

    Neil Sheeley Jr., of the Space Science Division of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), has been awarded the 2009 George Ellery Hale Prize by the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS). The international award recognizes work in solar astronomy done over an extended period of time. Sheeley will receive the award in June at the AAS meeting in Pasadena, Calif. Sheeley is cited "for his continuing outstanding contributions to our understanding of the solar magnetic field, coronal holes, and coronal mass ejections. His wide-ranging observational and theoretical work has laid the foundation for much current research in solar and heliospheric physics, and continues to have important applications in space weather prediction."

  15. Perspectives on 2014 Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-06-01

    In celebration of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, this issue of Hippocampus includes a collection of commentaries from a broad range of perspectives on the significance of position coding neurons in the hippocampal region. From the perspective of this student of hippocampal physiology, it is argued that place cells and grid cells reflect the outcome of experiments that strongly select the information available and correspondingly observe singular "trigger features" of these neurons. Notably, however, in more naturalistic situations where multiple dimensions of information are available, hippocampal neurons have mixed selectivity wherein population-firing patterns reflect the organization of many features of experience. Thus, while discoveries on position coding were major breakthroughs in penetrating the hippocampal code, future studies exploring more complex behaviors hold the promise of revealing the full contribution of the hippocampal region to cognition and memory.

  16. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  17. Perspectives on 2014 Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-06-01

    In celebration of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, this issue of Hippocampus includes a collection of commentaries from a broad range of perspectives on the significance of position coding neurons in the hippocampal region. From the perspective of this student of hippocampal physiology, it is argued that place cells and grid cells reflect the outcome of experiments that strongly select the information available and correspondingly observe singular "trigger features" of these neurons. Notably, however, in more naturalistic situations where multiple dimensions of information are available, hippocampal neurons have mixed selectivity wherein population-firing patterns reflect the organization of many features of experience. Thus, while discoveries on position coding were major breakthroughs in penetrating the hippocampal code, future studies exploring more complex behaviors hold the promise of revealing the full contribution of the hippocampal region to cognition and memory. PMID:25787853

  18. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    PubMed

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character. PMID:27256150

  19. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    PubMed

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  20. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  1. In Favour of a Multi-Method Approach to Differentiation-Polarization Theory-Building: A Response to Abraham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtte, Mieke

    2007-01-01

    This response to the comment of Abraham on Van Houtte's study within the differentiation-polarization tradition discusses the difference between her quantitative study and the ethnographic tradition. The quantification of the polarization part of the theory--the anti-school culture--makes it possible to merge the differentiation-polarization…

  2. A Brief Analysis of Abraham Maslow's Original Writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Nedra H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes Abraham Maslow's original writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health." The review of literature in this article reveals that Maslow's hierarchy of needs have had profound effects in the area of psychology. In addition, the authors present information regarding self-actualized people, theorists of…

  3. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  4. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy."

  5. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy." PMID:25521373

  6. Aldosterone perturbs adiponectin and PAI-1 expression and secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Zhang, X-N; Pan, C-M; Sun, F; Zhu, D-L; Song, H-D; Chen, M-D

    2011-06-01

    Aldosterone is considered as a new cardiovascular risk factor that plays an important role in metabolic syndrome; however, the underlying mechanism of these effects is not clear. Hypoadiponectinemia and elevated circulating concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of aldosterone on the production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that aldosterone treatment inhibited adiponectin mRNA expression and secretion and simultaneously enhanced PAI-1 mRNA expression and secretion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone did not prevent aldosterone's effect on adiponectin or PAI-1 expression. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α produced dramatic synergistic effects on adiponectin and PAI-1 expression when added together with aldosterone. Furthermore, the effects of aldosterone on adiponectin and PAI-1 expression appear to be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) but not mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). These results suggest that the effects of aldosterone on adiponectin and PAI-1 production are one of the underlying mechanisms linking it to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. PMID:21667402

  7. Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions.

    PubMed

    Meladze, Pikria; Brown, Jac

    2015-10-01

    This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonegativity was predicted by the main Abrahamic faiths (i.e. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and internalized shame. Qualitative analysis showed that gay men who adhere to a monotheistic religious faith follow a different path to reconciling their religion and homosexuality compared to gay men who adhere to Philosophical/New Age religions or to gay men who have no religious faith. The implications of these findings as well as directions for future research studies were discussed. PMID:25772199

  8. Doctor James Young Simpson, Rabbi Abraham De Sola, and Genesis Chapter 3, verse 16.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J

    1996-11-01

    When Dr. James Simpson began to use anesthesia in child-birth in 1846, a religious furor arose against its use. For many people, including many physicians, Genesis chapter 3, verse 16, implied that childbirth had to be a painful process. In 1849, the editors of one of Canada's medical journals asked Abraham De Sola, Canada's first rabbi, to give his interpretation of Genesis 3:16 for the benefit of their readers, which he did in a three-part article. Using Hebrew biblical scholars as his source, he wrote that the correct interpretation of this passage was that with toil or labor shall women bring forth children, rather than with pain. Therefore, by using anesthesia in childbirth, physicians were not going against the scriptures or the word of God.

  9. Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions.

    PubMed

    Meladze, Pikria; Brown, Jac

    2015-10-01

    This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonegativity was predicted by the main Abrahamic faiths (i.e. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and internalized shame. Qualitative analysis showed that gay men who adhere to a monotheistic religious faith follow a different path to reconciling their religion and homosexuality compared to gay men who adhere to Philosophical/New Age religions or to gay men who have no religious faith. The implications of these findings as well as directions for future research studies were discussed.

  10. Abraham Flexner and the Development of the Yale School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prutkin, Jordan M.

    2010-01-01

    Abraham Flexner first toured the Yale University School of Medicine in preparation for his report of 1910, but it was just the beginning of his relationship with the school. While his review of Yale in his report was generally favorable, he mentioned several shortfalls that needed to be improved to make the school acceptable. Throughout the next twenty-five years, Flexner worked with Deans George Blumer and Milton C. Winternitz to improve the school’s finances, infrastructure, and quality of education through his work with the Carnegie Foundation and General Education Board. Flexner has been given great accolades for his work on medical education for the country, but little mention is made of him at Yale, even though he was one of the most influential figures in the development of Yale in the last century. PMID:20885903

  11. Reduced-order Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation and the consistency of classical electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2015-03-01

    It is widely believed that classical electromagnetism is either unphysical or inconsistent, owing to pathological behavior when self-force and radiation reaction are non-negligible. We argue that there is no inconsistency as long as it is recognized that certain types of charge distribution are simply impossible, such as, for example, a point particle with finite charge and finite inertia. This is owing to the fact that negative inertial mass is an unphysical concept in classical physics. It remains useful to obtain an equation of motion for small charged objects that describes their motion to good approximation without requiring knowledge of the charge distribution within the object. We give a simple method to achieve this, leading to a reduced-order form of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation, essentially as proposed by Eliezer, Landau, and Lifshitz and derived by Ford and O'Connell.

  12. Abraham Lincoln's blue pills. Did our 16th president suffer from mercury poisoning?

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, N; Feldman, R G; Greaves, I A

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that Abraham Lincoln took a medicine called "blue mass" or "blue pill," commonly prescribed in the 19th century. What is now hardly known is that the main ingredient of blue mass was finely dispersed elemental mercury. As his friends understood, mercury was often prescribed for melancholy or "hypochondriasis," a condition Lincoln famously endured. Mercury in the form of the blue pill is a potential neurotoxin, which we have demonstrated by recreating and testing the recipe. We present the testimony of many of Lincoln's contemporaries to suggest that Lincoln suffered the neurobehavioural consequences of mercury intoxication but, perhaps crucial to history, before the main years of his presidency; he was astute enough to recognize the effects and stop the medication soon after his inauguration.

  13. Abraham Lincoln's marfanoid mother: the earliest known case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B?

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2012-07-01

    The nature and cause of President Abraham Lincoln's unusual physical features have long been debated, with the greatest attention directed at two monogenic disorders of the transforming growth factor β system: Marfan syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. The present report examines newly discovered phenotypic information about Lincoln's biological mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, and concludes that (a) Lincoln's mother was skeletally marfanoid, (b) the President and his mother were highly concordant for the presence of numerous facial features found in various transforming growth factor β disorders, and (c) Lincoln's mother, like her son, had hypotonic skeletal muscles, resulting in myopathic facies and 'pseudodepression'. These conclusions establish that mother and son had the same monogenic autosomal dominant marfanoid disorder. A description of Nancy Hanks Lincoln as coarse-featured, and a little-known statement that a wasting disease contributed to her death at age 34, lends support to the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B hypothesis.

  14. Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Sphere. Updating the Lorentz-Abraham Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    "This is a remarkable book. […] A fresh and novel approach to old problems and to their solution." Fritz Rohrlich, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Syracuse University This book takes a fresh, systematic approach to determining the equation of motion for the classical model of the electron introduced by Lorentz more than 100 years ago. The original derivations of Lorentz, Abraham, Poincaré and Schott are modified and generalized for the charged insulator model of the electron to obtain an equation of motion consistent with causal solutions to the Maxwell-Lorentz equations and the equations of special relativity. The solutions to the resulting equation of motion are free of pre-acceleration and runaway behavior. Binding forces and a total stress momentum energy tensor are derived for the charged insulator model. General expressions for synchrotron radiation emerge in a form convenient for determining the motion of the electron. Appendices provide simplified derivations of the self-force and power at arbitrary velocity. In this Second Edition, the method used for eliminating the noncausal pre-acceleration from the equation of motion has been generalized to eliminate pre-deceleration as well. The generalized method is applied to obtain the causal solution to the equation of motion of a charge accelerating in a uniform electric field for a finite time interval. Alternative derivations of the Landau-Lifshitz approximation to the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation of motion are also given, along with Spohn’s elegant solution of this approximate equation for a charge moving in a uniform magnetic field. The book is a valuable resource for students and researchers in physics, engineering and the history of science.

  15. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  16. Genetic association of five plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) polymorphisms and idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kim, Young Ran; Lee, Bo Eun; Choi, Yi Seul; Kim, Ji Hyang; Shin, Ji Eun; Rah, HyungChul; Cha, Sun Hee; Lee, Woo Sik; Kim, Nam Keun

    2013-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is important for maintaining pregnancy. Aberrantly increased PAI-1 levels may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation, leading to pregnancy loss. This study investigated the association of PAI-1 polymorphisms (PAI-1 rs2227631 [-844G>A], rs1799889 [-675 4G/5G], rs6092 [43G>A], rs2227694 [9785G>A], and rs7242 [11053T>G]) with idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) in Korean women. We screened 308 RPL patients and 227 control participants for five PAI-1 polymorphisms. Genotyping of PAI-1 was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. PAI-1 4G4G and -844AA/4G4G/11053GG genotypes were associated with RPL. PAI-1 -844A/4G/43G/9785G/11053G haplotype was connected to hypofibrinolytic status (i.e. increased levels of plasma PAI-1, increased numbers of platelets, reduced prothrombin time, and reduced activated partial thromboplastin time). Moreover, PAI-1 11053TG+GG frequency was positively related to plasma homocysteine and urate levels, whereas -844AA frequency was associated with plasma folate concentrations according to ordinal logistic regression analysis. Based on these results, we propose that PAI-1 -844G>A, 4G/5G, and 11053T>G polymorphisms are markers of RPL.

  17. The 6th FDR prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2013-06-01

    From the 58 papers published in 2012 in Fluid Dynamics Research, the following paper has been selected for the sixth FDR prize: The finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method and its application in computational aero-acoustics by Michihisa Tsutahara (Professor Emeritus, Kobe University, Japan), published in volume 44 (August 2012) 045507. This is a review paper of the author's recent work on the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM). In this paper, the author introduces a modified FDLBM and its application to aero-acoustics. To solve the discrete Bhatnager, Gross and Krook equation for simulating fluid flow, the FDLBM applies a stable finite-difference scheme on a curvilinear coordinate system, whereas the ordinary lattice Boltzmann method uses regular lattices. It is known that for the lattice Boltzmann methods, there is difficulty in simulating high Mach number compressible flows in principle. To alleviate this, the author proposed the modified FDLBM, expanding the flexibility of setting time increments. With this FDLBM, the author has shown that it is possible to simulate compressible flows efficiently around complex bluff bodies and with complex aero-acoustic behaviour. The author summarizes all those works, including studies only available in Japanese up to now, in this review paper. After discussing the details of the FDLBM proposed by the author, example results of simulating the Aeolian tone generated from a circular cylinder at the Mach number M = 0.7 are shown. Then, the scheme is expanded for moving bodies by combining with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation. Using this moving mesh scheme, the author shows the simulation results of the very strong sound pressure generated by a high-speed train in a tunnel. For issues of sound propagation in compressible two-phase flows whose density ratio is high, the two-particle model is introduced. Also, techniques to reduce noise generation from the flow velocity and pressure at gas

  18. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  19. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  20. PAI: Predicting adenosine to inosine editing sites by using pseudo nucleotide compositions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) editing is the most prevalent kind of RNA editing and involves in many biological processes. Accurate identification of A-to-I editing site is invaluable for better understanding its biological functions. Due to the limitations of experimental methods, in the present study, a support vector machine based-model, called PAI, is proposed to identify A-to-I editing site in D. melanogaster. In this model, RNA sequences are encoded by “pseudo dinucleotide composition” into which six RNA physiochemical properties were incorporated. PAI achieves promising performances in jackknife test and independent dataset test, indicating that it holds very high potential to become a useful tool for identifying A-to-I editing site. For the convenience of experimental scientists, a web-server was constructed for PAI and it is freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PAI. PMID:27725762

  1. Validity of the PAI interpersonal scales for measuring the dimensions of the interpersonal circumplex.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Emily B; Kurtz, John E; DeMoor, Rebecca M; Markey, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    Two studies evaluated the validity of the interpersonal scales, Dominance (DOM) and Warmth (WRM), from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991, 2007) to measure the 2 dimensions of the interpersonal circumplex (IPC). In Study 1, 114 college freshmen completed the PAI and the Interpersonal Adjectives Scale (IAS; Wiggins, 1995). In Study 2, 170 college students completed the PAI and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Short Circumplex (IIP-SC; Soldz, Budman, Demby, & Merry, 1995). The results of both studies supported the convergent validity of DOM and WRM, although discriminant validity was stronger using the IIP-SC as the criterion. Circumplex projections placed DOM and WRM in the appropriate segments of both the IAS and IIP-SC. These findings provide additional support for the validity of the PAI interpersonal scales as measures of the primary dimensions of the IPC.

  2. The German Adaptation and Standardization of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI).

    PubMed

    Groves, Julia A; Engel, Rolf R

    2007-02-01

    We developed the German Adaptation of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) under careful consideration of current adaptation literature and guidelines. The adaptation process included the translation of the 344 items into German, a back translation into English as well as the testing of the language equivalence using a bilingual sample. We then standardized the final German version of the PAI for the German population. We compared the American and German norm and reliability data. The observed differences in PAI scale means did not exceed 5 T scores. Internal consistency reliability showed a similar pattern in both language versions, although the German alpha coefficients were on average slightly lower than the American ones. Factor structure was similar in both versions. We discuss expectations about the German PAI and possible problems for its practical usefulness for the German-speaking population.

  3. Relationships between coping style and PAI profiles in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Deisinger, J A; Cassisi, J E; Whitaker, S L

    1996-05-01

    Relationships between coping style and psychological functioning were examined in a heterogeneous community sample (N = 168). Psychological functioning was categorized with the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991). Subjects were assigned to PAI configural profile clusters, using T-scores from PAI clinical scales. Three PAI clusters were prominent in this sample: normal, anxious, and eccentric. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that these clusters differed significantly in coping style, as measured by the dispositional format of the COPE Inventory (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989). Normals coped through avoidance significantly less than anxious or eccentric subjects. Also, normals engaged in seeking social support and venting more than eccentric but less than anxious subjects. Gender differences also were noted, with women more likely to cope by seeking social support and men more likely to cope through hedonistic escapism.

  4. Vitronectin-binding PAI-1 protects against the development of cardiac fibrosis through interaction with fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianyong; Yang, Hai-Chun; Kon, Valentina; Fogo, Agnes B; Lawrence, Daniel A; Ma, Ji

    2014-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes or abates fibrotic processes occurring in different organs. Binding of PAI-1 to vitronectin, an extracellular matrix component, may inhibit vitronectin-integrin complex-mediated cellular responses in pathophysiological conditions. To investigate the importance of plasmin suppression vs vitronectin-binding pathways of PAI-1 in cardiac fibrosis, we studied uninephrectomized mice fed a high salt diet and infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) together with different PAI-1 variants, including PAI-1AK (AK) that inhibits plasminogen activators but does not bind vitronectin, PAI-1RR (RR) that binds vitronectin but does not have protease inhibitory effects or control PAI-1 (CPAI), the control mutant that has similar molecular backbone and half-life as AK and RR while retaining all functions of native PAI-1. Compared with RR and CPAI, non-vitronectin-binding AK significantly increased expression of cardiac fibroblast marker, periostin (Ang+AK 8.40±3.55 vs Ang+RR 2.23±0.44 and Ang+CPAI 2.33±0.12% positive area, both P<0.05) and cardiac fibrosis (Ang+AK 1.79±0.26% vs Ang+RR 0.91±0.18% and Ang+CPAI 0.81±0.12% fibrotic area, both P<0.05), as well as Col1 mRNA (Ang+AK 12.81±1.84 vs Ang+RR 4.04±1.06 and Ang+CPAI 5.23±1.21 fold increase, both P<0.05). To elucidate mechanisms underlying the protective effects of vitronectin-binding PAI-1 against fibrosis, fibroblasts from normal adult human ventricles were stimulated with Ang and different PAI-1 variants. Protease inhibitory AK and CPAI increased supernatant fibronectin, while decreasing plasminogen activator/plasmin activities and matrix metalloproteinase. RR and CPAI variants significantly reduced fibroblast expression of integrin β3, vitronectin level in the supernatant and fibroblast adhesion to vitronectin compared with the non-vitronectin-binding AK. Further, RR and CPAI preserved apoptotic, decreased anti-apoptotic and proliferative activities in fibroblasts. Thus

  5. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Niamh M.; Joyce, Myles R.; Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M.

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  6. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  7. Therapeutic Assessment in Psychological Triage Using the PAI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Morey, Leslie C

    2016-01-01

    This case illustrates the utility of incorporating therapeutic assessment in a triage context that typically involves a focus on gathering information. A man referred to our clinic by a local mental health center was seen by our assessment team for a triage that includes the administration of a single psychological test, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). Although this triage must rapidly gather information to determine client suitability and treatment assignment, we still attempt to work with clients to collaboratively develop goals for this assessment that include addressing questions that are central concerns for the clients. In this case, the test results suggested a severe disorder that accounted for many phenomena that he had been experiencing but had apparently been reluctant to share. The information gathered led to a referral to a different treatment program that could provide pharmacological and more intensive forms of treatment. However, the collaborative bond formed between the assessor and the client during this triage was sufficiently strong that it was our assessor to whom the client turned in a subsequent crisis precipitated by a symptomatic exacerbation. This case illustrates complementary information gathering and therapeutic goals of assessment even in the context of a brief assessment. PMID:26730992

  8. [Space coding: a Nobel prize diary].

    PubMed

    Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2015-02-01

    The Nobel Prize in Medecine or Physiology for 2014 has been awarded to three neuroscientists: John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser for "their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain". This rewards innovative ideas which led to the development of intracerebral recording techniques in freely moving animals, thus providing links between behavior and physiology. This prize highlights how neural activity sustains our ability to localize ourselves and move around in the environment. This research provides key insights on how the brain drives behavior. PMID:25744268

  9. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: children's differentiation between historical and fantasy characters.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Kathleen H; Kim, Angie L; Schwalen, Courtney E; Harris, Paul L

    2009-11-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children (5-, 6-, and 7-year-olds) understand the status of familiar figures, correctly judging historical figures to be real and fictional figures to be pretend. However, when presented with information about novel figures embedded in either a realistic narrative or a narrative with obvious fantasy elements, only older children used the narrative to make an appropriate assessment of the status of the protagonist. In Experiment 2, 3-, and 4-year-olds were prompted to judge whether the story events were really possible or not. Those who did so accurately were able to deploy that judgment to correctly assess the status of the protagonist.

  10. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: children's differentiation between historical and fantasy characters.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Kathleen H; Kim, Angie L; Schwalen, Courtney E; Harris, Paul L

    2009-11-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children (5-, 6-, and 7-year-olds) understand the status of familiar figures, correctly judging historical figures to be real and fictional figures to be pretend. However, when presented with information about novel figures embedded in either a realistic narrative or a narrative with obvious fantasy elements, only older children used the narrative to make an appropriate assessment of the status of the protagonist. In Experiment 2, 3-, and 4-year-olds were prompted to judge whether the story events were really possible or not. Those who did so accurately were able to deploy that judgment to correctly assess the status of the protagonist. PMID:19766203

  11. Abraham Lincoln loses a medical malpractice case, debates Stephen A. Douglas, and secures two murder acquittals.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2004-02-01

    An improperly healed fracture was the most common reason for the medical malpractice crisis between the 1830s and 1860s in the United States. As a practicing lawyer in Illinois, Abraham Lincoln defended physicians in medical malpractice law suits. One of these was Dr. Powers Ritchey, who was sued for malpractice in 1855. Lincoln agreed to represent Dr. Ritchey in 1858 as the case was appealed to the supreme court of Illinois. In the interim, Lincoln defended two indicted murderers and won acquittals for both. Between the two murder trials, Lincoln debated Stephen A. Douglas while running for U.S. Senator from Illinois. Lincoln believed that Ritchey's case was poorly represented in the lower court. Ritchey's prior attorneys did not file a bill of exceptions to the testimony of the plaintiff's expert medical witnesses. Lincoln attempted to rebut the allegation of a lack of reasonable medical care and diligence by Ritchey, and he sought to secure a new trial for his client. In its decision, the supreme court of Illinois did not find any error and affirmed the lower court's judgment.

  12. It's No Secret: Progress Prized in Brownsville

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article features Brownsville Independent School District which was awarded the prestigious 2008 Broad Prize for Urban Education for being the nation's most improved urban school district. The Texas border district sees teacher training and data-based instruction as paths to learning gains--and the $1 million Broad award adds validation. In…

  13. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  14. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    PubMed

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006.

  15. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  16. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006.

  17. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    PubMed

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006. PMID:25894471

  18. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:27040677

  19. The 2007 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education, the nation's largest K-12 public education award given annually by The Broad Foundation, is awarded to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing income and ethnic achievement gaps. One hundred of the largest urban…

  20. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  1. Nobel Prize 2013: Englert and Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2013-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider".

  2. Therapeutic Pneumothorax and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Polianski, Igor J

    2015-08-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, the epidemic proportions of tuberculosis puzzled great parts the scientific community. Thus it is not surprising that well-known scholars who worked on particularly promising solutions to fight the disease were nominated for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, perhaps the most prestigious benchmark of scientific excellence. The authors have gathered files on the Italian phtisiologist Carlo Forlanini (1847 to 1918) at the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden. Drawing on these files and contemporary publications, the authors discuss the origin of artificial pneumothorax for treating pulmonary tuberculosis, show how it became an international gold standard operation, and trace why the Nobel committee finally chose not to award Forlanini. Twenty Nobel Prize nominations for Forlanini were submitted from 1912 to 1919 exclusively by Italian scholars. In 1913 and 1914, Forlanini was on the shortlist of the Nobel Committee and thus one of the prime candidates for the prestigious prize. Important aspects of the rise, fall, and revival of the artificial pneumothorax from 1815 to 2015 are highlighted along with its benefits and risks. PMID:26234863

  3. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:24668222

  4. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006. PMID:23579987

  5. The Brain Prize 2013: the optogenetics revolution.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Andreas; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2013-10-01

    The 2013 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize was awarded to Ernst Bamberg, Edward Boyden, Karl Deisseroth, Peter Hegemann, Gero Miesenböck, and Georg Nagel 'for their invention and refinement of optogenetics'. Why optogenetics? And why this sextet? To appreciate why, we turn first to some of the core questions of neuroscience and the technical difficulties that long obstructed their resolution.

  6. How Einstein Got the Nobel Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Abraham

    1982-01-01

    Discusses why the Nobel Committee for Physics waited so long before giving Einstein the Nobel Prize and why they did not award it for relativity, but for the photoelectric effect instead. Focuses on the judgments of leading scientists who made nominations as well as committee members' decisions. (Author/JN)

  7. Therapeutic Pneumothorax and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Polianski, Igor J

    2015-08-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, the epidemic proportions of tuberculosis puzzled great parts the scientific community. Thus it is not surprising that well-known scholars who worked on particularly promising solutions to fight the disease were nominated for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, perhaps the most prestigious benchmark of scientific excellence. The authors have gathered files on the Italian phtisiologist Carlo Forlanini (1847 to 1918) at the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden. Drawing on these files and contemporary publications, the authors discuss the origin of artificial pneumothorax for treating pulmonary tuberculosis, show how it became an international gold standard operation, and trace why the Nobel committee finally chose not to award Forlanini. Twenty Nobel Prize nominations for Forlanini were submitted from 1912 to 1919 exclusively by Italian scholars. In 1913 and 1914, Forlanini was on the shortlist of the Nobel Committee and thus one of the prime candidates for the prestigious prize. Important aspects of the rise, fall, and revival of the artificial pneumothorax from 1815 to 2015 are highlighted along with its benefits and risks.

  8. PAI-1 over-expression decreases experimental post-thrombotic vein wall fibrosis by a non-vitronectin dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Ballard-Lipka, Nicole L.; Roelofs, Karen J.; Farris, Diana M.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Henke, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Factors associated with post-thrombotic syndrome are known clinically, but the underlying cellular processes at the vein wall are not well-delineated. Prior work suggests that vein wall damage does not correlate with thrombus resolution, but rather with plasminogen activator-1 (PAI-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Objective We hypothesized that PAI-1 would confer post venous thrombosis (VT) vein wall protection via a Vitronectin (Vn) dependent mechanism. Methods A stasis model of VT was used with harvest over 2 weeks, in wild type (WT), Vn−/−, and PAI-1 overexpressing mice (PAI-1 Tg). Results PAI-1 Tg mice had larger VT at 6 and 14 days, compared to controls, but Vn−/−mice had no alteration of VT resolution. Gene deletion of Vn resulted in increased, rather than expected decrease in circulating PAI-1 activity. While both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg had attenuated intimal fibrosis, PAI-1 Tg had significantly less vein wall collagen and a compensatory increase in collagen III gene expression. Both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg vein wall had less monocyte chemotactic factor-1, and fewer macrophages (F4/80), with significantly less MMP-2 activity and decreased TIMP-1 antigen. Ex vivo assessment of TGFβ mediated fibrotic response showed that PAI-1 Tg vein walls had increased profibrotic gene expression (collagen I, III, MMP-2 and α-SMA) as compared with controls, opposite of the in vivo response. Conclusions The absence of Vn increases circulating PAI-1, which positively modulates vein wall fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner. Translationally, PAI-1 elevation may decrease vein wall damage after DVT, perhaps by decreasing macrophage-mediated activities. PMID:24943740

  9. Male-female differences in the genetic regulation of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a Ghanaian population.

    PubMed

    Schoenhard, J A; Asselbergs, F W; Poku, K A; Stocki, S A; Gordon, S; Vaughan, D E; Brown, N J; Moore, J H; Williams, Scott M

    2008-12-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation, and have been identified as risk factors for thromboembolic disease. Prior studies investigated determinants of t-PA and PAI-1 expression, but mainly in Caucasian subjects. The aim of this study was to identify the contributions of genetic and other factors to inter-individual variation in plasma levels of t-PA and PAI-1 in a large-scale population-based sample from urban West Africa. t-PA, PAI-1 and several demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic parameters were measured in 992 residents of Sunyani, the capital of the Brong-Ahafo region of Ghana. In addition, nine gene polymorphisms associated with components of the renin-angiotensin and fibrinolytic systems were determined. We found that BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, glucose, and triglycerides were all significant predictors of t-PA and PAI-1 in both females and males. In addition, a significant relationship was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G (rs1799768) polymorphism on PAI-1 levels in females, the TPA I/D (rs4646972) polymorphism on t-PA and PAI-1 in males, the renin (rs3730103) polymorphism on t-PA and PAI-1 in males, the ethanolamine kinase 2 (rs1917542) polymorphism on PAI-1 in males, and the renin (rs1464816) polymorphism on t-PA in females and on PAI-1 in males. This study of urban West Africans shows that t-PA and PAI-1 levels are determined by both genetic loci of the fibrinolytic and renin-angiotensin systems and other factors often associated with cardiovascular disease, and that genetic factors differ between males and females.

  10. Nobel Prizes and the emerging virus concept.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Erling

    2008-01-01

    The existence of infectious agents smaller than bacteria was demonstrated already during the 1890s. After this discovery it took more than 50 years before a resilient definition of viruses could be given. There were separate developments of knowledge concerning plant viruses, bacterial viruses and animal viruses. In the mid-1930s, Wendell Stanley at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research at Princeton described the purification and crystallization of tobacco mosaic virus. The finding of an "infectious protein" led to him receiving a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1946. In studies initiated at the end of the 1930s, bacteriophages were used as a model for replicating genes. They led to important insights into the unique characteristics of virus-cell interactions. However, an understanding of the chemical nature of animal virus particles and their mode of replication was slow in coming. Not until the early 1950s did tissue culture techniques become available, which allowed studies also of an extended number of animal viruses. This article discusses the emergence of concepts which eventually allowed a description of viruses. The unique real-time analyses of the state of knowledge provided by the Nobel Prize archives were used in the investigation. These archives remain secret for 50 years. Besides all of the underlying documents of the Prize to Stanley, comprehensive investigations made in the mid 1950s of Seymour E. Cohen, Max Delbrück, Alfred D. Hershey and Salvador D. Luria (the latter three received a Prize in Medicine in 1969) and of André Lwoff (he shared a Prize in Medicine with Francois Jacob and Jaques Monod in 1965) were reviewed. The final phase of the evolution of our understanding of the virus concept closely paralleled the eventual insight into the chemical nature of the genetic material. Understanding the principle nature of barriers to the development of new concepts is of timeless value for fostering and facilitating new discoveries in science

  11. PAI-1 Expression Is Required for HDACi-Induced Proliferative Arrest in ras-Transformed Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen P.; Higgins, Craig E.; Higgins, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant transformation of mammalian cells with ras family oncogenes results in dramatic changes in cellular architecture and growth traits. The generation of flat revertants of v-K-ras-transformed renal cells by exposure to the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB) was previously found to be dependent on transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 (SERPINE1) gene (encoding the type-1 inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activators). NaB-initiated PAI-1 expression preceded induced cell spreading and entry into G1 arrest. To assess the relevance of PAI-1 induction to growth arrest in this cell system more critically, two complementary approaches were used. The addition of a stable, long half-life, recombinant PAI-1 mutant to PAI-1-deficient v-K-ras-/c-Ha-ras-transformants or to PAI-1 functionally null, NaB-resistant, 4HH cells (engineered by antisense knockdown of PAI-1 mRNA transcripts) resulted in marked cytostasis in the absence of NaB. The transfection of ras-transformed cells with the Rc/CMVPAI expression construct, moreover, significantly elevated constitutive PAI-1 synthesis (10- to 20-fold) with a concomitant reduction in proliferative rate. These data suggest that high-level PAI-1 expression suppresses growth of chronic ras-oncogene transformed cells and is likely a major cytostatic effector of NaB exposure. PMID:21912547

  12. HIF-2alpha-dependent PAI-1 induction contributes to angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geis, Theresa; Döring, Claudia; Popp, Rüdiger; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehne, Nathalie; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Hypoxia promotes progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), not only affecting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, but also angiogenesis and thus, increasing the risk of metastasis. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF)-1α and -2α cause adaptation of tumors to hypoxia, still with uncertainties towards the angiogenic switch. We created a stable knockdown of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HepG2 cells and generated cocultures of HepG2 spheroids with embryonic bodies as an in vitro tumor model mimicking the cancer microenvironment. The naturally occuring oxygen and nutrient gradients within the cocultures allow us to question the role of distinct HIF isoforms in regulating HCC angiogenesis. In cocultures with a HIF-2α knockdown, angiogenesis was attenuated, while the knockdown of HIF-1α was without effect. Microarray analysis identified plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as a HIF-2α target gene in HepG2 cells. The knockdown of PAI-1 in HepG2 cells also lowered angiogenesis. Blocking plasmin, the downstream target of PAI-1, with aprotinin in HIF-2α knockdown (k/d) cells proved a cause-effect relation and restored angiogenesis, with no effect on control cocultures. Suggestively, HIF-2α increases PAI-1 to lower concentrations of active plasmin, thereby supporting angiogenesis. We conclude that the HIF-2α target gene PAI-1 favors the angiogenic switch in HCC. PMID:25489981

  13. HIF-2alpha-dependent PAI-1 induction contributes to angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geis, Theresa; Döring, Claudia; Popp, Rüdiger; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehne, Nathalie; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Hypoxia promotes progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), not only affecting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, but also angiogenesis and thus, increasing the risk of metastasis. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF)-1α and -2α cause adaptation of tumors to hypoxia, still with uncertainties towards the angiogenic switch. We created a stable knockdown of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HepG2 cells and generated cocultures of HepG2 spheroids with embryonic bodies as an in vitro tumor model mimicking the cancer microenvironment. The naturally occuring oxygen and nutrient gradients within the cocultures allow us to question the role of distinct HIF isoforms in regulating HCC angiogenesis. In cocultures with a HIF-2α knockdown, angiogenesis was attenuated, while the knockdown of HIF-1α was without effect. Microarray analysis identified plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as a HIF-2α target gene in HepG2 cells. The knockdown of PAI-1 in HepG2 cells also lowered angiogenesis. Blocking plasmin, the downstream target of PAI-1, with aprotinin in HIF-2α knockdown (k/d) cells proved a cause-effect relation and restored angiogenesis, with no effect on control cocultures. Suggestively, HIF-2α increases PAI-1 to lower concentrations of active plasmin, thereby supporting angiogenesis. We conclude that the HIF-2α target gene PAI-1 favors the angiogenic switch in HCC.

  14. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines.

  15. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) with proteasome within endothelial cells activated with inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-12-16

    Quiescent endothelial cells contain low concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2). However, its synthesis can be rapidly stimulated by a variety of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we provide evidence that PAI-2 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity in endothelial cells. To ensure that the PAI-2·proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after (a) transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-2 antibodies and (b) silencing of the PAI-2 gene using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-2·proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. As judged by confocal microscopy, both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern, but they also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. PAI-2 was not polyubiquitinated, suggesting that it bound to proteasome not as the substrate but rather as its inhibitor. Consistently, increased PAI-2 expression (a) abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and pd2EGFP-N1, (b) prevented degradation of p53, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting, and (c) inhibited proteasome cleavage of specific fluorogenic substrate. This suggests that PAI-2, in endothelial cells induced with inflammatory stimuli, can inhibit proteasome and thus tilt the balance favoring proapoptotic signaling.

  16. Association of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 2 (PAI-2) with Proteasome within Endothelial Cells Activated with Inflammatory Stimuli*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Quiescent endothelial cells contain low concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2). However, its synthesis can be rapidly stimulated by a variety of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we provide evidence that PAI-2 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity in endothelial cells. To ensure that the PAI-2·proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after (a) transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-2 antibodies and (b) silencing of the PAI-2 gene using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-2·proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. As judged by confocal microscopy, both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern, but they also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. PAI-2 was not polyubiquitinated, suggesting that it bound to proteasome not as the substrate but rather as its inhibitor. Consistently, increased PAI-2 expression (a) abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-2 and pd2EGFP-N1, (b) prevented degradation of p53, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting, and (c) inhibited proteasome cleavage of specific fluorogenic substrate. This suggests that PAI-2, in endothelial cells induced with inflammatory stimuli, can inhibit proteasome and thus tilt the balance favoring proapoptotic signaling. PMID:21976669

  17. First Calderón Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  18. The regulatory region of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Lund, L R; Sartorio, R; Lania, A; Andreasen, P A; Danø, K; Blasi, F

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has been isolated and its promoter region characterized. PAI-1 regulation by glucocorticoids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and the phorbol ester PMA is shown to be exerted at the promoter level. A fragment spanning 805 nucleotides of the 5' flanking and 72 of the 5' untranslated region contain information enough to promote transcription and to respond to glucocorticoids when fused to a reporter gene and transfected into human fibrosarcoma cells. A moderately repetitive DNA sequence, containing a TATA box, a GRE consensus, a Z-DNA forming sequence and two imperfect direct repeats at the extremities, is present a few nucleotides 5' of the human PAI-1 gene transcription start site, raising the possibility that this gene could have been activated by DNA insertion during evolution. Images PMID:3130610

  19. Reforming medical education in ethics and humanities by finding common ground with Abraham Flexner.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; McCullough, Laurence B; Wear, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Abraham Flexner was commissioned by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching to conduct the 1910 survey of all U.S. and Canadian medical schools because medical education was perceived to lack rigor and strong learning environments. Existing proprietary schools were shown to have inadequate student scholarship and substandard faculty and teaching venues. Flexner's efforts and those of the American Medical Association resulted in scores of inadequate medical schools being closed and the curricula of the survivors being radically changed. Flexner presumed that medical students would already be schooled in the humanities in college. He viewed the humanities as essential to physician development but did not explicitly incorporate this position into his 1910 report, although he emphasized this point in later writings. Medical ethics and humanities education since 1970 has sought integration with the sciences in medical school. Most programs, however, are not well integrated with the scientific/clinical curriculum, comprehensive across four years of training, or cohesive with nationally formulated goals and objectives. The authors propose a reformation of medical humanities teaching in medical schools inspired by Flexner's writings on premedical education in the context of contemporary educational requirements. College and university education in the humanities is committed to a broad education, consistent with long-standing tenets of liberal arts education. As a consequence, premedical students do not study clinically oriented science or humanities. The medical school curriculum already provides teaching of clinically relevant sciences. The proposed four-year curriculum should likewise provide clinically relevant humanities teaching to train medical students and residents comprehensively in humane, professional patient care.

  20. [The 2008 Nobel Prizes in medicine and physiology].

    PubMed

    Valdespino, José Luis; Ponce-de-León, Samuel; de Lourdes Garcia, María

    2009-01-01

    For the last century, the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine has been awarded worldwide to significant discoveries. The prize allows the dissemination of information on the achievements of recipients, promotes understanding of scientific knowledge among the public and attracts young students to biomedical research. This paper briefly describes the prizes granted to the fields of physiology and medicine, emphasizing those that related to development of vaccines. PMID:19685833

  1. HIF-2alpha-dependent PAI-1 induction contributes to angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, Theresa; Döring, Claudia; Popp, Rüdiger; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehne, Nathalie; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Hypoxia promotes progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), not only affecting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, but also angiogenesis and thus, increasing the risk of metastasis. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF)-1α and -2α cause adaptation of tumors to hypoxia, still with uncertainties towards the angiogenic switch. We created a stable knockdown of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HepG2 cells and generated cocultures of HepG2 spheroids with embryonic bodies as an in vitro tumor model mimicking the cancer microenvironment. The naturally occuring oxygen and nutrient gradients within the cocultures allow us to question the role of distinct HIF isoforms in regulating HCC angiogenesis. In cocultures with a HIF-2α knockdown, angiogenesis was attenuated, while the knockdown of HIF-1α was without effect. Microarray analysis identified plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as a HIF-2α target gene in HepG2 cells. The knockdown of PAI-1 in HepG2 cells also lowered angiogenesis. Blocking plasmin, the downstream target of PAI-1, with aprotinin in HIF-2α knockdown (k/d) cells proved a cause–effect relation and restored angiogenesis, with no effect on control cocultures. Suggestively, HIF-2α increases PAI-1 to lower concentrations of active plasmin, thereby supporting angiogenesis. We conclude that the HIF-2α target gene PAI-1 favors the angiogenic switch in HCC. - Highlights: • HepG2 were cocultured with stem cells to mimic a cancer microenvironment in vitro. • A knockdown of HIF-2α reduces angiogenesis. • PAI-1 was identified as a HIF-2α target gene in HCC by microarray analysis. • HIF-2α induces the angiogenic switch via inhibition of plasmin.

  2. New AGU Climate Communication Prize: Call for nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the newly launched AGU Climate Communication Prize. This new Union prize, generously funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo., will honor an AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science. The prize highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change. The prize will be awarded annually and will be presented at AGU's Fall Meeting. It will carry a cash award of $25,000.

  3. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits angiotensin II- stimulated PAI-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Min, Ae-Kyung; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Park, Young Joo; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Wan-Ju; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2010-01-31

    Angiotensin II is a major effector molecule in the development of cardiovascular disease. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II promotes cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation through the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression. Previously, we demonstrated that small heterodimer partner (SHP) represses PAI-1 expression in the liver through the inhibition of TGF-beta signaling pathways. Here, we investigated whether SHP inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated PAI-1 expression in VSMCs. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SHP (Ad- SHP) in VSMCs inhibited angiotensin II- and TGF-beta-stimulated PAI-1 expression. Ad-SHP also inhibited angiotensin II-, TGF-beta- and Smad3-stimulated PAI-1 promoter activity, and angiotensin II-stimulated AP-1 activity. The level of PAI-1 expression was significantly higher in VSMCs of SHP(-/-) mice than wild type mice. Moreover, loss of SHP increased PAI-1 mRNA expression after angiotensin II treatment. These results suggest that SHP inhibits PAI-1 expression in VSMCs through the suppression of TGF-beta/Smad3 and AP-1 activity. Thus, agents that target the induction of SHP expression in VSMCs might help prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  4. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct.

  5. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  6. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct. PMID:26743401

  7. The Brain Prize 2014: complex human functions.

    PubMed

    Grigaityte, Kristina; Iacoboni, Marco

    2014-11-01

    Giacomo Rizzolatti, Stanislas Dehaene, and Trevor Robbins were recently awarded the 2014 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize for their 'pioneering research on higher brain mechanisms underpinning such complex human functions as literacy, numeracy, motivated behavior and social cognition, and for their effort to understand cognitive and behavioral disorders'. Why was their work highlighted? Is there anything that links together these seemingly disparate lines of research?

  8. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies.

  9. Maria Goeppert Mayer and the Nobel Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karen E.

    2013-04-01

    When Maria Goeppert Mayer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, she was only the second woman to receive that award and there have been no additional female physics laureates since. Mayer was uniquely prepared to carry out her prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. Furthermore, she worked with some of the most well-known figures in mid-twentieth century physics, and her award came at a time when American science was in ascendance. Why, then, is her name so little known beyond the physics community? There are several possible answers to this question, ranging from the personal (her modest reaction to public acclaim) and the scientific (the mathematically abstract nature of her prize-winning work), to the national (the nature of the issues commanding public attention in the 1960s). In this talk I will present an overview of the circumstances that enabled Mayer to make exceptional contributions to nuclear physics, and then examine some of the possible reasons why her exceptional status is not more widely known.

  10. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  11. Novel Combinatorial Therapeutic Targeting of PAI-1 (SERPINE1) Gene Expression in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, Stacie M.; Higgins, Craig E.; Higgins, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid peptides (Aβ) in the brain, generated by β-site proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the hallmark pathophysiologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The plasmin-activating cascade, in which urokinase (uPA) and tissue-type (tPA) plasminogen activators convert plasminogen to the broad-spectrum protease plasmin, appears to serve a protective, Aβ-clearing, role in the central nervous system. Plasmin degrades Aβ and catalyzes α- site APP proteolysis generating nontoxic peptides. Plasmin activation in the brain is negatively regulated by the fast-acting clade E serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) resulting in Aβ accumulation. PAI-1 and its major physiological inducer TGF-β1, moreover, are both increased in Alzheimer's disease models and implicated in the etiology and progression of human neurodegenerative disorders. Current findings support the hypothesis that targeting of PAI-1 function (by small molecule drugs) and/or gene expression (by histone deacetylase inhibitors) may constitute a clinically-relevant molecular approach to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases associated with increased PAI-1 levels. PMID:23847772

  12. Compression-induced HIF-1 enhances thrombosis and PAI-1 expression in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Minematsu, Takeo; Yoshida, Mikako; Nishijima, Yoshimi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yasunori; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    Pressure ulcers result from tissue hypoxia caused by external forces. Thrombosis due to external forces is considered important, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of pressure ulcer development. To date, however, their causal relationship has not been determined. This study therefore investigated the mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation in compressed mouse skin, based on a hypothesis that HIF-1 regulation by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) enhances thrombosis. Compression of mouse skin significantly increased the numbers of thrombi and HIF-1α-positive cells compared with control skin. A thrombosis inhibitor significantly reduced the numbers of HIF-1α-positive cells and an HIF-1 inhibitor significantly inhibited thrombosis in compressed skin tissue, suggesting a mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation. Compression of mouse skin also enhanced the level of Pai-1 messenger RNA expression, but this increase was significantly reduced by treatment with an HIF-1 inhibitor, whereas a thrombosis inhibitor had no effect. These results suggested the involvement of PAI-1 in HIF-1-enhanced thrombosis and that an additional factor participates in regulating Pai-1 expression in compressed skin. These findings may suggest new strategies in pressure ulcer management.

  13. Cross-Validation of the PAI Negative Distortion Scale for Feigned Mental Disorders: A Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Richard; Gillard, Nathan D.; Wooley, Chelsea N.; Kelsey, Katherine R.

    2013-01-01

    A major strength of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is its systematic assessment of response styles, including feigned mental disorders. Recently, Mogge, Lepage, Bell, and Ragatz developed and provided the initial validation for the Negative Distortion Scale (NDS). Using rare symptoms as its detection strategy for feigning, the…

  14. Relationship between HMGB1 and PAI-1 after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shosaku; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Katayama, Yuta; Yagi, Hideo; Fujishima, Naoto; Ota, Shuichi; Moriyama, Masato; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Kunio; Fujita, Shinya; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Kyo, Taiichi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2016-01-01

    Background Conditioning regimens including total body irradiation (TBI) or cyclophosphamide can mobilize high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) to peripheral blood. Additionally, increased plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 levels are associated with post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). However, changes to circulating levels of HMGB1 after aHSCT are poorly understood. Materials and methods The study cohort included 289 patients who underwent aHSCT at one of 25 institutions in Japan. We have investigated the relationship between HMGB1 and PAI-1 following aHSCT. A significant increase in HMGB1 levels occurred after conditioning treatment. Additionally, levels of HMGB1 at day 0 were significantly increased in TBI+ patients and cyclophosphamide/TBI patients. Conclusion Our data revealed that an increased level of HMGB1 at day 0 following aHSCT correlates with increased PAI-1 after aHSCT, which is consistent with previous reports. Increased HMGB1 at day 0 after a conditioning regimen may play a role in transplantation-associated coagulopathy following aHSCT, because PAI-1 can accelerate procoagulant activity. PMID:26848281

  15. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prizes and awards. 1.74-1 Section 1.74-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.74-1 Prizes and awards. (a) Inclusion in gross income. (1) Section...

  16. Nominations sought for the 2016 Haagen-Smit Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    We, the editors and publishers of Atmospheric Environment invite our readers to nominate papers for the 2016 "Haagen-Smit Prize". The prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution.

  17. 29 CFR 778.330 - Prizes or contest awards generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prizes or contest awards generally. 778.330 Section 778.330 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.330...

  18. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  19. Is the Nobel Prize in chemistry still relevant?

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Rajendrani

    2009-10-01

    No other prize in science matches the iconic stature of the Nobels. But they only recognize individuals in the categories of physics, chemistry, and physiology/medicine. In the modern era of multidisciplinary, multiple-team endeavors, are the Nobel Prizes outdated?

  20. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  1. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Andrew ML; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma. PMID:18854052

  2. Analysis of the inhibition of PAI-1 by metal theaflavin complexes and their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy; Kondray, Victor; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-05-01

    The inhibition of elements of the plasminogen activator system [urokinase (uPA), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)] plays an important role in human diseases. PAI-1 is overexpressed in obesity and diabetes, and the inhibition of this protein has been postulated to alleviate the symptoms of both disorders. We found that two theaflavins (TFs) from black tea inhibit PAI-1 and we suggest that the beneficial effects of drinking tea may be associated with the suppression of PAI-1 activity by theaflavins. Epidemiological studies are controversial; some studies show the beneficial effects of drinking black tea on obesity and diabetes, while others do not. TFs, a family of compounds that can comprise up to 40% the dry weight of black tea, are responsible for the characteristic color, and they are known to chelate metals. We hypothesized that the content/variety of metals present in drinking water may be one of the reasons for such controversies in the population studies. TFs are excellent chelating compounds by trapping metals into complexes; thus, the quality of water used for tea preparation may influence changes in the formation of new products according to TF affinity for different metals, as well as their high molecular weight oxidation products. Our modeling and docking studies suggest that TF/metal complexes have similar affinity to PAI-1 as native TFs. However, analyses using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) revealed the presence of TF degradation products in tea brewed using water containing metal salts. These can further form high molecular weight oxidation products. Thus, metals present in tea could diminish the beneficial effects of black tea by reducing TF concentration via metal-induced degradation and precipitation.

  3. Effects of teneligliptin on PDMPs and PAI-1 in patients with diabetes on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Yoshinori; Omoto, Seitaro; Taniura, Takehito; Shouzu, Akira; Nomura, Shosaku

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death among hemodialysis (HD) patients. The effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor teneligliptin on CVD-related biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) receiving HD treatment are poorly understood. To determine whether teneligliptin has anti-CVD properties, we assessed its effects on soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin), platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), soluble vascular adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), and adiponectin plasma levels in HD and non-HD patients with T2DM. Methods Patients with T2DM eligible for teneligliptin monotherapy or combination therapy (eg, teneligliptin plus a sulfonylurea) were administered teneligliptin (20 mg/d) once daily for 6 months. Plasma levels of sP-selectin, PDMPs, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, and adiponectin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline and after 3 months and 6 months of treatment. Results Teneligliptin therapy significantly reduced plasma levels of sP-selectin, PDMPs, and PAI-1 compared with baseline levels, while significantly increasing adiponectin levels. sE-selectin and sVCAM-1 levels were significantly decreased only at 6 months. The reduction in sP-selectin, PDMPs, and PAI-1 was more significant in HD patients than in non-HD patients. However, the improvement in adiponectin levels was unchanged with HD treatment. Conclusion By modulating PDMPs or PAI-1, teneligliptin shows an antiatherothrombotic effect that may be beneficial in the primary prevention of CVD in patients with T2DM on HD. PMID:27110135

  4. Effect of Reinforcement Probability and Prize Size on Cocaine and Heroin Abstinence in Prize-Based Contingency Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2008-01-01

    Although treatment outcome in prize-based contingency management has been shown to depend on reinforcement schedule, the optimal schedule is still unknown. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (Ghitza et al., 2007) to determine the effects of the probability of winning a prize (low vs. high) and…

  5. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials.

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter polymorphism and coronary artery disease in non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, M W; Stickland, M H; Grant, P J

    1995-10-01

    Elevated levels of PAI-1 are found in coronary artery disease (CAD) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). PAI-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of CAD through suppression of fibrinolysis, alternatively the high levels may result from vascular damage. There is evidence that PAI-1 levels are related to genotype at a PAI-1 promoter polymorphism. Genotype at this 4G/5G polymorphism was determined in 160 NIDDM (90 males and 70 females) patients with (n = 38) or without (n = 122) clinical evidence of CAD. Levels of cholesterol were higher (6.5 vs 5.9 mM, p < 0.01) and PAI-1 tended to be higher (PAI-1 activity 23.0 vs 20.4 U/ml) with CAD. The frequency of the 4G/4G genotype was increased and the 5G/5G genotype decreased, in the group CAD compared to those without (p < 0.05). These results suggest that possession of the 4G/4G PAI-1 promoter genotype is a risk factor for the development of CAD in subjects with NIDDM.

  7. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    2005 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following 14 articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2005 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: P Kundrát et al 2005 Probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation by ionizing particles Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1433-47 D Arora et al 2005 Direct thermal dose control of constrained focused ultrasound treatments: phantom and in vivo evaluation Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1919-35 J S Dysart et al 2005 Characterization of Photofrin photobleaching for singlet oxygen dose estimation during photodynamic therapy of MLL cells in vitro Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2597-616 M Defrise et al 2005 Fourier rebinning of time-of-flight PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2749-63 Z Su et al 2005 Systematic investigation of the signal properties of polycrystalline HgI2 detectors under mammographic, radiographic, fluoroscopic and radiotherapy irradiation conditions Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2907-28 E Bräuer-Krisch et al 2005 New irradiation geometry for microbeam radiation therapy Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3103-11 H C Pyo et al 2005 Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3183-96 R P Findlay et al 2005 Effects of posture on FDTD calculations of specific absorption rate in a voxel model of the human body Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3825-35 G Alexandrakis et al 2005 Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 J Keshvari et al 2005 Comparison of radio frequency energy absorption in ear and eye region of children and adults at 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4355-69 J Laufer et al 2005 In vitro measurements of absolute blood

  8. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    2006 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following ten articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2006 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: D W Mundy et al 2006 Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377-91 Y Yang et al 2006 Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1649-59 M Krämer and M Scholz 2006 Rapid calculation of biological effects in ion radiotherapy Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1959-70 P Crespo et al 2006 On the detector arrangement for in-beam PET for hadron therapy monitoring Phys. Med. Biol. 51 2143-63 R J Senden et al 2006 Polymer gel dosimeters with reduced toxicity: a preliminary investigation of the NMR and optical dose-response using different monomers Phys. Med. Biol. 51 3301-14 J Wang et al 2006 FDTD calculation of whole-body average SAR in adult and child models for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4119-27 C A T Van den Berg et al 2006 The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4735-46 S Qin and K W Ferrara 2006 Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5065-88 R Kramer et al 2006 Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6265-89 R Leiderman et al 2006 Coupling between elastic strain and interstitial fluid flow: ramifications for poroelastic imaging Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6291-313 An IPEM college of jurors then assessed and rated these papers in order to choose a winner. We have much

  9. Impact of cagPAI and T4SS on the Inflammatory Response of Human Neutrophils to Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Zauco, Norma Angélica; Torres, Javier; Pérez-Figueroa, Gloria Erandi; Álvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Gómez, Alejandro; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori contains a pathogenicity island, cagPAI, with genes homologous to components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The T4SS components assemble a structure that transfers CagA protein and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells, causing the increased release of interleukin 8 (IL8) from the cells. The Toll-like receptors on neutrophils recognize H. pylori, initiating signaling pathways that enhance the activation of NF-κB. However, the roles of cagPAI and T4SS in the inflammatory response of neutrophils are unknown. We evaluated the participation of cagPAI and T4SS in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori infection. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and infected with H. pylori cagPAI+, cagPAI–, and cagPAI mutant strains virB4– and virD4–. Whereas cagPAI+ strain 26695 induced the greatest IL8 production, a proinflammatory response, cagPAI– strain 8822 induced the greatest IL10 production, an anti-inflammatory response. In contrast, the virB4– and virD4– mutant strains produced significantly more of the two proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and tumor necrosis factor αthan the cagPAI+ strain 26695. We observed that H. pylori downregulated the expression of TLRs 2 and 5 but upregulated TLR9 expression in a cagPAI and T4SS-independent manner. These results show for the first time that the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori may vary from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory response, depending on cagPAI and the integrity of T4SS. PMID:23755130

  10. Inaugural Climate Communications Prize winner announced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris; Fine, Rana

    2011-10-01

    In recognition of Gavin Schmidt's exceptional work as a climate communicator, AGU has selected him as the recipient of its inaugural Climate Communications Prize. Schmidt is a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate.org blog. RealClimate.org covers areas of science related to climate—from present-day measurements to paleoclimate proxies, from natural climate variation to anthropogenic change. Schmidt has also worked with photographers on a popular science book, on museum exhibits, and on online courses and has often appeared on TV and radio and in print.

  11. Society News: Welcome to Griffiths Bay; RAS Associate wins Shaw Prize; Postgraduate prize preparations; Council minutes on-line; Birthday Honours; Kavli Prize; New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The late Donald Griffiths will be commemorated in the name of a bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. Prof. Reinhard Genzel, Associate of the Society since 1994, Darwin Lecturer in 2007, and Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics has been awarded the Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008. While postgrad students complete their PhD theses, supervisors should note the deadline for submissions to the annual Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes.

  12. Design, synthesis, and SAR of embelin analogues as the inhibitors of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanglei; Zhang, Guiping; Hong, Zebin; Lin, Zhonghui; Lei, Min; Huang, Mingdong; Hu, Lihong

    2014-05-15

    The natural product embelin was found to have PAI-1 inhibitory activity with the IC50 value of 4.94μM. Based on the structure of embelin, a series of analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their ability to inhibit PAI-1. The SAR study on these compounds disclosed that the inhibitory potency largely depended on the hydroxyl groups at C2 and C5, and the length of the alkyl chains at C3 and C6. Compound 11 displayed the best PAI-1 inhibitory potency with the IC50 value of 0.18μM.

  13. It Is My Desire to Be Free: Annie Davis's Letter to Abraham Lincoln and Winslow Homer's Painting "A Visit from the Old Mistress"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussey, Michael; Eder, Elizabeth K.

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. President, It is my Desire to be free," wrote Annie Davis to Abraham Lincoln, 20 months after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation affected only those parts of the country that were in rebellion against the United States on the date it was issued, January 1, 1863. The slaveholding border states of Delaware,…

  14. The Lincoln Legal Papers Curriculum: Understanding Illinois Social History through Documents from the Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln, 1836-1861.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Lawrence W., Ed.; Drake, Frederick D., Ed.

    This curriculum considers the social history of Illinois during the years of 1836-1861 by studying Abraham Lincoln's legal papers from his time as a lawyer. Nearly 100,000 documents have been discovered in the archives of local, county, state, federal courts, libraries, and other repositories. The documents include detailed information about the…

  15. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p<0.001). Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage. PMID:26945715

  16. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p<0.001). Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  17. Evaluating PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in diving: human serum total PAI-1 is unaltered after 2 h dry exposures to 280 kPa hyperbaric air

    PubMed Central

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Fredriksen, Hallvard Aglen; Hjelde, Astrid; Møllerløkken, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is induced in the vasculature and secreted into the vascular lumen in response to inflammation and oxidative stress. We have previously reported a fivefold increase in plasma PAI-1 from rats exposed to 708 kPa hyperbaric air. In the current study we assess the potential of human serum total PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in compressed air diving. Eleven recreational divers, nine males and two females, completed four 2 h hyperbaric air exposures to 280 kPa in a pressure chamber over a period of 2 weeks. The air pressure corresponds to a diving depth of 18 m in water. Serum was collected before the study and again 3 h 30 min after completion of each hyperbaric exposure. All samples were taken in the afternoon to minimize the contribution of circadian variation. The analysis revealed no change in serum total PAI-1 after hyperbaric exposures within the group of divers (P = 0.064), but significant interindividual differences persisted throughout the study (P < 0.0005). A case of decompression sickness after the third round of hyperbaric exposure did not affect PAI-1. In conclusion, compressed air exposure to 280 kPa does not affect serum total PAI-1, and significant interindividual variation in PAI-1 levels may limit its usefulness as a biomarker. This does, however, not give a complete answer regarding PAI-1 in physiologically stressful dives. Further studies with different exposures and timing are needed for that. PMID:26109191

  18. PAI-1 synthesis in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 is increased by cytokines--evidence that the liver contributes to acute phase behaviour of PAI-1.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Abbink, J J; Brouwer, M C; Meijer, C; Roem, D; Voorn, G P; Lambers, J W; van Mourik, J A; Hack, C E

    1991-02-12

    The acute phase behaviour of the fast inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (PAI-1) in vivo has been attributed to increased synthesis by endothelial cells. However, most other acute phase proteins in vivo are synthesized in the liver, which process is regulated by cytokines and can be studied in the hepatoma derived cell line HepG2. In this study, we investigated whether the synthesis of PAI-1 by HepG2 cells is regulated by the cytokines recombinant IL-1, rIL-6 and rTNF. Recombinant IL-1 and rTNF each increased PAI-1 synthesis by HepG2 cells two to three fold, whereas rIL-6 hardly had an effect. Mixtures of rIL-1, rIL-6 and rTNF increased PAI-1 synthesis up to eleven fold. The effects observed were not due to non-specific effects on HepG2 cell metabolism, since synthesis of alpha-2-antiplasmin was not effected by any of those cytokines, whereas fibrinogen synthesis was increased three to four fold by rIL-6, but was unaffected by rIL-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that synthesis of PAI-1 by HepG2 cells is regulated by cytokines and implicate that the acute phase behaviour of PAI-1 in vivo at least in part may be due to an increased synthesis by the liver.

  19. Jeffrey T. Kiehl Receives 2012 Climate Communication Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey T. Kiehl was awarded the 2012 Climate Communication Prize at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The Climate Communication Prize is funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry based in Boulder, Colo. The prize honors an "AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science, and highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respected and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change."

  20. Suppression of PAI-1 expression through inhibition of the EGFR-mediated signaling cascade in rat kidney fibroblast by ascofuranone.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Ji; Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Teoan; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, In-Seon; Min, Kwan-Sik; Magae, Junji; Nakajima, Hiroo; Bae, Young-Seuk; Chang, Young-Chae

    2009-05-15

    Fibrosis in glomerulosclerosis causes progressive loss of renal function. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, one of the major profibrotic cytokines, induces the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, a factor that plays a crucial role in the development of fibrosis. Here, we found that an isoprenoid antibiotic, ascofuranone, suppresses expression of profibrotic factors including matrix proteins and PAI-1 induced by TGF-beta in renal fibroblasts. Ascofuranone selectively inhibits phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and downstream kinases such as Raf-1, MEK-1/2, and ERK-1/2. PAI-1 transcription also is suppressed by treatment with kinase inhibitors for MEK-1/2 or EGFR, and with small interfering RNA for EGFR. Ascofuranone inhibits cellular metalloproteinase activity, and an inhibitor of metalloproteinases suppresses EGFR phosphorylation and PAI-1 transcription. These results suggest that ascofuranone suppresses expression of profibrotic factors through the inhibition of an EGFR-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by metalloproteinases.

  1. Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy of Precambrian carbonate rocks in the Amderma Rise, Pai-Khoi Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. B.; Starikova, E. V.; Maslov, A. V.; Konstantinova, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Sr and C isotopic compositions of Precambrian carbonate rocks are determined for Amderma Rise, in the northeastern margin of Pai-Khoi Ridge. Based on the Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy, it is established for the first time that the Amderma Formation is referred to the Early Vendian, while the Morozovsk Formation is Late Riphean in age. This conclusion along with detailed mapping proves that the Precambrian "section" of the Amderma Rise is a series of tectonic plates combined in a nonchronostratigraphic order. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Morozovsk and Sokolninsk formations make up the allochthon proper, while carbonate rocks of the Amderma Formation make up the para-autochthon. The high values of δ13C (up to +9.5‰) identified in limestones of both formations suggest a considerable distance of the Pai-Khoi paleobasin from the passive margin of the Baltic Region upon facies similarity to the Laurentia active margins.

  2. PAI-OFF: A new proposal for online flood forecasting in flash flood prone catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G. H.; Cullmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe Process Modelling and Artificial Intelligence for Online Flood Forecasting (PAI-OFF) methodology combines the reliability of physically based, hydrologic/hydraulic modelling with the operational advantages of artificial intelligence. These operational advantages are extremely low computation times and straightforward operation. The basic principle of the methodology is to portray process models by means of ANN. We propose to train ANN flood forecasting models with synthetic data that reflects the possible range of storm events. To this end, establishing PAI-OFF requires first setting up a physically based hydrologic model of the considered catchment and - optionally, if backwater effects have a significant impact on the flow regime - a hydrodynamic flood routing model of the river reach in question. Both models are subsequently used for simulating all meaningful and flood relevant storm scenarios which are obtained from a catchment specific meteorological data analysis. This provides a database of corresponding input/output vectors which is then completed by generally available hydrological and meteorological data for characterizing the catchment state prior to each storm event. This database subsequently serves for training both a polynomial neural network (PoNN) - portraying the rainfall-runoff process - and a multilayer neural network (MLFN), which mirrors the hydrodynamic flood wave propagation in the river. These two ANN models replace the hydrological and hydrodynamic model in the operational mode. After presenting the theory, we apply PAI-OFF - essentially consisting of the coupled "hydrologic" PoNN and "hydrodynamic" MLFN - to the Freiberger Mulde catchment in the Erzgebirge (Ore-mountains) in East Germany (3000 km 2). Both the demonstrated computational efficiency and the prediction reliability underline the potential of the new PAI-OFF methodology for online flood forecasting.

  3. uPA and PAI-1-Related Signaling Pathways Differ between Primary Breast Cancers and Lymph Node Metastases12

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Wolff, Claudia; Berg, Daniela; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Mannsperger, Heiko; Schmidt, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The supporting role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in migration and invasion is well known. In addition, both factors are key components in cancer cell-related signaling. However, little information is available for uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling pathways in primary cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling proteins in 52 primary breast cancers and corresponding metastases. Proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the primary tumors and metastases. Protein lysates were subsequently analyzed by reverse phase protein array for the expression of members of the PI3K/AKT (FAK, GSK3-β, ILK, pGSK3-β, PI3K, and ROCK) and the MAPK pathways (pp38, pSTAT3, and p38). A solid correlation of uPA expression existed between primary tumors and metastases, whereas PAI-1 expression did not significantly correlate between them. The correlations of uPA and PAI-1 with signaling pathways found in primary tumors did not persist in metastases. Analysis of single molecules revealed that some correlated well between tumors and metastases (FAK, pGSK3-β, ILK, Met, PI3K, ROCK, uPA, p38, and pp38), whereas others did not (PAI-1 and GSK3-β). Whether the expression of a protein correlated between tumor and metastasis or not was independent of the pathway the protein is related to. These findings hint at a complete deregulation of uPA and PAI-1-related signaling in metastases, which might be the reason why uPA and PAI-1 reached clinical relevance only for lymph node-negative breast cancer tissues. PMID:22496926

  4. uPA and PAI-1-Related Signaling Pathways Differ between Primary Breast Cancers and Lymph Node Metastases.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Wolff, Claudia; Berg, Daniela; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Mannsperger, Heiko; Schmidt, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-04-01

    The supporting role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in migration and invasion is well known. In addition, both factors are key components in cancer cell-related signaling. However, little information is available for uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling pathways in primary cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling proteins in 52 primary breast cancers and corresponding metastases. Proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the primary tumors and metastases. Protein lysates were subsequently analyzed by reverse phase protein array for the expression of members of the PI3K/AKT (FAK, GSK3-β, ILK, pGSK3-β, PI3K, and ROCK) and the MAPK pathways (pp38, pSTAT3, and p38). A solid correlation of uPA expression existed between primary tumors and metastases, whereas PAI-1 expression did not significantly correlate between them. The correlations of uPA and PAI-1 with signaling pathways found in primary tumors did not persist in metastases. Analysis of single molecules revealed that some correlated well between tumors and metastases (FAK, pGSK3-β, ILK, Met, PI3K, ROCK, uPA, p38, and pp38), whereas others did not (PAI-1 and GSK3-β). Whether the expression of a protein correlated between tumor and metastasis or not was independent of the pathway the protein is related to. These findings hint at a complete deregulation of uPA and PAI-1-related signaling in metastases, which might be the reason why uPA and PAI-1 reached clinical relevance only for lymph node-negative breast cancer tissues.

  5. Propofol treatment modulates neurite extension regulated by immunologically challenged rat primary astrocytes: a possible role of PAI-1.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Myung; Joo, So Hyun; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Min; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-04-01

    Propofol, a widely used anesthetic, regulates neurological processes including neurotoxicity, neuroprotection, glial activation, synaptic plasticity and neuronal maturation. Tissue plasminogen activator/tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tPA/PAI-1) in CNS acts as a neuromodulator regulating synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth, seizure spreading and cell survival. Here, we investigated the effects of propofol on tPA/PAI-1 system using cultured neurons and astrocytes and their role in the regulation of neurite extension. Cultured rat primary astrocytes were treated with propofol (1-10 µM) and LPS (10 ng/ml). The expression of functional tPA/PAI-1 was examined by casein zymography, Western blot and RT-PCR. Alternatively, culture supernatants were added to cultured rat primary neuron to investigate the effects on neurite extension. Propofol alone did not affect tPA activity in rat primary cortical neuron. Similarly, propofol alone changed neither tPA nor PAI-1 activity in rat primary astrocytes. In immunologically challenged situation using LPS, propofol synergistically increased expression of PAI-1 in rat primary astrocytes without affecting tPA expression in a manner dependent on MAPKs activation. Increased expression of PAI-1 reduced tPA activity in LPS plus propofol-treated rat primary astrocytes. Consistent with the critical role of tPA activity in the regulation of neurite extension (Cho et al. 2013), the diminished tPA activity in astrocyte culture supernatants resulted in decreased neurite extension when administered to cultured rat primary cortical neuron. The results from the present study suggest that propofol, especially in immunologically-challenged situation, dysregulates tPA/PAI-1 system in brain. Whether the dysregulated tPA/PAI-1 activity adversely affects neural differentiation as well as regeneration of neuron in vivo should be empirically determined in the future.

  6. The Role of TLR4 and Fyn Interaction on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated PAI-1 Expression in Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Myung; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ki Chan; Joo, So Hyun; Choi, Wahn Soo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an endogenous inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) that acts as a neuromodulator in various neurophysiological and pathological conditions. Several researchers including us reported the induction of PAI-1 during inflammatory condition; however, the mechanism regulating PAI-1 induction is not yet clear. In this study, we investigated the role of non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fyn in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of PAI-1 in rat primary astrocyte. The activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, induced by its ligand LPS, stimulated a physical interaction between TLR4 and Fyn along with phosphorylation of tyrosine residue in both molecules as determined by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Immunofluorescence staining also showed increased co-localization of TLR4-Fyn on cultured rat primary astrocytes after LPS treatment. The increased TRLR4-Fyn interaction induced expression of PAI-1 through the activation of PI3k/Akt/NFĸB pathway. Treatment with Src kinase inhibitor (PP2) or transfection of Fyn small interfering RNA (siRNA) into cultured rat primary astrocytes inhibited phosphorylation of tyrosine residue of TLR4 and blocked the interaction between TLR4 and Fyn resulting to the inhibition of LPS-induced expression of PAI-1. The activation of PI3K/Akt/NFĸB signaling cascades was also inhibited by Fyn knockdown in rat primary astrocytes. The induction of PAI-1 in rat primary astrocytes, which resulted in downregulation of tPA activity in culture supernatants, inhibited neurite outgrowth in cultured rat primary cortical neuron. The inhibition of neurite extension was prevented by PP2 or Fyn siRNA treatment in rat primary astrocytes. These results suggest the critical physiological role of TRL4-Fyn interaction in the modulation of PAI-1-tPA axis in astrocytes during neuroinflammatory responses such as ischemia/reperfusion injuries.

  7. Cross-validation of the PAI Negative Distortion Scale for feigned mental disorders: a research report.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Richard; Gillard, Nathan D; Wooley, Chelsea N; Kelsey, Katherine R

    2013-02-01

    A major strength of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is its systematic assessment of response styles, including feigned mental disorders. Recently, Mogge, Lepage, Bell, and Ragatz developed and provided the initial validation for the Negative Distortion Scale (NDS). Using rare symptoms as its detection strategy for feigning, the usefulness of NDS was examined via a known-groups comparison. The current study sought to cross-validate the NDS by implementing a between-subjects simulation design. Simulators were asked to feign total disability in an effort to secure unwarranted compensation from their insurance company. Even in an inpatient sample with severe Axis I disorders and concomitant impairment, the NDS proved effective as a rare-symptom strategy with low levels of item endorsement that remained mostly stable across genders. For construct validity, the NDS was moderately correlated with the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms-Second Edition and other PAI feigning scales. For discriminant validity, it yielded a very large effect size (d = 1.81), surpassing the standard PAI feigning indicators. Utility estimates appeared to be promising for both ruling-out (low probability of feigning) and ruling-in (high probability of feigning) determinations at different base rates. Like earlier research, the data supported the creation of well-defined groups with indeterminate scores (i.e., the cut score ± 1 SEM) removed to avoid high rates of misclassifications for this narrow band.

  8. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  9. Cell density-dependent nuclear accumulation of ELK3 is involved in suppression of PAI-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shu; Nakao, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2013-07-01

    Cell-cell contact regulates the proliferation and differentiation of non-transformed cells, e.g., NIH/3T3 cells show growth arrest at high cell density. However, only a few reports described the dynamic behavior of transcription factors involved in this process. In this study, we showed that the mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) decreased drastically at high cell density, and that ELK3, a member of the Ets transcription factor family, repressed PAI-1 expression. We also demonstrated that while ELK3 was distributed evenly throughout the cell at low cell density, it accumulated in the nucleus at high cell density, and that binding of DNA by ELK3 at the A domain facilitated its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, we found that ETS1, a PAI-1 activator, occupied the ELK3-binding site within the PAI-1 promoter at low cell density, while it was released at high cell density. These results suggest that at high cell density, the switching of binding of transcription factors from ETS1 to ELK3 occurs at a specific binding site of the PAI-1 promoter, leading to the cell-density dependent suppression of PAI-1 expression.

  10. Antidepressant-like effect of n-3 PUFAs in CUMS rats: role of tPA/PAI-1 system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mimi; Jiang, Pei; Li, Huande; Cai, Hualin; Liu, Yiping; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lihong

    2015-02-01

    BDNF is strongly implicated in the development of depression. Recent evidence has indicated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are related to the cleavage of pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) into its mature form. Chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) is widely used to induce depressive behaviors in rodents. Therefore, we investigated the effects of PUFAs and sertraline on tPA/PAI-1 system in CUMS rats. After 5 weeks of CUMS procedures, the rats were induced to a depressive-like state. The expressions of PAI-1 and proBDNF were increased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of CUMS rats. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or sertraline administration reversed the changes in behavioral test and induced the expression of tPA in certain brain areas, but failed to restore the CUMS-induced PAI-1 expression. Meanwhile, the antidepressant treatment also accelerated the extracellular conversion of proBDNF into mature BDNF in CUMS rats. Our results firstly showed the synchronously altered balance of tPA/PAI-1 system in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of CUMS rats, which was partly ameliorated by PUFAs and sertraline medication, providing new evidence for the involvement of tPA/PAI-1 system in the progression and treatment of depression.

  11. Keeping an Eye on the Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Setting performance goals is part of the business plan for almost every company. The same is true in the world of supercomputers. Ten years ago, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) to help ensure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing. ASCI, which is now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program and is managed by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), set an initial 10-year goal to obtain computers that could process up to 100 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraflops). Many computer experts thought the goal was overly ambitious, but the program's results have proved them wrong. Last November, a Livermore-IBM team received the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize for achieving more than 100 teraflops while modeling the pressure-induced solidification of molten metal. The prestigious prize, which is named for a founding father of supercomputing, is awarded each year at the Supercomputing Conference to innovators who advance high-performance computing. Recipients for the 2005 prize included six Livermore scientists--physicists Fred Streitz, James Glosli, and Mehul Patel and computer scientists Bor Chan, Robert Yates, and Bronis de Supinski--as well as IBM researchers James Sexton and John Gunnels. This team produced the first atomic-scale model of metal solidification from the liquid phase with results that were independent of system size. The record-setting calculation used Livermore's domain decomposition molecular-dynamics (ddcMD) code running on BlueGene/L, a supercomputer developed by IBM in partnership with the ASC Program. BlueGene/L reached 280.6 teraflops on the Linpack benchmark, the industry standard used to measure computing speed. As a result, it ranks first on the list of Top500 Supercomputer Sites released in November 2005. To evaluate the performance of nuclear weapons systems, scientists must understand how

  12. Perspectives on the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics for graphene.

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Araujo, Paulo T

    2010-11-23

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene. Some personal perspectives about this award are presented.

  13. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  14. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

  15. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School.

  16. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    PubMed

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.'

  17. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Christiana N.; Kovats, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  18. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    PubMed

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.' PMID:24661232

  19. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  20. Shaw Prize Goes to Reinhard Genzel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    The Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008 is awarded to Professor Reinhard Genzel, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), in recognition of his outstanding contribution in demonstrating that the Milky Way contains a supermassive black hole at its centre, a result largely obtained with the help of ESO's telescopes. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 18/08 Motion of a Star The Shaw Prize is awarded annually by the Shaw Prize Foundation in Hong Kong in the Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Astronomy, each of the three prizes bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. "I warmly congratulate Professor Genzel for this well-deserved award which highlights some of the best science produced with ESO's telescopes," says Tim de Zeeuw, ESO's Director General. "Professor Genzel and his team have made a dedicated, long-term effort, using our telescopes and co-developing instruments, to study the Centre of our Galaxy, and as such, he has allowed us to enter an era of observational black hole physics." In 1969, Donald Lynden-Bell and Martin Rees suggested that the Milky Way might contain a supermassive black hole at its centre. But evidence for such an object was lacking at the time because the centre of the Milky Way is obscured by interstellar dust, and was detected only as a relatively faint radio source. Reinhard Genzel and his collaborators obtained compelling evidence for this black hole by developing state-of-the-art astronomical instruments to be used on ESO's telescopes and carrying out a persistent programme of observing the Galactic Centre and its surrounding stars for many years, which ultimately led to the discovery of a black hole with a mass of about three million times that of the Sun. Genzel's group has in particular followed since 1992, the motion of several stars, around the Galactic Centre. These observations were first done with the MPE-built near-infrared speckle imaging camera SHARP on ESO's New Technology Telescope at La

  1. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize. PMID:17469121

  2. Volatility, house edge and prize structure of gambling games.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel E

    2011-12-01

    This study used simulations to examine the effect of prize structure on the outcome volatility and the number of winners of various game configurations. The two most common prize structures found in gambling games are even money payoff games (bet $1; win $2) found on most table games and multilevel prizes structures found in gambling machine games. Simulations were set up to examine the effect of prize structure on the long-term outcomes of these games. Eight different prize structures were compared in terms of the number of winners and volatility. It was found that the standard table game and commercial gambling machines produced fairly high numbers of short term winners (1 h), but few long term winners (50 h). It was found that the typical even money game set up produced the lowest level of volatility. Of the multilevel prize structures examined, the three simulations based on commercial gambling machines were the least volatile. The results are examined in terms of the pragmatics of game design. PMID:21243518

  3. Highlights and prizes of an international meeting.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    A short description selected from the presentations which had been awarded prizes in the 4th International Meeting of Nuclear Medicine, of the Hellenic Society of Nuclear Medicine, in Thessaloniki, Greece, is as follows: Professor L.G. Strauss from Heidelberg received the first prize for his original paper under the title: "Modulation of FDG kinetics in tumors by gene expression". He studied 25 patients with colorectal tumors with dynamic PET-FDG within 2 days prior to surgery and he finally came to the conclusion that angiogenesis has a significant impact primarily on the kinetic data (k1, k3), but also on the global FDG uptake. A detailed analysis of the FDG kinetics can help to classify the grade of angiogenesis in primary colorectal tumors. The cell cycle associated genes have a comparable impact on the FDG kinetics as compared to the angiogenesis related genes. Furthermore, hypoxia was associated with the FDG parameters. Enhanced expression of HIF-1a was primarily associated with an enhanced influx of FDG. The results demonstrated the impact of dedicated groups of genes on the FDG kinetics. Furthermore, if the FDG kinetics are quantitatively analyzed, the expression of certain genes may be predicted from these data. Dr. P. Bouziotis et al. received the second prize for their original paper under the title: "Labeling of bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, with technetium-99m and rhenium-188". The authors were from Athens and Oxford and studied the reduction of the endogenous disulphide bonds of bevacizumab by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol and TCEP-HCl. The number of generated-SH groups was estimated before each labelling experiment. The results of the present study show that VEGF expression in tumors can be detected and visualized specifically with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, labelled with gamma-emitting radioisotopes. The third prize went to Dr C. H. Tsopelas et al. from Adelaide who presented an original paper under the title

  4. Amount of earnings during prize contingency management treatment is associated with posttreatment abstinence outcomes.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Roll, John M

    2011-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments that provide patients with the opportunity to earn chances of winning prizes of varying magnitudes are becoming increasingly popular. In the CM literature, magnitude of reinforcement is linked with effect sizes, such that CM treatments that provide larger magnitude reinforcement are more efficacious than those that provide lower magnitude reinforcement. With prize CM, even when magnitudes of overall expected prize earnings are constant, some patients win more prizes than others. Thus, patients who win larger overall amounts of prizes during treatment may have better outcomes than those who win fewer prizes. This study evaluated the impact of overall amounts of prizes won on long-term abstinence outcomes. The dollar amount of prizes won during prize CM treatments was determined from 78 cocaine-abusing methadone-maintenance patients who were randomized to prize CM treatments in three clinical trials. Abstinence three months following the end of the CM intervention was the primary dependent variable. The dollar amount of prizes won during CM treatment was a significant predictor of submission of cocaine-negative urine samples and self-reports of cocaine abstinence at the follow-up evaluation, even after controlling for other variables associated with long-term abstinence, such as pretreatment urinalysis results and longest duration of abstinence achieved during treatment. These results suggest that magnitudes of earnings during prize CM may impact outcomes and call for further experimentation of parameters related to the efficacy of prize CM.

  5. Amount of earnings during prize contingency management treatment is associated with post-treatment abstinence outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Roll, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments that provide patients with the opportunity to earn chances of winning prizes of varying magnitudes are becoming increasingly popular. In the CM literature, magnitude of reinforcement is linked with effect sizes, such that CM treatments that provide larger magnitude reinforcement are more efficacious than those that provide lower magnitude reinforcement. With prize CM, even when magnitudes of overall expected prize earnings are constant, some patients win more prizes than others. Thus, patients who win larger overall amounts of prizes during treatment may have better outcomes than those who win fewer prizes. This study evaluated the impact of overall amounts of prizes won on long-term abstinence outcomes. The dollar amount of prizes won during prize CM treatments was determined from 78 cocaine abusing methadone maintenance patients who were randomized to prize CM treatments in three clinical trials. Abstinence three months following the end of the CM intervention was the primary dependent variable. The dollar amount of prizes won during CM treatment was a significant predictor of submission of cocaine-negative urine samples and self reports of cocaine abstinence at the follow-up evaluation, even after controlling for other variables associated with long-term abstinence such as pre-treatment urinalysis results and longest duration of abstinence achieved during treatment. These results suggest that magnitudes of earnings during prize CM may impact outcomes and call for further experimentation of parameters related to the efficacy of prize CM. PMID:21707189

  6. Ascochlorin suppresses TGF-β1-induced PAI-1 expression through the inhibition of phospho-EGFR in rat kidney fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Ji; Kang, Jeong-Han; Jeong, Ji-Hak; Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Park, Yoon-Yub; Moon, Yong-Suk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Chung, Il-Kyung; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Chang, Young-Chae

    2012-04-01

    Fibrosis is induced by the excessive and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) with various growth factors in tissues. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), the growth factor involved in fibrosis, modulates ECM synthesis and accumulation. TGF-β1 enhances the production of stimulators of ECM synthesis such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). As such, PAI-1 expression directly influences the proteolysis, invasion, and accumulation of ECM. It was shown in this study that ascochlorin, a prenylpenl antiobiotic, prevents the expression of profibrotic factors, such as PAI-1 and collagen type I, and that the TGF-β1-induced PAI-1 promoter activity is inhibited by ascochlorin. Ascochlorin abolishes the phosphorylation of the EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway to regulate the TGF-β1-induced expression of PAI-1 without the inhibition of TβRII phosphorylation. Furthermore, the MEK inhibitor and EGFR siRNA block PAI-1 expression, and the Raf-1, MEK, and ERK signaling pathways for the regulation of PAI-1 expression. Ascochlorin suppresses the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity to activate the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), to induce the phosphorylation of EGFR, and the MMPs inhibitor suppresses EGFR phosphorylation and the PAI-1 mRNA levels. These results suggest that ascochlorin prevents the expression of PAI-1 via the inhibition of an EGFR-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by MMPs.

  7. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... public comment. Interested persons are encouraged to learn about the SunShot Prize: America's Most... regarding the SunShot Prize received no later than July 13, 2012. ADDRESSES: To submit comments,...

  8. "Microquasar" Discoveries Win Prize for Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The discovery of "microquasars" within our own Milky Way Galaxy has won two astronomers a prize from the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society. Felix Mirabel of the Center for Studies at Saclay, France, and Luis Rodriguez of the Institute of Astronomy at the National Autonomous University in Mexico City, were awarded the Bruno Rossi Prize at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Toronto, Ontario, today. The two researchers, who have collaborated for more than 15 years, used an orbiting X-Ray observatory and the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to discover the extremely energetic microquasars. Microquasars are thought to be binary-star systems with one of the stars either a superdense neutron star or a black hole. They emit X-rays and eject jets of subatomic particles at speeds approaching that of light. Though the neutron stars or black holes in microquasars are only a few times the mass of the sun, the phenomena associated with them, such as the jets, are similar to those seen in active galaxies and quasars, believed to be powered by the gravitational energy of black holes with millions of times the mass of the sun. As such, the microquasars provide much closer "laboratories" for study of these phenomena, which remain poorly understood. The Rossi Prize is awarded for "a significant contribution to high energy astrophysics, with particular emphasis on recent work," according to the High Energy Astrophysics Division. Mirabel and Rodriguez began the research that led to the microquasar discoveries in 1990. Using the French-Russian SIGMA- GRANAT X-Ray satellite, they discovered a microquasar near the Milky Way's center in 1992. With the VLA, they found radio emission from this object. In 1992, using the same satellite, they discovered a similar object, called GRS 1915+105. In 1994, that object experienced an outburst that made it bright enough at radio wavelengths to observe with the VLA

  9. Chandra Telescope Designer Wins 2002 Rossi Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts has been awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society. The Rossi Prize recognizes significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics. It is awarded annually in honor of the late Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of X-ray astronomy. The prize also includes an engraved certificate and a $1,500 award. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the X-ray mirrors for NASA's premier X­ray observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision X-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Hughes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the X-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory. "Leon is one of the master mirror designers of our time," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Chandra X-ray Center. "His contributions were crucial to the spectacular success of the Chandra mission." The Chandra mirrors are the most precise mirrors ever made, smooth with tolerances of a few atoms. If the state of Colorado had the same relative smoothness as the surface of the Chandra X-ray Observatory mirrors, Pike's Peak would be less than an inch tall. The smoothness and alignment of the Chandra's mirrors are enabling scientists to make new discoveries about black holes, neutron stars, and galactic explosions. "Many, many other people made essential contributions to the Chandra program, and hopefully some of them will receive proper recognition," said Van Speybroeck. "In the meantime, I am thoroughly enjoying

  10. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  11. Binding of PAI-1 to endothelial cells stimulated by thymosin beta4 and modulation of their fibrinolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2006-01-13

    Our previous studies showed that thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) induced the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via the AP-1 dependent mechanism and its enhanced secretion. In this work we provide evidence that the released PAI-1 is accumulated on the surface of HUVECs, exclusively in its active form, in a complex with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) that is also up-regulated and released from the cells. This mechanism is supported by several lines of experiments, in which expression of both proteins was analyzed by flow cytometry and their colocalization supported by confocal microscopy. PAI-1 did not bind to quiescent cells but only to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells. In contrast, significant amounts of AGP were found to be associated with the cells overexpressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) without Tbeta4 treatment. The AGP.PAI-1 complex was accumulated essentially at the basal surface of endothelial cells, and such cells showed (a) morphology characteristic for strongly adhered and spread cells and (b) significantly reduced plasmin formation. Taken together, these results provide the evidence supporting a novel mechanism by which active PAI-1 can be bound to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells, thus influencing their adhesive properties as well as their ability to generate plasmin.

  12. The Effect of PAI-1 4G/5G Polymorphism and Clinical Factors on Coronary Artery Occlusion in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Parpugga, Tajinder Kumar; Tatarunas, Vacis; Skipskis, Vilius; Kupstyte, Nora; Zaliaduonyte-Peksiene, Diana; Lesauskaite, Vaiva

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Data on the impact of PAI-1-675 4G/5G genotype for fibrinolysis during myocardial infarction are inconsistent. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association of clinical and genetic (PAI-1-675 4G/5G polymorphism) factors with coronary artery occlusion in patients with myocardial infarction. Materials and Methods. PAI-1-675 4G/5G detection was achieved by using Sanger sequencing in a sample of patients hospitalized for stent implantation due to myocardial infarction. We categorized the patients into two groups: patients with coronary artery occlusion and patients without coronary artery occlusion according to angiographic evaluation. Results. We identified n = 122 (32.4%) 4G/4G, n = 186 (49.5%) 4G/5G, and n = 68 (18.1%) 5G/5G PAI-1 genotype carriers. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that only the 4G/5G genotype was associated with coronary artery occlusion (OR: 1.656 and 95% CI: 1.009–2.718, p = 0.046). Conclusions. Our results showed that carriers of PAI-1 4G/5G genotype with myocardial infarction have increased odds of coronary artery occlusion more than 1.6 times in comparison to the carriers of homozygous genotypes. PMID:26273123

  13. Imaginary-scaling versus indefinite-metric quantization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2011-11-01

    Using the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator as a toy model, we outline a consistent alternative to the indefinite-metric quantization scheme that does not violate unitarity. We describe the basic mathematical structure of this method by giving an explicit construction of the Hilbert space of state vectors and the corresponding creation and annihilation operators. The latter satisfy the usual bosonic commutation relation and differ from those of the indefinite-metric theories by a sign in the definition of the creation operator. This change of sign achieves a definitization of the indefinite metric that gives life to the ghost states without changing their contribution to the energy spectrum.

  14. First principles approach to the Abraham-Minkowski controversy for the momentum of light in general linear non-dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Tomás; Rubilar, Guillermo F.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2015-02-01

    We study the problem of the definition of the energy-momentum tensor of light in general moving non-dispersive media with linear constitutive law. Using the basic principles of classical field theory, we show that for the correct understanding of the problem, one needs to carefully distinguish situations when the material medium is modeled either as a background on which light propagates or as a dynamical part of the total system. In the former case, we prove that the (generalized) Belinfante-Rosenfeld (BR) tensor for the electromagnetic field coincides with the Minkowski tensor. We derive a complete set of balance equations for this open system and show that the symmetries of the background medium are directly related to the conservation of the Minkowski quantities. In particular, for isotropic media, the angular momentum of light is conserved despite of the fact that the Minkowski tensor is non-symmetric. For the closed system of light interacting with matter, we model the material medium as a relativistic non-dissipative fluid and we prove that it is always possible to express the total BR tensor of the closed system either in the Abraham or in the Minkowski separation. However, in the case of dynamical media, the balance equations have a particularly convenient form in terms of the Abraham tensor. Our results generalize previous attempts and provide a first principles basis for a unified understanding of the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski controversy without ad hoc arguments.

  15. Randomized Trial of Prize-Based Reinforcement Density for Simultaneous Abstinence from Cocaine and Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effect of reinforcer density in prize-based abstinence reinforcement, heroin/cocaine users (N = 116) in methadone maintenance (100 mg/day) were randomly assigned to a noncontingent control group (NonC) or to 1 of 3 groups that earned prize draws for abstinence: manual drawing with standard prize density (MS) or computerized drawing…

  16. Prize Contingency Management for Smoking Cessation: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, David M.; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjunctive behavioral smoking cessation treatments have the potential to improve outcomes beyond standard care. The present study had two aims: 1) compare standard care (SC) for smoking (four weeks of brief counseling and monitoring) to SC plus prize-based contingency management (CM), involving the chance to earn prizes on days with demonstrated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide (CO) ≤6ppm); and 2) compare the relative efficacy of two prize reinforcement schedules - one a traditional CM schedule, and the second an early enhanced CM schedule providing greater reinforcement magnitude in the initial week of treatment but equal overall reinforcement. Methods Participants (N = 81 nicotine-dependent cigarette smokers) were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. Results Prize CM resulted in significant reductions in cigarette smoking relative to SC. These reductions were not apparent at follow-up. We found no meaningful differences between the traditional and enhanced CM conditions. Conclusions Our findings reveal that prize CM leads to significant reductions in smoking during treatment relative to a control intervention, but the benefits did not extend long-term. PMID:24793364

  17. Preparing medical students for the continual improvement of health and health care: Abraham Flexner and the new "public interest".

    PubMed

    Berwick, Donald M; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2010-09-01

    In 1910, in his recommendations for reforming medical education, Abraham Flexner responded to what he deemed to be the "public interest." Now, 100 years later, to respond to the current needs of society, the education of physicians must once again change. In addition to understanding the biological basis of health and disease, and mastering technical skills for treating individual patients, physicians will need to learn to navigate in and continually improve complex systems in order to improve the health of the patients and communities they serve. Physicians should not be mere participants in, much less victims of, such systems. Instead, they ought to be prepared to help lead those systems toward ever-higher-quality care for all. A number of innovative programs already exist for students and residents to help integrate improvement skills into professional preparation, and that goal is enjoying increasing support from major professional organizations and accrediting bodies. These experiences have shown that medical schools and residency programs will need to both teach the scientific foundations of system performance and provide opportunities for trainees to participate in team-based improvement of the real-world health systems in which they work. This significant curricular change, to meet the social need of the 21st century, will require educators and learners to embrace new core values, in addition to those held by the profession for generations. These include patient-centeredness, transparency, and stewardship of limited societal resources for health care. PMID:20736631

  18. The gender-specific role of polymorphisms from the fibrinolytic, renin-angiotensin, and bradykinin systems in determining plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2006-10-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation and thus risk for arterial thrombosis. We report here results from a genetic analysis of plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a large population-based sample from the PREVEND study in Groningen, the Netherlands (n = 2,527). We measured polymorphisms from genes of the fibrinolytic system, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and the bradykinin system. We found that males had higher levels of natural-log transformed t-PA, and PAI-1 (P < 0.01) compared to females. When stratifying females by menopausal status, PAI-1 levels were only significantly different between pre-menopausal females and males (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we found that age, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio were significant predictors of t-PA and PAI-1 in both females and males, and that the regression relationships between these factors and plasma t-PA and PAI-1 were dependent on gender. In addition, we found that the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was a significant predictor of PAI-1 levels in both females and males, that the angiotensin II type I receptor A1166C was a significant predictor of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in females, and that the bradykinin receptor B2 58CT polymorphism was a significant predictor of t-PA levels in females. In conclusion, this large population-based study showed that t-PA and PAI-1 levels are determined by several demographic and genetic factors involved in the fibrinolytic, RAS and bradykinin system. In addition, the results support the idea that the biology of t-PA and PAI-1 is different between females and males.

  19. Elevated Cytokines, Thrombin and PAI-1 in Severe HCPS Patients Due to Sin Nombre Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bondu, Virginie; Schrader, Ron; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; McGuire, Paul; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Hjelle, Brian; Buranda, Tione

    2015-01-01

    Sin Nombre Hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae Hantavirus) is a Category A pathogen that causes Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS) with case fatality ratios generally ranging from 30% to 50%. HCPS is characterized by vascular leakage due to dysregulation of the endothelial barrier function. The loss of vascular integrity results in non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, shock, multi-organ failure and death. Using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) measurements, we found that plasma samples drawn from University of New Mexico Hospital patients with serologically-confirmed HCPS, induce loss of cell-cell adhesion in confluent epithelial and endothelial cell monolayers grown in ECIS cultureware. We show that the loss of cell-cell adhesion is sensitive to both thrombin and plasmin inhibitors in mild cases, and to thrombin only inhibition in severe cases, suggesting an increasing prothrombotic state with disease severity. A proteomic profile (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) of HCPS plasma samples in our cohort revealed robust antifibrinolytic activity among terminal case patients. The prothrombotic activity is highlighted by acute ≥30 to >100 fold increases in active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) which, preceded death of the subjects within 48 h. Taken together, this suggests that PAI-1 might be a response to the severe pathology as it is expected to reduce plasmin activity and possibly thrombin activity in the terminal patients. PMID:25674766

  20. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  1. Epistatic interactions in genetic regulation of t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a Ghanaian population.

    PubMed

    Penrod, Nadia M; Poku, Kwabena A; Vaughan, Douglas E; Vaughn, Douglas E; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Brown, Nancy J; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Scott M

    2011-01-31

    The proteins, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), act in concert to balance thrombus formation and degradation, thereby modulating the development of arterial thrombosis and excessive bleeding. PAI-1 is upregulated by the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), specifically by angiotensin II, the product of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cleavage of angiotensin I, which is produced by the cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) by renin (REN). ACE indirectly stimulates the release of t-PA which, in turn, activates the corresponding fibrinolytic system. Single polymorphisms in these pathways have been shown to significantly impact plasma levels of t-PA and PAI-1 differently in Ghanaian males and females. Here we explore the involvement of epistatic interactions between the same polymorphisms in central genes of the RAS and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels within the same population (n = 992). Statistical modeling of pairwise interactions was done using two-way ANOVA between polymorphisms in the ETNK2, RENIN, ACE, PAI-1, t-PA, and AGT genes. The most significant interactions that associated with t-PA levels were between the ETNK2 A6135G and the REN T9435C polymorphisms in females (p = 0.006) and the REN T9435C and the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.005) in males. The most significant interactions for PAI-1 levels were with REN T9435C and the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.001) in females, and the association of REN G6567T with the TPA I/D polymorphisms (p = 0.032) in males. Our results provide evidence for multiple genetic effects that may not be detected using single SNP analysis. Because t-PA and PAI-1 have been implicated in cardiovascular disease these results support the idea that the genetic architecture of cardiovascular disease is complex. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the relationship between interacting polymorphisms of pathway specific genes that predict t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

  2. Mobility of the Yersinia High-Pathogenicity Island (HPI): transfer mechanisms of pathogenicity islands (PAIS) revisited (a review).

    PubMed

    Benedek, Orsolya; Schubert, S

    2007-06-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a key role in the evolution of bacterial pathogens. The exchange of genetic material supplies prokaryotes with several fitness traits enhancing their adaptive response to environmental changes. Pathogenicity islands (PAIs) represent an important and in most cases already immobilized subset of the different vehicles for HGT. Encoding several virulence factors PAls represent a major contribution to bacterial pathogenicity. Nonetheless, the transfer mechanisms of PAIs still remain elusive. We summarise the currently available data regarding the major ways of genetic mobilisation with a focus on the transfer of the Yersinia High-Pathogenicity Island (HPI).

  3. Pioneers in ozone research receive Nobel Prize in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded its 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three AGU members for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. Only one other Nobel prize has ever been awarded in the realm of atmospheric research. The honorees are professors Paul Crutzen of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany; Mario Molina of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and F. Sherwood Rowland of the University of California, Irvine. The Academy credits the three with contributing to “our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

  4. Irish Team Wins SEA & SPACE Super Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    A secondary school team from Ireland has won a trip to Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guyana, and to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The trip is the Super-Prize for the Sea & Space Newspaper Competition , organised within the framework of the European Week for Scientific and Technological Culture. ESO PR Photo 33/98 ESO PR Photo 33/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 434 pix - 568k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 1627 pix - 6.7Mb] The presentation of prize certificates to the winning Irish team (right) in Lisbon, on August 31, 1998, by ESO, ESA and EAAE representatives. Stephen Kearney, Cian Wilson (both aged 16 years), Eamonn McKeogh (aged 17 years) together with their teacher, John Daly of Blackrock College in Dublin, prepared their newspaper, Infinitus , on marine and space themes, and came first in the national round of the competition. Together with other students from all over Europe, they were invited to present their winning newspaper to a jury consisting of representatives of the organisers, during a special programme of events at the Gulbenkian Planetarium and EXPO '98 in Lisbon, from 28-31 August, 1998. The Irish team scored highly in all categories of the judging, which included scientific content and originality and creativity of the articles. Their look at Irish contributions to sea and space research also proved popular in a ballot by fellow student competitors. This vote was also taken into account by the judges. The jury was very impressed by the high quality of the national entries and there were several close runners-up. The width and depth was amazing and the variety of ideas and formats presented by the sixteen teams was enormous. A poster competition was organised for younger students, aged 10 to 13 and winning entries at national level are on display at the Oceanophilia Pavilion at EXPO '98. The SEA & SPACE project is a joint initiative of the European Space Agency (ESA) , the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , and the

  5. Ecosystems Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. H.; Frame, M. T.; Ferriter, O.; Recker, J.

    2014-12-01

    Stimulating innovation and private sector entrepreneurship is an important way to advance the preparedness of communities, businesses and individuals for the impacts of climate change on certain aspects of ecosystems, such as: fire regimes; water availability; carbon sequestration; biodiversity conservation; weather-related hazards, and the spread of invasive species. The creation of tools is critical to help communities and natural resource managers better understand the impacts of climate change on ecosystems and the potential resulting implications for ecosystem services and conservation efforts. The Department of the Interior is leading an interagency effort to develop the Ecosystems Vulnerability theme as part of the President's Climate Action Plan. This effort will provide seamless access to relevant datasets that can help address such issues as: risk of wildfires to local communities and federal lands; water sensitivity to climate change; and understanding the role of ecosystems in a changing climate. This session will provide an overview of the proposed Ecosystem Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition, outlining the intended audience, scope, goals, and overall timeline. The session will provide an opportunity for participants to offer new ideas. Through the Challenge, access will be made available to critical datasets for software developers, engineers, scientists, students, and researchers to develop and submit applications addressing critical science issues facing our Nation today. Application submission criteria and guidelines will also be discussed. The Challenge will be open to all sectors and organizations (i.e. federal, non-federal, private sector, non-profits, and universities) within the United States. It is anticipated the Challenge will run from early January 2015 until spring of 2015.

  6. Upstream stimulatory factor-2 mediates quercetin-induced suppression of PAI-1 gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olave, Nélida C; Grenett, Maximiliano H; Cadeiras, Martin; Grenett, Hernan E; Higgins, Paul J

    2010-10-15

    The polyphenol quercetin (Quer) represses expression of the cardiovascular disease risk factor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured endothelial cells (ECs). Transfection of PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter deletion constructs identified a 251-bp fragment (nucleotides -800 to -549) responsive to Quer. Two E-box motifs (CACGTG), at map positions -691 (E-box1) and -575 (E-box2), are platforms for occupancy by several members of the c-MYC family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) proteins. Promoter truncation and electrophoretic mobility shift/supershift analyses identified upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF-2 as E-box1/E-box2 binding factors. ECs co-transfected with a 251 bp PAI-1 promoter fragment containing the two E-box motifs (p251/luc) and a USF-2 expression vector (pUSF-2/pcDNA) exhibited reduced luciferase activity versus p251/luc alone. Overexpression of USF-2 decreased, while transfection of a dominant-negative USF construct increased, EC growth consistent with the known anti-proliferative properties of USF proteins. Quer-induced decreases in PAI-1 expression and reduced cell proliferation may contribute, at least in part, to the cardioprotective benefit associated with daily intake of polyphenols.

  7. PAI-1-regulated miR-21 defines a novel age-associated fibrogenic pathway in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ardite, Esther; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Vidal, Berta; Gutarra, Susana; Serrano, Antonio L; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of skeletal muscle homeostasis by substitution with fibrotic tissue constitutes the principal cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, yet the implicated fibrogenic mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study identifies the extracellular PAI-1/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) balance as an important regulator of microribonucleic acid (miR)-21 biogenesis, controlling age-associated muscle fibrosis and dystrophy progression. Genetic loss of PAI-1 in mdx dystrophic mice anticipated muscle fibrosis through these sequential mechanisms: the alteration of collagen metabolism by uPA-mediated proteolytic processing of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in muscle fibroblasts and the activation of miR-21 expression, which inhibited phosphatase and tensin homologue and enhanced AKT signaling, thus endowing TGF-β with a remarkable cell proliferation-promoting potential. Age-associated fibrogenesis and muscle deterioration in mdx mice, as well as exacerbated dystrophy in young PAI-1(-/-) mdx mice, could be reversed by miR-21 or uPA-selective interference, whereas forced miR-21 overexpression aggravated disease severity. The PAI-1-miR-21 fibrogenic axis also appeared dysregulated in muscle of DMD patients, providing a basis for effectively targeting fibrosis and muscular dystrophies in currently untreatable individuals.

  8. The -844 G>A PAI-1 Polymorphism Is Associated with Acute Coronary Syndrome in Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Ilian Janet; Valle, Yeminia; Sandoval-Pinto, Elena; Valdés-Alvarado, Emmanuel; Valdez-Haro, Angélica; Francisco Muñoz-Valle, José; Flores-Salinas, Héctor Enrique; Figuera-Villanueva, Luis Eduardo; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra; Padilla-Gutiérrez, Jorge Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has an important impact in public health with high morbidity and mortality. Prothrombotic and proinflammatory states are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the major inhibitor of the fibrinolysis and also is part of immune response. The -844 G>A gene polymorphism is related to increased PAI-1 protein levels. The aim of the study is to evaluate the association of -844 G>A PAI-1 polymorphism with ACS. Methods. A total of 646 individuals were recruited from Western Mexico: 350 unrelated healthy subjects and 296 patients with diagnosis of ACS. Results. The most important risk factor in our population was hypertension, followed by smoking. The genetic distribution showed an association of the A allele (OR = 1.27, P = 0.04) and AA genotype (OR = 1.86, P = 0.02) with ACS. The recessive model displayed similar results (OR = 1.76, P = 0.02). As additional finding, we observed significant differences in the genetic distribution of ACS dyslipidemic patients (OR = 1.99, P = 0.04). The A allele and AA genotype of -844 polymorphism of PAI-1 gene are risk factors for ACS. The AA genotype might be associated with the development of dyslipidemia in ACS patients. PMID:25788758

  9. PASTIS 57: Autonomous light sensors for PAI continuous monitoring. Principles, calibration and application to vegetation phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecerf, R.; Baret, F.; Hanocq, J.; Marloie, O.; Rautiainen, M.; Mottus, M.; Heiskanen, J.; Stenberg, P.

    2010-12-01

    The LAI (Leaf Area Index) is a key variable to analyze and model vegetation and its interactions with atmosphere and soils. The LAI maps derived from remote sensing images are often validated with non-destructive LAI measures obtained from digital hemispherical photography, LAI-2000 or ceptometer instruments. These methods are expensive and time consuming particularly when human intervention is needed. Consequently it is difficult to acquire overlapping field data and remotely sensed LAI. There is a need of a cheap, autonomous, easy to use ground system to measure foliage development and senescence at least with a daily frequency in order to increase the number of validation sites where vegetation phenology is continuously monitored. A system called PASTIS-57 (PAI Autonomous System from Transmittance Instantaneous Sensors oriented at 57°) devoted to PAI (Plant Area Index) ground measurements was developed to answer this need. PASTIS-57 consists in 6 sensors plugged on one logger that record data with a sampling rate of 1 to few minutes (tunable) with up to 3 months autonomy (energy and data storage). The sensors are plugged to the logger with 2x10m wires, 2x6m wires and 2x2m wires. The distance between each sensor was determined to obtain a representative spatial sampling over a 20m pixel corresponding to an Elementary Sampling Unit (ESU). The PASTIS-57 sensors are made of photodiodes that measure the incoming light in the blue wavelength to maximize the contrast between vegetation and sky and limit multiple scattering effects in the canopy. The diodes are oriented to the north to avoid direct sun light and point to a zenithal angle of 57° to minimize leaf angle distribution and plant clumping effects. The field of view of the diodes was set to ± 20° to take into consideration vegetation cover heterogeneity and to minimize environmental effects. The sensors were calibrated after recording data on a clear view site during a week. After calibration, the sensors

  10. German History. A Pupils' Competition for the Federal President's Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Borries, Bodo

    The Pupils' Competition for the Federal President's German History Prize is one of the many youth competitions held every year in West Germany and sponsored by government offices, industries, common interest groups, and foundations. In this competition, which draws over 1,000 entries from all age groups, participants are expected to make an…

  11. What to do to win a Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foundationeer, Second; chrischievious; Hasler, John; nvrao; dedalus22; Martin

    2014-11-01

    In reply to the infographic "Illustrating a century of Nobels" and a related physicsworld.com blog post "What type of physics should you do if you want to bag a Nobel prize?" (2 October, http://ow.ly/CmCzl, see also pp22-23).

  12. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  13. Defining Excellence: Lessons from the 2013 Aspen Prize Finalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In many respects, one couldn't find a group of 10 schools more diverse than the finalists for the 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. One community college serves 1,500 students, another 56,000. There are institutions devoted primarily--even solely--to technical degrees, and ones devoted mainly to preparing students for further…

  14. Pulitzer Prize Speakers Enhance Credibility of San Antonio Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aradillas, Elaine

    1994-01-01

    Describes a mass communications program at Texas's San Antonio College that invites Pulitzer Prize recipients to give guest lectures. Includes a list of the speakers who have lectured since the program's inception in 1978, a description of the speakers' accomplishments, and a description of program activities. (MAB)

  15. The Nobel Prize Economics Lectures as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahka, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes using some of the 26 Nobel Prize lectures as teaching tools in economics courses. Notes lectures are reprinted in economic journals. Lists titles of lectures from 1969 to 1988; identifies level of difficulty; and categorizes the lectures by subject field. Outlines George Stigler's 1982 Nobel lecture and gives suggestions for teaching. (NL)

  16. Modular Curriculum: English, American Nobel Prize Winners in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James A.

    This independent study module treats those Americans who have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. They include Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Pearl Buck. Selections from the writings of these authors are included. Their works represent many literary genres and also…

  17. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  18. Prizes in Cereal Boxes: An Application of Probability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwiller, Bonnie H.; Duncan, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents four cases of real-world probabilistic situations to promote more effective teaching of probability. Calculates the probability of obtaining six of six different prizes successively in six, seven, eight, and nine boxes of cereal, generalizes the problem to n boxes of cereal, and offers suggestions to extend the problem. (MDH)

  19. Whose Big Prize? A Response to Hall and Gunter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, John

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Hall and Gunter who accuse the author of trying to mount "a stout defence" of New Labour's reforms of the teaching profession. Hall and Gunter go further and accuse the author of "triumphalism" in his use of the title "Tony Blair's big prize". Their second and more serious challenge concerns the…

  20. Training Quality: Before and after Winning the Deming Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magennis, Jo P.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Quality Improvement Program developed by Florida Power and Light's Nuclear Training organization that was awarded the Deming Application Prize for quality control. Training quality, team activities, training's role in business planning, customer involvement and evaluation, and continuous improvement of training are discussed. (LRW)

  1. Award of EC Television Prize for Broadcasts on Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    The European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) is endeavoring to encourage television to provide more and better information on vocational and continuing education in the European Community (EC). Therefore, it held its first competition to award prizes for broadcasts presenting information on vocational training,…

  2. John Hardy is the UK's first Breakthrough Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2015-12-01

    John Hardy, Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and Editorial Board member of The FEBS Journal, has been awarded The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in recognition of his work identifying mutations that cause amyloid build-up in the brain--research that has transformed the study of Alzheimer's disease and other major neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Harry Smith — recipient of the 2008 Molecular Ecology Prize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harry Smith is a scholar, mentor, internationally renowned researcher, eloquent speaker and author, pioneering journal editor and highly valued colleague who has contributed greatly in multiple ways to plant science and the community. He richly deserves the honour of the Molecular Ecology Prize....

  4. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology. PMID:20004159

  5. Eppur si muove! The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy C; Roux, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel for their work on developing computational methods to study complex chemical systems. Their work has led to mechanistic critical insights into chemical systems both large and small and has enabled progress in a number of different fields, including structural biology.

  6. E pluribus tres: the 2009 nobel prize in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W

    2009-12-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  7. SunShot Catalyst Prize Competition Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Catalyst Energy Innovation Prize, an open innovation program launched in 2014 by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This program aims to catalyze the rapid creation and development of products and solutions that address near-term challenges in the U.S. solar energy marketplace.

  8. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  9. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2016-07-12

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  10. Grand Prize and Citation Winners: Ten School with Soaring Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design features of the grand prize winners of the 2002 "Learning by Design" contest--an addition to West Linn High School in West Linn, Oregon, and the renovation of Beaver Brook Academic Center/The Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, Connecticut. Also describes the designs of the eight citation winners. (EV)

  11. Sources of Financial Support for Research Prize Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The principal objective of this study was to determine the organizational sources of support for the scientists and engineers who have received the Nobel and other major scientific prizes. A secondary objective was to determine what role the National Science Foundation (NSF) may have played in the recipients' research careers. The results of the…

  12. How to get the Nobel Prize in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordling, Carl

    1995-01-01

    Every year, on the 10th of December, one piece is added to the history of science. This is the day when the Nobel Prizes are awarded to those scientists who "during the preceding year have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind". The Nobel Prize carries the highest prestige and fame of all distinctions in the world of science. There have been many speculations regarding the prize: What effect does it have on its recipients? Does it boost their research activities or does it kill them? Is it merely an after-the-fact recognition of important steps in the history of science, or does it also create history by changing the directions along which science develops? What role does it play in the sociology of science? Is it a prize for leaders of big research teams or is there a preference for the genius working completely on his own? Are there equal opportunities for men and women, for Swedes and Russians, for black and white? Where does one find the track that leads to Stockholm?

  13. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y.; Żuberek, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  14. Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    The life and personality of Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes established by his will are discussed. Nobel was a 19th century Swedish industrialist who was fluent in six languages. He invented dynamite. At his death in 1896, his estate amounted to $9,200,000. His will stipulated that the income from his estate should be divided annually into five…

  15. How Robert A. Millikan Got the Physics Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panusch, Martin; Heering, Peter; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    In 1923, R.A. Millikan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the elementary charge of electricity and on the photoelectric effect. Recently, historical research had a focus on Millikan's publication practice, as well as on the role of his assistant, Harvey Fletcher. Several studies have raised doubts on whether Millikan can…

  16. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. An Elusive Honor: Psychology, Behavior, and the Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickren, Wade E.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from economics, the human sciences have not generally been rewarded with high honors from the world community. Psychology has been awarded the distinction of a Nobel Prize only when it has served a role in explicating human behavior in relation to economics. Yet psychological science has played no small part in the work of a number of Nobel…

  18. "Not Censorship but Selection": Censorship and/as Prizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This essay calls for a fresh critical approach to the topic of censorship, suggesting that anticensorship efforts, while important and necessary, function much like literary prizing. The analysis draws especially on James English's recent study "The Economy of Prestige." There are two central arguments: first, that the librarian ethic of…

  19. The 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlstein, Linda

    2013-01-01

    For millions of Americans, community colleges provide an essential pathway to well-paying jobs and continuing higher education. The Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence honors those institutions that strive for and achieve exceptional levels of success for all students, while they are in college and after they graduate. Community colleges…

  20. Reclaiming "Lost Prizes": An Interview with Ken McCluskey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Ken McCluskey, Dean and Professor of Education at the University of Winnipeg. He is known internationally for his work in several areas including: (1) mentoring; (2) attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (3) at-risk children and youth (where his "Lost Prizes" and related projects serve as models…

  1. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school district,…

  2. What Is Community College Excellence? Lessons from the Aspen Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year, in a process to select the winner of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Aspen Institute has convened national experts to define and determine how to measure "excellence," to identify community colleges with high levels of student success, and to help more community colleges understand what can be done to…

  3. UPA and PAI-1 analysis from fixed tissues - new perspectives for a known set of predictive markers.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, K; Böllner, C; Hipp, S; Berg, D; Schmitt, M; Becker, K F

    2010-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its main inhibitor PAI-1 play key roles in tumor-associated processes such as the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), tissue remodeling, cell adhesion and migration. Elevated expression of both molecules is known to correlate with negative outcomes in node negative breast cancer. To date, these molecules are the only prognostic markers to have reached the highest level of evidence (LOE I) in multi-centered clinical trials for prognosis of node negative breast cancer. Unfortunately, the clinical utility of these molecules as markers is limited by the use of enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) tests for their detection. The ELISA relies on the use of fresh or frozen tissue, which are rarely available in routine clinical settings. In this review article, we provide an overview of the clinical relevance of uPA and PAI-1 and present alternative methods for their detection. Common uPA and PAI-1 detection methods discussed in literature include RT-PCR-based assays and classical immunohistochemistry approaches. In recent years, attempts have been made to isolate and analyze proteins of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. These new methods are of special interest because up to now neither RT-PCR nor immunohistochemistry are recommended for the detection of uPA and PAI-1. Here, we present an approach for the analysis of uPA and PAI-1 directly from FFPE tissues that may eventually overcome the limitations of current assays and make the use of both markers widely available for routine prognosis and therapy decisions for breast cancer patients.

  4. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present.

  5. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present. PMID:22166484

  6. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment.

  7. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment. PMID:26450094

  8. More than Prize Lists: Head Teachers, Student Prize Winners, School Ceremonies and Educational Promotion in Colonial South Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Marisa

    2007-01-01

    Australian educators now operate in environments that frequently stress marketing activities. This article highlights the ways that colonial school prize ceremonies were deliberately developed to promote teaching activities. These ceremonies were part of carefully considered strategies that helped to boost the status of entrepreneurial teachers…

  9. The Nobel Peace Prize and Peace Studies. "Styles of Leadership: An Undergraduate Course Based upon the Prize."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merikangas, Robert J.

    An undergraduate honors course on the Nobel Peace Prize winners at the University of Maryland focuses on styles of leadership and includes three main areas of attention: (1) the inner journey, or heart of the peacemaker, (2) leadership exercised through organizations and movements, and (3) the rhetoric of the leader. The course was divided into a…

  10. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  11. Procedures for the quantitative protein determination of urokinase and its inhibitor, PAI-1, in human breast cancer tissue extracts by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Manfred; Sturmheit, Alexandra S; Welk, Anita; Schnelldorfer, Christel; Harbeck, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    The determination of the protein content of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, PAI-1, in breast cancer tissue extracts is used clinically to identify patients at risk to experience disease recurrence (metastasis) or early death. The serine protease uPA, in concert with its inhibitor PAI-1, promotes tumor cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, as well as extracellular matrix degradation and, thus, facilitates tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The various technical steps to recover uPA and PAI-1 protein from archived breast cancer tissues and to quantitatively determine uPA and PAI-1 protein content in tumor tissue extracts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are described in detail. The technical steps involved require fresh-frozen breast cancer tissue, a dismembrator machine (ball mill) to pulverize the tissue in the frozen state, detergent (Triton X-100) containing Tris-buffered saline to extract uPA and PAI-1 from the pulverized breast cancer tissue, an ultracentrifuge to separate the detergent fraction from cellular debris, uPA and PAI-1 ELISA kits, protein determination reagents, and a 96-well spectrophotometer (ELISA reader) to assess uPA, PAI-1, and total protein in the detergent extract. The uPA/PAI-1 ELISAs and the protein determination format described are robust and highly sensitive. In addition to the macromethod of tissue disintegration, we present a simple but sensitive micro-extraction procedure using cryostat sections or core biopsies as the source of breast cancer tissue. Such a technique allows rapid and quantitative determination of uPA and PAI-1, even in small breast cancer specimens.

  12. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Horie, Shuichi

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR

  13. What’s Behind a Name: The Kaufman Prize of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Kaufman Prize has been given by the Canadian Geriatrics Society for nearly 30 years, but few Society members are aware of who Kaufman was or why the Prize was named after him. They are equally unclear about the objectives established for the Prize and how successful it has been in achieving them. This paper reviews the history of the Kaufman Prize and the eponymous A.R. Kaufman. The original objectives of the award were to encourage clinical research in geriatric medicine and to foster research interest in medical residents. Over the years the Prize has allowed the Society to both recognize and encourage excellence in age-related research among trainees. With the renaming of the Prize, now would be an opportune time for the Society to review both its objectives and its format. PMID:23251314

  14. Was Abraham Lincoln gay?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scholars and historians are blind to Lincoln's same-sex inclinations in part because of a personal aversion to male homosexuality, but more importantly because they fail to perceive the vast differences between the sexual culture of antebellum America and that of our own time, especially in regard to male-male physical and emotional intimacy. This article brings those differences to light and sets Lincoln's life in the context of the sexual culture of his own time. This enables one to see that Lincoln's same-sex sexuality was not only unproblematic, but commonplace, if not typical, in his day. Revising the Myth of Lincoln in regard to his same-sex inclinations will have a positive effect on contemporary culture, especially on the education and socialization of young boys.

  15. Correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4G/5G polymorphism and metabolic/proinflammatory factors in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, M F; Sóter, M O; Candido, A L; Fernandes, A P; Oliveira, F R; Ferreira, A C S; Sousa, M O; Ferreira, C N; Gomes, K B

    2013-10-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of subfertility associated to metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to correlate metabolic and proinflammatory factors in women with PCOS. The frequency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter 4 G/5 G polymorphism was also compared to healthy controls. We evaluated 79 PCOS and 79 healthy women. PAI-1 levels are positively correlated with proinflammatory factors in PCOS group. 4 G allele in PAI-1 gene was more frequent in PCOS and the 4G/4 G genotype was associated with increased PAI-1 levels. A correlation between insulin resistance and proinflammatory and overweight was also observed. C-reactive protein, serum levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), Lipid Accumulation Product (LAP) and vitamin D are good tools to evaluated factors associated to cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS.

  16. Prognostic value of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and its complex with the type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1) in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Witte, J H de; Sweep, C G J; Klijn, J G M; Grebenschikov, N; Peters, H A; Look, M P; Tienoven, ThH van; Heuvel, J J T M; Vries, J Bolt-De; Benraad, ThJ; Foekens, J A

    1999-01-01

    The prognostic value of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) measured in samples derived from 865 patients with primary breast cancer using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated. Since the assay could easily be adapted to the assessment of the complex of tPA with its type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1), it was investigated whether the tPA:PAI-1 complex also provides prognostic information. To this end, cytosolic extracts and corresponding detergent extracts of 100 000 g pellets obtained after ultracentrifugation when preparing the cytosolic fractions for routine steroid hormone receptor determination were assayed. Statistically significant correlations were found between the cytosolic levels and those determined in the pellet extracts (Spearman correlation coefficient rs = 0.75, P < 0.001 for tPA and r = 0.50, P < 0.001 for tPA:PAI-1 complex). In both Cox univariate and multivariate analysis elevated levels of (total) tPA determined in the pellet extracts, but not in cytosols, were associated with prolonged relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In contrast, high levels of the tPA:PAI-1 complex measured in cytosols, but not in the pellet extracts, were associated with a poor RFS and OS. The prognostic information provided by the cytosolic tPA:PAI-1 complex was comparable to that provided by cytosolic (total) PAI-1. Furthermore, the estimated levels of free, uncomplexed tPA and PAI-1, in cytosols and in pellet extracts, were related to patient prognosis in a similar way as the (total) levels of tPA and PAI-1 respectively. Determination of specific forms of components of the plasminogen activation system, i.e. tPA:PAI-1 complex and free, uncomplexed tPA and/or PAI-1, may be considered a useful adjunct to the analyses of the separate components (tPA and/or PAI-1) and provide valuable additional prognostic information with respect to survival of breast cancer patients. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390010

  17. The American Orthodontics BOS MOrth Cases Prize 2005.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Nadine

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic treatment of two cases that were successfully entered for the 2005 American Orthodontics MOrth Cases Prize. The first case is that of a patient presenting with a Class II division 2 malocclusion treated with upper and lower fixed appliances plus headgear. The second case demonstrates the use of a twin-block appliance, followed by fixed appliances to correct a moderate Class II division 1 malocclusion.

  18. In Brief: IPCC and Gore share Nobel Peace Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-10-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, Jr. have been named as co-recipients of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced on 12 October. The Committee cited them "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change."

  19. Review of research on Dendrobium, a prized folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Liu, Jingyi; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan; Wing Sze, Stephen Cho; Tong, Yao; Zhang, Kalin Yanbo

    2012-03-01

    Medicinal plants of the Dendrobium genus are highly prized, and hence, methodologies have been developed to authenticate Dendrobium drugs from its adulterants. Many bioactive constituents of Dendrobium species have been identified. The macromolecules included lectins; the enzymes chalcone synthase, sucrose synthase, and cytokinin oxidase; and polysaccharides. The polysaccharides display immunomodulatory and hepatoprotective activities. Alkaloids exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, and neuroprotective activities. Other compounds manifest antioxidant, anticancer, and immunomodulatory.

  20. Impact of guideline-based use of uPA/PAI-1 on patient outcome in intermediate-risk early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolben, Thomas; Augustin, D; Armbrust, R; Kolben, T M; Degenhardt, T; Burgmann, M; Goess, C; Ditsch, N; Kates, R; Harbeck, N; Wuerstlein, R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of guideline-based prospective use of uPA/PAI-1 on clinical outcome in an intermediate-risk cohort of breast cancer patients. We analyzed 381 consecutive primary breast cancer patients (2003-2011) at the breast center Ostbayern meeting the following criteria: M0/N0/estrogen receptor (ER)+/G2. Clinical-pathological data, uPA/PAI-1, and follow-up data were collected. Decisions for adjuvant chemotherapy were made upon consideration of prospectively measured uPA/PAI-1. Observed disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Using guideline-based analysis of uPA/PAI-1, treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy was avoided in 86.5 % of patients with low uPA/PAI-1, i.e., 38.8 % of the total patient collective. Median follow-up was 52.5 months. Five-year relapse-free survival in intermediate-risk patients (N0, G2) without chemotherapy was 99 %. Five-year overall survival including all causes of death was 95 %. By using uPA/PAI-1, adjuvant chemotherapy can be avoided in a major part of patients with intermediate-risk breast cancer. Nevertheless, DFS and OS of these patients at 5 years remain excellent. The potential, but hardly measurable, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has to be set in contrast with its associated side effects and increased morbidity. Patients with high uPA/PAI-1 show benefit from chemotherapy. In this subgroup, a very good OS was observed as well. These findings strongly support the use of uPA/PAI-1 together with clinic-pathological parameters as an evidence-based, clinically relevant and inexpensive decision tool in the routine of a breast center.

  1. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine. PMID:25554824

  2. Kevin E. Trenberth Receives 2013 Climate Communication Prize: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    I am delighted to be recognized with this prize. I want to first thank AGU and the prize committee and, especially, Nature's Own for establishing this prize in a field that has become contentious and highly political. It did not used to be this way. Following the media frenzy with the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, there was hope at the 2009 Conference of Parties meeting in Copenhagen that an international framework agreement on climate change might be achieved. It was not to be. Planned actions to address issues of climate change were undermined by huge funding of misinformation by vested interests. It was not helped by so-called "climategate" in which many emails illegally hacked from a computer server at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom were released, cherry picked, distorted, and misused by climate change deniers. Minor errors in the IPCC report were blown out of all proportion and ineffectively addressed. I was caught up in all this, and one of my many emails went viral: the "travesty" quote in which I bemoaned the inability to close the global energy balance associated with short-term climate variability but which was misinterpreted as saying there was no global warming. These examples highlight failures of communication.

  3. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine.

  4. Evaluation of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as prognostic markers in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Tomasz; Szajewski, Mariusz; Szefel, Jarosław; Aleksandrowicz-Wrona, Ewa; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydlowska, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In carcinoma of prostate, a causative role of platelet 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) for tumor progression has been firmly established in tumor and/or adjacent tissue. Our goal was to investigate if 12-LOX and/or PAI-1 in patient's plasma could be used to predict outcome of the disease. The study comprised 149 patients (age 70±9) divided into two groups: a study group with carcinoma confirmed by positive biopsy of prostate (n=116) and a reference group (n=33) with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The following parameters were determined by the laboratory test in plasma or platelet-rich plasma: protein level of 12-LOX, PAI-1, thromboglobulin (TGB), prostate specific antigen (PSA), C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin (HGB, and hematocrit (HCT), as well as red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC), number of platelets (PLT), international normalized ratio of blood clotting (INR), and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The only difference of significance was noticed in the concentration of 12-LOX in platelet rich plasma, which was lower in cancer than in BPH group. Standardization to TGB and platelet count increases the sensitivity of the test that might be used as a biomarker to assess risk for prostate cancer in periodically monitored patients.

  5. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1): A KEY FACTOR LINKING FIBRINOLYSIS AND AGE-RELATED SUBCLINICAL AND CLINICAL CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Matteo; Pahor, Marco; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2010-01-01

    The close relationship existing between aging and thrombosis has growingly been studied in this last decade. The age-related development of a pro-thrombotic imbalance in the fibrinolysis homeostasis has been hypothesized at the basis of this increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk. Fibrinolysis is the resulting of the interactions among multiple plasminogen activators and inhibitors constituing the enzymatic cascade, and ultimately leading to the degradation of fibrin. The plasminogen activator system plays a key role in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a member of the superfamily of serine-protease inhibitors (or serpins), and the principal inhibitor of both the tissue-type and the urinary-type plasminogen activator, the two plasminogen activators able to activate plasminogen. In this review, current evidence describing the central role played by PAI-1 in a number of age-related subclinical (i.e., inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance) and clinical (i.e., obesity, comorbidities, Werner syndrome) conditions is presented. Despite some controversial and unclear issues, PAI-1 represents an extremely promising marker which may become a biological parameter to be growingly considered in the prognostic evaluation, in the disease monitoring, and as treatment target of age-related conditions in the next future. PMID:20626406

  6. PA-I lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa binds acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Raina N; Bogoeva, Vanya P; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R

    2005-03-14

    The study analyses the binding affinities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-I lectin (PA-IL) to three N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHSL), quorum sensing signal molecules responsible for cell-cell communication in bacteria. It shows that like some plant lectins, PA-IL has a dual function and, besides its carbohydrate-binding capacity, can accommodate AHLS. Formation of complexes between PA-IL and AHSL with acyl side chains composed of 4, 6 or 12 methyl groups is characterized by changes in the emissions of two incorporated fluorescent markers, TNS and IAEDANS, both derivatives of naphthalene sulfonic acid. PA-IL shows increasing affinities to lactones with longer aliphatic side chains. The values of the apparent dissociation constants (K(d)), which are similar to the previously determined K(d) for the adenine high affinity binding, and the similar effects of lactones and adenine on the TNS emission indicate one identical binding site for these ligands, which is suggested to represent the central cavity of the oligomeric molecule formed after the association of the four identical subunits of PA-IL. Intramolecular distances between the fluorescent markers and protein Trp residues are determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  7. Signalling networks associated with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 in breast cancer tissues: new insights from protein microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Claudia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Berg, Daniela; Schragner, Kerstin; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the main uPA inhibitor PAI-1 play important roles in cell migration and invasion in both physiological and pathological contexts. Both factors are clinically applicable predictive markers in node-negative breast cancer patients that are used to stratify patients for adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition to their classical functions in plasmin regulation, both factors are key components in cancer-related cell signalling. Such signalling cascades are well described in cell culture systems, but a better understanding of uPA- and PAI-1-associated signalling networks in clinical tissues is needed. We examined the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and 21 signalling molecules in 201 primary breast cancer tissues using protein microarrays. Expression of uPA was significantly correlated with the expression of ERK and Stat3, while expression of PAI-1 was correlated with the uPA receptor and Akt activation, presumably via integrin and HER-receptor signalling. Analysis of uPA expression did not reveal any significant correlation with staging, grading or age of the patients. The PAI-1 expression was correlated with nodal stage. Network monitoring for uPA and PAI-1 in breast cancer reveals interactions with main signalling cascades and extends the findings from cell culture experiments. Our results reveal possible mechanisms underlying cancer development.

  8. Human circadian system causes a morning peak in prothrombotic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) independent of the sleep/wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Shea, Steven A

    2014-01-23

    Serious adverse cardiovascular events peak in the morning, possibly related to increased thrombosis in critical vessels. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which inhibits fibrinolysis, is a key circulating prothrombotic factor that rises in the morning in humans. We tested whether this morning peak in PAI-1 is caused by the internal circadian system or by behaviors that typically occur in the morning, such as altered posture and physical activity. Twelve healthy adults underwent a 2-week protocol that enabled the distinction of endogenous circadian effects from behavioral and environmental effects. The results demonstrated a robust circadian rhythm in circulating PAI-1 with a peak corresponding to ∼6:30 am. This rhythm in PAI-1 was 8-times larger than changes in PAI-1 induced by standardized behavioral stressors, including head-up tilt and 15-minute cycle exercise. If this large endogenous morning peak in PAI-1 persists in vulnerable individuals, it could help explain the morning peak in adverse cardiovascular events.

  9. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  10. Students in the Abraham S. Fischler Center for the Advancement of Education Respond to a Satisfaction Survey: A Comparison Between On-Campus Students and Off-Campus Students. Research and Planning Report 96-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    This study examined student satisfaction among a sample of on-campus and off-campus students of the Abraham S. Fischler Center for the Advancement of Education at Nova Southeastern University. A total of 1,039 students responded to a survey that focused on demographic and background information, academic programs, and student services. The study…

  11. Sinistral strike-slip dominated inclined transpression along the Pai-Khoi fold-and-thrust belt, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The Arctic Uralides comprise Pai-Khoi, Novaya Zemlya and the Taimyr Peninsula. Together they form a margin controlled salient in the former Baltica margin of Laurussia. This arcuate orogen forms a fundamental tectonic boundary between major hydrocarbon provinces; Timan-Pechora and Barents Sea to the southwest and west, respectively, and the South Kara Sea to the east. To understand the complex regional tectonic relationship between the Arctic Uralides and the South Kara Sea, it is essential to establish the structural and kinematic style of the various sectors of this remote orogen. This contribution focuses on the southern limb of the salient, the NW-SE trending, Pai-Khoi fold-and-thrust belt (PKFB), which links the Polar Urals with Novaya Zemlya approximately 600 km to the northwest. The PKFB comprises a highly deformed, Late Cambrian to Mississippian age, passive margin succession, with allochthonous deep-water and continental slope facies rocks thrust over a shallow-water carbonate platform succession along the Main Pai-Khoi Thrust. Deformation is interpreted to have occurred between the Late Palaeozoic and end Triassic resulting in the formation of an apparent southwesterly verging fold-and-thrust belt with an associated foreland basin. Analysis of regional scale geological maps reveals the presence of large scale en-echelon folds, together with late stage, orogen-parallel faults, indicating that the evolution of PKFB has been influenced by a component of sinistral strike-slip. Detailed field data from a transect across the largest structure in the orogen, the Main Pai-Khoi Thrust, confirms the obliquity of both planar structures and finite stretching lineations to this major allochthon bounding thrust. Subtle but consistent variations in the orientation of finite stretching directions within zones of qualitatively differing finite strain were identified. Comparison of these variations with theoretical models of inclined transpression suggests that deformation

  12. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  13. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1956: Hinshelwood and Semenov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-04-01

    This is the fifth in a series of thirteen monthly essays reviewing the Nobel Prizes in chemical dynamics during the 20th century. Cyril Hinshelwood and Nikolay Semenov received the Nobel Prize in 1956 "for their researches into the mechanism of chemical reactions," in particular, chain reactions.

  14. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced Through the Nobel Prizes. 1967: Eigen, Norrish, and Porter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-05-01

    The third Nobel Prize for research in chemical dynamics awarded during the middle decades of the Twentieth Century is reviewed. Manfred Eigen, Ronald Norrish, and George Porter received the Nobel Prize in 1967 "for studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equilibrium by means of very short impulses of energy," i.e., temperature jump, pressure jump, and flash photolysis.

  15. 77 FR 58114 - SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... installation cost of rooftop solar energy systems. DATES: Registration opened on September 12, 2012, and will... about the SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop competition rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html . Teams that wish to enter the competition can register at...

  16. Vouchers Versus Prizes: Contingency Management Treatment of Substance Abusers in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Marx, Jacqueline; Austin, Mark; Tardif, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions usually use vouchers as reinforcers, but a new technique awards chances of winning prizes. This study compares these approaches. In community treatment centers, 142 cocaine- or heroin-dependent outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST with vouchers, or ST with prizes for 12 weeks.…

  17. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  18. Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac versus Landau-Lifshitz radiation friction force in the ultrarelativistic electron interaction with electromagnetic wave (exact solutions)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Bulanov, Stepan S.

    2011-11-15

    When the parameters of electron-extreme power laser interaction enter the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the electron dynamics changes qualitatively. The adequate theoretical description of this regime becomes crucially important with the use of the radiation friction force either in the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac form, which possesses unphysical runaway solutions, or in the Landau-Lifshitz form, which is a perturbation valid for relatively low electromagnetic wave amplitude. The goal of the present paper is to find the limits of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation force applicability in terms of the electromagnetic wave amplitude and frequency. For this, a class of the exact solutions to the nonlinear problems of charged particle motion in the time-varying electromagnetic field is used.

  19. Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac versus Landau-Lifshitz radiation friction force in the ultrarelativistic electron interaction with electromagnetic wave (exact solutions).

    PubMed

    Bulanov, Sergei V; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K; Bulanov, Stepan S

    2011-11-01

    When the parameters of electron-extreme power laser interaction enter the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the electron dynamics changes qualitatively. The adequate theoretical description of this regime becomes crucially important with the use of the radiation friction force either in the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac form, which possesses unphysical runaway solutions, or in the Landau-Lifshitz form, which is a perturbation valid for relatively low electromagnetic wave amplitude. The goal of the present paper is to find the limits of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation force applicability in terms of the electromagnetic wave amplitude and frequency. For this, a class of the exact solutions to the nonlinear problems of charged particle motion in the time-varying electromagnetic field is used.

  20. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  1. ["If Berger had survived the second world war - he certainly would have been a candidate for the Nobel Prize". Hans Berger and the legend of the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Gerhard, U-J; Schönberg, A; Blanz, B

    2005-03-01

    The public opinion pays much attention to the Nobel Prize as an indicator for the scientific efficiency of a university or a country in connection with foundation of so-called elite universities. The former holder of the psychiatric chair in Jena and discoverer of the electroencephalogram Hans Berger (1873 - 1941) came into discussion as candidate for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The current medical-historical publications maintain the view that Berger should have received the Nobel Prize in 1936 as well as in 1949. This was prevented in 1936 by an enactment from Hitler, which forbid him to accept the prize, and later in 1949 by Berger's own death. According to documents of the Nobel archives these statements can be disproved. Berger was only nominated three times out of 65 nominations in 1940. Because of his death the other two recommendations in 1942 and 1947 were never evaluated. PMID:15747225

  2. Epistatic effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2007-03-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) directly influence thrombus formation and degradation and thereby risk for arterial thrombosis. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system has been linked to the production of PAI-1 expression via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In addition, bradykinin can induce the release of t-PA through a B2 receptor mechanism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the epistatic effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels in a large population-based sample (n=2527). We demonstrated a strong significant interaction within genetic variations of the bradykinin B2 gene (P=0.002) and between ACE and bradykinin B2 (p=0.003) polymorphisms on t-PA levels in females. In males, polymorphisms in the bradykinin B2 and AT1R gene showed the most strong effect on t-PA levels (P=0.006). In both females and males, the bradykinin B2 gene interacted with AT1R gene on plasma PAI-1 levels (P=0.026 and P=0.039, respectively). In addition, the current study found a borderline significant interaction between PAI 4G5G and ACE I/D on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels. These results support the idea that the interplay between the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems might play an important role in t-PA and PAI-1 biology.

  3. p53- and PAI-1-mediated induction of C-X-C chemokines and CXCR2: importance in pulmonary inflammation due to cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nivedita; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Fu, Jian; Shetty, Sreerama

    2016-03-15

    We previously demonstrated that tumor suppressor protein p53 augments plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure-induced lung injury. Chronic lung inflammation with elevated p53 and PAI-1 expression in AECs and increased susceptibility to and exacerbation of respiratory infections are all associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We recently demonstrated that preventing p53 from binding to the endogenous PAI-1 mRNA in AECs by either suppressing p53 expression or blockading p53 interactions with the PAI-1 mRNA mitigates apoptosis and lung injury. Within this context, we now show increased expression of the C-X-C chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and their receptor CXCR2, and the intercellular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. We also found a similar increase in lung tissues and AECs from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to passive CS for 20 wk and in primary AECs treated with CS extract in vitro. Interestingly, passive CS exposure of mice lacking either p53 or PAI-1 expression resisted an increase in CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCR2, and ICAM-1. Furthermore, inhibition of p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression by treatment of WT mice exposed to passive CS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide reduced CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2 levels and lung inflammation. Our study reveals that p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression due to chronic CS exposure exacerbates lung inflammation through elaboration of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2. We further provide evidence that targeting this pathway mitigates lung injury associated with chronic CS exposure.

  4. Accumulation of uPA-PAI-1 complexes inside the tumour cells is associated with axillary nodal invasion in progesterone-receptor-positive early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Pollán, M; Tejerina, A; Sánchez, J; Lucas, A R

    2003-01-13

    Both urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), as well as uPA-PAI-1 complexes, have been identified as important prognostic factors in breast cancer. We have recently reported that the latter are identifiable inside breast cancer cells by means of immunohistochemistry. Using this technique, we have studied a series of 212 early (pT1) unifocal breast cancers and have correlated the expression of uPA-PAI-1 complexes, together with other clinical and biological features (histologic variety, histologic and nuclear grade, hormone receptors, Ki67 labelling index, c-erb-B2-, p53- and CD44std-expression) with or without the occurrence of axillary node invasion. In a logistic regression model, looking for associations with axillary metastasis, we found a statistically significant interaction between the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes and progesterone receptor positivity (P=0.04). A final model showed that the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes was a determinant factor for axillary metastasis among women carrying tumours expressing progesterone receptors. In these cases, the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes carried with it a nearly 14-fold risk of axillary node invasion (P=0.009). These results may indicate that small, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers (with a theoretical good prognosis) may carry an elevated risk of nodal involvement if accumulation of uPA-PAI-1 complexes is shown inside their tumour cells by means of immunohistochemistry. PMID:12556966

  5. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  6. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck. PMID:16802565

  7. Paul Ehrlich: the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 1908.

    PubMed

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Antonio; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    We wish to commemorate Paul Ehrlich on the centennial of his being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. His studies are now considered as milestones in immunology: the morphology of leukocytes; his side-chain theory where he defined the cellular receptor for first time; and his clarification of the difference between serum therapy and chemotherapy. Ehrlich also invented the first chemotherapeutic drug: compound 606, or Salvarsan. We have used some original documents from the Royal Society of London, where Ehrlich was a fellow, and from Leipzig University, where he took a degree in medicine.

  8. [Opinions of the participants of 'Quit and Win' competition concerning prizes motivating to refrain from smoking].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Rzeźnicki, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Big antinicotine campaigns both in Poland and worldwide, are finished with a competition with prizes of different value. Psychologists say that a prize significantly motivates a person to certain kinds of behaviour. During educational activities carried out in the time of campaign, it is recommended to use techniques of psychological interaction that would release motives most beneficial to health. The aim of the work was to recognize frequency of being influenced mostly by the possibility of winning a prize before making a decision about quitting smoking and joining the competition, and learning the opinions of prize laureates concerning efficiency of 'Quit and Win' competitions. Empirical material comes from two sources. The first one is the selected fragments of a survey study carried out at Social and Preventive Medicine Department among 1700 participants of 'Quit and Win' competition that finished the 2nd International Antinicotine Campaign in Poland. The correctly filled survey was sent by 1285 people, that is 75.6%. The second source is a fragment of a survey study carried out in 2003 among 54 laureates of 'Quit and Win' competition in Poland. The completed survey was sent by majority of the laureates, that is 34 people (f = 0.63). Possibility of winning a prize as the most important reason for taking up the attempt to stop smoking and joining the competition was pointed to by 56 respondents (4.4%), whereas the remaining people chose other reasons as the most important ones. In the group of 34 respondents who were the laureates of competitions, majority, that is 22 people (f = 0.65) claimed the competition with prizes as a very effective method of reducing smoking. Half of the surveyed (17 people) claimed the possibility of winning a few prizes of high value would be more motivating than winning one of many prizes of smaller value. As the least attractive, prize gifts were pointed to. A prize in the form of a trip or holiday was considered very popular, as

  9. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO) in COPD. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson’s partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure) and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. Results First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P=0.007). Then, the correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), FEV1/Pre (justified r=−0.308, P<0.001; justified r=−0.295, P=0.001, respectively) and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=−0.289, P=0.001; justified r=−0.273, P=0.002, respectively), but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001), the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively). Besides, multivariable

  10. Beta-Adrenoceptor agonists and other cAMP elevating agents suppress PAI-1 production of human adipocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Gottschling-Zeller, H; Aprath, I; Skurk, T; Hauner, H

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies showed that catecholamines contribute to the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, at least in endothelial cells. Aim of this study was to examine the role of catecholamines on PAI-1 production by human adipocytes and, in particular, to clarify which adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes are involved. Addition of the unselective AR agonist isoproterenol led to a dose- and time-dependent suppression of PAI-1 mRNA and protein release in adipocytes from the subcutaneous and omental depot of obese subjects. A similar degree of suppression was observed in subcutaneous mammary adipocytes of lean women. This effect was mainly mediated via the beta2-adrenoceptor according to experiments using selective agonists. Moreover, addition of cAMP-elevating agents such as dibutyryl-cAMP, forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitors isobutyl-methylxanthine and milrinone resulted in a reduction of PAI-1 of varying degrees. In conclusion, the results of this study support the assumption that catecholamines are able to down-regulate PAI-1 expression and secretion in human adipocytes via beta-adrenergic receptors.

  11. Association of a PAI-1 Gene Polymorphism and Early Life Infections with Asthma Risk, Exacerbations, and Reduced Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Young; Oh, Sam S.; Torgerson, Dara R.; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Hu, Donglei; Sen, Saunak; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Farber, Harold J.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Serebrisky, Denise; Thyne, Shannon M.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Williams, L. Keoki; DuPont, William; Seibold, Max A.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Avila, Pedro C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is induced in airways by virus and may mediate asthmatic airway remodeling. We sought to evaluate if genetic variants and early life lower respiratory infections jointly affect asthma risk. Methods We included Latino children, adolescents, and young adults aged 8–21 years (1736 subjects with physician-diagnosed asthma and 1747 healthy controls) from five U.S. centers and Puerto Rico after excluding subjects with incomplete clinical or genetic data. We evaluated the independent and joint effects of a PAI-1 gain of function polymorphism and bronchiolitis / Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) or other lower respiratory infections (LRI) within the first 2 years of life on asthma risk, asthma exacerbations and lung function. Results RSV infection (OR 9.9, 95%CI 4.9–20.2) and other LRI (OR 9.1, 95%CI 7.2–11.5) were independently associated with asthma, but PAI-1 genotype was not. There were joint effects on asthma risk for both genotype-RSV (OR 17.7, 95% CI 6.3–50.2) and genotype-LRI (OR 11.7, 95% CI 8.8–16.4). A joint effect of genotype-RSV resulted in a 3.1-fold increased risk for recurrent asthma hospitalizations. In genotype-respiratory infection joint effect analysis, FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC % predicted were further reduced in the genotype-LRI group (β -2.1, 95% CI -4.0 to -0.2; β -2.0, 95% CI -3.1 to -0.8 respectively). Similarly, lower FEV1% predicted was noted in genotype-RSV group (β -3.1, 95% CI -6.1 to -0.2) with a trend for lower FEV1/FVC % predicted. Conclusions A genetic variant of PAI-1 together with early life LRI such as RSV bronchiolitis is associated with an increased risk of asthma, morbidity, and reduced lung function in this Latino population. PMID:27556405

  12. Molecular approaches to understanding neural network plasticity and memory: the Kavli Prize Inaugural Symposium on Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Sander, M; Bergersen, L H; Storm-Mathisen, J

    2009-11-10

    The Kavli Prizes were awarded for the first time in Oslo, Norway on September 9, 2008 to seven of the world's most prominent scientists in astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. The astrophysics prize was awarded jointly to Maarten Schmidt, of the California Institute of Technology, USA, and Donald Lynden-Bell, of Cambridge University, UK; the nanoscience prize was awarded jointly to Louis E. Brus, of Columbia University, USA, and Sumio Iijima, of Meijo University, Japan; and the neuroscience prize was awarded jointly to Pasko Rakic, of the Yale University School of Medicine, USA, Thomas Jessell, of Columbia University, USA, and Sten Grillner, of the Karolinska Institute, Sweden. The Kavli Prize is a joint venture of the Kavli Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. The Kavli Prize Inaugural Symposium on Neuroscience was held at the University of Oslo on 8 September, 2008, organized by L.H. Bergersen, E. Moser M.-B. Moser, and J. Storm-Mathisen. At this Symposium, seven leading neuroscientists described their groundbreaking work, which encompasses some of the most important recent advances in the field of neuroscience, from molecule to synapse to network to behavior. The Symposium was a fitting tribute to Fred Kavli's vision of neuroscience as an outstanding area of progress, and to the achievements of the winners of the first Kavli Prize in Neuroscience. The main points of the Symposium presentations are summarized below.

  13. Leon Van Speybroeck Wins Astrophysics Bruno Rossi Prize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge Massachusetts was awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomy Society. The Rossi Prize is an arnual recognition of significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics in honor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's late Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of x-ray astronomy. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the x-ray mirrors for NASA's premier Chandra X-Ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision x-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Huhes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the x-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory.

  14. [Weizsäcker, Bethe and the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For his work on nuclear physics Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize in physics. Bethe had worked on the energy production in stars at about the same time as Weizsäcker but independently from him. The Nobel Committee valued the structural depth of BETHE'S work more than Weizsäcker's temporal priority because Bethe had described the nuclear reactions quantitatively and had shown a much deeper understanding of the nuclear processes in the centre of stars whereas Weizsäcker had worked more qualitatively. There are no reasons to believe that political resentments towards Weizsäcker played any significant role in awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 only to Bethe. The lives and works of Weizsäcker and Bethe show some remarkable parallels, ranging from calculating the binding energy in nuclei to the energy production in sun-like and massive stars to peace- and disarmament initiatives.

  15. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  16. MiR-10a and miR-181c regulate collagen type I generation in hypertrophic scars by targeting PAI-1 and uPA.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhu, Hua-Yu; Bai, Wen-Dong; Su, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jia-Qi; Cai, Wei-Xia; Zhao, Bin; Gao, Jian-Xin; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Jun; Hu, Da-Hai

    2015-01-30

    Urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been proposed to play key roles in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in hypertrophic scars (HS). Here, we found that in HS fibroblasts (HFs) miR-181c and miR-10a were differentially-expressed and targeted uPA and PAI-1, respectively. The production of Type 1 collagen (Col1) was inhibited by miR-181c knockdown or miR-10a overexpression in HFs, and this resulted in increased levels of metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1). These results suggest that the miR-181c-uPA and miR-10a-PAI-1 regulatory pathways have an integral role in HS pathogenesis.

  17. Prizes to solve problems in and beyond medicine, big and small: it can work.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    This article complements Dr. Charlton's follow-up of David Horrobin's suggestion in Nature two decades ago to offer sizeable prizes for practical approaches to either eliminate a problem in medicine or reduce the cost of its solution. Examples from the 20th and 21st centuries illustrate that prizes--small and big--have generated sustained and successful attacks on defined problems in biology, physics and, lately, mathematics. Provided that glittering prizes are offered and awarded with care, they can lead to effective problem-solving in medicine and related biomedical sciences as well. PMID:17207938

  18. Yellow fever and Max Theiler: the only Nobel Prize for a virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Norrby, Erling

    2007-01-01

    In 1951, Max Theiler of the Rockefeller Foundation received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of an effective vaccine against yellow fever—a discovery first reported in the JEM 70 years ago. This was the first, and so far the only, Nobel Prize given for the development of a virus vaccine. Recently released Nobel archives now reveal how the advances in the yellow fever vaccine field were evaluated more than 50 years ago, and how this led to a prize for Max Theiler. PMID:18039952

  19. Prognostic impact of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) in cytosols and pellet extracts derived from 892 breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    de Witte, J H; Sweep, C G J; Klijn, J G M; Grebenschikov, N; Peters, H A; Look, M P; van Tienoven, Th H; Heuvel, J J T M; van Putten, W L J; Benraad, Th J; Foekens, J A

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its type-1 inhibitor (PAI-1) measured by a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analysed both components in samples derived from 892 patients with primary breast cancer (median follow-up 99 months). The assays were performed in cytosolic extracts as well as in corresponding detergent extracts of pellets obtained after ultracentrifugation, which was carried out when preparing the cytosolic fractions for routine steroid hormone receptor determination. Statistically significant correlations were found between the cytosolic levels and those determined in the pellet extracts (Spearman correlation coefficient rs = 0.60, P < 0.0001 for uPA and rs = 0.65, P < 0.0001 for PAI-1). Furthermore, strong correlations were found between the levels of both uPA (rs = 0.85, P < 0.0001) and PAI-1 (rs = 0.90, P < 0.0001) in the cytosols and their levels previously measured with ELISAs based on commercial reagents. In both Cox univariate and multivariate analysis, high cytosolic levels of uPA or PAI-1 were significantly associated with increased rates of relapse and death. The levels of uPA and PAI-1 in the pellet extracts also provided prognostic information, although to a lesser extent compared with the cytosolic extracts. The prediction of prognosis on the basis of uPA and PAI-1 assessed by an alternative ELISA once again emphasizes the established prognostic role and usefulness of these parameters in selection of breast cancer patients at high or low risk of recurrence. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098758

  20. Give them prizes, and they will come: contingency management for treatment of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Petry, N M; Martin, B; Cooney, J L; Kranzler, H R

    2000-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a contingency management (CM) procedure that provided opportunities to win prizes as reinforcers. At intake to outpatient treatment, 42 alcohol-dependent veterans were randomly assigned to receive standard treatment or standard treatment plus CM, in which they earned the chance to win prizes for submitting negative Breathalyzer samples and completing steps toward treatment goals. Eighty-four percent of the CM participants were retained in treatment for an 8-week period compared with 22% of the standard treatment participants (p < .001). By the end of the treatment period, 69% of those receiving CM were still abstinent, but 61% of those receiving standard treatment had used alcohol (p < .05). These results support the efficacy of this CM procedure. Participants earned an average of $200 in prizes. This CM procedure may be suitable for use in standard treatment settings because prizes can be solicited from the community. PMID:10780125

  1. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

  2. MIT Clean Energy Prize: Final Technical Report May 12, 2010 - May 11, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Chris; Campbell, Georgina; Salony, Jason; Aulet, Bill

    2011-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize (MIT CEP) is a venture creation and innovation competition to encourage innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy. The Competition invited student teams from any US university to submit student-led ventures that demonstrate a high potential of successfully making clean energy more affordable, with a positive impact on the environment. By focusing on student ventures, the MIT CEP aims to educate the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs. Teams receive valuable mentoring and hard deadlines that complement the cash prize to accelerate development of ventures. The competition is a year-long educational process that culminates in the selection of five category finalists and a Grand Prize winner and the distribution of cash prizes to each of those teams. Each entry was submitted in one of five clean energy categories: Renewables, Clean Non-Renewables, Energy Efficiency, Transportation, and Deployment.

  3. Nobel Prize for Physical Therapy? Rise, Fall, and Revival of Medico-Mechanical Institutes.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Ottosson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    This historical vignette explores the considerations of the Nobel Prize Committee for Physiology or Medicine by vetting the Nobel Prize chances of Dr Gustaf Zander (1835-1920). His way to stardom started 150 years ago when he began mechanizing the passive and active movements that physical therapists manually used to treat diseases. A glance at his machines shows that they parallel surprisingly well what can be found in modern fitness studios. By combining files from the Nobel Prize Archive and sources from the first physical therapists, this vignette pieces together why Zander was considered one of the best candidates for the Nobel Prize in 1916. By providing this glimpse of history, questions about the origin of physical therapy concepts and the profession of the physical therapist are raised. PMID:25655882

  4. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-10-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize story may attract and motivate high school students to open-up to scientific topics and thus be spurred to pursue science. The two major arguments for the method are that if presented in story form Nobel Prizes naturally incorporate the philosophical and historical aspects of science and therefore enable teaching about science as well as teaching science itself; and that such instruction implements case-based teaching principles, which is how humans naturally think, learn, and remember. Finally, the paper presents the storycase of the Nobel Prize Einstein received for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect as a concrete illustration of classroom implementation.

  5. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26676474

  6. Nobel Prize for Physical Therapy? Rise, Fall, and Revival of Medico-Mechanical Institutes.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Ottosson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    This historical vignette explores the considerations of the Nobel Prize Committee for Physiology or Medicine by vetting the Nobel Prize chances of Dr Gustaf Zander (1835-1920). His way to stardom started 150 years ago when he began mechanizing the passive and active movements that physical therapists manually used to treat diseases. A glance at his machines shows that they parallel surprisingly well what can be found in modern fitness studios. By combining files from the Nobel Prize Archive and sources from the first physical therapists, this vignette pieces together why Zander was considered one of the best candidates for the Nobel Prize in 1916. By providing this glimpse of history, questions about the origin of physical therapy concepts and the profession of the physical therapist are raised.

  7. The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science: three years of honouring outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchet, T.; Chatzichristou, E.; Heward, A.

    2012-09-01

    Europlanet launched an annual Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Sciences at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) in 2009. At EPSC 2012, the prize will be presented for the third time. To date, the prize has been awarded to: • 2010 - Dr Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble for his development and dissemination of his 'planeterrella' experiment; • 2011 - The Austrian Space Forum for their coordinated programme of outreach activities, which range from simple classroom presentations to space exhibitions reaching 15 000 visitors; • 2012 - Yaël Nazé, for the diverse outreach programme she has individually initiated over the years, carefully tailored to audiences across the spectrum of society, including children, artists and elderly people. These three prizes cover a spectrum of different approaches to outreach and provide inspiration for anyone wishing to become engaged in public engagement, whether at an individual and institutional level.

  8. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  9. From Stealing Fire to Cellular Reprogramming: A Scientific History Leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize

    PubMed Central

    Lensch, M. William; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming was recently “crowned” with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context. PMID:24052937

  10. Introducing the Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Benson Prize Sponsored by Space Development Corporation The Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs is an annual competition which awards prizes to the best proposed methods by which amateur astronomers may discover such near earth objects as asteroids and comet cores. The purpose of the Benson Prize is to encourage the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers. The utilization of valuable near earth resources can provide many new jobs and economic activities on earth, while also creating many new opportunities for opening up the space frontier. The utilization of near earth resources will significantly contribute to the lessening of environmental degradation on the Earth caused by mining and chemical leaching operations required to exploit the low grade ores now remaining on Earth. In addition, near earth objects pose grave dangers for life on earth. Discovering and plotting the orbits of all potentially dangerous near earth objects is the first and necessary step in protecting ourselves against the enormous potential damage possible from near earth objects. With the high quality, large size and low cost of todays consumer telescopes, the rapid development of powerful, high resolution and inexpensive CCD cameras, and the proliferation of inexpensive software for todays powerful home computers, the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers is more attainable than ever. The Benson Prize is sponsored by the Space Development Corporation, a space resource exploration and utilization company. In 1997 one prize of \\500 will be awarded to the best proposed method for the amateur discovery of NEOs, and in each of the four following years, Prizes of \\500, \\250 and \\100 will be awarded. Prizes for the actual discovery of Near Earth Asteroids will be added in later years.

  11. Nobel Prizes for surgeons: In recognition of the surgical healing strategy.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Theodor Kocher (1909), Alexis Carrel (1912), Antonio Egas Moniz (1949) and Joseph E. Murray (1990) received Nobel Prizes for their accomplishments in the field of surgery. This essay puts these achievements in the context of the history of surgery, in particular its recognition of a field of modern medicine. It characterizes the view of the body that is associated with modern surgery and the specific surgical healing strategy that the Nobel Prizes acknowledged.

  12. Nobel Prizes for surgeons: In recognition of the surgical healing strategy.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Theodor Kocher (1909), Alexis Carrel (1912), Antonio Egas Moniz (1949) and Joseph E. Murray (1990) received Nobel Prizes for their accomplishments in the field of surgery. This essay puts these achievements in the context of the history of surgery, in particular its recognition of a field of modern medicine. It characterizes the view of the body that is associated with modern surgery and the specific surgical healing strategy that the Nobel Prizes acknowledged. PMID:17448978

  13. Nobel prize winner trading card (CIRCA 1952). Elie Metchnikoff.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Dale E

    2003-03-01

    Russian doctor and bacteriologist, born in Ivanowca in 1845. He began his studies in Kharkov, continuing them at the Universities of Giessen, Gothingen, and Munich, later being named Professor of Zoology in Odessa in 1870. In the Canary Islands, he completed some anthropological works, but dedicated himself especially to studies of marine fauna. In 1887, much taken by the work of Pasteur, he wrote to him asking for a position in his laboratories; in a short time he became one of the principal collaborators with the master, especially in works concerning bacteriology. These were an inspiration to him, and led him to his famous theory of phagocytosis, the defensive act whereby white blood cells protect an organism against pathogenic microbes. Metchnikoff supposed that old age was avoidable, and subscribed to the materialistic school of thought. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908. (With the complements of the Jose Lopez Luis Cigarillo Factory, Tenerife).

  14. From Tomato King to World Food Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical article describes my early years, education, and career at Purdue University. Helping form and expand the Department of Food Science at Purdue was exciting and gratifying, and working with students in the classroom and on research projects was rewarding and kept me feeling young. My research on bulk aseptic processing allowed me to help solve problems relevant to the tomato industry, but I learned later that it had much broader relevance. I certainly never expected the impact and visibility of the work to result in my being awarded the World Food Prize. Being the first food scientist to win this award has enabled me to focus increased attention on the need to reduce food losses. PMID:24328431

  15. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality. PMID:27372164

  16. From Tomato King to World Food Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical article describes my early years, education, and career at Purdue University. Helping form and expand the Department of Food Science at Purdue was exciting and gratifying, and working with students in the classroom and on research projects was rewarding and kept me feeling young. My research on bulk aseptic processing allowed me to help solve problems relevant to the tomato industry, but I learned later that it had much broader relevance. I certainly never expected the impact and visibility of the work to result in my being awarded the World Food Prize. Being the first food scientist to win this award has enabled me to focus increased attention on the need to reduce food losses.

  17. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality.

  18. The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the Evolution of Neuro-Trauma Care: Would the 16th President Have Survived in the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    Yan, Sandra C; Smith, Timothy R; Bi, Wenya Linda; Brewster, Ryan; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2015-11-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16(th) President of the United States of America. On April 14, 1865, shortly after his re-election and the conclusion of the Civil War, Lincoln was shot and killed by John Wilkes Booth. Although numerous physicians tended to the President shortly after his injury, he passed away the next morning. Today, we recognize Lincoln as one of the greatest Presidents in American history. His assassination profoundly influenced the future of the United States, especially as the country was coming back together again following the Civil War. Testaments to his lasting legacy can be seen in many places, from the stone carving of him on Mount Rushmore to his image gracing the $5 bill. What if the President had survived his injury? Would he have had a different outcome utilizing current critical care treatment? Neurotrauma care in 1865 was not yet developed, and head wounds such as the one Lincoln sustained were almost always fatal. The medical attention he received is considered by historians and physicians today to be excellent for that time. We look at the evolution of neurotrauma care during the last 150 years in the US. Particular focus is paid to the advancement of care for penetrating brain injuries in modern trauma centers. PMID:26092530

  19. The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the Evolution of Neuro-Trauma Care: Would the 16th President Have Survived in the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    Yan, Sandra C; Smith, Timothy R; Bi, Wenya Linda; Brewster, Ryan; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2015-11-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16(th) President of the United States of America. On April 14, 1865, shortly after his re-election and the conclusion of the Civil War, Lincoln was shot and killed by John Wilkes Booth. Although numerous physicians tended to the President shortly after his injury, he passed away the next morning. Today, we recognize Lincoln as one of the greatest Presidents in American history. His assassination profoundly influenced the future of the United States, especially as the country was coming back together again following the Civil War. Testaments to his lasting legacy can be seen in many places, from the stone carving of him on Mount Rushmore to his image gracing the $5 bill. What if the President had survived his injury? Would he have had a different outcome utilizing current critical care treatment? Neurotrauma care in 1865 was not yet developed, and head wounds such as the one Lincoln sustained were almost always fatal. The medical attention he received is considered by historians and physicians today to be excellent for that time. We look at the evolution of neurotrauma care during the last 150 years in the US. Particular focus is paid to the advancement of care for penetrating brain injuries in modern trauma centers.

  20. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  1. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  2. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-05-04

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  3. Potential clinical relevance of uPA and PAI-1 levels in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up.

    PubMed

    Buta, Marko; Džodić, Radan; Đurišić, Igor; Marković, Ivan; Vujasinović, Tijana; Markićević, Milan; Nikolić-Vukosavljević, Dragica

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) prognostic value in postmenopausal, node-negative breast cancer patients bearing tumors with estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) expression, treated with locoregional therapy alone, within an early follow-up. We focused our analysis on tumors of histological grade II in order to improve its prognostic value and, consequently, to improve a decision-making process. The cytosol extracts of 73 tumor samples were used for assessing several biomarkers. ER and PR levels were measured by classical biochemical method. Cathepsin D was assayed by a radiometric immunoassay while both uPA and PAI-1 level determinations were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. HER-2 gene amplification was determined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) in primary tumor tissue. Patients bearing tumors smaller than or equal to 2 cm (pT1) or those with low PAI-1 levels (PAI-1 < 6.35 pg/mg) showed favorable outcome compared to patients bearing tumors greater than 2 cm (pT2,3) or those with high PAI-1 levels, respectively. Analyses of 4 phenotypes, defined by tumor size and PAI-1 status, revealed that patients bearing either pT1 tumors, irrespective of PAI-1 levels, or pT2,3 tumors with low PAI-1 levels, had similar disease-free interval probabilities and showed favorable outcome compared to those bearing pT2,3 tumors with high PAI-1 levels. Our findings suggest that tumor size and PAI-1, used in combination as phenotypes are not only prognostic but might also be predictive in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up period.

  4. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  5. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  6. When a misperception favors a tragedy: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Couto, Lucélio B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-11-20

    Carlos Chagas, the discoverer of Chagas' disease was nominated to the Nobel Prize in 1921, but none did win the prize in that year. As a leader of a young scientist team, he discovered all aspects of the new disease from 1909 to 1920. It is still obscure why he did not win the Nobel Prize in 1921. Chagas was discarded by Gunnar Hedrèn on April 16, 1921. Hedrèn should have made a written report about the details of his evaluation to the Nobel Committee. However, such a document has not been found in the Nobel Committee Archives. No evidence of detractions made by Brazilian scientists on Chagas was found. Since Chagas nomination was consistent with the Nobel Committee requirements, as seen in the presentation letter by until now unknown Cypriano de Freitas, it become clear that Chagas did not win the Nobel Prize exclusively because the Nobel Committee did not perceive the importance of his discovery. Thus, it would be fair a posthumous Nobel Prize of 1921 to Carlos Chagas. A diploma of the Nobel Prize, as precedent with Dogmack in 1947, would recognize the merit of the scientist who made the most complete medical discovery of all times.

  7. The Utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for Discriminating PTSD, Depression, and Social Phobia in Trauma-Exposed College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Weathers, Frank W.; Flood, Amanda M.; Eakin, David E.; Benson, Trisha A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a sample…

  8. PULMONARY LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1) IN HEALTHY OR HYPERTENSIVE RATS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY LOCALIZATION AND EXPRESSION OF PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1) IN HEALTHY OR HYPERTENSIVE RATS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM). GS Backus1, R Vincent2, UP Kodavanti2, 1Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill; 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park,...

  9. Effect of Fagonia arabica on thrombin induced release of t-PA and complex of PAI-1 tPA in cultured HUVE cells.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Prutha D; Nayak, Amit R; Chaurasia, Sweta R; Deopujari, Jayant Y; Chourasia, Chhaya; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-07-01

    Fagonia arabica (FA) possesses a thrombolytic property which has been earlier reported in our laboratory. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of FA on thrombin-induced tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) release from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVE) for studying its clot lytic activity. For this, establishment of cell line model has been done by isolating the cells from human umbilical cord. Cell toxicity was evaluated using XTT assay. Estimation of t-PA and PAI-1 t-PA complex were done using ELISA technique. Thrombin treatment induces the t-PA and PAI-1 release from HUVE cell line, and FA treatment was found to antagonize the thrombin induced t-PA and PAI-1 release. Our preliminary results suggest that FA may be used as an alternative to thrombolytic drug. However, study demands further experiments using animal model of thrombosis to establish the role of FA as a novel thrombolytic drug. PMID:27419084

  10. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  11. Plasminogen mRNA induction in the mouse brain after kainate excitation: codistribution with plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Ronit; Abramovitz, Rene; Miskin, Ruth

    2002-08-15

    Plasminogen (Plg), which can be converted to the active protease plasmin by plasminogen activators, has been previously implicated in brain plasticity and in toxicity inflicted in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by kainate. Here we have localized Plg. mRNA through in situ hybridization in brain cryosections derived from normal adult mice or after kainate injection (i.p.). The results indicated that Plg mRNA was undetectable in the normal brain, but after kainate injection it was induced in neuronal cells in multiple, but specific areas, including layers II-III of the neocortex; the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and the piriform cortex; the caudate/putamen and accumbens nucleus shell; throughout the amygdaloid complex; and in the CAI/CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. Interestingly, this distribution pattern coincided with what we have recently described for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) mRNA, however differing from that of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA, as also shown here. These results suggest that enhanced Plg gene expression could be involved in events associated with olfactory, striatal, and limbic structures. Furthermore, because PAI-2 is thought to intracellularly counteract cytotoxic events, our results raise the possibility that PAI-2 can act in the brain as an intracellular neuroprotector against potential plasmin-mediated toxicity.

  12. PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in non-hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, Linda; Pasta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the different roles of thrombophilia in patients with and without viral etiology. The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 1079 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), enrolled from January 2000 to January 2014. METHODS: All Caucasian LC patients consecutively observed in a fourteen-year period were included; the presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS) was registered. The differences between the proportions of each THRGF with regard to the presence or absence of viral etiology and the frequencies of the THRGF genotypes with those predicted in a population by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were registered. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventeen/one thousand and seventy-six patients (38.6%) showed thrombophilia: 217 PAI-1 4G-4G, 176 MTHFR C677TT, 71 V Leiden factor and 41 prothrombin G20210 A, 84 with more than 1 THRGF; 350 presented with no viral liver cirrhosis (NVLC) and 729 with, called viral liver cirrhosis (VLC), of whom 56 patients were hepatitis C virus + hepatitis B virus. PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR C677TT, the presence of at least one TRHGF and the presence of > 1 THRGF, were statistically more frequent in patients with NVLC vs patients with VLC: All χ2 > 3.85 and P < 0.05. Patients with PVT and/or BCS with at least one TRHGF were 189/352 (53.7%). The Hardy-Weinberg of PAI-1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes deviated from that expected from a population in equilibrium in patients with NVLC (respectively χ2 = 39.3; P < 0.000 and χ2 = 27.94; P < 0.05), whereas the equilibrium was respected in VLC. CONCLUSION: MTHFR 677TT was nearly twofold and PAI-1 4G-4G more than threefold more frequently found in NVLC vs patients with VLC; the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of these two polymorphisms confirms this data in NVLC. We suggest that PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT could be considered as factors of fibrosis and thrombosis mechanisms, increasing

  13. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities.

  14. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities. PMID:25946543

  15. [The Hospital-Colónia Rovisco Pais: the last Portuguese leprosarium and the contingent universes of experience and memory].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Alice

    2009-01-01

    The Hospital-Colónia Rovisco Pais was inaugurated in Portugal in the 1940s for the treatment, study and prophylaxis of leprosy based on the compulsive internment model, whose configuration reflects the total institution concept proposed by Goffman. It concerns an important hygiene project of the Estado Novo. Its educative paradigm combined elements inspired in European social medicine and the ideology of the paternalistic Portuguese dictatorial regime. The Hospital Colony here will be thought of as a disciplinary dispositive, developing considerations regarding the confrontation between disciplinary power and experience. Memory emerges as a contingent instrument to access the practices and interstitial meanings woven into the Hospital Colony's daily life, seeking to find out about the experience of its former patients as political subjects.

  16. The MAPK pathway and HIF-1 are involved in the induction of the human PAI-1 gene expression by insulin in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Elitsa Y; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Enhanced levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are considered to be a risk factor for pathological conditions associated with hypoxia or hyperinsulinemia. The expression of the PAI-1 gene is increased by insulin in different cells, although, the molecular mechanisms behind insulin-induced PAI-1 expression are not fully known yet. Here, we show that insulin upregulates human PAI-1 gene expression and promoter activity in HepG2 cells and that mutation of the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE)-binding hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) abolished the insulin effects. Mutation of E-boxes E4 and E5 abolished the insulin-dependent activation of the PAI-1 promoter only under normoxia, but did not affect it under hypoxia. Furthermore, the insulin effect was associated with activation of HIF-1alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) but not PDK1 and PKB in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, mutation of a putative FoxO1 binding site which was supposed to be involved in insulin-dependent PAI-1 gene expression influenced the insulin-dependent activation only under normoxia. Thus, insulin-dependent PAI-1 gene expression might be regulated by the action of both HIF-1 and FoxO1 transcription factors.

  17. FETTU Wins International Year of Astronomy 2009 Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    The "From Earth to the Universe" (FETTU) project -- a worldwide series of exhibitions featuring striking astronomical imagery -- has won the first Mani Bhaumik prize for excellence in astronomy education and public outreach. This award was given for the best of the tens of thousands of activities conducted during the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009. NASA was a major sponsor of the project, which was led by the Chandra X-ray Center, that placed these images into public parks, metro stations, libraries, and other non-traditional locations around the world. The exhibit showcases some of the best astronomical images taken from telescopes both on the ground and in space, representing the wide variety of wavelengths and objects observed. While FETTU has been a worldwide effort, a NASA grant provided the primary funding for the FETTU exhibits in the US. NASA funds also supplied the project's infrastructure as well as educational and other materials that helped the FETTU international efforts to thrive. "We are truly thrilled to see how many people FETTU has reached both in the US and around the world," said Hashima Hasan, NASA's Single Point of Contact for IYA2009. "It's an investment we feel has been well spent." In the US, FETTU has been placed on semi-permanent display at Chicago's O'Hare and Atlanta's Hartsfield airports. In addition, a traveling version of the exhibit has visited over a dozen US cities such as Washington, DC, Anchorage, AK, Memphis, TN, and New York City. Three tactile and Braille versions of the FETTU exhibit were also made possible by the NASA funds, each of which has traveled to multiple locations around the country. "It's been so rewarding to see how people - many of whom had never seen these images - have embraced the wonders of astronomy through these exhibits," said Kimberly Kowal Arcand, co-chair of the FETTU project at the Chandra X-ray Center, which is located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. "The

  18. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    SciTech Connect

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow [Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240]. Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher [Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233] and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of {beta}-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development [Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805]. Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time. According to background

  19. Nobel Prize Literature; A Selection of the Works of Forty-Four Nobel Prize Winning Authors in the Library of Dutchess Community College, with Biographical and Critical Sketches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Terry E., Comp.

    This bibliography is a compilation of works by 44 Nobel Prize winning authors presently available at the Dutchess Community College library. Each entry describes the piece of literature for which the author received an award, provides a brief sketch of the writer, includes a commentary on the themes of major works, and lists the writer's works. An…

  20. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2010 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 is awarded to M M Paulides et al from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for their paper on hyperthermia treatment: The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement M M Paulides, J F Bakker, M Linthorst, J van der Zee, Z Rijnen, E Neufeld, P M T Pattynama, P P Jansen, P C Levendag and G C van Rhoon 2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2465 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Alonzo-Proulx O, Packard N, Boone J M, Al-Mayah A, Brock K K, Shen S Z and Yaffe M J 2010 Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms Phys. Med. Biol. 55 3027 Bian J, Siewerdsen J H, Han X, Sidky E Y, Prince J L, Pelizzari C A and Pan X 2010 Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat-panel-detector cone-beam CT Phys. Med. Biol. 55 6575 Brun M-A, Formanek F, Yasuda A, Sekine M, Ando N

  1. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-07-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2009 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have a clear, and very worthy, winner this year. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the 2009 Roberts Prize is awarded to E Z Zhang et al from University College London for their paper on photoacoustic tomography. In vivo high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy E Z Zhang, J G Laufer, R B Pedley and P C Beard 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1035-46 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Cheng Y-C N , Neelavalli J and Haacke E M 2009 Limitations of calculating field distributions and magnetic susceptibilities in MRI using a Fourier based method Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1169-89 Cho S, Ahn S, Li Q and Leahy R M 2009 Exact and approximate Fourier rebinning of PET data from time-of-flight to non time-of-flight 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 467-84 Davidson S R H, Weersink R A, Haider M A, Gertner M R, Bogaards A, Giewercer D, Scherz A, Sherar M D, Elhilali M, Chin J L, Trachtenberg J and Wilson B C 2009 Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial

  2. The curious case of the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    The 1960 Nobel Prize was awarded to Macfarlane Burnet and Peter Medawar for immunological tolerance. The Nobel Archives reveal that the two were never nominated together by anyone; Burnet had repeatedly been nominated for his virology studies, and the Medawar group (including Rupert Billingham and Leslie Brent) had been nominated independently for their transplantation work. A review of the 1950s literature suggests that tolerance had not yet, by 1960, reached the level of acceptance and acclaim in the immunological community to appear to justify the award. Burnet probably should have received the Prize for his virus work, and perhaps also for his Clonal Selection Theory, whereas Billingham and Brent should have shared in a Prize with Medawar for transplantation. If a Prize were to be given for tolerance, most agree that Ray Owen should have shared in it, for his work on cattle chimerism. It is suggested that the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar for immunological tolerance may have been given for the wrong reasons and to the wrong associates. PMID:26790994

  3. Prize-based Contingency Management for the Treatment of Substance Abusers: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benishek, L. A.; Dugosh, K. L.; Kirby, K. C.; Matejkowski, J.; Clements, N. T.; Seymour, B. L.; Festinger, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To review randomized controlled trials to assess efficacy of a prize-based contingency management procedure in reducing substance use (where a drug-free breath or urine sample provides a chance of winning a prize). Methods A meta-analysis was conducted on articles published from January 2000 to February 2013 to determine the effect size of studies comparing prize-based contingency management to a treatment-as-usual control condition (k=19 studies). Parallel analyses evaluated the efficacy of both short- (k=9 studies) and long-term outcomes (k=6 studies) of prize-based contingency management . Results The average end-of-treatment effect size (Cohen's d) was .46 [95% CI=0.37,0.54). This effect size decreased at the short-term (≤ 3-month) post-intervention follow-up to .33 (95% CI=0.12,0.54) and at the 6-month follow-up time point there was no detectable effect (d=-.09 (95% CI=−0.28,0.10)). Conclusion Adding prize-based contingency management to behavioral support for substance use disorders can increase short-term abstinence but the effect does not appear to persist to 6 months. PMID:24750232

  4. The curious case of the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    The 1960 Nobel Prize was awarded to Macfarlane Burnet and Peter Medawar for immunological tolerance. The Nobel Archives reveal that the two were never nominated together by anyone; Burnet had repeatedly been nominated for his virology studies, and the Medawar group (including Rupert Billingham and Leslie Brent) had been nominated independently for their transplantation work. A review of the 1950s literature suggests that tolerance had not yet, by 1960, reached the level of acceptance and acclaim in the immunological community to appear to justify the award. Burnet probably should have received the Prize for his virus work, and perhaps also for his Clonal Selection Theory, whereas Billingham and Brent should have shared in a Prize with Medawar for transplantation. If a Prize were to be given for tolerance, most agree that Ray Owen should have shared in it, for his work on cattle chimerism. It is suggested that the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar for immunological tolerance may have been given for the wrong reasons and to the wrong associates.

  5. The Dual Diverse Dynamic Reversible Effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on EPCR and PAI-1 Inside Vascular Endothelial Cells With and Without LPS Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Karabıyık, Afife; Yılmaz, Erkan; Güleç, Şükrü; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim; Akar, Nejat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) is comprised of a mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. ABS is used as a topical hemostatic agent due to its antihemorrhagic effect, yet its hemostatic mechanism of action remains to be investigated. ABS does not affect the levels of coagulation factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI and XII. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ABS on endothelium and immune response. As such, we evaluated changes in endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) expression inside human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). Material and Methods: We exposed HUVECs to 10 μL and 100 μL of ABS for 5 min, 25 min, 50 min, 6 h, and 24 h. Additionally, 10 μg mL–1 of LPS was administered for 1 h to observe the effects of LPS challenge on HUVECs, and then the cells were treated with ABS for 5 min, 25 min, 50 min, and 6 h to observe the effects of ABS on HUVECs. Total RNA was isolated from HUVECs and then the level of expression of EPCR and PAI-1 mRNA was measured. Results: Cells were microscopically observed to arise from the surface and adhere to each other following the administration of ABS to HUVECs. Additionally, after 24 h the cells had normal growth and physiology, which suggests that the adhesive cellular effects of ABS might be reversible. ABS had a negative effect on EPCR and PAI-1 expression; the effect in response to 100 µL was greater than that to 10 µL. EPCR and PAI-1 expression increased over time in response to LPS and 10 µL of ABS. EPCR and PAI-1 expression was very low during the first hour of exposure to LPS and 100 µL of ABS, but after 6 h increased to levels similar to those observed in response to LPS and 10 µL of ABS. Conclusion: It was observed that ABS had dual diverse dynamic reversible effects on EPCR and PAI-1

  6. Randomized Trial Comparing Two Treatment Strategies Using Prize-Based Reinforcement of Abstinence in Cocaine and Opiate Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kenzie L.; Ghitza, Udi E.; Schmittner, John P.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Epstein, David H.

    2008-01-01

    We compared two strategies of prize-based contingency management (CM) in methadone-maintained outpatients. Urine was tested thrice weekly for 5 weeks pre-CM, 12 weeks CM, and 8 weeks post-CM. Participants were randomly assigned to a cocaine contingency (four prize draws for each cocaine-negative urine, N = 29) or an opiate-cocaine contingency (one…

  7. The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education: Ten Years of Learning for Peace. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Unku Abdul; Reardon, Betty A.

    The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education was established in 1981. The purpose of the award is to honor outstanding contributions to the field of peace education in its most broadly defined sense. In this paper, two members of the international jury for the prize review the recipients of the awards from 1981 to 1991, and thus demonstrate the variety of…

  8. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  9. The British Orthodontic Society MOrth cases prize 2014.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Mohammad O

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic treatment of two cases that were successful in winning the British Orthodontic Society (BOS) Membership in Orthodonitcs (MOrth) cases prize in 2014. The first case describes the management of a 26-year-old female with a Class II division 2 incisor relationship on a Class III skeletal base with reduced vertical proportions. This was complicated by: an unerupted ectopic palatally displaced upper right permanent canine, an erupted palatally displaced upper left permanent canine, retained deciduous canines, generalised microdontia, an overall Bolton tooth size discrepancy, mild crowding in the upper arch, an increased overbite (complete to tooth tissue) and crossbites. Treatment involved a surgical exposure of the ectopic canine and the use of fixed pre-adjusted edgewise appliances over a period of 24 months. The second case describes the management of a 12-year-old female with a Class II division 2 incisor relationship on a Class 2 skeletal base with reduced vertical proportions. This was complicated by: an increased overjet and overbite (complete to soft tissue), mild upper and lower arch crowding and an increased naso-labial angle. Treatment involved an initial phase of modified Clark Twin Block and sectional fixed appliances followed by complete fixed pre-adjusted edgewise appliances over a period of 24 months. PMID:27086722

  10. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-07-01

    A review is given of the crucial work performed by Paul C. Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield that lead to their being awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2003. Lauterbur first expounded the idea of mapping spatial information from spectral data in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through the application of magnetic field gradients (P. C. Lauterbur, Nature 1973 , 242, 190-191). One year later Mansfield and co-workers introduced the idea of selective excitation to NMR imaging (A. N. Garroway, P. K. Grannell, and P. Mansfield. J. Phys. C: Solid State Physics 1974 , 7, L457-L462). A major step in making the technique useful for clinical imaging came with Mansfield's publication of the method known as echo planar imaging (P. Mansfield, J. Phys. C: Solid State Physics 1977, 10 (3) , L55-L58). Lauterbur's and Mansfield's work captured the essence of scientific discovery, collaboration, and concerted effort to overcome significant technical issues, and were key to the development of the technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Examples of how MRI technology can be extended to chemical research are given, and limitations of the technique in this regard are discussed. Discussion of how to use commonly available NMR spectrometers for chemical imaging is also provided.

  11. The British Orthodontic Society MOrth cases prize 2014.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Mohammad O

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic treatment of two cases that were successful in winning the British Orthodontic Society (BOS) Membership in Orthodonitcs (MOrth) cases prize in 2014. The first case describes the management of a 26-year-old female with a Class II division 2 incisor relationship on a Class III skeletal base with reduced vertical proportions. This was complicated by: an unerupted ectopic palatally displaced upper right permanent canine, an erupted palatally displaced upper left permanent canine, retained deciduous canines, generalised microdontia, an overall Bolton tooth size discrepancy, mild crowding in the upper arch, an increased overbite (complete to tooth tissue) and crossbites. Treatment involved a surgical exposure of the ectopic canine and the use of fixed pre-adjusted edgewise appliances over a period of 24 months. The second case describes the management of a 12-year-old female with a Class II division 2 incisor relationship on a Class 2 skeletal base with reduced vertical proportions. This was complicated by: an increased overjet and overbite (complete to soft tissue), mild upper and lower arch crowding and an increased naso-labial angle. Treatment involved an initial phase of modified Clark Twin Block and sectional fixed appliances followed by complete fixed pre-adjusted edgewise appliances over a period of 24 months.

  12. [Posthumous nomination for Medicine Nobel Prizes II. The positivism era (1849-1899)].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1997-06-01

    The author proposes the nomination of great physicians of the second half of the XIX century for a posthumous Medicine Nobel Prize. The valorization given by medical historians Garrison, Lavastine, Castiglioni, Lain Entralgo and Guerra, is used to select the better candidates. One to three names are assigned by year from 1849 to 1899. Four categories of Nobel prizes are assigned: a) Basic biological disciplines, b) Clinical and surgical medicine, pathology and specialties, c) Discoverers of transcendental diseases that are eponyms and d) New medical technologies. A total of 84 nominees for the Nobel Prize are presented. These lists are presented as preliminary and tentative to allow an extensive debate about the history of medicine during the nineteenth century. PMID:9515294

  13. [Posthumous nomination for Medicine Nobel Prizes. I. The Romantic Era (1800-1848)].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1997-04-01

    In the centennial of Alfred Nobel's death, the author proposes the nomination of great physicians of XIX century for a posthumous Medicine Nobel Prize. The valorization given by medical historians such as Garrison, Lavastine, Castiglioni, Lain Entralgo and Guerra, was used to select the best candidates. One to three names were assigned per year, from 1800 to 1848. Four categories of "Romantic Nobel Prizes" are assigned: a) Founders of basic disciplines (anatomy, chemistry, physiology etc); b) Masters of clinical and surgical medicine, pathology and specialties; c) Discoverers of transcendental diseases that are eponyms and d) Other great inventors or discoverers. A total of 66 nominees for the Nobel Prize, equally distributed between French, German and English physician, are presented. The omissions and limitation of this proposals are discussed. PMID:9460293

  14. Sex of rearing seems to exert a powerful influence on gender identity in the absence of strong hormonal influence: report of two siblings with PAIS assigned different sex of rearing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Angela Ann; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Mehta, Manju; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2011-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the relative contribution of nurture over nature in development of gender identity. Patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) have ambiguous genitalia and are known to be reared as male or female. Familial cases of PAIS sharing common hormonal defects are usually reared in the same sex. Here, we describe two siblings with PAIS, one reared as a male and the other as female. These two siblings presented at adolescence. Gender identity was concordant with the sex of rearing for both. The male sibling was distressed with gynecomastia that had disrupted his social life. The sex of rearing seems to have played a predominant role in the formation of gender identity in these two patients with PAIS.

  15. Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

    2012-04-24

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions

  16. Polymorphisms of PAI-1 and platelet GP Ia may associate with impairment of renal function and thrombocytopenia in Puumala hantavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Outi; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Mäkelä, Satu; Mikkelsson, Jussi; Pessi, Tanja; Tuomisto, Sari; Huhtala, Heini; Libraty, Daniel; Vaheri, Antti; Karhunen, Pekka; Mustonen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Puumala virus (PUUV) infection is a viral hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) characterized by thrombocytopenia and acute impairment of renal function. We aimed to assess whether genetic polymorphisms of platelet antigens together with those of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) correlate with disease severity. Patients and methods 172 consecutive hospital-treated patients with serologically confirmed acute PUUV infection were included. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIIa T>C (rs5918), GP Ia T>C (rs1126643), GP Ib C>T (rs6065), GP VI T>C (rs1613662), VWF A>G (rs1063856) and PAI-1 A>G (rs2227631) were genotyped. The associations of the rarer alleles with variables reflecting the severity of the disease were analyzed. Results PAI-1 G-carriers had higher maximum creatinine level compared with the non-carriers (median 213 μmol/l, range 60–1499 μmol/l vs. median 122 μmol/l, range 51–1156 μmol/l, p=0.01). The GG-genotypes had higher creatinine levels than GA- and AA-genotypes (medians 249 μmol/l, 204 μmol/l and 122 μmol/l, respectively, p=0.03). Polymorphisms of GP VI and VWF associated with lower creatinine levels during PUUV infection. The minor C-allele of GP Ia associated with lower platelet counts (median 44×109/l, range 20–90×109/l vs median 64×109/l, range 3–238×109/l; p=0.02). Conclusions Polymorphism of PAI-1, a major regulator of fibrinolysis, has an adverse impact on the outcome of kidney function in PUUV-HFRS. Platelet collagen receptor GP Ia polymorphism associates with lower platelet count. PMID:22133274

  17. PAI-1 -675 4G/5G Polymorphism in Association with Diabetes and Diabetic Complications Susceptibility: a Meta-Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Cui, Dai; Shi, Yun; Shen, Chong; Tang, Wei; Yang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism and susceptibility to diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic nephropathy (DN), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). A literature-based search was conducted to identify all relevant studies. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was calculated mainly at the allele level to determine heterogeneity bias among studies. Further stratified analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Publication bias was examined by the modified Begg’s and Egger’s test. Twenty published articles with twenty-seven outcomes were included in the meta-analysis: 6 studies with a total of 1,333 cases and 3,011 controls were analyzed for the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetes risk, 7 studies with 1,060 cases and 1,139 controls for DN risk, 10 studies with 1,327 cases and 1,557 controls for DR and 4 studies with 610 cases and 1,042 controls for diabetic CAD risk respectively. Using allelic comparison (4G vs. 5G), the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism was observed to have no significant association with diabetes (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96, 1.20), DN (REM OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98, 1.25), DR (REM OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.97, 1.22) or diabetic CAD risk (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.81, 1.42), and similar results were obtained in the dominant, recessive and co-dominant models. Our meta-analyses suggest that the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism might not be a risk factor for DM, DN, DR or diabetic CAD risk in the populations investigated. This conclusion warrants confirmation by further studies. PMID:24223897

  18. Mega-prizes in medicine: big cash awards may stimulate useful and rapid therapeutic innovation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Following Horrobin's suggestion of 1986, I argue that offering very large prizes (tens of millions of US dollars, or more) for solving specific therapeutic problems, would be an excellent strategy for promoting the rapid development of effective new treatments. The two mainstream ways of paying for medical research are funding the process with grants or funding the outcome via patent protection. When grants are used to fund the process of research the result tends to be 'pure' science, guided by intrinsic scientific objectives. Practical results, such as useful therapeutic advances, are a by-product. Patent-seeking research, by contrast, is more focused on technology than science. It seeks practical results; and aims to pay for itself (and make a profit) in the long term by generating a patentable product or procedure. Prize-seeking research is subject to different incentives and applicable to different situations than either process-funded or patent-seeking research. Prize seeking researchers have a strong incentive to solve the specified problem as rapidly as possible, but the problem may be solved using old ideas that are scientifically mundane or unpatentable technologies and methods. Prizes therefore seem to generate solutions which are incremental extensions, new applications or novel combinations of already-existing technologies. The main use of mega-prizes in medicine would be to accelerate therapeutic progress in stagnant fields of research and to address urgent problems. For example, medical charities focused on specific diseases should consider accumulating their resources until they can offer a mega-prize for solving a clinical problem of special concern to their patients. Prize money should be big enough to pay for the research and development, the evaluation of the new treatment in a clinical trial, and with a large profit left-over to compensate for the intrinsic risk of competing. Sufficiently large amounts of money, and the prestige and publicity

  19. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1999: Ahmed H. Zewail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-12-01

    The 1999 Nobel Prize was awarded to Ahmed Zewail "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy." His pioneering investigation of fundamental chemical reactions using ultra-short flashes allowed chemists, for the first time, to monitor reactions on the time scale on which the atoms are actually moving as bonds are broken and formed. The fundamental limit of femtosecond resolution represents the culmination of a century of progress in chemical dynamics that began with the first Nobel Prize awarded to Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901.

  20. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  1. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Spatial Model for Cognitive Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O’Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.” This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  2. Effect of aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid on the protein expression of PAI-1 and p22(phox) in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Zaghetto, Francesca; Pagnin, Elisa; Davis, Paul A; De Mozzi, Paola; Sartorato, Paola; Martire, Giuseppe; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio

    2004-04-01

    Aldosterone excess can produce heart and kidney fibrosis, which seem to be related to a direct effect of aldosterone at the level of specific receptors. We report a direct, mineralocorticoid-mediated effect on the protein expression of two markers of oxidative stress after incubation of mononuclear leukocytes with 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.38 +/- 0.05 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.05). The same effect was also found with 3 x 10(-5) M glycyrrhetinic acid, the principal constituent of licorice root (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.37 +/- 0.97 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.04). The effect of both aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid is blocked by incubation with added 1 x 10(-6) M of receptor-antagonist canrenone. Canrenone alone did not show any effect. PAI-1 related protein was also found using 4 x 10(-9) M aldosterone. Incubations with 1 x 10(-9) M for 3 hours as well as 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone for 5, 10, and 20 minutes were ineffective for both proteins. These data support the previous finding of an involvement of mononuclear leukocytes in the pathogenesis of the oxidative stress induced by hyperaldosteronism. In addition, the results confirm our previous data on a direct effect of glycyrrhetinic acid at the level of mineralocorticoid receptors. PMID:15070972

  3. Differential response patterns on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in compensation-seeking and non-compensation-seeking mild traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Galbreath, Jennifer; Brown, Michelle; Turnbull, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively little research on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) populations. There is also little research on how compensation-seeking status affects personality assessment results in MTBI patients. The current study examined the PAI scales and subscales in two MTBI groups, one composed of compensation-seeking MTBI patients and the other consisting of non-compensation-seeking MTBI patients. Results indicated significant differences on several scales and subscales between the two MTBI groups, with the compensation-seeking MTBI patients having significantly higher elevations on scales related to somatic preoccupation (Somatic Complaint Scale, SOM), emotional distress (Anxiety Scale, ANX; Anxiety Related Disorders Scale, ARD; Depression Scale, DEP), and the Negative Impression Management, NIM, validity scale. All the SOM subscales and the Anxiety Cognitive (ANX-C) and ANX Affective, ANX-A, subscales were also elevated in the compensation-seeking group. Results indicated that several scales on the PAI were sensitive to group differences in compensation-seeking status in MTBI patients.

  4. SERPINE1, PAI-1 protein coding gene, methylation levels and epigenetic relationships with adiposity changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features under dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Zulet, Marian Angeles; Martinez, Jose Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with metabolic disorders, through different mechanisms, which could involve changes in DNA methylation. This work aimed to assess the potential relationships of the cytosine methylation levels within SERPINE1 gene transcriptional regulatory region, which codes for PAI-1, in peripheral white blood cells with anthropometrical, metabolic and inflammatory features. Forty-six obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features followed Control or Metabolic Syndrome Reduction in Navarra (RESMENA) energy-restricted (−30%E) diets for 8 weeks. SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region methylation at baseline was analyzed by a microarray technical. Both dietary strategies reduced anthropometric and biochemical parameters. The Control group significantly reduced plasma PAI-1 concentrations but not the RESMENA group. Participants from both nutritional interventions with higher SERPINE1 methylation levels at baseline showed significantly major reductions in body weight, total fat mass, android fat mass, total cholesterol and triglycerides, as compared with those with lower initial SERPINE1 methylation levels. In conclusion, the DNA methylation levels of SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region were associated with some metabolic and anthropometric changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome under energy restriction, suggesting a complex epigenetic network in the regulation of this recognized pro-inflammatory marker. (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086) PMID:24249967

  5. Renal transplantation experience in a patient with factor V Leiden homozygous, MTHFR C677T heterozygous, and PAI heterozygous mutation.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Bora; Tavil, Betül; Gümrük, Fatma; Aki, Tuncay F; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2015-08-01

    Vascular complications are important causes of allograft loss in renal transplantation. A two and a half-month-old boy was diagnosed with posterior urethral valve and progressed to end-stage renal disease at eight yr of age. During the HD period, a central venous catheter was replaced three times for repeated thrombosis. The boy was found to be homozygous for FVL and heterozygous for both MTHFR (C677T) and PAI. At the age of 12, renal transplantation was performed from a deceased donor. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy was initiated with continuous intravenous administration of heparin at the dose of 10 IU/kg/h. HD was performed for the first three days. By the fourth day of transplantation, his urine output had increased gradually. Heparin infusion was continued for 18 days during hospitalization at the same dosage. Thereafter, he was discharged with LMWH. On the third month after transplantation, his serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dL and eGFR was 75.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2). He has still been using LMWH, and his eGFR was 78.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) eight months after transplantation. Postoperative low-dose heparin treatment is a safe strategy for managing a patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors. PMID:25996881

  6. The Aula Espazio Observatory At The Universidad Del Pais Vasco (Spain): Planetary Observations For Graduate And Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.

    2010-10-01

    The Aula Espazio Gela is a facility at the School of Technical Engineering of the Universidad del Pais Vasco (Bilbao, Spain) dedicated to the education of undergarduated and gratuated students in the research and technology of space science activities. It also promotes the collaboration between the University and industrial spatial sector. One of the main elements of this facility is an astronomical observatory that is oriented to the activities of the students of the Master in Space Science and Technology. The main instrument is a 50 cm aperture Dall-Kirham telescope with equatorial mount completely robotized that includes different CCD cameras. Here we present some of the projects developed by graduate and under-graduate students in the field of the solar system. Explicitly we present some studies dedicated to the studies of planetary atmospheres and to acquire skills on the software management of planetary images. Aknowledgements: This project is supported by the Dpto. Innovación y Promoción Económica de la Diputación Foral de Bizkaia (Basque Country).

  7. [Tuberculosis 110 years after the Nobel Prize awarded to Koch].

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Viviana; Kantor, Isabel N

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1905 to Robert Koch "for his investigations and discoveries in relation to tuberculosis (TB)". He discovered the causal agent of TB, described the four principles that since then have guided research in communicable diseases and also prepared the old tuberculin, a bacillary extract that failed as a healing element but allowed the early diagnosis of TB infection and promoted the understanding of cellular immunity. After his death, the most conspicuous achievements against TB were the BCG vaccine, and the discovery of streptomycin, the antibiotic that launched the era of the effective treatment of TB. Drug-resistance soon appeared. In Argentina, studies on drug resistance began in the 60s. In the 70s, shortened anti-TB drug schemes were introduced consisting in two-month treatment with four drugs, followed by four months with two drugs. The incidence of TB decreased worldwide, but the immune depression associated with awarded together with the misuse of anti-TB drugs allowed the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensive resistance, with the emergence of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, including Argentina. New rapid diagnostic methods based on molecular biology were developed and also new drugs, but the treatment of multidrug resistant and extensively resistant TB is still difficult and expensive. TB research has marked several milestones in medical sciences, including the monumental Koch postulates, the tuberculin skin test that laid the basis for understanding cell-mediated immunity, the first design of randomized clinical trials and the use of combined multi-drug treatments. PMID:26707664

  8. [Tuberculosis 110 years after the Nobel Prize awarded to Koch].

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Viviana; Kantor, Isabel N

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1905 to Robert Koch "for his investigations and discoveries in relation to tuberculosis (TB)". He discovered the causal agent of TB, described the four principles that since then have guided research in communicable diseases and also prepared the old tuberculin, a bacillary extract that failed as a healing element but allowed the early diagnosis of TB infection and promoted the understanding of cellular immunity. After his death, the most conspicuous achievements against TB were the BCG vaccine, and the discovery of streptomycin, the antibiotic that launched the era of the effective treatment of TB. Drug-resistance soon appeared. In Argentina, studies on drug resistance began in the 60s. In the 70s, shortened anti-TB drug schemes were introduced consisting in two-month treatment with four drugs, followed by four months with two drugs. The incidence of TB decreased worldwide, but the immune depression associated with awarded together with the misuse of anti-TB drugs allowed the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensive resistance, with the emergence of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, including Argentina. New rapid diagnostic methods based on molecular biology were developed and also new drugs, but the treatment of multidrug resistant and extensively resistant TB is still difficult and expensive. TB research has marked several milestones in medical sciences, including the monumental Koch postulates, the tuberculin skin test that laid the basis for understanding cell-mediated immunity, the first design of randomized clinical trials and the use of combined multi-drug treatments.

  9. [Avermectin, from winning the Nobel Prize to "innovation in China"].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    The uprise of the superpower nations is always accompanied by the breakthrough and advances of technologies and innovations in the history. Natural products play very important role in human health, such as anticancer molecular taxol, anti-infection drug artemisinin that save a lot of lives, metabolic disease treatment, nutrition and health care. However, more has never been explored. With the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded to William C. Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu for the discovery of avermectins and artemisinin respectively, the second "Golden age" in the development of natural product is dawning. China is a "world factory" and natural drugs-rich country, but how to upgrade and advance the industry and realize the China dream? Avermectins, produced by Streptomyces avermitilis, are pesticide with high efficiency and low levels of side effects. However, the low producer and expensive development pattern of high consumption, high contamination is not sustainable. Solving the problem, increasing the production and utilization of raw material, reducing the energy consumption and cost of production, decreasing environmental pollution are key to transform China into a power house. In this paper, we case-study avermectins to review the industry development driven by fundamental research. Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy.of Sciences increased the production of avermectin 1000 folds to 9 g/L, which out licensed to new Veyong biochemical Ltd and avermectin Coalitions. As a result, Merck Sharp and Dohme ceased the manufacture of avermectins. The success also shed lights on the improvement of other natural product drugs in China. PMID:27382795

  10. The fabulous legacy of a Nobel Prize Laureate

    PubMed Central

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Merad, Miriam; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medecine 2011 was awarded to Ralph M. Steinman, Jules A. Hoffman and Bruce A. Beutler for the discovery of essential elements of innate immunity, in particular dendritic cells (DCs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antigens become immunogenic and capable of triggering an adaptive immune response involving antigen-specific, MHC- restricted effector T cells, only if they are captured and presented by “accessory” cells. In 1972, Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil Cohn identified in lymphoid tissues, cells with treelike, arborescent morphology that they named “dendritic cells” (DC) (from the greek word “tree” for tree, δένδρον) with a superior ability to induce alloreactive T cell proliferation in vitro (1978) and to stimulate the rejection of kidney allotransplants in rodents (1982). Thirty years after their discovery, DCare now known to play a seminal role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, In addition DC are being used in numerous clinical studies all over the world to increase immunity to infectious or tumor-associated antigens. This effort involved the contribution of an international network of basicand clinical scientists spearheaded by Ralph M. Steinman to defineappropriate culture conditions to generate ex vivo DC from circulating or bone marrow precursors, to definefunctionally distinct DC subsets, to identifytheir maturation pathways including those relying on the stimulation of TLRs, and finally to develop DC based-vaccines to immunize patients infected with HIV or affected by cancer. Here, we will detail the history of DC and outline the therapeutic implications of Ralph M. Steinman’s seminal discovery.

  11. [Avermectin, from winning the Nobel Prize to "innovation in China"].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    The uprise of the superpower nations is always accompanied by the breakthrough and advances of technologies and innovations in the history. Natural products play very important role in human health, such as anticancer molecular taxol, anti-infection drug artemisinin that save a lot of lives, metabolic disease treatment, nutrition and health care. However, more has never been explored. With the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded to William C. Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu for the discovery of avermectins and artemisinin respectively, the second "Golden age" in the development of natural product is dawning. China is a "world factory" and natural drugs-rich country, but how to upgrade and advance the industry and realize the China dream? Avermectins, produced by Streptomyces avermitilis, are pesticide with high efficiency and low levels of side effects. However, the low producer and expensive development pattern of high consumption, high contamination is not sustainable. Solving the problem, increasing the production and utilization of raw material, reducing the energy consumption and cost of production, decreasing environmental pollution are key to transform China into a power house. In this paper, we case-study avermectins to review the industry development driven by fundamental research. Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy.of Sciences increased the production of avermectin 1000 folds to 9 g/L, which out licensed to new Veyong biochemical Ltd and avermectin Coalitions. As a result, Merck Sharp and Dohme ceased the manufacture of avermectins. The success also shed lights on the improvement of other natural product drugs in China.

  12. Revisiting the 1981 Nobel Prize to Roger Sperry, David Hubel, and Torsten Wiesel on the occasion of the centennial of the Prize to Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    In 1981 the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology was awarded to Roger Sperry for his work on the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, and to David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel for their work on information processing in the visual system. The present paper points to some important links between the work of Sperry and that of Hubel and Wiesel and to their influences on neuroscience in the best tradition going back to Cajal. PMID:16997764

  13. Revisiting the 1981 Nobel Prize to Roger Sperry, David Hubel, and Torsten Wiesel on the occasion of the centennial of the Prize to Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    In 1981 the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology was awarded to Roger Sperry for his work on the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, and to David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel for their work on information processing in the visual system. The present paper points to some important links between the work of Sperry and that of Hubel and Wiesel and to their influences on neuroscience in the best tradition going back to Cajal.

  14. John Bardeen: The Only Person to Win Two Nobel Prizes in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-01-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity.…

  15. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p < 0.0001) during an intervention period of 2.5 school weeks. The school with the longest intervention period, 6 months, showed a PP selection increase of from 3.9% to 26.4% (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, giving small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children. PMID:26914228

  16. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p < 0.0001) during an intervention period of 2.5 school weeks. The school with the longest intervention period, 6 months, showed a PP selection increase of from 3.9% to 26.4% (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, giving small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children.

  17. Children's spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mandy; Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children's level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

  18. 2004 Foster G. McGaw Prize. Winner: Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Gina

    2005-04-01

    Henry Ford Health System's commitment to community service took root with its founding in 1915 and has been embraced by leaders ever since. Wide-ranging efforts of school health programs offering grief support for children earned it the 2004 McGaw Prize.

  19. Detroit's Henry Ford Health System awarded Foster G. McGaw Prize.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, is named winner of the prestigious Foster G. McGaw Prize for excellence in community service. The organization received 100,000 dollars from the sponsors, the American Hospital Association, The Baxter International Foundation and the Cardinal Health Foundation.

  20. Languages for Learning: Granting All Students Access to New Skills. Fishman Prize Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Steven; Zunkiewicz, Kelly; Strait, Laura; Towne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A single great teacher can change a life by introducing a new language, helping you master a new skill or opening a door you never knew was there. That's why every year, TNTP awards the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice: to celebrate a select cohort of public school teachers who demonstrate exceptionally effective teaching with…

  1. Creative Problem Solving with Marginalized Populations: Reclaiming Lost Prizes through In-the-Trenches Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Ken W.; Baker, Philip A.; McCluskey, Andrea L. A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes several initiatives in which Creative Problem Solving, in combination with career exploration and mentoring, has been used successfully to identify and develop the talents of "at-risk" populations. During the past decade, the Lost Prizes project helped turn around the lives of talented but troubled high-school dropouts,…

  2. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-06-01

    Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS). The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story), showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  3. Richard Willstätter and the 1915 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    One hundred years after his Nobel Prize, Richard Willstätter's achievements and the fascinating role he played in 20th century chemistry are discussed in this Essay. Several of his discoveries, such as the anthocyanidins, cyclooctatetraene, the ortho-quinones, and the structure of cocaine, will forever be associated with his name.

  4. ["Process of the research and development received Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002"].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tamio

    2004-01-01

    Mr. K. Tanaka engaged in Shimadzu Corporation received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002 for the development of soft laser desorption ionization method for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules. In this paper, the process of the research and development of desorption ionization method and the produced laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometer (LDI-TOFMS) are described.

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1981: Fukui and Hoffmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-06-01

    The 1981 Nobel Prize was awarded to Kenichi Fukui and Roald Hoffmann "for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions." Those theories, which have come to be known as "frontier orbital theory" and the "Woodward-Hoffmann rules" respectively, remain important tools for predicting the course of organic reactions and they are frequently taught in courses in mechanistic organic chemistry.

  6. Prizing Children's Science Information Books: The Text, Reading and the Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Joy; Jarman, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Society Young People's Book Prize is awarded annually in the United Kingdom for the best science information book, and the winning book is chosen by panels of young people. This article discusses the findings of a study of the responses to the books and to their judging experience of young people who participated on panels in the 2011…

  7. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected…

  8. Richard Willstätter and the 1915 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    One hundred years after his Nobel Prize, Richard Willstätter's achievements and the fascinating role he played in 20th century chemistry are discussed in this Essay. Several of his discoveries, such as the anthocyanidins, cyclooctatetraene, the ortho-quinones, and the structure of cocaine, will forever be associated with his name. PMID:26291186

  9. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  10. Children's spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mandy; Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children's level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize. PMID:26441776

  11. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  12. Using prize-based incentives to enhance daily interactive voice response (IVR) compliance: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Jan A.; Minard, Charles G.; Hudson, Sonora; Green, Charles E.; Schmitz, Joy M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a prize-based contingency-management (CM) approach to encourage interactive voice response (IVR) compliance in a cocaine-treatment study and explored the association between IVR call rate and outcome during a cocaine abstinence-induction trial. Subjects called into the IVR system daily to complete a brief interview assessing cocaine use for past 24 hours. One group earned $1 for each call; the other earned one draw per call from a “prize bowl” with a range of awards. Abstinence was rewarded according to a high-value voucher incentive schedule, which was the same for both groups, and confirmed by thrice-weekly urine testing at clinic visits. Odds of calling were 4.7 times greater (95% CI: 1.23, 17.91) in the prize-CM group than in the fixed dollar CM group. In addition, the percent of IVR calls was significantly associated with abstinence achievement, χ2 (1) = 5.147, p<0.023. The use of prize-based CM to increase the use of IVR is feasible and deserves examination as an innovation for helping participants engage in treatment. PMID:24029622

  13. A Nobel Prize for membrane traffic: Vesicles find their journey’s end

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cell biologists everywhere rejoiced when this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof for their contributions to uncovering the mechanisms governing vesicular transport. In this article, we highlight their achievements and also pay tribute to the pioneering scientists before them who set the stage for their remarkable discoveries. PMID:24215073

  14. Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics Lecture: Understanding Nonequilibrium via Rare Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona-Lasinio, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Irreversible processes are a hot subject in statistical mechanics. During the last decade through the effort of several people, including the recipient of the prize and his collaborators, a progress in understanding stationary nonequilibrium states has been achieved. The key has been the study of rare fluctuations. The talk will review some basic ideas, results and perspectives.

  15. Charting the Course: Four Years of the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Entremont, Chad; Norton, Jill; Bennett, Michael; Piazza, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move (SOM) Prize has been awarded annually to a Boston public school that has made significant progress in improving student achievement. This case study identifies the structures and strategies that best serve students in prizewinning schools, provides a profile of each of the four winning schools…

  16. Following Zahka: Using Nobel Prize Winners' Speeches and Ideas to Teach Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin P.; Wilson, John K.; Becker, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, the late William Zahka (1990, 1998) outlined how the acceptance speeches of those who received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science could be used to teach undergraduates. This article updates and expands Zahka's work, identifying some of the issues discussed by recent Nobel Laureates, classifying their speeches by topic…

  17. Nobel Centennial Essays: A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1901: Jacobus van't Hoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2001-12-01

    December 2001 marks the centenary of the Nobel Prize. During the 20th century, the Nobel Prize was awarded 13 times, to a total of 22 recipients, for work involving various aspects of chemical dynamics--beginning with Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901, and continuing through Ahmed Zewail in 1999. Examining those prizes provides some interesting insights into the history and the evolution of chemical dynamics. In this essay, the first of a series of articles commemorating the Nobel centennial, the work of the first Nobel Laureate in chemical dynamics, Jacobus van't Hoff (1901), is examined.

  18. The Limit of a strong Lobby: Why did August Bier and Ferdinand Sauerbruch never receive the Nobel Prize?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    August Bier (1861-1949) and Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) have remained two of the most influential figures during the first half of the 20th century in German and even in international surgery. They were jointly awarded Adolf Hitler's German Science Prize in 1937, but never the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, although no other German surgeons were nominated as often as Bier and Sauerbruch for the prestigeful award from 1901 to 1950. This contribution gives an overview of the reasons why and by whom Bier and Sauerbruch were nominated, and discusses the reasons of the Nobel Prize Committee for not awarding them. PMID:25094023

  19. The Limit of a strong Lobby: Why did August Bier and Ferdinand Sauerbruch never receive the Nobel Prize?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    August Bier (1861-1949) and Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) have remained two of the most influential figures during the first half of the 20th century in German and even in international surgery. They were jointly awarded Adolf Hitler's German Science Prize in 1937, but never the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, although no other German surgeons were nominated as often as Bier and Sauerbruch for the prestigeful award from 1901 to 1950. This contribution gives an overview of the reasons why and by whom Bier and Sauerbruch were nominated, and discusses the reasons of the Nobel Prize Committee for not awarding them.

  20. Factors Associated with Fear of Falling among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the Shih-Pai Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Chou, Pesus

    2016-01-01

    Background Fear of falling is an important risk indicator for adverse health related outcomes in older adults. However, factors associated with fear of falling among community-dwelling older adults are not well-explored. Objectives To explore the quality of life and associated factors in fear of falling among older people in the Shih-Pai area in Taiwan. Methods This community-based survey recruited three thousand eight hundred and twenty-four older adults aged ≥ 65 years. The measurements included a structured questionnaire, including quality of life by using Short-Form 36, and information of fear of falling, fall history, demographics, medical conditions, insomnia, sleep quality, depression and subjective health through face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 53.4% of participants reported a fear of falling. The rate of fear of falling was higher in female subjects. Subjects with fear of falling had lower Short Form-36 scores both for men and women. Falls in the previous year, older age, insomnia, depression and worse subjective health were correlates of fear of falling for both sexes. Male-specific associations with fear of falling were the accessibility of medical help in an emergency, diabetes mellitus and stroke. In parallel, cardiovascular diseases were a female-specific correlate for fear of falling. Conclusions Fear of falling is prevalent among community-dwelling older adults. It is seems that there are gender differences in fear of falling with respect to the prevalence and associated factors in older adults. Gender differences should be considered when planning prevention and intervention strategies for fear of falling among older people. PMID:26933882

  1. [The Nobel Prize for nitric oxide. The unjust exclusion of Dr. Salvador Moncada].

    PubMed

    de Berrazueta, J R

    1999-04-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded jointly to North-American scientists, Dr Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, for their discoveries in relation to "nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". This has raised an important polemic because of the exclusion the South-American scientist, now nationalized British, Dr. Salvador Moncada. This short historical review examines some of the fundamental contributions to the knowledge in this field. It shows the sequence of the discoveries and the communication of them to the scientific community by the rewarded scientists and by Dr. Moncada. It is based on some fundamental publications in order to better understand this story, which does not coincide with the writing in 1996 by the Lasker Prize Committee, and which in 1998 was re-written again by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy. More than 90 universities, academies and societies have acknowledged Dr. Moncada up to now with priority in the discovery of the fact that nitric oxide is released by endothelial cells, and the revealing of its metabolic way. More than 20,000 citations of their fundamental papers endorse in the scientific community his primacy in this field. Even Robert Furchgott, author of the brilliant discovery of the endothelium derived relaxing factor, that opened this field to the science, declared about the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize: "I feel that the Nobel Prize Committee could have made an exception this year and chosen a fourth person, Salvador Moncada (to share the prize)".

  2. How the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gunnar

    2007-10-01

    In 1906 the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Camillo Golgi and Ramón y Cajal in recognition of their work on the structure of the nervous system. Golgi's most impressive contribution was his method, described in 1873. This was applied in studies of the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, hippocampus and the spinal cord. These studies together with his earlier work were included in his Opera Omnia, published in 1903. His method was highly praised by Cajal. His adherence to the reticular theory was opposed by Cajal, however, who had spelled out the neuron theory already in the late 1800s. Cajal's extraordinary contributions to the structure of the nervous system, based largely on the Golgi method and Ehrlich's methylene blue stain, were published in his Textura del Sistema Nerviosa de Hombre y de los Vertebrados, three volumes published from 1897 to 1904. Documents from the Nobel Archives reveal that Kölliker, Retzius and Fürst were the ones who proposed Golgi and Cajal for a shared prize. Golgi was nominated by Hertwig, as well. Cajal was proposed by Ziehen and Holmgren, and also by Retzius, as an alternative to a shared prize. Holmgren, who was commissioned to write the report to the Nobel Committee, found Cajal far superior to Golgi. Sundberg, asked for another evaluation, was more positive to Golgi's contributions than Holmgren. Gadelius supported Holmgren's views. The final vote gave a majority for a shared prize. The prize ceremony and the lectures were described in detail in Cajal's autobiography.

  3. The effects of polymorphisms in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on plasma t-PA and PAI-1 levels are dependent on environmental context.

    PubMed

    Asselbergs, Folkert W; Williams, Scott M; Hebert, Patricia R; Coffey, Christopher S; Hillege, Hans L; Snieder, Harold; Navis, Gerjan; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Moore, Jason H

    2007-11-01

    Thrombosis is a key factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. Important biochemical constituents of the fibrinolytic system, affecting thrombosis, include tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Both t-PA and PAI-1 are determined by multiple genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to investigate whether the effects of polymorphism in genes from the renin-angiotensin, bradykinin, and fibrinolytic systems on t-PA or PAI-1 levels are dependent on environmental factors in a large population-based sample from the PREVEND study in Groningen, The Netherlands (n = 2,527). We found strong evidence (P PAI-1 in males. Only suggestive evidence (P PAI-1 levels in females. Another consistent finding was evidence for an interaction between bradykinin receptor (BDKRB2) gene polymorphisms and body size as measured by body mass index and/or waist-hip-ratio. For each gender and for both t-PA and PAI-1 there was at least one BDKRB2-body size combination that exhibited suggestive (P PAI-1 is dependent on the environmental context such as body size and alcohol use. The present study emphasizes the importance of including environmental factors in genetic analyses to fully comprehend the genetic architecture of a specific trait.

  4. Society News: PhD theses could win prizes; Last chance for IYA2009 grants; New Fellows; RAS Fellows win prizes; Need a job? Need staff? RAS Library Saturdays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    Fellows who are PhD student supervisors should be on the lookout for exceptionally good work from research students submitting their theses this year, for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston Astronomy Prize and the RAS Keith Runcorn Prize. The RAS is offering one last chance to apply for grants towards International Year of Astronomy activities, but you'll have to apply soon. The Society sends congratulations to Fellows of the RAS who have recently received prestigious awards for their work.

  5. Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry 2014: Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015, commemorating the Old Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL), while the physics and chemistry Nobel Prizes 2014 are both about light. The work leading to the two prizes share the same basic theoretical foundation: when an electron jumps from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, the energy difference is transformed into a photon. This basic way of light generation is a key part of the Old Quantum Theory. Interestingly, the date of announcing the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics coincided with the birthdays of Niels Bohr and, especially, of Planck's blackbody radiation formula. In connection with the two 2014 Nobel Prizes, we recall the development of the Old Quantum Theory by Planck, Einstein and Bohr.

  6. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1986: Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-08-01

    The 1986 Nobel Prize was awarded to Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi for their work extending chemical dynamics to the level of individual atoms and molecules, using molecular beam and infrared chemiluminescence experiments.

  7. Remembering Charles B. Huggins' Nobel Prize for Hormonal Treatment of Prostatic Cancer at its 50th Anniversary.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Moll, Friedrich; Schultheiss, Dirk; Krischel, Matthis

    2016-06-01

    Charles B. Huggins received the Nobel Prize in 1966. Based on archival sources from the Nobel archive we have found that nominators emphasised the practical therapeutic applications of his discoveries that were showing 25 yr after his key publications.

  8. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1913: The Highest Honor for the Lowest Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif-Acherman, Simón

    2013-12-01

    One century ago this year the Dutch experimental physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853-1926) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in low-temperature physics, in particular for his production of liquid helium. I trace the route to his Nobel Prize within the context of his and his colleagues' research in his laboratory at the University of Leiden, and in light of his nominators and the nominations he received in the five years 1909-1913.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-mediated transcription of miR-301a and miR-454 and their host gene SKA2 regulates endothelin-1 and PAI-1 expression in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Caryn S; Li, Chen; Malik, Punam; Tahara, Stanley M; Kalra, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) play important roles in pulmonary hypertension (PH) in sickle cell disease (SCD). Our previous studies show higher levels of placenta growth factor (PlGF) in SCD correlate with increased plasma levels of ET-1, PAI-1, and other physiological markers of PH. PlGF-mediated ET-1 and PAI-1 expression occurs via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). However, relatively little is understood regarding post-transcriptional regulation of PlGF-mediated expression of ET-1 and PAI-1. Herein, we show PlGF treatment of endothelial cells reduced levels of miR-301a and miR-454 from basal levels. In addition, both miRNAs targeted the 3'-UTRs of ET-1 and PAI-1 mRNAs. These results were corroborated in the mouse model of SCD [Berkeley sickle mice (BK-SS)] and in SCD subjects. Plasma levels of miR-454 in SCD subjects were significantly lower compared with unaffected controls, which correlated with higher plasma levels of both ET-1 and PAI-1. Moreover, lung tissues from BK-SS mice showed significantly reduced levels of pre-miR-301a and concomitantly higher levels of ET-1 and PAI-1. Furthermore, we show that miR-301a/miR-454 located in the spindle and kinetochore-associated protein-2 (SKA2) transcription unit was co-transcriptionally regulated by both HIF-1α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) as demonstrated by SKA2 promoter mutational analysis and ChIP. Finally we show that fenofibrate, a PPAR-α agonist, increased the expression of miR-301a/miR-454 and SKA2 in human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC) cells; the former were responsible for reduced expression of ET-1 and PAI-1. Our studies provide a potential therapeutic approach whereby fenofibrate-induced miR-301a/miR-454 expression can ameliorate PH and lung fibrosis by reduction in ET-1 and PAI-1 levels in SCD.

  10. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2012-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 is awarded to Matthew Hough et al from the University of Florida, the Francis Marion University and the National Cancer Institute, USA for their paper on a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of skeletal tissues in the adult male: An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309 Matthew Hough1, Perry Johnson1, Didier Rajon2, Derek Jokisch3, Choonsik Lee4 and Wesley Bolch1,5 1Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC, USA 4Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Bone marrow is one of the more radiosensitive tissues in the human body and is housed within a complex structure of bone. This paper describes a comprehensive model of energy deposition by internal electron or beta particle emitters for the ICRP reference adult male based upon ex vivo CT and microCT images of

  11. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2013-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award the Roberts prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 is awarded to Michel Defrise, Ahmadreza Rezaei and Johan Nuyts from the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium for their breakthrough paper that describes how the information needed for attenuation correction in PET imaging can be extracted, to within a constant, from time-of-flight emission data: Time-of-flight PET data determine the attenuation sinogram up to a constant 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 885 Michel Defrise1, Ahmadreza Rezaei2 and Johan Nuyts2 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium This paper represents an important and timely contribution to the literature as time-of-flight PET scanners are now offered by several manufacturers. In hybrid PET/CT scanners, the PET attenuation correction, necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution, can be derived directly from the CT data. Sometimes, however, the PET and CT scans may be poorly aligned due to patient motion and other approaches are needed. In addition, hybrid PET/MRI scanners also, have been developed recently, and in

  12. Standard magnitude prize reinforcers can be as efficacious as larger magnitude reinforcers in cocaine-dependent methadone patients

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Barry, Danielle; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Contingency management (CM) reduces cocaine use in methadone patients, but only about 50% of patients respond to CM interventions. This study evaluated whether increasing magnitudes of reinforcement will improve outcomes. Methods Cocaine-dependent methadone patients (N = 240) were randomized to one of four 12-week treatment conditions: usual care (UC), UC plus “standard” prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $300, UC plus high magnitude prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $900, or UC plus voucher CM with an expected maximum of about $900 in vouchers. Results All three CM conditions yielded significant reductions in cocaine use relative to UC, with effect sizes (d) ranging from 0.38 to 0.59. No differences were noted between CM conditions, with at least 55% of patients in each CM condition achieving one week or more of cocaine abstinence versus 35% in UC. During the 12 weeks after the intervention ended, CM increased time until relapse relative to UC, but the effects of CM were no longer significant at a 12-month follow-up. Conclusions Providing the standard magnitude of $300 in prizes was as effective as larger magnitude CM in cocaine-dependent methadone patients in this study. Given its strong evidence base and relatively low costs, standard magnitude prize CM should be considered for adoption in methadone clinics to encourage cocaine abstinence, but new methods need to be developed to sustain abstinence. PMID:25198284

  13. Promoting public health research in BRICS through a multinational public health prize fund.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes the establishment of a prize fund to incentivise public health research within the BRICS association, which comprises the five major emerging world economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. This would stimulate cooperative healthcare research within the group and, on the proviso that the benefits of the research are made freely available within the association, would be rewarding for researchers. The results of the research stimulated by the prize would provide beneficial new healthcare technologies, targeting the most vulnerable and needy groups. The proposed fund is consistent with current international patent law and would not only avoid some of the problems associated with the "Health Impact Fund", but also create a new model for healthcare research. PMID:24509109

  14. [Nitric oxide (NO)--Nobel prize in medicine and physiology for 1998].

    PubMed

    Derentowicz, P; Markiewicz, K; Wawrzyniak, M; Czerwińska-Kartowicz, I; Buława, E; Siwińska-Gołebiowska, H

    2000-01-01

    On October 12, 1998. The Nobel Assembly announced the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology to pharmacologists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad. The Nobel Committee decided to award the prize for their discoveries concerning--nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Nitric oxide (NO) has a key importance for vascular tonus, acts as a signal molecule in the nervous system and plays an important function in the immunological system. Nitric oxide is a multifunction molecule which controls the blood pressure, modulates gastrointestinal motility. It is produced in abnormal level intensifies septic shock and destruction of nervous tissue. NO is important in different branches of medicine. For instance NO gas has been used to reduced high blood pressure in the lung of infants. Several unknown NO applications in medicine are waiting for discovery.

  15. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  16. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-10-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON-OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment.

  17. Fermi Prize: J. Robert Oppenheimer Named to Receive Annual AEC Award.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J R

    1963-04-12

    The White House announced last week that J. Robert Oppenheimer would be the recipient of the Atomic Energy Commission's 1963 Fermi prize. The prize, which is accompanied by a $50,000 award, is given for "especially meritorious contribution to the development, use or control of atomic energy," and, as such, is strictly a recognition of scientific merit. This fact cannot be overstated. Nevertheless, because of the bitter and emotional controversy that surrounded the removal of Oppenheimer's security clearance in 1954, the Oppenheimer case has come to symbolize the dark hour to which nonconformity and scientific integrity were subjected in the McCarthy era. Oppenheimer's selection for the award is thus widely regarded as an effort by the scientific community and the Kennedy administration to right a long-standing wrong. The following account is an appreciation of Oppenheimer, written especially for Science by his colleague, Hans Bethe, of Cornell University.

  18. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    ScienceCinema

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  19. Promoting public health research in BRICS through a multinational public health prize fund.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes the establishment of a prize fund to incentivise public health research within the BRICS association, which comprises the five major emerging world economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. This would stimulate cooperative healthcare research within the group and, on the proviso that the benefits of the research are made freely available within the association, would be rewarding for researchers. The results of the research stimulated by the prize would provide beneficial new healthcare technologies, targeting the most vulnerable and needy groups. The proposed fund is consistent with current international patent law and would not only avoid some of the problems associated with the "Health Impact Fund", but also create a new model for healthcare research.

  20. Chemistry in the News: 1998 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jennifer B.

    1999-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Walter Kohn (University of California at Santa Barbara) for his development of the density-functional theory and to John A. Pople (Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois) for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Robert F. Fuchgott (State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn), Louis J. Ignarro (University of California at Los Angeles), and Ferid Murad (University of Texas Medical School at Houston) for identifying nitric oxide as a key biological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.