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Sample records for abraham pais prize

  1. Abraham Pais Prize: Physics, History, and Biography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2014-03-01

    Each of these fields differs in obvious and not so obvious ways from the others in terms of goals, methods, purposes, and perspectives. Yet each also holds much in common with the others. Having worked in these fields and crossed the boundaries between them, I will explore in this talk not only the similarities and differences I have encountered on this journey, but also my growing appreciation of how these fields together provide a unified perspective on physics as a science and a disciple and as a vital component of our broader human culture.

  2. Abraham Pais Prize Talk: The Joy of History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, Roger H.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists and historians of physics share a common goal, the quest for understanding, but their objects are different: Physicists attempt to understand Nature, while historians attempt to understand the past, finding both the challenge and joy of history in exploring the contingencies of historical events, their dependence on scientific, biographical, sociopolitical, cultural, and other factors, and shaping them into a coherent narrative. My first example will focus on the history of the photon concept, in particular on the work of Arthur Holly Compton between 1916 and 1922 that led to his discovery of the Compton effect, whose understanding ultimately rested on a close examination of his laboratory notebooks. I will then turn to two episodes in the history of nuclear physics. The first deals with a controversy between 1922 and 1927 between Ernest Rutherford and James Chadwick at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge and Hans Pettersson and Gerhard Kirsch at the Institute for Radium Research in Vienna that involved their fundamentally different experimental observations and theoretical interpretations of the artificial disintegration of nuclei whose resolution could only be understood after uncovering crucial correspondence between the protagonists. The second episode traces George Gamow's creation and development of the liquid-drop model of the nucleus in 1928 and 1929 and its subsequent development in two stages, first by Werner Heisenberg and Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker from 1933 to 1936, and second by Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar in 1936 and 1937, both of which merged in the minds of Lise Meitner and Otto Robert Frisch at the end of 1938 to yield the correct interpretation of nuclear fission, an act of creation whose understanding rested on a detailed analysis of the published literature.

  3. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics: Physics Textbooks Don't Always Tell the Truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Allan

    2016-03-01

    Anyone who studies the history of physics quickly realizes that the history of physics presented in physics textbooks is often inaccurate. This is not necessarily a bad thing. The purpose of textbooks is to help students learn physics. An inaccurate history may serve a pedagogical purpose. It may help to explain concepts more clearly than the actual history. I believe, however, that it is important for those of us who teach physics to know the accurate history. In this talk I will discuss two episodes from the history of modern physics, Millikan's experiments on the photoelectric effect and the Ellis-Wooster experiment on the energy spectrum in β decay. Everyone knows that Millikan's work established the photon theory of light. The problem is that what everyone knows is wrong. The Ellis-Wooster experiment, on the other hand, is rarely discussed in physics texts, but it should be. In this talk I will present a more accurate history of these experiments.

  4. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Talk: Henry Cavendish, John Michell, Weighing the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2010-03-01

    This talk is about an interaction between two 18th-century natural philosophers (physical scientists), Henry Cavendish and John Michell, and its most important outcome, the experiment of weighing the world (their name for it) using a torsion balance (our name for it). Michell was the most inventive of the 18th century English natural philosophers, and Cavendish was the first of his countrymen to possess abilities at all comparable with Newton's. By their interests and skills, they were drawn to one another. Both were universal natural philosophers, equally adept at building scientific instruments, performing experiments, constructing theory, and using mathematics; both had a penchant for exacting, quantitative work. Both also had fitful habits of publication, which did not begin to reveal the range of their work, to the mystification of later scientists and historians. Late in life, Cavendish and Michell turned their attention to the force that Newton had examined most completely, a singular triumph of his natural philosophy, the force of universal gravitation. Over the course of the 18th century, abundant evidence of attraction had been gathered from the motions of the earth, moon, planets, and comets, phenomena which span the intermediate range of masses, sizes, and distances. But in three domains of experience, involving the extreme upper and lower limits of masses and dimensions, the universality of gravitation remained an article of faith. These were the gravity of the ``fixed'' stars, the mutual attraction of terrestrial bodies, and the gravitation of light and other special substances. Michell took on himself the task of deducing observable consequences from each of these prospective instances of universal gravitation. Cavendish encouraged Michell, and he followed up the resulting observational and experimental questions. The experiment of weighing the world was the last experiment Mitchell planned and the last experiment Cavendish published. The capstone of two distinguished careers, the experiment outlived the world in which it was conceived and carried out. Today gravitation is at the center of the physics of the very small and the very large, and experiments that followed in Michell and Cavendish's footsteps find a place in it. The ``most important advance in experiments on gravitation,'' to quote an authority, ``was the introduction of the torsion balance'' by Michell and Cavendish and independently by Coulomb; ``it has been the basis of all the most significant experiments on gravitation ever since.'' Another authority traces the ``noble tradition of precision measurement to which we are heirs'' to Cavendish's experiment, which he calls the ``first modern physics experiment.''

  5. The Abraham Pais Prize Lecture: The historical Development of the Physical Concept of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammer, Max

    2007-04-01

    The Irish physicist and mathematician John Lighton Synge once (1959) proclaimed that of all physical measurements that of time is the most fundamental and its theory ``the most basic theory of all.'' Twenty years later the Belgian physicist and chemist Ilya Prigogine declared that ``the concept of time is much more complex than we thought.'' Indeed, having studied the basic notions in physics like space, mass, force, simultaneity and written on each of them a detailed monograph, I always postponed a similar treatment of the concept of time because I realized that just by being the ``most basic'' it is also the most ``complex'' of all notions in physics and therefore a rather complicated subject of research. In fact, time, as perceived by us, is both ``flowing'' and ``enduring'' and its ``passing'' always ``lasts.'' If I venture nevertheless to offer herewith a survey of the conceptual development of the notion of time, I do so because I delimit myself to the role of time only in physics and ignore as far as possible general metaphysical, psychological or biological issues. The presentation thus ignores the history of the notion of time as conceived in the myths and religions of ancient civilizations and begins, after some brief remarks about the Pythagoreans, with the theories of time as proposed by the Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle. After a critical discourse on the early proponents of an idealistic interpretation of the notion of time, like that of St. Augustine, medieval theories of time, like those which proposed the atomicity of time, are discussed. After a presentation of sixteenth century discussions of time, like that by Bruno or Gassendi, Isaac Barrow's and Isaac Newton's theories of physical time are critically analyzed. This is followed by a brief study of the conceptions of time by Locke and Berkeley and subsequently by Leibniz, who is often regarded as the first proponent of a relational or causal theory of time. Following some brief remarks about Hume's conception of time Kant's critical investigation of the notion of time is analyzed and followed by the theories of an ``arrow if time'' as a result of the existence of irreversible thermodynamic processes. After a brief discussion of Poincar'e's thesis of the conventional status of temporal metric, Einstein's interpretation of distant simultaneity and consequently his definition of time via simultaneity, as presented in his famous 1905 paper on relativity, are discussed. This is followed by some remarks on the concept of time in the general theory of relativity. A brief outline of the role of the concept of time in modern cosmology and, in particular, Hawking's notion of ``imaginary time'' conclude this essay.

  6. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Lecture: Big, Bigger, Too Big? From Los Alamos to Fermilab and the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2012-03-01

    The modern era of big science emerged during World War II. Oppenheimer's Los Alamos laboratory offered the quintessential model of a government-funded, mission-oriented facility directed by a strong charismatic leader. The postwar beneficiaries of this model included the increasingly ambitious large laboratories that participated in particle physics--in particular, Brookhaven, SLAC, and Fermilab. They carried the big science they practiced into a new realm where experiments eventually became as large and costly as entire laboratories had been. Meanwhile the available funding grew more limited causing the physics research to be concentrated into fewer and bigger experiments that appeared never to end. The next phase in American high-energy physics was the Superconducting Super Collider, the most costly pure physics project ever attempted. The SSC's termination was a tragedy for American science, but for historians it offers an opportunity to understand what made the success of earlier large high-energy physics laboratories possible, and what made the continuation of the SSC impossible. The most obvious reason for the SSC's failure was its enormous and escalating budget, which Congress would no longer support. Other factors need to be recognized however: no leader could be found with directing skills as strong as those of Wilson, Panofsky, Lederman, or Richter; the scale of the project subjected it to uncomfortable public and Congressional scrutiny; and the DOE's enforcement of management procedures of the military-industrial complex that clashed with those typical of the scientific community led to the alienation and withdrawal of many of the most creative scientists, and to the perception and the reality of poor management. These factors, exacerbated by negative pressure from scientists in other fields and a post-Cold War climate in which physicists had little of their earlier cultural prestige, discouraged efforts to gain international support. They made the SSC crucially different from its predecessors and sealed its doom.

  7. Improbable Research and the Ig Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, then make them think. Marc Abrahams, father of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony and editor of the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, will show us some of the most outstanding Ig Nobel winners. He will also discuss why Ohio has been such a good producer of Ig Nobel Prize winners, and of improbable research.

  8. Pais Prize Lecture: History and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2006-04-01

    Modern history and experimental physics entered the university together, in the course of the eighteenth century. They shared several practices and projects. Historians began to emphasize physical factors, and so drew on, and occasionally contributed to, meteorology and physical geography; and they developed ancillary disciplines, like numismatics, diplomatics, and paleography, which required the analysis of metals, paper, and inks, and the careful comparison of material objects. In physics, historical reviews of newer subject matters, such as electricity, optics, and pneumatics, guided instruction where neither the facts nor their interpretation compelled consensus. The inherently historical science, geology, was a favorite subject of the age: the earth received a history, and the cosmos, too; evolutionary ideas found applications everywhere. The new physics and the new history became potent weapons of Enlightenment. A product of their collaboration is the lengthiest history of physics ever written, J.G. Fischer's Geschichte der Physik (8 vols., 1801-1808). It appeared within a series edited by Johnn Gottfried Eichhorn, Germany's leading exponent of the ``higher criticism,'' the corrosive application of historical and literary considerations to the stories of the Old Testament. The writings of historians like Eichhorn were more subversive than the work reported by Fischer in so far as humans are more concerned with their place in the world than with the details of its behavior. The coincidental matriculation of modern history and experimental physics, and its consequences, will be discussed.

  9. Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg illness.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S; Schmalstieg, Frank C

    2007-05-01

    When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, he was weak and dizzy; his face had a ghastly colour. That evening on the train to Washington, DC, he was febrile and weak, and suffered severe headaches. The symptoms continued; back pains developed. On the fourth day of the illness, a widespread scarlet rash appeared that soon became vesicular. By the tenth day, the lesions itched and peeled. The illness lasted three weeks. The final diagnosis, a touch of varioloid, was an old name for smallpox that was later used in the 20th century to denote mild smallpox in a partially immune individual. It was unclear whether Lincoln had been immunized against smallpox. Indeed, this review suggests that Lincoln had unmodified smallpox and that Lincoln's physicians tried to reassure the public that Lincoln was not seriously ill. Indeed, the successful conclusion of the Civil War and reunification of the country were dependent upon Lincoln's presidency. PMID:17551612

  10. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  11. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  12. Abraham Maslow: On the Potential of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podeschi, Ronald L.; Podeschi, Phyllis J.

    1973-01-01

    Authors presented some principal perspectives by the psychologist, Abraham Maslow, who died in 1970, and who was writing about the potential of women long before it became popular to do so. (Author/RK)

  13. Abraham Flexner and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ludmerer, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization. Abraham Flexner, a brilliant educator, had the background to understand and popularize the meaning of this new view of education, and he took the unprecedented step of relating the developments in medical education to the ideas of John Dewey and the progressive education movement. Although the Flexner Report is typically viewed as a historical document--due to an understandable tendency to refer only to the second half of the report, where Flexner provides his famous critiques of the medical schools that existed at the time--this article argues that the Flexner Report is actually a living educational document of as much significance to medical educators today as in Flexner's time. The article analyzes Flexner's discussion of medical education and shows that his message--the importance of academic excellence, professional leadership, proper financial support, and service and altruism--is timeless, as applicable to the proper education of physicians today and tomorrow as in the past. PMID:21399378

  14. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry ... Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Nomination Archive Ceremonies Ceremonies Ceremony Archive Nobel ...

  15. Prize Recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    The John Bardeen Prize is awarded for theoretical work that has provided significant insights on the nature of superconductivity and has led to verifiable predictions. It is sponsored by the Dresdner Bank.

  16. PAI-1 in Tissue Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Asish K.; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    1. Summary Fibrosis is defined as a fibroproliferative or abnormal fibroblast activation–related disease., Deregulation of wound healing leads to hyperactivation of fibroblasts and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the wound area, the pathological manifestation of fibrosis. The accumulation of excessive levels of collagen in the extracellular matrix depends on two factors: an increased rate of collagen synthesis and or decreased rate of collagen degradation by cellular proteolytic activities. The urokinase-type/tissue-type plasminogen activator (uPA/tPA) and plasmin play significant roles in the cellular proteolytic degradation of ECM proteins and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The activities of uPA/tPA/plasmin and plasmin-dependent MMPs rely mostly on the activity of a potent inhibitor of uPA/tPA, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Under normal physiologic conditions, PAI-1 controls the activities of uPA/tPA/plasmin/MMP proteolytic activities and thus maintains the tissue homeostasis. During wound healing, elevated levels of PAI-1 inhibit uPA/tPA/plasmin and plasmin-dependent MMP activities and thus help expedite wound healing. In contrast to this scenario, under pathologic conditions, excessive PAI-1 contributes to excessive accumulation of collagen and other ECM protein in the wound area and thus preserves scarring. While the level of PAI-1 is significantly elevated in fibrotic tissues, lack of PAI-1 protects different organs from fibrosis in response to injury-related profibrotic signals. Thus PAI-1 is implicated in the pathology of fibrosis in different organs including the heart, lung, kidney, liver and skin. Paradoxically, PAI-1 deficiency promotes spontaneous cardiac-selective fibrosis. In this review we discuss the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of fibrosis in multiple organs. PMID:21465481

  17. Famous Americans: George Washington & Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    Introducing students in grade 1-3 to George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, this book presents thematic units that present biographical information, and literature links such as poems, songs, stories, cross-curricular activities, and hands-on reproducibles. Chapters in the book are: (1) Getting to Know George; (2) The Father and His Country; (3)…

  18. Famous Americans: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    This book provides background information and ideas for teaching about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln at the primary grade level. Cross-curricular activities include work in music, writing, art, research, plays, and games. A pull-out poster with a poem on "President's Day" is stapled in the center of the book. Chapters in the book are: (1)…

  19. Abraham Lincoln: American Lawyer-President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirck, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the most experienced trial lawyer Americans have ever placed in the White House. While more than half of the United State's presidents have been attorneys, none possessed Lincoln's extensive courtroom experience: approximately 3,800 known cases, litigated during a quarter century at the Illinois bar. However, the law's…

  20. Estimation of Abraham solvation equation coefficients for hydrogen bond formation from Abraham solvation parameters for solute acidity and basicity.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Abraham solvation equations find widespread use in environmental chemistry and pharmaco-chemistry. The coefficients in these equations, which are solvent (system) descriptors, are usually determined by fitting experimental data. To simplify the determination of these coefficients in Abraham solvation equations, this study derives equations, based on Abraham solvation parameters for hydrogen acidity and basicity of the solvents involved, to estimate the value of the coefficients for hydrogen bond formation. These equations were applied to calculate Abraham solvation parameters for hydrogen acidity and basicity for polyoxymethylene, polyacrylate, sodium dodecylsulfate, some ionic liquids, alkanoyl phosphatidyl cholines, and lipids for which fitted values for Abraham coefficients for hydrogen bond formation were available. PMID:22892357

  1. View southwest, buildings of the Abraham Cyrus Farmstead. (Left to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest, buildings of the Abraham Cyrus Farmstead. (Left to right in photograph: hen house, chicken shed, equipment shed, large tree at center foreground, barn, evergreen in yard, wash house, farmhouse - Abraham Cyrus Farmstead, 3271 Cyrus Road (County Road 1/6), Cyrus, Wayne County, WV

  2. Arabidopsis PAI gene arrangements, cytosine methylation and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Melquist, S; Luff, B; Bender, J

    1999-01-01

    Previous analysis of the PAI tryptophan biosynthetic gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that the Wassilewskija (WS) ecotype has four PAI genes at three unlinked sites: a tail-to-tail inverted repeat at one locus (PAI1-PAI4) plus singlet genes at two other loci (PAI2 and PAI3). The four WS PAI genes are densely cytosine methylated over their regions of DNA identity. In contrast, the Columbia (Col) ecotype has three singlet PAI genes at the analogous loci (PAI1, PAI2, and PAI3) and no cytosine methylation. To understand the mechanism of PAI gene duplication at the polymorphic PAI1 locus, and to investigate the relationship between PAI gene arrangement and PAI gene methylation, we analyzed 39 additional ecotypes of Arabidopsis. Six ecotypes had PAI arrangements similar to WS, with an inverted repeat and dense PAI methylation. All other ecotypes had PAI arrangements similar to Col, with no PAI methylation. The novel PAI-methylated ecotypes provide insights into the mechanisms underlying PAI gene duplication and methylation, as well as the relationship between methylation and gene expression. PMID:10471722

  3. Arabidopsis PAI gene arrangements, cytosine methylation and expression.

    PubMed

    Melquist, S; Luff, B; Bender, J

    1999-09-01

    Previous analysis of the PAI tryptophan biosynthetic gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that the Wassilewskija (WS) ecotype has four PAI genes at three unlinked sites: a tail-to-tail inverted repeat at one locus (PAI1-PAI4) plus singlet genes at two other loci (PAI2 and PAI3). The four WS PAI genes are densely cytosine methylated over their regions of DNA identity. In contrast, the Columbia (Col) ecotype has three singlet PAI genes at the analogous loci (PAI1, PAI2, and PAI3) and no cytosine methylation. To understand the mechanism of PAI gene duplication at the polymorphic PAI1 locus, and to investigate the relationship between PAI gene arrangement and PAI gene methylation, we analyzed 39 additional ecotypes of Arabidopsis. Six ecotypes had PAI arrangements similar to WS, with an inverted repeat and dense PAI methylation. All other ecotypes had PAI arrangements similar to Col, with no PAI methylation. The novel PAI-methylated ecotypes provide insights into the mechanisms underlying PAI gene duplication and methylation, as well as the relationship between methylation and gene expression. PMID:10471722

  4. Lorentz Abraham Force and Power Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    Toward the end of the nineteenth century Lorentz modeled the electron (“vibrating charged particle,” as he called it) by a spherical shell of uniform surface charge density and set about the difficult task of deriving the equation of motion of this electron model by determining, from Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force law, the retarded self electromagnetic force that the fields of the accelerating charge distribution exert upon the charge itself [1]. (This initial work of Lorentz in 1892 on a moving charged sphere appeared five years before J.J. Thomson's “discovery” of the electron. It is summarized in English by J.Z. Buchwald [2, app. 7].) With the help of Abraham,1 a highly successful theory of the moving electron model was completed by the early 1900's [3, 4]. Before Einstein's papers [5, 6] on special relativity appeared in 1905, they had derived the following force equation of motion

  5. Abraham Lincoln and the insanity plea.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D

    1994-06-01

    A confederate civilian physician shot and killed a white Union officer who was drilling Negro troops in Norfolk, Virginia. With no question as to guilt, President Abraham Lincoln decided to have a medical expert conduct a professional sanity/insanity examination. Documentation indicates that legal and political factors may have influenced Lincoln's decision. As a lawyer, Lincoln prosecuted a case where the insanity plea was used as a defense. Two influential Cabinet members, William H. Seward and Edwin M. Stanton, also had legal experience involving the insanity plea. Politically, Lincoln faced serious issues such as the draft riots, the military necessity to recruit slaves into the army, the impact of Union Negro soldiers upon the border states, the morale and discipline of the army and the upcoming presidential election. Upon Seward's recommendation, Lincoln chose a physician who had a reputation for finding the accused sane and who did so in this case. As the southern physician was hanged, Lincoln's means achieved the desired legal and political ends. PMID:8089270

  6. Abraham Lincoln and the global economy.

    PubMed

    Hormats, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Abraham Lincoln would have well understood the challenges facing many modern emerging nations. In Lincoln's America, as in many developing nations today, sweeping economic change threatened older industries, traditional ways of living, and social and national cohesion by exposing economies and societies to new and powerful competitive forces. Yet even in the midst of the brutal and expensive American Civil war--and in part because of it--Lincoln and the Republican Congress enacted bold legislation that helped create a huge national market, a strong and unified economy governed by national institutions, and a rising middle class of businessmen and property owners. Figuring out how to maximize the benefits of globalization while minimizing its disruptions is a formidable challenge for policy makers. How do you expand opportunities for the talented and the lucky while making sure the rest of society doesn't fall behind? It may be helpful to look at the principles that informed the policies that Lincoln and the Republican Congress instituted after they came to power in 1861: Facilitate the upward mobility of low- and middle-income groups to give them a significant stake in the country. Emphasize the good of the national economy over regional interests. Affirm the need for sound government institutions to temper the dynamics of the free enterprise system. Tailor policies to the national situation. Realize that a period of turmoil may present a unique opportunity for reform. These principles drove the reforms that helped Americans cope with and benefit from rapid technological advances and the fast integration of the American economy in the nineteenth century. They may be instructive to today's policy makers who are struggling to help their own citizens integrate into the fast-changing global economy of the twenty-first century. PMID:12884668

  7. The Enigmatic Savior of the Union: Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Ronald L.; Diamond, Linda W.

    Abraham Lincoln rose from the depths of obscurity to guide the United States successfully through the turbulent and menacing years of the Civil War. Laborer, businessman, postmaster, politician, and lawyer were some of the vocations, not all successful, that Lincoln tried during the years leading to his ascent to the Presidency. This review of the…

  8. "Happy Birthday, Mr. President!" New Books for Abraham Lincoln's Bicentennial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrell A.; Ward, Barbara A.; Day, Deanna

    2009-01-01

    Stories about Abraham Lincoln have captivated children for generations. The Lincoln story has taken on almost mythic proportions, making it difficult to separate fact from fiction or exaggeration. Young readers never tire of talking about Lincoln's early days--from his birth in a log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky to his childhood in…

  9. Our Own Pulitzer Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmon, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    A school board member in Gilman, Wisconsin, started a literary awards program to improve student writing. Students compete for prizes, and at the end of each year the winning entries are published in a literary magazine. (MLF)

  10. Breakthrough Prize for LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    A special Breakthrough Prize has been awarded to the 1000 scientists and engineers working on the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) for the discovery of gravitational waves.

  11. Energy conservation equation for a radiating pointlike charge in the context of the Abraham-Lorentz versus the Abraham-Becker radiation-reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, U.; Bornatici, M.

    1997-12-01

    With reference to a radiating pointlike charge, the energy conservation equation comprising the effect of the Abraham-Lorentz radiation-reaction force is contrasted with the incorrect energy conservation equation obtained by Hartemann and Luhmann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1107 (1995)] on considering instead the Abraham-Becker force that accounts only for a part of the instantaneous radiation-reaction force.

  12. Citations Prize 2010 Citations Prize 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2010 Citations Prize winners The winning authors Fernando Rannou (left), George Alexandrakis (holding the Rotblat Medal) and Arion Chatziioannou (right). The winner of the 2010 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2005-2009) is Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Authors: George Alexandrakis, Fernando R Rannou and Arion F Chatziioannou Reference: George Alexandrakis et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/44334). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  13. Abraham Lincoln, psychotherapist to the nation: the use of metaphors.

    PubMed

    Leetz, K L

    1997-01-01

    Metaphors are widely utilized in psychotherapy to effect change in patients. Psychotherapeutic metaphors, in their various versions, may offer new choices and ways of viewing oneself to the patient which are more palatable than straight discussions or sterile insights. By addressing resistances indirectly, metaphors can be an effective tool for the therapist to use, regardless of theoretical orientation. Abraham Lincoln, a master of metaphor, utilized this tool effectively in dealing with crises and the ultimate fragmentation, disunion of the national identity. The author argues that Lincoln was able to address complex issues (such as slavery, liberty, nationhood, union, and conduct of the war) with metaphors, much as a skilled psychotherapist addresses complex issues within his or her purview. Abraham Lincoln effectively disarmed his critics, established a means of communication with the people, and sought to make his points in an understandable nonconfrontational fashion. These are skills highly valued by psychotherapists. One might say that Abraham Lincoln conducted psychotherapy on a national scale. Without formal training, he was ultimately able to create a new and more stable sense of national self using a metaphorical approach. PMID:9139547

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor with very long half-life (VLHL PAI-1) can reduce bleeding in PAI-1-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) deficiency and proposes some novel treatments for this condition. PAI-1 is a fast acting inhibitor of tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA). PAI-1 controls/slows clot lysis triggered by tPA activated plasminogen. PAI-1 deficiency was once considered to be an extremely rare disorder characterized by frequent and prolonged bleeding episodes. PAI-1 deficiency is now thought to be more frequent than initially reported and is known to be caused by mutations in the PAI-1 gene that produce a dysfunctional PAI-1 protein or slow the secretion of PAI-1 into the circulation. PAI-1 deficiency is characterized by hyperfibrinolysis that results in frequent bleeding episodes. Patients with this condition form normal blood clots that are quickly lysed by unopposed tPA-activated plasmin. Spontaneous bleeding is rare in PAI-1 deficient patients, but moderate hemorrhaging of the knees, elbows, nose, and gums can be triggered by mild trauma. Additionally, prolonged bleeding after surgery is common and menstrual bleeding may be severe. Moderate PAI-1 deficiency is associated with a lifelong bleeding tendency, but severe deficiencies can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of this disorder remains challenging due to the lack of a clear definition of PAI-1 deficiency as well as a lack of standardized tests. Patients with mild PAI-1 deficiency may be treated with antifibrinolytic agents (ε-aminocaproic acid or tranexamic acid); however, not all patients respond well to these treatments. These patients may be treated with wild-type PAI-1; however, this molecule quickly converts into its inactive form. We propose to use PAI-1 with an extended half-life to treat these patients. PMID:23988002

  15. Citations Prize 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  16. Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  17. Citations Prize 2012 Citations Prize 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The authors of the winning paper. The authors of the winning paper. The winner of the 2012 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2007-2011) is Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization Authors: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan Reference: Emil Y Sidky and Xiaochuan Pan 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4777-807 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/51868). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Simon Cherry Editor-in-Chief Jon Ruffle Publisher

  18. The 2010 Broad Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  19. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  20. Unilateral coronal craniosynostosis in Abraham Lincoln and his family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2010-09-01

    Premature closure of one coronal skull suture produces a characteristic arching or relative elevation of the superior orbital rim on the involved side. This sign is associated with facial asymmetry, and both signs are usually the most conspicuous features in patients with mild unilateral coronal craniosynostosis. Photographs suggest that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family had premature closure of 1 coronal suture. In 8 males, there was involvement of the left side; in 1 female, there was involvement of the right side. PMID:20856045

  1. Abraham Flexner and the black medical schools. 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd

    2006-01-01

    "Abraham Flexner and the Black Medical Schools" first appeared in Beyond Flexner: Medical Education in the Twentieth Century, Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz, eds. Copyright 1992 by Barbara Barzansky and Norman Gevitz. Reproduced with permission of Greenwood Publishing Group Inc., Westport, CT. The article will be reprinted in a collection of the author's writings on African-American medical history called Race and Medicine in Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century America, to be published in December 2006 by Kent State University Press and published here with permission of the Kent State University Press. PMID:17019906

  2. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  3. Functional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer PAI.

    PubMed

    Passador, L; Tucker, K D; Guertin, K R; Journet, M P; Kende, A S; Iglewski, B H

    1996-10-01

    A series of structural analogs of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer [PAI, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone] were obtained and tested for their ability to act as autoinducers in stimulating the expression of the gene for elastase (lasB) by measuring beta-galactosidase production from a lasB-lacZ gene fusion in the presence of the transcriptional activator LasR. The data suggest that the length of the acyl side chain of the autoinducer molecule is the most critical factor for activity. Replacement of the ring O by S in the homoserine lactone moiety can be tolerated. Tritium-labelled PAI ([3H]PAI) was synthesized and used to demonstrate the association of [3H]PAI with cells overexpressing LasR. The PAI analogs were also tested for their ability to compete with [3H]PAI for binding of LasR. Results from the competition assays suggest that once again the length of the acyl side chain appears to be crucial for antagonist activity. The presence of the 3-oxo moiety also plays a significant role in binding since analogs which lacked this moiety were much less effective in blocking binding of [3H]PAI. All analogs demonstrating competition with PAI in binding to LasR also exhibited the ability to activate lasB expression, suggesting that they are functional analogs of PAI. PMID:8830697

  4. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  5. Theory and Experiment in the Quantum-Relativity Revolution (Pais History of Physics Prize 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Does new scientific knowledge come from theory (whose predictions are confirmed by experiment) or from experiment (whose results are explained by theory)? Either can happen, depending on whether theory is ahead of experiment or experiment is ahead of theory at a particular time. In the first case, new theoretical hypotheses are made and their predictions are tested by experiments. But even when the predictions are successful, we can't be sure that some other hypothesis might not have produced the same prediction. In the second case, as in a detective story, there are already enough facts, but several theories have failed to explain them. When a new hypothesis plausibly explains all of the facts, it may be quickly accepted before any further experiments are done. In the quantum- relativity revolution there are examples of both situations. Because of the two-stage development of both relativity (``special,'' then ``general'') and quantum theory (``old,'' then ``quantum mechanics'') in the period 1905-1930, we can make a double comparison of acceptance by prediction and by explanation. A curious anti-symmetry is revealed and discussed. )

  6. Abraham Lincoln did not have type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2009-10-20

    An autosomal dominant genetic disorder, type 5 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA5), occurs in multiple descendants of one paternal uncle and one paternal aunt of President Abraham Lincoln. It has been suggested that Lincoln himself had the disease and that his DNA should be tested for an SCA5-conferring gene. Herein, I review the pertinent phenotypes of Lincoln, his father, and his paternal grandmother, and conclude that 1) Lincoln's father did not have SCA5, and, therefore, that Lincoln was not at special risk of the disease; 2) Lincoln had neither subclinical nor visible manifestations of SCA5; 3) little evidence suggests SCA5 is a "Lincolnian" disorder; and 4) without additional evidence, Lincoln's DNA should not be tested for SCA5. PMID:19841386

  7. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  8. In Brief: Trieste Prize nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    Nominations for the 2008 Trieste Science Prize in Earth, space, ocean, and atmospheric sciences and in engineering sciences are being accepted through 31 January 2008. The prize has been established to give international recognition and visibility to outstanding scientific achievements made by scientists from developing countries. Candidates must be nationals of developing countries, and the prizes will only be awarded to individuals for scientific research of outstanding international merit carried out at institutions in developing countries. The prizes, each of which carries a US$50,000 monetary award, are administered by the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) and funded by Illycaffè in collaboration with the Trieste (Italy) Town Council and the Trieste International Foundation for Scientific Progress and Freedom. For more information, contact the TWAS Secretariat at prizes@twas.org.

  9. The Brain Prize 2011

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation awarded the inaugural Brain Prize 2011 to Péter Somogyi, Tamás Freund and György Buzsáki ‘for their wide-ranging, technically and conceptually brilliant research on the functional organization of neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex, especially in the hippocampus, a region that is crucial for certain forms of memory’. The present article highlights key findings and major conceptual contributions by these three scientists that were recognized by the award. PMID:21917323

  10. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  11. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  12. Optics pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Three physicists who carried out pioneering work in former industrial research labs have picked up this year's Nobel Prize for Physics. One half of the SEK 10m prize has been awarded to Charles Kao, 75, for his work at the UK-based Standard Telephones and Cables (STC) on the transmission of light in optical fibres, which underpinned the telecommunications revolution. The other half of the prize is shared between Willard Boyle, 85, and George Smith, 79, of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, US, for inventing the charge-coupled device (CCD) - an imaging semiconductor circuit that forms the basis of most digital cameras.

  13. EDITORIAL: The FDR Prize The FDR Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Shigeo

    2009-06-01

    From the 45 papers published in the year 2008 in Fluid Dynamics Research the following paper has been selected for the second FDR prize: 'Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis' by Adrian Constantin and Robin S Johnson, published in volume 40 (March 2008) pp 175-211. This paper takes, as its main theme, the analysis of the propagation of very long gravity waves in the ocean environment, with the possibility of applying the results to tsunamis. Both variable depth and some pre-existing vorticity are allowed in the model, but under the over-arching assumption of long waves; indeed, it is argued, the waves are so long that it is impossible for classical soliton theory to be the appropriate description of a developing tsunami. This aspect is supported by some simple scaling arguments, together with some observations associated with the tsunami of Boxing Day 2004. The formulation is based on two small scales: the slow scale on which the depth varies and the small amplitude of the wave (as initially generated in deep water). The technique adopted is that of matched asymptotic expansions. The solution, constructed for deep water, is not valid in suitably reduced depth of water; the solution in this shallow region (close inshore) is then matched to the deep-water solution. A novel feature of this work is the inclusion of a general distribution of vorticity in the absence of waves—intended to model the realistic ocean—which is based on the slow evolution scale for the bottom topography. Some general properties of such background flows are proved, and two specific examples have been obtained: constant vorticity everywhere (as far as the shoreline), and regions of isolated vorticity (for appropriate bottom profiles). The way in which the wave properties are modified in the presence of vorticity is described. The significant overall proposal in this theory, specifically applicable to tsunamis, is that it is

  14. An alternative Hamiltonian formulation for the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Ostrogradsky's method allows one to construct Hamiltonian formulation for a higher derivative system. An application of this approach to the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator yields the Hamiltonian which is unbounded from below. This leads to the ghost problem in quantum theory. In order to avoid this nasty feature, the technique previously developed in [7] is used to construct an alternative Hamiltonian formulation for the multidimensional Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator of arbitrary even order with distinct frequencies of oscillation. This construction is also generalized to the case of an N = 2 supersymmetric Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator.

  15. Detection of the Abraham force with a succession of short optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2012-08-01

    For over a century, two rival descriptions of electromagnetic field momentum in matter have coexisted, due to Abraham and Minkowski, respectively. We propose a setup for measuring the difference between Abraham's and Minkowski's predictions in optics. To wit, a setup is proposed in which the transient “Abraham force,” a consequence of the Abraham energy-momentum tensor of 1909, may be measured directly. We show that when a train of short laser pulses is sent through a fiber wound up on a cylindrical drum, the Abraham theory predicts a torque, which, by inserting realistic parameters, is found to be detectable. Indeed, the same torque when calculated with the Minkowski tensor takes the opposite sign. Numerical estimates show that with a typical torsion pendulum setup and standard laser parameters, the angular deflection is in the order of 10-3 rad, which is easily measurable and even visible to the naked eye. Although its prediction is a century old, the Abraham force has proven experimentally elusive, and to our knowledge no macroscopic experimental demonstration of the difference between the predictions of the two mentioned energy-momentum tensors exists at optical frequencies.

  16. Nobel Prize 2012: Haroche & Wineland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Iulia

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

  17. Legends about Legends: Abraham Eleazar's Adaptation of Nicolas Flamel.

    PubMed

    Priesner, Claus

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the relationship between three illustrated alchemical treatises, all of which are associated with Jewish adepts: the famous Le Livre des figures hieroglyphiques attributed to Nicolas Flamel, and two treatises published in 1735 in Erfurt-the Uraltes Chymisches Werckh and the Donum Dei. The Werckh is supposedly written by Rabbi Abraham Eleazar, while the Donum Dei is attributed to an ancient alchemist-cabalist, Rabbi Samuel Baruch. I argue that these authors are fictitious, and that both works were in fact written in the early eighteenth century by their supposed editor, the probably pseudonymous Julius Gervasius. Gervasius connects the Werckh with the legend of Nicolas Flamel by suggesting that it is based on the original, Jewish manuscript which helped Flamel to find the Stone of the Sages. Gervasius used various strategies to confer a sense of Jewish "authenticity" on these works, borrowing from contemporary (non-Jewish) perceptions of Jewish ritual, Hebrew language, and Christian Cabala. The Werckh also borrows and adapts a sequence of allegorical illustrations from those in pseudo-Flamel's Livre, and I compare the two sets of figures and, where possible, interpret them. I conclude that the later works in fact teach us far more about the state of alchemy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries than they do about either medieval alchemy or Judaism. PMID:27376176

  18. 2014 Lush Science Prize.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terry

    2015-11-01

    The Lush Prize supports animal-free testing by rewarding the most effective projects and individuals who have been working toward the goal of replacing animals in product or ingredient safety testing. A Background Paper is prepared each year, prior to the judging process, to provide the panel with a brief overview of current developments in the field of Replacement alternatives, particularly those relevant to the concept of toxicity pathways. This Background Paper includes information on recent work by the relevant scientific institutions and projects in this area, including AXLR8, OECD, CAAT, The Hamner Institutes, the Human Toxome Project, EURL ECVAM, ICCVAM, the US Tox21 Programme, the ToxCast programme, and the Human Toxicology Project Consortium. Recent developments in toxicity pathway research are also assessed by reviewing the relevant literature, with a view to presenting the two papers receiving the highest score to the judges for consideration. PMID:26551288

  19. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  20. Haagen-Smit Prize 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2014 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  1. Symmetric energy-momentum tensor: The Abraham form and the explicitly covariant formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We compare the known in literature, explicitly covariant 4-dimensional formula for the symmetric energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetic field in a medium and the energy-momentum tensor derived by Abraham in the 3-dimensional vector form. It is shown that these two objects coincide only on the physical configuration space Γ ¯ , formed by the field vectors and the velocity of the medium, which satisfy the Minkowski constitutive relations. It should be emphasized that the 3-dimensional vector formulae for the components of the energy-momentum tensor were obtained by Abraham only on Γ ¯ , and the task of their extension to the whole unconditional configuration space Γ was not posed. In order to accomplish the comparison noted above, we derive the covariant formula a new by another method, namely, by generalizing the Abraham reasoning. The comparison conducted enables one to treat the explicitly covariant formula as a unique consistent extension of the Abraham formulae to the whole configuration space Γ. Thus the question concerning the relativistic covariance of the original 3-dimensional Abraham formulae defined on Γ ¯ is solved positively. We discuss in detail the relativistic covariance of the 3-dimensional vector formulae for individual components of the 4-dimensional tensors in electrodynamics which is manifested in the form-invariance of these formulae under Lorentz transformations.

  2. Non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials à la Abraham-Moses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odake, Satoru; Sasaki, Ryu

    2013-10-01

    Abraham-Moses transformations, besides Darboux transformations, are well-known procedures to generate extensions of solvable potentials in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. Here we present the explicit forms of infinitely many seed solutions for adding eigenstates at arbitrary real energy through the Abraham-Moses transformations for typical solvable potentials, e.g., the radial oscillator, the Darboux-Pöschl-Teller, and some others. These seed solutions are simple generalisations of the virtual state wavefunctions, which are obtained from the eigenfunctions by discrete symmetries of the potentials. The virtual state wavefunctions have been an essential ingredient for constructing multi-indexed Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials through multiple Darboux-Crum transformations. In contrast to the Darboux transformations, the virtual state wavefunctions generate non-polynomial extensions of solvable potentials through the Abraham-Moses transformations.

  3. Karl Abraham's revolution of 1916: from sensual sucking to the oral-aggressive wish of destruction.

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The author argues that "The First Pregenital Stage of the Libido" (Abraham 1916-1917) expounds a new conception of orality, i.e., of purposeful oral aggression directed against an object during the first stage of psychic development. This conception is shown to be contrary to Freud's view of orality as elaborated in Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905), as well as in other writings of late 1914 and 1915. Abraham's conception ignores fundamental dimensions of Freud's thinking during these years, namely, the difference between autoerotism/narcissism and object love, on the one hand, and also between the leading role of sexuality and the secondary role of aggression, on the other. Thus, Abraham's thinking represents a basic theoretical change that had far-reaching consequences for psychoanalytic practice. PMID:22423435

  4. Particle theorists scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Every year the award of the Nobel Prize for Physics goes through a familiar pattern - a few days' heightened speculation, a warm congratulation and, more often than not, a trailing dispute. This year has been no exception. The three new laureates, whose predictions and concepts on symmetry breaking have become cornerstones of the Standard Model, had long been tipped to win at some point. Makoto Kobayashi, 64, of the KEK lab, and Toshihide Maskawa, 68, of the University of Kyoto, both in Japan, share one half of the SwKr 10m (about £800 000) prize for their work in 1972 on the mechanism of broken symmetry, which led to the prediction of a new family of quarks. Yoichiro Nambu, 87, of the University of Chicago in the US, wins the other half of the prize for realizing in 1960 how to apply spontaneous symmetry breaking to particle physics.

  5. U.S. Medical Education Reformers Abraham Flexner (1866-1959) and Simon Flexner (1863-1946).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin; Parker, Betty J.

    This paper (in the form of a dialogue) tells the stories of two members of a remarkable family of nine children, the Flexners of Louisville, Kentucky. The paper focuses on Abraham and Simon, who were reformers in the field of medical education in the United States. The dialogue takes Abraham Flexner through his undergraduate education at Johns…

  6. 3 CFR 8636 - Proclamation 8636 of March 4, 2011. 150th Anniversary of the Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proclamation 8636 of March 4, 2011. 150th Anniversary of the Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln 8636 Proclamation 8636 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8636 of March 4, 2011 Proc. 8636 150th Anniversary of the Inauguration of Abraham LincolnBy the President of the United States...

  7. Inhibition of PAI-1 Antiproteolytic Activity Against tPA by RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Damare, Jared; Brandal, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) inhibits the plasminogen activators: tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been correlated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Pharmacologically suppressing PAI-1 might prevent, or successfully treat PAI-1 related vascular diseases. This can potentially be accomplished by using small RNA molecules (aptamers). This study's goal is to develop RNA aptamers to a region of PAI-1 that will prevent the ability of PAI-1 to interact with the plasminogen activators. The aptamers were generated through a systematic evolution of ligands via exponential enrichment approach that ensures the creation of RNA molecules that bind to our target protein, PAI-1. In vitro assays were used to determine the effect of these aptamers on PAI-1's inhibitory activity. Three aptamers that bind to PAI-1 with affinities in the nanomolar range were isolated. The aptamer clones R10-4 and R10-2 inhibited PAI-1's antiproteolytic activity against tPA and disrupted PAI-1's ability to form a stable covalent complex with tPA. Increasing aptamer concentrations correlated positively with an increase in cleaved PAI-1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of RNA molecules that inhibit the antiproteolytic activity of PAI-1. PMID:24922319

  8. [The PAI-1 swing: microenvironment and cancer cell migration].

    PubMed

    Malo, Michel; Charrière-Bertrand, Cécile; Chettaoui, Chafika; Fabre-Guillevin, Elizabeth; Maquerlot, François; Lackmy, Alexandra; Vallée, Benoît; Delaplace, Franck; Barlovatz-Meimon, Georgia

    2006-12-01

    Cancer is a complex and dynamic process caused by a cellular dysfunction leading to a whole organ or even organism vital perturbation. To better understand this process, we need to study each one of the levels involved, which allows the scale change, and to integrate this knowledge. A matricellular protein, PAI-1, is able to induce in vitro cell behaviour modifications, morphological changes, and to promote cell migration. PAI-1 influences the mesenchymo-amaeboid transition. This matricellular protein should be considered as a potential 'launcher' of the metastatic process acting at the molecular, cellular, tissular levels and, as a consequence, at the organism's level. PMID:17126795

  9. The odd-order Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterov, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We consider a Hamiltonian formulation of the (2 n + 1)-order generalization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator with distinct frequencies of oscillation. This system is invariant under time translations. However, the corresponding Noether integral of motion is unbounded from below and can be presented as a direct sum of 2n one-dimensional harmonic oscillators with an alternating sign. If this integral of motion plays a role of a Hamiltonian, a quantum theory of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator faces a ghost problem. We construct an alternative canonical formulation for the system under study to avoid this nasty feature.

  10. The Netherlands' School Building Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents awardees of the Netherland's School Building Prize: those schools that have shown they can embrace new directions in school building design while adhering to budgetary limitations. Highlights general findings of the judges on school design and construct as presented by the 41 participating schools. (GR)

  11. 1993 Gordon Bell Prize Winners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, Alan H.; Simon, Horst; Heller, Don; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Gordon Bell Prize recognizes significant achievements in the application of supercomputers to scientific and engineering problems. In 1993, finalists were named for work in three categories: (1) Performance, which recognizes those who solved a real problem in the quickest elapsed time. (2) Price/performance, which encourages the development of cost-effective supercomputing. (3) Compiler-generated speedup, which measures how well compiler writers are facilitating the programming of parallel processors. The winners were announced November 17 at the Supercomputing 93 conference in Portland, Oregon. Gordon Bell, an independent consultant in Los Altos, California, is sponsoring $2,000 in prizes each year for 10 years to promote practical parallel processing research. This is the sixth year of the prize, which Computer administers. Something unprecedented in Gordon Bell Prize competition occurred this year: A computer manufacturer was singled out for recognition. Nine entries reporting results obtained on the Cray C90 were received, seven of the submissions orchestrated by Cray Research. Although none of these entries showed sufficiently high performance to win outright, the judges were impressed by the breadth of applications that ran well on this machine, all nine running at more than a third of the peak performance of the machine.

  12. A prize for membrane magic.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof "for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells". I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  13. Cosmic pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US, Adam Riess at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Brian Schmidt from the Australian National University, Weston Creek, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  14. [Two Nobel prizes for psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Knezević, Aleksandar; Knezević, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    It was pointed out that both Nobel prizes for medicine in the field of psychiatry have lost their importance in contemporary medicine. Modern achievements in psychiatry have suppresed both psychosurgery of Egas Moniz and malaria treatment of Wagner-Jauregg as methods in the treatment of mental diseases. PMID:19368289

  15. A Prize for Membrane Magic

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells”. I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  16. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: Children's Differentiation between Historical and Fantasy Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Kim, Angie L.; Schwalen, Courtney E.; Harris, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children…

  17. Abraham Lincoln--His Words and His World: a Unit Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Ronald L.; Diamond, Linda W.

    Planned for an eighth-grade classroom, this unit plan, consisting of 19 lesson plans on the topic of Abraham Lincoln, is based upon the fulfillment of 17 unit objectives. Each daily lesson plan specifies the following: lesson theme, learner objective, needed prerequisites, new vocabulary or terms, learning set/motivation, presentation of new…

  18. Anatomy of a Masterpiece: A Close Textual Analysis of Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slagell, Amy R.

    1991-01-01

    States that Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address is a recognized rhetorical masterpiece. Accounts for this recognition by examining the text microscopically. Uses the method of close textual analysis that explores the inner workings of the text to discover the complexity of Lincoln's masterwork. (PRA)

  19. Hereditary premature closure of a coronal suture in the Abraham Lincoln family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2013-10-01

    The most easily recognized facial features of unilateral premature closure of a coronal suture in the skull are an upward arching of the superior orbital rim and a smaller face on the involved side. Photographs indicate that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family showed this anomaly. PMID:23856133

  20. Abraham Baldwin: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series, No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Although his father was an illiterate blacksmith, Abraham Baldwin demonstrated how academic achievement opened opportunities in colonial society, and he later became a fervent missionary of public education. This booklet on Baldwin is one in a series on Revolutionary War soldiers who signed the U.S. Constitution. The booklet reviews his education,…

  1. An Interview with Abraham J. Tannenbaum: Innovative Programs for the Gifted and Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Sandra I.

    2002-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Abraham Tannenbaum, an author and leader of numerous research projects concerning gifted and talented students, discusses homeschooling, the impact of charter schools, magnet schools, and school choice on gifted education, the Ganiech psychosocial definition of giftedness, and the development of gifted programs. (Contains 7…

  2. Technology Staff-Development and Support Programs: Applying Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Pownell, David

    1998-01-01

    Presents Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs (physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, self-actualization) as a model for developing technology training and support for teachers, identifies basic technology-related needs that must be met before higher levels of technology integration can be achieved, and offers seven implications to help…

  3. Electromagnetic Momentum in Magnetic Media and the Abraham-Minkowski Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Lopez-Marino, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the consequences of a force density, [image omitted], studied by some authors, for the device designed by Lai (1980 "Am. J. Phys. 48" 658) to analyse which definition of electromagnetic momentum density, either Minkowski's or Abraham's, is consistent with mechanical torques that arise from the change in time of a magnetic field, which…

  4. In black South Africans from rural and urban communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphism influences PAI-1 activity, but not plasma clot lysis time.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R; Jerling, Johann C; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  5. In Black South Africans from Rural and Urban Communities, the 4G/5G PAI-1 Polymorphism Influences PAI-1 Activity, but Not Plasma Clot Lysis Time

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Zelda; Rijken, Dingeman C.; Hoekstra, Tiny; Conradie, Karin R.; Jerling, Johann C.; Pieters, Marlien

    2013-01-01

    Data on genetic and environmental factors influencing PAI-1 levels and their consequent effect on clot lysis in black African populations are limited. We identified polymorphisms in the promoter area of the PAI-1 gene and determined their influence on PAI-1act levels and plasma clot lysis time (CLT). We also describe gene-environment interactions and the effect of urbanisation. Data from 2010 apparently healthy urban and rural black participants from the South African arm of the PURE study were cross-sectionally analysed. The 5G allele frequency of the 4G/5G polymorphism was 0.85. PAI-1act increased across genotypes in the urban subgroup (p = 0.009) but not significantly in the rural subgroup, while CLT did not differ across genotypes. Significant interaction terms were found between the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI, waist circumference and triglycerides in determining PAI-1act, and between the 4G/5G polymorphism and fibrinogen and fibrinogen gamma prime in determining CLT. The C428T and G429A polymorphisms did not show direct relationships with PAI-1act or CLT but they did influence the association of other environmental factors with PAI-1act and CLT. Several of these interactions differed significantly between rural and urban subgroups, particularly in individuals harbouring the mutant alleles. In conclusion, although the 4G/5G polymorphism significantly affected PAI-1act, it contributed less than 1% to the PAI-1act variance. (Central) obesity was the biggest contributor to PAI-1act variance (12.5%). Urbanisation significantly influenced the effect of the 4G/5G polymorphism on PAI-1act as well as gene-environment interactions for the C428T and G429A genotypes in determining PAI-1act and CLT. PMID:24386152

  6. Special issue: Culham Thesis Prize winners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Culham Thesis Prize is awarded annually to the nominee who has displayed an excellence in the execution of the scientific method as witnessed by the award of Doctor of Philosophy in Plasma Science from a UK or Irish university. The thesis content should exhibit significant new work and originality, clearly driven by the nominee, be well explained and demonstrate a good understanding of the subject. The prize is awarded at the Institute of Physics Plasma Physics Group Spring Conference and the prize winner gives an invited talk about their thesis work. The prize is sponsored by Culham Centre for Fusion Energy.

  7. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists. PMID:24008752

  8. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He had laid foundations for our understanding of quantum matter like superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi liquid. Here we present some Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  9. Isolation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) from human placenta. Evidence for vitronectin/PAI-2 complexes in human placenta extract.

    PubMed

    Radtke, K P; Wenz, K H; Heimburger, N

    1990-12-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2), found in human placenta and pregnancy plasma, was prepared in a highly purified and functionally active form from human placenta. The purification was achieved by a combination of Rivanol and ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by chromatography on DEAE Affigel Blue, hydroxylapatite and phenylalanine-Sepharose. PAI-2, which is precipitated by low Rivanol concentrations, can be selectively redissolved from the pellet by increasing the Rivanol concentration in the presence of a reducing agent, i.e. dithiothreitol. The purified protein shows a molecular mass of 45 kDa in SDS PAGE, cross-reacts with monoclonal antibodies against PAI-2 (Mab'PAI-2), and inhibits the amidolytic activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) towards the chromogenic substrate Glu-Gly-Arg-pNA (S-2444). The specific activity of the purified inhibitor was 52,300 units/mg, attaining 71,000 units/mg in peak fractions. In the immunopurification of placental extract on anti-PAI-2 Sepharose, the eluate showed the expected reaction with Mab' PAI-2, and it also cross-reacted with anti-vitronectin serum. In order to complement these results, anti-vitronectin Sepharose was used for immunopurification of placenta extract. In Western Blot experiments the eluates of anti PAI-2 Sepharose and anti-vitronectin Sepharose both showed a heterogeneous pattern of high molecular weight bands recognized by either polyclonal antiserum against vitronectin or Mab'PAI-2. In either case, reduction of the eluates releases mainly a 45-kDa band, which is recognized by Mab'PAI-2, or 80-kDa and 76-kDa bands recognized by anti-serum against vitronectin. These data suggest that the predominant form of PAI-2 in placenta extract is heterogeneous and of high molecular mass, containing complexes in which vitronectin is covalently bound to PAI-2 by disulfide bridges. PMID:1708670

  10. Wear of short carbon-fiber-reinforced PAI and PPS

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.W.; Jerina, K.L.; Hahn, H.T.

    1988-07-01

    Wear of short carbon-fiber-reinforced polyamide-imide and polyphenylene sulfide is described. Comparative data from thrust washer wear tests for both polymers are presented. Fiber orientation is shown to have a significant effect on wear rates. The wear mechanisms in both polymers are illustrated with optical and scanning electron micrographs. Wear is shown to be a nonlinear function of time and stress for both PPS and PAI. 15 references, 14 figures.

  11. The 2006 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education is the nation's largest award in K-12 public education. The Broad Prize is given annually by The Broad Foundation in the form of scholarships to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing achievement gaps among ethnic…

  12. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  13. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  14. Reactivated recombinant plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rPAI-1) effectively prevents thrombolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, D E; Declerck, P J; Van Houtte, E; De Mol, M; Collen, D

    1992-07-01

    The effects of human recombinant plasminogen activator inhibitor (rPAI-1) on thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were studied in a rabbit model of jugular vein thrombosis. Two functionally distinct rPAI-1 preparations were used in these experiments, including latent rPAI-1 (approximately 2 units of t-PA neutralizing activity per micrograms protein) and reactivated rPAI-1 (approximately 150 units/micrograms). Simultaneous intravenous infusion over 4 h of 1.7 mg/kg of reactivated rPAI-1 (inhibitory capacity approximately 0.5 mg/kg rt-PA) with 0.5 mg/kg of rt-PA completely prevented lysis of a jugular venous thrombus, whereas an equivalent amount of latent PAI-1 did not significantly influence clot lysis. These findings demonstrate that reactivated human rPAI-1 efficiently neutralizes thrombolysis with rt-PA in vivo. Since previous studies have suggested that elevated endogenous levels of PAI-1 do not attenuate the thrombolytic potency of rt-PA in the endotoxin-treated model, we compared the stability of complexes formed by 125I-rt-PA with reactivated human rPAI-1 and with rabbit PAI-1 in vitro. Our findings indicate that both forms of PAI-1 form SDS-stable complexes following incubation with 125I-rt-PA. Thus, it seems likely that elevated levels of active PAI-1 can negate the thrombolytic effects of rt-PA in vivo and argues against the possibility that t-PA can dissociate from PAI-1 and have its activity restored in the presence of a thrombus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1514173

  15. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population

    PubMed Central

    White, Marquitta J.; Kodaman, Nuri M.; Harder, Reed H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Brown, Nancy J.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10−7). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway’s effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL). PMID:26322636

  16. Clinical impact of PAI 1 4G/5G gene polymorphism in colorectal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Halamkova, J; Kiss, I; Pavlovsky, Z; Tomasek, J; Jarkovsky, J; Cech, Z; Bednarova, D; Tucek, S; Hanakova, L; Moulis, M; Zavrelova, J; Man, M; Benda, P; Robek, O; Kala, Z; Penka, M

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator ihnibitor (PAI 1) belongs to the plasminogen activator system, which is part of the metastatic cascade and significantly contributes to invasive growth and angiogenesis of malignant tumors. Its plasma level is normally low but 4G/4G homozygotes have higher concentrations of PAI 1. This genotype may be associated with worse prognosis and proximal location of colorectal cancer than 5G/5G homozygotes. In our prospective evaluation we examined plasma level PAI 1 (using photometric microplate method ELISA) pre-surgery and, subsequently, 6-8 weeks later, from 80 patients. For the PAI 1 rs1799889 -675 4G/5G polymorphism test the PCR amplification was used.Analysis of collected data was confirmed that significantly higher plasma levels of PAI 1 were found in patients before starting therapy, which decreased (p=0.004) after initiation of treatment. Patients with higher plasma level PAI 1 before (p=0.013) and after therapy (p=0.004) had significantly shorter survival. We found no relationship between polymorphisms of PAI 1 (-675 4G/5G) in relation to stage, survival or tumor location. PAI 1 is useful as a negative marker of prognosis and could be advantageous when planning adjuvant treatment of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Although opinions on the importance of polymorphisms of PAI 1 in relation to the prognosis are not uniform, it does seem that their role in the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer is not essential. PMID:23259783

  17. Resveratrol suppresses PAI-1 gene expression in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NF κ B pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NF κ B inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity. PMID:23819014

  18. PAI-1 and TNF-α profiles of adipose tissue in obese cardiovascular disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic Gazioglu, Sema; Akan, Gokce; Atalar, Fatma; Erten, Gaye

    2015-01-01

    Obesity as a leading preventable cause of death worldwide is closely linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, a potent inhibitor of plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis, is increased in many clinical situations associated with high incidence of CVD. In the obesity-linked elevation of PAI-1, evidence points to TNF-α as an important regulator of PAI-1 expression in adipose tissue. Background: This study aims to evaluate mediastinal PAI-1 and TNF-α mRNA levels in adipose tissues (AT) and compare serum levels in obesity with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients and methods: Obese patients with (n=37) and without CAD (n=20) were included in the study. Results: The serum levels of PAI-1 and TNF-α were significantly higher in obese patients with CAD compared to obese patients without CAD. PAI-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of obese patients with CAD compared to those without CAD, TNF-α mRNA expressions were found to be higher in EAT (epicardial AT), MAT and SAT (subcutaneous AT) of obese patients with CAD. Conclusions: The study demonstrated a close direct relationship between TNF-α and PAI-1. PAI-1 mRNA expression strongly correlated positively with serum TNF-α in MAT, and TNF-α expressions with PAI-1 serum levels. PMID:26884864

  19. [Karl Sudhoff and the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on files in the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, this paper illuminates the Nobel Prize nominations for and by Karl Sudhoff from 1918 to 1923. He was nominated by Max Cloetta and Max Neuburger, and Sudhoff himself put forward Julius Hirschberg, Erwin Payr and Georg Sticker. Even though none of the proposals led to a prize, the nomination letters offer insights in the relationships between leading historians of medicine in the immediate post-war years. The study is part of a project exploring the construction and enactment of scientific excellence. PMID:26821496

  20. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2002-05-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded shares of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2001 to three scientists for their development of methods for the efficient catalytic production of just one member of a pair of enantiomers. One-half of the prize was divided equally between William S. Knowles and Ryoji Noyori. The other half of the prize was awarded to K. Barry Sharpless. This paper briefly discusses their discoveries and the significance of the discoveries. It includes an annotated bibliography of their most relevant and easily obtained publications.

  1. The Orthoworld Specialist Practitioner Prize Cases 2000.

    PubMed

    Johal, A

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic management of three diverse malocclusions that were awarded the Orthoworld Specialist Practitioner Prize (2000) and presented at the British Orthodontic Conference in Harrogate 2001. PMID:12444265

  2. Scientists share nobel prize for "nanoscopy".

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    Three scientists were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to developing super-resolved fluorescence microscopy, which allows biologists to study cells on a nanometer scale. PMID:25477087

  3. Plyler Prize and APS Fellow Introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Physics is delighted to announce the 2013 APS Fellows sponsored by DCP and to honor the 2014 Earl K. Plyler Prize Award winner. The new APS Fellows are: Ilan Benjamin, Hua Guo, Manos Mavrikakis, Josef Paldus, Joern Siepmann, Hans-Peter Steinrueck, Douglas Tobias, Angela Wilson, and Yijing Yan. The citations for each awardee will be read out loud. I will also introduce Prof. Lai-Sheng Wang of the Department of Chemistry at Brown University, who was awarded the 2014 Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics. Please come learn about these extraordinary scientists during this prize session. Prof. Wang's Plyler Prize talk will follow immediately after this introduction. For more information, see http://www.aps.org/units/dcp/.

  4. Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Celebrating optical nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrit, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the pioneers of various optical schemes capable of achieving super-resolution and single-molecule detection is recognition of a revolution in optical imaging.

  5. Nobel Prize 2014: Akasaki, Amano & Nakamura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources."

  6. Nobel Prize 2011: Perlmutter, Schmidt & Riess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  7. Fishman Receives the Shaw Prize for Astronomy

    NASA Video Gallery

    In the video, Dr. Jerry Fishman discusses his career as a scientist, his lifelong interest in science and his recognition as the 2011 Shaw Prize Recipient for Astronomy. Fishman is being recognized...

  8. Perspectives on 2014 Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-06-01

    In celebration of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, this issue of Hippocampus includes a collection of commentaries from a broad range of perspectives on the significance of position coding neurons in the hippocampal region. From the perspective of this student of hippocampal physiology, it is argued that place cells and grid cells reflect the outcome of experiments that strongly select the information available and correspondingly observe singular "trigger features" of these neurons. Notably, however, in more naturalistic situations where multiple dimensions of information are available, hippocampal neurons have mixed selectivity wherein population-firing patterns reflect the organization of many features of experience. Thus, while discoveries on position coding were major breakthroughs in penetrating the hippocampal code, future studies exploring more complex behaviors hold the promise of revealing the full contribution of the hippocampal region to cognition and memory. PMID:25787853

  9. Fullerene discoverers win nobel prize

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-10-16

    Two Rice University (Houston) chemists, Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley, and a scientist at the University of Sussex (Brighton, U.K.), Harold W. Kroto, have won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the joint discovery of buckminsterfullerenes - soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules. The novel form of carbon, which was initially synthesized by the scientists in 1985 as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} has led to the development of {open_quotes}an entirely new branch of chemistry... with consequences in such diverse areas as astrochemistry, superconductivity, and material chemistry/physics,{close_quotes} according to the Swedish Academy of Sciences (Stockholm). For chemists, the structure is {open_quotes}uniquely beautiful and satisfying,{close_quotes} the academy says.

  10. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  11. The role of Abraham Lincoln in securing a charter for a homeopathic medical college.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2002-10-01

    In 1854, Abraham Lincoln was retained to prepare a state legislative proposal to charter a homeopathic medical college in Chicago. This was a complex task in view of the deep-seated animosity between allopathic or orthodox medical practitioners and irregular healers. Homeopathy was regarded as a cult by the nascent American Medical Association. In addition, the poor reputation of medical education in the United States in general, further complicated the project. Lincoln and influential individuals in Illinois lobbied legislators and succeeded in securing the charter. Subsequently, the Hahnemann Homeopathic Medical College accepted its first class in 1860 and with its successors remained in existence for almost sixty-five years. PMID:12238734

  12. Templeton Prize again goes to physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeandron, Michelle

    2008-04-01

    The Polish mathematical physicist and former priest Michael Heller has been awarded this year's Templeton Prize. Heller, whose more than 40-year-long career has encompassed research in theology, philosophy, mathematics and cosmology, intends to use the £820 000 prize to found an interuniversity institute in Poland to investigate questions in science, theology and philosophy. Dubbed the "Copernicus Centre", the institute will be affiliated to the Jagiellonian University and the Pontifical Academy of Theology in Cracow.

  13. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  14. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    PubMed

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character. PMID:27256150

  15. Increased Umbilical Cord PAI-1 Levels in Placental Insufficiency Are Associated with Fetal Hypoxia and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seferovic, Maxim D.; Gupta, Madhulika B.

    2016-01-01

    In intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a subset of pregnancies undergoes placental vascular dysregulation resulting in restricted blood flow and fetal hypoxemia. Altered transcription of hypoxic regulated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with pregnancy complications and angiogenic regulation. Here we assessed circulating PAI-1 as an indicator of placental insufficiency. Venous umbilical PAI-1 of hypoxemic (VpO2 20 versus 35 mmHg, p < 0.0001) placental insufficient pregnancies (resistance index 0.9 versus 0.63, p < 0.05) (n = 18) was compared to controls (n = 12). PAI-1 was increased (~10-fold, p < 0.001) and had a positive predictive ratio of 6.7. Further, PAI-1 levels correlated to blood oxygen (r = −0.68, p < 0.0001). The plasma's angiogenic potency measured in vitro was associated with umbilical cord blood PAI-1 levels (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). This association was attenuated by PAI-1 inhibiting antibody (p < 0.001). The results demonstrate PAI-1 as a potential marker of placental insufficiency and identify its close association with pathological hypoxia and angiogenesis in a subset of growth restricted pregnancies. PMID:26903689

  16. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy." PMID:25521373

  17. Nuclear Fusion prize laudation Nuclear Fusion prize laudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, W.

    2011-01-01

    Clean energy in abundance will be of critical importance to the pursuit of world peace and development. As part of the IAEA's activities to facilitate the dissemination of fusion related science and technology, the journal Nuclear Fusion is intended to contribute to the realization of such energy from fusion. In 2010, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the IAEA journal. The excellence of research published in the journal is attested to by its high citation index. The IAEA recognizes excellence by means of an annual prize awarded to the authors of papers judged to have made the greatest impact. On the occasion of the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, Republic of Korea at the welcome dinner hosted by the city of Daejeon, we celebrated the achievements of the 2009 and 2010 Nuclear Fusion prize winners. Steve Sabbagh, from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York is the winner of the 2009 award for his paper: 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' [1]. This is a landmark paper which reports record parameters of beta in a large spherical torus plasma and presents a thorough investigation of the physics of resistive wall mode (RWM) instability. The paper makes a significant contribution to the critical topic of RWM stabilization. John Rice, from the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge is the winner of the 2010 award for his paper: 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' [2]. The 2010 award is for a seminal paper that analyzes results across a range of machines in order to develop a universal scaling that can be used to predict intrinsic rotation. This paper has already triggered a wealth of experimental and theoretical work. I congratulate both authors and their colleagues on these exceptional papers. W. Burkart Deputy Director General Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

  18. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  19. Deformation quantization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck fourth order oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra-Montiel, Jasel; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efraín

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the quantization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck fourth order oscillator within the framework of deformation quantization. Our approach exploits the Noether symmetries of the system by proposing integrals of motion as the variables to obtain a solution to the ⋆-genvalue equation, namely the Wigner function. We also obtain, by means of a quantum canonical transformation the wave function associated to the Schrödinger equation of the system. We show that unitary evolution of the system is guaranteed by means of the quantum canonical transformation and via the properties of the constructed Wigner function, even in the so called equal frequency limit of the model, in agreement with recent results.

  20. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  1. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... all types, as well as any prizes and awards from an employer to an employee in recognition of some... received as a prize or award, if (1) such prize or award was made primarily in recognition of past... fields; (2) the recipient was selected without any action on his part to enter the contest or...

  2. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... all types, as well as any prizes and awards from an employer to an employee in recognition of some... received as a prize or award, if (1) such prize or award was made primarily in recognition of past... fields; (2) the recipient was selected without any action on his part to enter the contest or...

  3. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  4. Aldosterone perturbs adiponectin and PAI-1 expression and secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Zhang, X-N; Pan, C-M; Sun, F; Zhu, D-L; Song, H-D; Chen, M-D

    2011-06-01

    Aldosterone is considered as a new cardiovascular risk factor that plays an important role in metabolic syndrome; however, the underlying mechanism of these effects is not clear. Hypoadiponectinemia and elevated circulating concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of aldosterone on the production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that aldosterone treatment inhibited adiponectin mRNA expression and secretion and simultaneously enhanced PAI-1 mRNA expression and secretion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone did not prevent aldosterone's effect on adiponectin or PAI-1 expression. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α produced dramatic synergistic effects on adiponectin and PAI-1 expression when added together with aldosterone. Furthermore, the effects of aldosterone on adiponectin and PAI-1 expression appear to be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) but not mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). These results suggest that the effects of aldosterone on adiponectin and PAI-1 production are one of the underlying mechanisms linking it to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. PMID:21667402

  5. A Brief Analysis of Abraham Maslow's Original Writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Nedra H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes Abraham Maslow's original writing of "Self-Actualizing People: A Study of Psychological Health." The review of literature in this article reveals that Maslow's hierarchy of needs have had profound effects in the area of psychology. In addition, the authors present information regarding self-actualized people, theorists of…

  6. In Favour of a Multi-Method Approach to Differentiation-Polarization Theory-Building: A Response to Abraham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtte, Mieke

    2007-01-01

    This response to the comment of Abraham on Van Houtte's study within the differentiation-polarization tradition discusses the difference between her quantitative study and the ethnographic tradition. The quantification of the polarization part of the theory--the anti-school culture--makes it possible to merge the differentiation-polarization…

  7. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  8. Abraham Lincoln's marfanoid mother: the earliest known case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B?

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2012-07-01

    The nature and cause of President Abraham Lincoln's unusual physical features have long been debated, with the greatest attention directed at two monogenic disorders of the transforming growth factor β system: Marfan syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B. The present report examines newly discovered phenotypic information about Lincoln's biological mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, and concludes that (a) Lincoln's mother was skeletally marfanoid, (b) the President and his mother were highly concordant for the presence of numerous facial features found in various transforming growth factor β disorders, and (c) Lincoln's mother, like her son, had hypotonic skeletal muscles, resulting in myopathic facies and 'pseudodepression'. These conclusions establish that mother and son had the same monogenic autosomal dominant marfanoid disorder. A description of Nancy Hanks Lincoln as coarse-featured, and a little-known statement that a wasting disease contributed to her death at age 34, lends support to the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B hypothesis. PMID:22504423

  9. Abraham Lincoln's blue pills. Did our 16th president suffer from mercury poisoning?

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, N; Feldman, R G; Greaves, I A

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that Abraham Lincoln took a medicine called "blue mass" or "blue pill," commonly prescribed in the 19th century. What is now hardly known is that the main ingredient of blue mass was finely dispersed elemental mercury. As his friends understood, mercury was often prescribed for melancholy or "hypochondriasis," a condition Lincoln famously endured. Mercury in the form of the blue pill is a potential neurotoxin, which we have demonstrated by recreating and testing the recipe. We present the testimony of many of Lincoln's contemporaries to suggest that Lincoln suffered the neurobehavioural consequences of mercury intoxication but, perhaps crucial to history, before the main years of his presidency; he was astute enough to recognize the effects and stop the medication soon after his inauguration. PMID:11482002

  10. Abraham Flexner and the Development of the Yale School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prutkin, Jordan M.

    2010-01-01

    Abraham Flexner first toured the Yale University School of Medicine in preparation for his report of 1910, but it was just the beginning of his relationship with the school. While his review of Yale in his report was generally favorable, he mentioned several shortfalls that needed to be improved to make the school acceptable. Throughout the next twenty-five years, Flexner worked with Deans George Blumer and Milton C. Winternitz to improve the school’s finances, infrastructure, and quality of education through his work with the Carnegie Foundation and General Education Board. Flexner has been given great accolades for his work on medical education for the country, but little mention is made of him at Yale, even though he was one of the most influential figures in the development of Yale in the last century. PMID:20885903

  11. Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions.

    PubMed

    Meladze, Pikria; Brown, Jac

    2015-10-01

    This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonegativity was predicted by the main Abrahamic faiths (i.e. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and internalized shame. Qualitative analysis showed that gay men who adhere to a monotheistic religious faith follow a different path to reconciling their religion and homosexuality compared to gay men who adhere to Philosophical/New Age religions or to gay men who have no religious faith. The implications of these findings as well as directions for future research studies were discussed. PMID:25772199

  12. [Space coding: a Nobel prize diary].

    PubMed

    Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2015-02-01

    The Nobel Prize in Medecine or Physiology for 2014 has been awarded to three neuroscientists: John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser for "their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain". This rewards innovative ideas which led to the development of intracerebral recording techniques in freely moving animals, thus providing links between behavior and physiology. This prize highlights how neural activity sustains our ability to localize ourselves and move around in the environment. This research provides key insights on how the brain drives behavior. PMID:25744268

  13. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Niamh M.; Joyce, Myles R.; Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M.

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  14. Cholesterol diet enhances daily rhythm of Pai-1 mRNA in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Nakayama, Emiko; Suzuki, Sawako; Akiyama, Masashi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2004-10-01

    Myocardial infarction frequently occurs in the morning, a phenomenon in part resulting from the downregulation of fibrinolytic activity. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key factor behind fibrinolytic activity, and its gene expression is controlled under the circadian clock gene in the mouse heart and liver. Hypercholesterolemia has been associated with impaired fibrinolysis due to enhanced PAI-1 activity, which has also been implicated in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to decipher whether the Pai-1 gene is still expressed daily with hypercholesterolemia. Hypercholesterolemia (1% cholesterol diet) did not significantly affect the daily expression of clock genes (Per2 and Bmal1) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp and E4bp4) in the liver (P > 0.05); however, daily expression of the Pai-1 gene and Pai-1 promoter regulating factor genes such as Nr4a1 was significantly upregulated (P < 0.01). Daily restricted feeding for 4 h during the day reset the gene expression of Per2, Pai-1, Nr4a1, and Tnf-alpha. Lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the location of the main clock system, led to loss of Per2 and Pai-1 daily expression profiles. In the present experiments, we demonstrated that hypercholesterolemia enhanced daily expression of the Pai-1, Tnf-alpha, and Nr4a1 genes in the mouse liver without affecting clock and clock-controlled genes. Therefore, the risk or high frequency of acute atherothrombotic events in the morning still seems to be a factor that may be augmented under conditions of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15361354

  15. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  16. Therapeutic Assessment in Psychological Triage Using the PAI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Morey, Leslie C

    2016-01-01

    This case illustrates the utility of incorporating therapeutic assessment in a triage context that typically involves a focus on gathering information. A man referred to our clinic by a local mental health center was seen by our assessment team for a triage that includes the administration of a single psychological test, the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). Although this triage must rapidly gather information to determine client suitability and treatment assignment, we still attempt to work with clients to collaboratively develop goals for this assessment that include addressing questions that are central concerns for the clients. In this case, the test results suggested a severe disorder that accounted for many phenomena that he had been experiencing but had apparently been reluctant to share. The information gathered led to a referral to a different treatment program that could provide pharmacological and more intensive forms of treatment. However, the collaborative bond formed between the assessor and the client during this triage was sufficiently strong that it was our assessor to whom the client turned in a subsequent crisis precipitated by a symptomatic exacerbation. This case illustrates complementary information gathering and therapeutic goals of assessment even in the context of a brief assessment. PMID:26730992

  17. The 2007 Broad Prize for Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The $1 million Broad Prize in Urban Education, the nation's largest K-12 public education award given annually by The Broad Foundation, is awarded to urban school districts that demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student achievement while reducing income and ethnic achievement gaps. One hundred of the largest urban…

  18. Therapeutic Pneumothorax and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Polianski, Igor J

    2015-08-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, the epidemic proportions of tuberculosis puzzled great parts the scientific community. Thus it is not surprising that well-known scholars who worked on particularly promising solutions to fight the disease were nominated for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, perhaps the most prestigious benchmark of scientific excellence. The authors have gathered files on the Italian phtisiologist Carlo Forlanini (1847 to 1918) at the Nobel Prize archive for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden. Drawing on these files and contemporary publications, the authors discuss the origin of artificial pneumothorax for treating pulmonary tuberculosis, show how it became an international gold standard operation, and trace why the Nobel committee finally chose not to award Forlanini. Twenty Nobel Prize nominations for Forlanini were submitted from 1912 to 1919 exclusively by Italian scholars. In 1913 and 1914, Forlanini was on the shortlist of the Nobel Committee and thus one of the prime candidates for the prestigious prize. Important aspects of the rise, fall, and revival of the artificial pneumothorax from 1815 to 2015 are highlighted along with its benefits and risks. PMID:26234863

  19. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    PubMed

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006. PMID:25894471

  20. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:24668222

  1. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:27040677

  2. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    PubMed

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006. PMID:23579987

  3. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  4. It's No Secret: Progress Prized in Brownsville

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article features Brownsville Independent School District which was awarded the prestigious 2008 Broad Prize for Urban Education for being the nation's most improved urban school district. The Texas border district sees teacher training and data-based instruction as paths to learning gains--and the $1 million Broad award adds validation. In…

  5. How Einstein Got the Nobel Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pais, Abraham

    1982-01-01

    Discusses why the Nobel Committee for Physics waited so long before giving Einstein the Nobel Prize and why they did not award it for relativity, but for the photoelectric effect instead. Focuses on the judgments of leading scientists who made nominations as well as committee members' decisions. (Author/JN)

  6. Nobel Prize 2013: Englert and Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alison

    2013-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider".

  7. Nobel Prizes and the emerging virus concept.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Erling

    2008-01-01

    The existence of infectious agents smaller than bacteria was demonstrated already during the 1890s. After this discovery it took more than 50 years before a resilient definition of viruses could be given. There were separate developments of knowledge concerning plant viruses, bacterial viruses and animal viruses. In the mid-1930s, Wendell Stanley at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research at Princeton described the purification and crystallization of tobacco mosaic virus. The finding of an "infectious protein" led to him receiving a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1946. In studies initiated at the end of the 1930s, bacteriophages were used as a model for replicating genes. They led to important insights into the unique characteristics of virus-cell interactions. However, an understanding of the chemical nature of animal virus particles and their mode of replication was slow in coming. Not until the early 1950s did tissue culture techniques become available, which allowed studies also of an extended number of animal viruses. This article discusses the emergence of concepts which eventually allowed a description of viruses. The unique real-time analyses of the state of knowledge provided by the Nobel Prize archives were used in the investigation. These archives remain secret for 50 years. Besides all of the underlying documents of the Prize to Stanley, comprehensive investigations made in the mid 1950s of Seymour E. Cohen, Max Delbrück, Alfred D. Hershey and Salvador D. Luria (the latter three received a Prize in Medicine in 1969) and of André Lwoff (he shared a Prize in Medicine with Francois Jacob and Jaques Monod in 1965) were reviewed. The final phase of the evolution of our understanding of the virus concept closely paralleled the eventual insight into the chemical nature of the genetic material. Understanding the principle nature of barriers to the development of new concepts is of timeless value for fostering and facilitating new discoveries in science

  8. Basic Equations and Constitutive Equations of Micropolar Magnetic Fluids with E-BAnalogy and the Abraham Expression of Electromagnetic Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Yasushi

    A complete set of basic equations for magnetic fluids with internal rotation is proposed in this paper. The basic equations are derived from the conservation laws of mass, linear momentum, angular momentum and energy, while the constitutive equations are obtained by the thermodynamical method that is based on the free energy and the dissipation function. The concrete expression of constitutive equations are determined by the principle of material frame indifference and the principle of maximal dissipation rate. The Abraham expression of the electromagnetic momentum and E-Banalogy are adopted in this theory. It is shown that the difference in the basic equations in case of adopting the Abraham expression and the Minkowski expression, respectively. The constitutive equation of magnetization which includes the Shliomis relaxation equation (1972) is proposed.

  9. First Calderón Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  10. PAI-1 over-expression decreases experimental post-thrombotic vein wall fibrosis by a non-vitronectin dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Ballard-Lipka, Nicole L.; Roelofs, Karen J.; Farris, Diana M.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Henke, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Factors associated with post-thrombotic syndrome are known clinically, but the underlying cellular processes at the vein wall are not well-delineated. Prior work suggests that vein wall damage does not correlate with thrombus resolution, but rather with plasminogen activator-1 (PAI-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Objective We hypothesized that PAI-1 would confer post venous thrombosis (VT) vein wall protection via a Vitronectin (Vn) dependent mechanism. Methods A stasis model of VT was used with harvest over 2 weeks, in wild type (WT), Vn−/−, and PAI-1 overexpressing mice (PAI-1 Tg). Results PAI-1 Tg mice had larger VT at 6 and 14 days, compared to controls, but Vn−/−mice had no alteration of VT resolution. Gene deletion of Vn resulted in increased, rather than expected decrease in circulating PAI-1 activity. While both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg had attenuated intimal fibrosis, PAI-1 Tg had significantly less vein wall collagen and a compensatory increase in collagen III gene expression. Both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg vein wall had less monocyte chemotactic factor-1, and fewer macrophages (F4/80), with significantly less MMP-2 activity and decreased TIMP-1 antigen. Ex vivo assessment of TGFβ mediated fibrotic response showed that PAI-1 Tg vein walls had increased profibrotic gene expression (collagen I, III, MMP-2 and α-SMA) as compared with controls, opposite of the in vivo response. Conclusions The absence of Vn increases circulating PAI-1, which positively modulates vein wall fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner. Translationally, PAI-1 elevation may decrease vein wall damage after DVT, perhaps by decreasing macrophage-mediated activities. PMID:24943740

  11. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines. PMID:21950238

  12. [The 2008 Nobel Prizes in medicine and physiology].

    PubMed

    Valdespino, José Luis; Ponce-de-León, Samuel; de Lourdes Garcia, María

    2009-01-01

    For the last century, the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine has been awarded worldwide to significant discoveries. The prize allows the dissemination of information on the achievements of recipients, promotes understanding of scientific knowledge among the public and attracts young students to biomedical research. This paper briefly describes the prizes granted to the fields of physiology and medicine, emphasizing those that related to development of vaccines. PMID:19685833

  13. Structural and Functional Evidence for Bacillus subtilis PaiA as a Novel N1-spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Lee, I.; Vujcic, J.; Vujcic, S.; Shen, J.; Vorobiev, S.; Xiao, R.; Acton, T.; Montelione, G.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis PaiA has been implicated in the negative control of sporulation as well as production of degradative enzymes. PaiA shares recognizable sequence homology with N-acetyltransferases, including those that can acetylate spermidine/spermine substrates (SSATs). We have determined the crystal structure of PaiA in complex with CoA at 1.9 Angstrom resolution and found that PaiA is a member of the N-acetyltransferase superfamily of enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observed the binding of an oxidized CoA dimer in the active site of PaiA, and the structural information suggests the substrates of the enzyme could be linear, positively charged compounds. Our biochemical characterization is also consistent with this possibility since purified PaiA possesses N1-acetyltransferase activity towards polyamine substrates including spermidine and spermine. Further, conditional over-expression of PaiA in bacteria results in increased acetylation of endogenous spermidine pools. Thus, our structural and biochemical analyses indicate that PaiA is a novel N-acetyltransferase capable of acetylating both spermidine and spermine. In this way, the pai operon may function in regulating intracellular polyamine concentrations and/or binding capabilities. In addition to preventing toxicity due to polyamine excess, this function may also serve to regulate expression of certain bacterial gene products such as those involved in sporulation.

  14. Abraham Lincoln loses a medical malpractice case, debates Stephen A. Douglas, and secures two murder acquittals.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2004-02-01

    An improperly healed fracture was the most common reason for the medical malpractice crisis between the 1830s and 1860s in the United States. As a practicing lawyer in Illinois, Abraham Lincoln defended physicians in medical malpractice law suits. One of these was Dr. Powers Ritchey, who was sued for malpractice in 1855. Lincoln agreed to represent Dr. Ritchey in 1858 as the case was appealed to the supreme court of Illinois. In the interim, Lincoln defended two indicted murderers and won acquittals for both. Between the two murder trials, Lincoln debated Stephen A. Douglas while running for U.S. Senator from Illinois. Lincoln believed that Ritchey's case was poorly represented in the lower court. Ritchey's prior attorneys did not file a bill of exceptions to the testimony of the plaintiff's expert medical witnesses. Lincoln attempted to rebut the allegation of a lack of reasonable medical care and diligence by Ritchey, and he sought to secure a new trial for his client. In its decision, the supreme court of Illinois did not find any error and affirmed the lower court's judgment. PMID:14768936

  15. Abraham Lincoln and Harry Potter: children's differentiation between historical and fantasy characters.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Kathleen H; Kim, Angie L; Schwalen, Courtney E; Harris, Paul L

    2009-11-01

    Based on the testimony of others, children learn about a variety of figures that they never meet. We ask when and how they are able to differentiate between the historical figures that they learn about (e.g., Abraham Lincoln) and fantasy characters (e.g., Harry Potter). Experiment 1 showed that both younger (3- and 4-year-olds) and older children (5-, 6-, and 7-year-olds) understand the status of familiar figures, correctly judging historical figures to be real and fictional figures to be pretend. However, when presented with information about novel figures embedded in either a realistic narrative or a narrative with obvious fantasy elements, only older children used the narrative to make an appropriate assessment of the status of the protagonist. In Experiment 2, 3-, and 4-year-olds were prompted to judge whether the story events were really possible or not. Those who did so accurately were able to deploy that judgment to correctly assess the status of the protagonist. PMID:19766203

  16. A new prize system for drug innovation.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin; Chernyak, Nadja

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new prize (reward) system for drug innovation which pays a price based on the value of health benefits accrued over time. Willingness to pay for a unit of health benefit is determined based on the cost-effectiveness ratio of palliative/nursing care. We solve the problem of limited information on the value of health benefits by mathematically relating reward size to the uncertainty of information including information on potential drug overuse. The proposed prize system offers optimal incentives to invest in research and development because it rewards the innovator for the social value of drug innovation. The proposal is envisaged as a non-voluntary alternative to the current patent system and reduces excessive marketing of innovators and generic drug producers. PMID:21724290

  17. New AGU Climate Communication Prize: Call for nominations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the newly launched AGU Climate Communication Prize. This new Union prize, generously funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo., will honor an AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science. The prize highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change. The prize will be awarded annually and will be presented at AGU's Fall Meeting. It will carry a cash award of $25,000.

  18. Inhibition of PAI-1 Limits Tumor Angiogenesis Regardless of Angiogenic Stimuli in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yusuke; Hattori, Noboru; Hamada, Hironobu; Masuda, Takeshi; Omori, Keitaro; Akita, Shin; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-06-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignant tumor that secretes various angiogenic factors. The main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, PAI-1 (SERPINE1), has been implicated in tumor progression and angiogenesis, and high PAI-1 expression has been associated with poor prognosis in MPM patients. In this study, we examined the antiangiogenic effects of PAI-1 inhibition in MPM. We administered the PAI-1 inhibitor, SK-216, to orthotopic mouse models in which MPM cells expressing high levels of VEGF (VEGFA) or bFGF (FGF2) were intrapleurally transplanted. SK-216 administration reduced tumor weights and the degree of angiogenesis in intrapleural tumors, irrespective of their angiogenic expression profiles. In addition, a combination of SK-216 and the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin significantly reduced tumor weights compared with monotherapy, prolonging the survival of animals compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Furthermore, SK-216 inhibited migration and tube formation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by various angiogenic factors known to be secreted by MPM. These findings suggest that PAI-1 inactivation by SK-216 may represent a general strategy for inhibiting angiogenesis, including for the treatment of MPM. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3285-94. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197170

  19. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  20. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct. PMID:26743401

  1. Maria Goeppert Mayer and the Nobel Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karen E.

    2013-04-01

    When Maria Goeppert Mayer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, she was only the second woman to receive that award and there have been no additional female physics laureates since. Mayer was uniquely prepared to carry out her prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. Furthermore, she worked with some of the most well-known figures in mid-twentieth century physics, and her award came at a time when American science was in ascendance. Why, then, is her name so little known beyond the physics community? There are several possible answers to this question, ranging from the personal (her modest reaction to public acclaim) and the scientific (the mathematically abstract nature of her prize-winning work), to the national (the nature of the issues commanding public attention in the 1960s). In this talk I will present an overview of the circumstances that enabled Mayer to make exceptional contributions to nuclear physics, and then examine some of the possible reasons why her exceptional status is not more widely known.

  2. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  3. HIF-2alpha-dependent PAI-1 induction contributes to angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, Theresa; Döring, Claudia; Popp, Rüdiger; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehne, Nathalie; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Hypoxia promotes progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), not only affecting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, but also angiogenesis and thus, increasing the risk of metastasis. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF)-1α and -2α cause adaptation of tumors to hypoxia, still with uncertainties towards the angiogenic switch. We created a stable knockdown of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HepG2 cells and generated cocultures of HepG2 spheroids with embryonic bodies as an in vitro tumor model mimicking the cancer microenvironment. The naturally occuring oxygen and nutrient gradients within the cocultures allow us to question the role of distinct HIF isoforms in regulating HCC angiogenesis. In cocultures with a HIF-2α knockdown, angiogenesis was attenuated, while the knockdown of HIF-1α was without effect. Microarray analysis identified plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) as a HIF-2α target gene in HepG2 cells. The knockdown of PAI-1 in HepG2 cells also lowered angiogenesis. Blocking plasmin, the downstream target of PAI-1, with aprotinin in HIF-2α knockdown (k/d) cells proved a cause–effect relation and restored angiogenesis, with no effect on control cocultures. Suggestively, HIF-2α increases PAI-1 to lower concentrations of active plasmin, thereby supporting angiogenesis. We conclude that the HIF-2α target gene PAI-1 favors the angiogenic switch in HCC. - Highlights: • HepG2 were cocultured with stem cells to mimic a cancer microenvironment in vitro. • A knockdown of HIF-2α reduces angiogenesis. • PAI-1 was identified as a HIF-2α target gene in HCC by microarray analysis. • HIF-2α induces the angiogenic switch via inhibition of plasmin.

  4. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Andrew ML; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma. PMID:18854052

  5. 29 CFR 778.330 - Prizes or contest awards generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prizes or contest awards generally. 778.330 Section 778.330 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.330...

  6. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prizes and awards. 1.74-1 Section 1.74-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.74-1 Prizes and awards. (a) Inclusion in gross income. (1) Section...

  7. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  8. Nominations sought for the 2016 Haagen-Smit Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    We, the editors and publishers of Atmospheric Environment invite our readers to nominate papers for the 2016 "Haagen-Smit Prize". The prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution.

  9. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  10. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    2006 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following ten articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2006 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: D W Mundy et al 2006 Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377-91 Y Yang et al 2006 Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1649-59 M Krämer and M Scholz 2006 Rapid calculation of biological effects in ion radiotherapy Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1959-70 P Crespo et al 2006 On the detector arrangement for in-beam PET for hadron therapy monitoring Phys. Med. Biol. 51 2143-63 R J Senden et al 2006 Polymer gel dosimeters with reduced toxicity: a preliminary investigation of the NMR and optical dose-response using different monomers Phys. Med. Biol. 51 3301-14 J Wang et al 2006 FDTD calculation of whole-body average SAR in adult and child models for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4119-27 C A T Van den Berg et al 2006 The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies Phys. Med. Biol. 51 4735-46 S Qin and K W Ferrara 2006 Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5065-88 R Kramer et al 2006 Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6265-89 R Leiderman et al 2006 Coupling between elastic strain and interstitial fluid flow: ramifications for poroelastic imaging Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6291-313 An IPEM college of jurors then assessed and rated these papers in order to choose a winner. We have much

  11. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    2005 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following 14 articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2005 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: P Kundrát et al 2005 Probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation by ionizing particles Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1433-47 D Arora et al 2005 Direct thermal dose control of constrained focused ultrasound treatments: phantom and in vivo evaluation Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1919-35 J S Dysart et al 2005 Characterization of Photofrin photobleaching for singlet oxygen dose estimation during photodynamic therapy of MLL cells in vitro Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2597-616 M Defrise et al 2005 Fourier rebinning of time-of-flight PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2749-63 Z Su et al 2005 Systematic investigation of the signal properties of polycrystalline HgI2 detectors under mammographic, radiographic, fluoroscopic and radiotherapy irradiation conditions Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2907-28 E Bräuer-Krisch et al 2005 New irradiation geometry for microbeam radiation therapy Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3103-11 H C Pyo et al 2005 Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3183-96 R P Findlay et al 2005 Effects of posture on FDTD calculations of specific absorption rate in a voxel model of the human body Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3825-35 G Alexandrakis et al 2005 Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 J Keshvari et al 2005 Comparison of radio frequency energy absorption in ear and eye region of children and adults at 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4355-69 J Laufer et al 2005 In vitro measurements of absolute blood

  12. Effect of Reinforcement Probability and Prize Size on Cocaine and Heroin Abstinence in Prize-Based Contingency Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2008-01-01

    Although treatment outcome in prize-based contingency management has been shown to depend on reinforcement schedule, the optimal schedule is still unknown. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (Ghitza et al., 2007) to determine the effects of the probability of winning a prize (low vs. high) and…

  13. Inaugural Climate Communications Prize winner announced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris; Fine, Rana

    2011-10-01

    In recognition of Gavin Schmidt's exceptional work as a climate communicator, AGU has selected him as the recipient of its inaugural Climate Communications Prize. Schmidt is a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate.org blog. RealClimate.org covers areas of science related to climate—from present-day measurements to paleoclimate proxies, from natural climate variation to anthropogenic change. Schmidt has also worked with photographers on a popular science book, on museum exhibits, and on online courses and has often appeared on TV and radio and in print.

  14. The ternary complex factor Net regulates cell migration through inhibition of PAI-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Buchwalter, Gilles; Gross, Christian; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2005-12-01

    Net, Elk-1, and Sap-1 are members of the ternary complex factor (TCF) subfamily of Ets transcription factors. They form ternary complexes with serum response factor (SRF) on serum response elements of immediate early genes such as c-fos and egr-1 and mediate responses to growth factors and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Although the TCFs have been extensively studied as intermediates in signaling cascades, surprisingly little is known about their different target genes and physiological functions. We report that Net homozygous mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have a defect in cell migration. This defect results at least in part from increased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that controls extracellular proteolysis and cell matrix adhesion. The defect in cell migration can be reverted by the addition of a PAI-1 blocking antibody. Net represses PAI-1 promoter activity and binds to a specific region of the promoter containing Ets binding sites in the absence of SRF. We conclude that Net is a negative regulator of PAI-1 expression and is thereby involved in cell migration. PMID:16314510

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-I lectin gene molecular analysis and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Avichezer, D; Gilboa-Garber, N; Garber, N C; Katcoff, D J

    1994-05-17

    This communication describes a Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA fragment (cloned in lambda gt11) which contains the structural gene coding for the galactophilic PA-I lectin (pa-1L, 369 bp) and an additional downstream 237 bp sequence. This DNA is relatively rich in G + C (54%), and exhibits a strong codon preference biased for XXC and also for XXG. The Shine-Dalgarno site of the gene is preceded by an adjacent ATATAT sequence resembling the -10 sequence of the Escherichia coli promoter. The stop codons are followed by a stem and loop structure--typical of the rho-independent transcriptional stop element. This lambda gt11-cloned DNA was expressed in E. coli Y1090 cells. The resulting cell lysates exhibited a galactose-specific hemagglutination and a protein with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of the native PA-I, which were both absent from E. coli lysates infected with ovalbumin gene-bearing bacteriophages. The recombinant PA-I, purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography, was shown to be a galactophilic hemagglutinin resembling the native lectin in molecular weight and selective reactivity with rabbit anti native PA-I serum. These results are important for development of a safe Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccine using recombinant DNA techniques, thus avoiding contamination with toxic products of this bacterium. PMID:8193158

  16. Gender-responsiveness in corrections: Estimating female inmate misconduct risk using the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI).

    PubMed

    Davidson, Megan; Sorensen, Jon R; Reidy, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Proper inmate assessment is critical to correctional management and institutional security. While many instruments have been developed to assist with this process, most of these tools have not been validated using samples of female inmates although distinct gender differences have been identified in the inmate population in terms of adaptation and misconduct. The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is a multiscale measure of psychopathology that is being increasingly utilized in the correctional setting to assist with the inmate classification process. The current study contributes to the dearth of literature surrounding gender-responsive inmate classification by utilizing a sample of 2,000 female inmates to examine the incremental and predictive validity of the PAI in association with general and assaultive disciplinary infractions. Findings from this study reveal that the PAI scales presenting the strongest relationship to general and assaultive disciplinary infractions among this female sample included Aggression (AGG), Antisocial Features (ANT), Paranoia (PAR), and the Violence Potential Index (VPI). Moreover, findings derived from this study suggest that certain PAI measures, specifically ARD-T, DRU, and more general substance abuse and mental health indicators may be useful in gender-responsive assessments during the female inmate classification process. PMID:26436333

  17. Cross-Validation of the PAI Negative Distortion Scale for Feigned Mental Disorders: A Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Richard; Gillard, Nathan D.; Wooley, Chelsea N.; Kelsey, Katherine R.

    2013-01-01

    A major strength of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) is its systematic assessment of response styles, including feigned mental disorders. Recently, Mogge, Lepage, Bell, and Ragatz developed and provided the initial validation for the Negative Distortion Scale (NDS). Using rare symptoms as its detection strategy for feigning, the…

  18. Relationship between HMGB1 and PAI-1 after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shosaku; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Katayama, Yuta; Yagi, Hideo; Fujishima, Naoto; Ota, Shuichi; Moriyama, Masato; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Kunio; Fujita, Shinya; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Kyo, Taiichi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2016-01-01

    Background Conditioning regimens including total body irradiation (TBI) or cyclophosphamide can mobilize high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) to peripheral blood. Additionally, increased plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 levels are associated with post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). However, changes to circulating levels of HMGB1 after aHSCT are poorly understood. Materials and methods The study cohort included 289 patients who underwent aHSCT at one of 25 institutions in Japan. We have investigated the relationship between HMGB1 and PAI-1 following aHSCT. A significant increase in HMGB1 levels occurred after conditioning treatment. Additionally, levels of HMGB1 at day 0 were significantly increased in TBI+ patients and cyclophosphamide/TBI patients. Conclusion Our data revealed that an increased level of HMGB1 at day 0 following aHSCT correlates with increased PAI-1 after aHSCT, which is consistent with previous reports. Increased HMGB1 at day 0 after a conditioning regimen may play a role in transplantation-associated coagulopathy following aHSCT, because PAI-1 can accelerate procoagulant activity. PMID:26848281

  19. Society News: Welcome to Griffiths Bay; RAS Associate wins Shaw Prize; Postgraduate prize preparations; Council minutes on-line; Birthday Honours; Kavli Prize; New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The late Donald Griffiths will be commemorated in the name of a bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. Prof. Reinhard Genzel, Associate of the Society since 1994, Darwin Lecturer in 2007, and Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics has been awarded the Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008. While postgrad students complete their PhD theses, supervisors should note the deadline for submissions to the annual Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes.

  20. Effects of teneligliptin on PDMPs and PAI-1 in patients with diabetes on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Yoshinori; Omoto, Seitaro; Taniura, Takehito; Shouzu, Akira; Nomura, Shosaku

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death among hemodialysis (HD) patients. The effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor teneligliptin on CVD-related biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) receiving HD treatment are poorly understood. To determine whether teneligliptin has anti-CVD properties, we assessed its effects on soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin), platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), soluble vascular adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), and adiponectin plasma levels in HD and non-HD patients with T2DM. Methods Patients with T2DM eligible for teneligliptin monotherapy or combination therapy (eg, teneligliptin plus a sulfonylurea) were administered teneligliptin (20 mg/d) once daily for 6 months. Plasma levels of sP-selectin, PDMPs, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, and adiponectin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline and after 3 months and 6 months of treatment. Results Teneligliptin therapy significantly reduced plasma levels of sP-selectin, PDMPs, and PAI-1 compared with baseline levels, while significantly increasing adiponectin levels. sE-selectin and sVCAM-1 levels were significantly decreased only at 6 months. The reduction in sP-selectin, PDMPs, and PAI-1 was more significant in HD patients than in non-HD patients. However, the improvement in adiponectin levels was unchanged with HD treatment. Conclusion By modulating PDMPs or PAI-1, teneligliptin shows an antiatherothrombotic effect that may be beneficial in the primary prevention of CVD in patients with T2DM on HD. PMID:27110135

  1. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p<0.001). Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage. PMID:26945715

  2. Prize level and debt size: impact on gambling behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crewe-Brown, Courtney; Blaszczynski, Alex; Russell, Alex

    2014-09-01

    No studies to date have specifically determined the relationship between prize levels, debt size, and impulsivity on reported gambling behaviour on Electronic Gaming Machines (EGM). The present study reports the findings of a pilot study designed to investigate whether or not the likelihood of increasing the size of a bet was related to the level of prize offered and personal debt. The sample consisted of 171 first year psychology students (61 males and 120 females). Participants completed a series of gambling vignettes designed to elicit data on reported bet size according to different prize levels and debt sizes; the Eysenck Impulsivity Scale (Eysenck and Eysenck 1977); the Canadian Problem Gambling Index; and an author-constructed questionnaire eliciting data on demographic and gambling behaviours. Results indicated that as prize levels increase the odds (relative risk) of an individual placing a bet on an EGM and the amount of money reportedly bet tends to increase. A negative relationship between debt size and reported gambling behaviour moderated by prize level was found. No differences were found in the odds of placing a bet according to impulsivity. It was concluded that prize and debt sizes do influence propensities to gamble and level of bets. The findings have implications for restricting jackpot and general prize levels as a responsible gambling strategy designed to reduce motivations to gamble. PMID:23543350

  3. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials. PMID:26164207

  4. Modeling self-potential data in the Abraham and Meadow-Hatton geothermal systems: The search for upflow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Schima, S.; Wilt, M.; Ross, H.

    1995-12-31

    Self-potential (SP) measurements may be used to locate up-flow zones in geothermal systems. As geothermal waters move beneath the surface, the resulting pressure and heat variations are seen as anomalies in the electrical currents that are measured within or at the surface. Beginning in 1991, Ross et al. collected SP data at Abraham and Meadow-Hatton Hot Springs, two of the largest thermal spring systems in Utah. In this paper, these data were modeled to determine upflow zones and source characteristics using a numerical modeling code. The code calculates the forward solution for fluid or heat flow models and the resulting self-potential anomalies. These results were matched to field data by iterative forward modeling; that is, we adjusted the model until field and numerical data agreed. At Abraham Hot Springs, a 3 km, north-south trending, dipolar anomaly was measured, centered on a suspected fault zone. The anomaly was not coincident with the hot springs themselves. Modeling indicates that the upflow originates from about 200 m depth, ascends up the fault zone to a shallow aquifer, where it then migrates eastward to outflow at the hot springs. At Meadow-Hatton Hot Springs, two closely spaced negative anomalies, also about 3 km long trending north-south, were modeled to show two upflow sources at about 200 m depth. The flow likely ascends up fractured zones until it reaches a shallow travertine layer and disperses laterally, with very little outflow at the hot springs at present.

  5. Jeffrey T. Kiehl Receives 2012 Climate Communication Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey T. Kiehl was awarded the 2012 Climate Communication Prize at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The Climate Communication Prize is funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry based in Boulder, Colo. The prize honors an "AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science, and highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respected and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change."

  6. Defining physics: The Nobel Prize selection process, 1901-1937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, James

    1991-02-01

    The great prestige of the Nobel Prizes has come virtually to define physics in the public mind. An examination of the nominations and the selections in the first 37 years of Nobel awards shows that those in charge of the selections went through a process of development as they refined their conceptions of the kind of work appropriate to be rewarded. Analyses are presented of the 1800 nominations made by 448 nominators for 213 scientists, of whom 44 received physics prizes between 1901 and 1937, 10 more who were awarded Nobel Prizes in physics after 1937, and 12 in chemistry, although nominated also in physics.

  7. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

  8. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  9. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Christiana N.; Kovats, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  10. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    PubMed

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.' PMID:24661232

  11. Pat Thiel talks about Nobel Prize winner Dan Shechtman

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Pat Thiel talks about her friend and colleague Dan Shechtman who received the 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

  12. Evaluating PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in diving: human serum total PAI-1 is unaltered after 2 h dry exposures to 280 kPa hyperbaric air

    PubMed Central

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Fredriksen, Hallvard Aglen; Hjelde, Astrid; Møllerløkken, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is induced in the vasculature and secreted into the vascular lumen in response to inflammation and oxidative stress. We have previously reported a fivefold increase in plasma PAI-1 from rats exposed to 708 kPa hyperbaric air. In the current study we assess the potential of human serum total PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in compressed air diving. Eleven recreational divers, nine males and two females, completed four 2 h hyperbaric air exposures to 280 kPa in a pressure chamber over a period of 2 weeks. The air pressure corresponds to a diving depth of 18 m in water. Serum was collected before the study and again 3 h 30 min after completion of each hyperbaric exposure. All samples were taken in the afternoon to minimize the contribution of circadian variation. The analysis revealed no change in serum total PAI-1 after hyperbaric exposures within the group of divers (P = 0.064), but significant interindividual differences persisted throughout the study (P < 0.0005). A case of decompression sickness after the third round of hyperbaric exposure did not affect PAI-1. In conclusion, compressed air exposure to 280 kPa does not affect serum total PAI-1, and significant interindividual variation in PAI-1 levels may limit its usefulness as a biomarker. This does, however, not give a complete answer regarding PAI-1 in physiologically stressful dives. Further studies with different exposures and timing are needed for that. PMID:26109191

  13. Evaluating PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in diving: human serum total PAI-1 is unaltered after 2 h dry exposures to 280 kPa hyperbaric air.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Fredriksen, Hallvard Aglen; Hjelde, Astrid; Møllerløkken, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is induced in the vasculature and secreted into the vascular lumen in response to inflammation and oxidative stress. We have previously reported a fivefold increase in plasma PAI-1 from rats exposed to 708 kPa hyperbaric air. In the current study we assess the potential of human serum total PAI-1 as a biomarker for stress in compressed air diving. Eleven recreational divers, nine males and two females, completed four 2 h hyperbaric air exposures to 280 kPa in a pressure chamber over a period of 2 weeks. The air pressure corresponds to a diving depth of 18 m in water. Serum was collected before the study and again 3 h 30 min after completion of each hyperbaric exposure. All samples were taken in the afternoon to minimize the contribution of circadian variation. The analysis revealed no change in serum total PAI-1 after hyperbaric exposures within the group of divers (P = 0.064), but significant interindividual differences persisted throughout the study (P < 0.0005). A case of decompression sickness after the third round of hyperbaric exposure did not affect PAI-1. In conclusion, compressed air exposure to 280 kPa does not affect serum total PAI-1, and significant interindividual variation in PAI-1 levels may limit its usefulness as a biomarker. This does, however, not give a complete answer regarding PAI-1 in physiologically stressful dives. Further studies with different exposures and timing are needed for that. PMID:26109191

  14. Shaw Prize Goes to Reinhard Genzel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    The Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008 is awarded to Professor Reinhard Genzel, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), in recognition of his outstanding contribution in demonstrating that the Milky Way contains a supermassive black hole at its centre, a result largely obtained with the help of ESO's telescopes. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 18/08 Motion of a Star The Shaw Prize is awarded annually by the Shaw Prize Foundation in Hong Kong in the Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Astronomy, each of the three prizes bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. "I warmly congratulate Professor Genzel for this well-deserved award which highlights some of the best science produced with ESO's telescopes," says Tim de Zeeuw, ESO's Director General. "Professor Genzel and his team have made a dedicated, long-term effort, using our telescopes and co-developing instruments, to study the Centre of our Galaxy, and as such, he has allowed us to enter an era of observational black hole physics." In 1969, Donald Lynden-Bell and Martin Rees suggested that the Milky Way might contain a supermassive black hole at its centre. But evidence for such an object was lacking at the time because the centre of the Milky Way is obscured by interstellar dust, and was detected only as a relatively faint radio source. Reinhard Genzel and his collaborators obtained compelling evidence for this black hole by developing state-of-the-art astronomical instruments to be used on ESO's telescopes and carrying out a persistent programme of observing the Galactic Centre and its surrounding stars for many years, which ultimately led to the discovery of a black hole with a mass of about three million times that of the Sun. Genzel's group has in particular followed since 1992, the motion of several stars, around the Galactic Centre. These observations were first done with the MPE-built near-infrared speckle imaging camera SHARP on ESO's New Technology Telescope at La

  15. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  16. It Is My Desire to Be Free: Annie Davis's Letter to Abraham Lincoln and Winslow Homer's Painting "A Visit from the Old Mistress"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussey, Michael; Eder, Elizabeth K.

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. President, It is my Desire to be free," wrote Annie Davis to Abraham Lincoln, 20 months after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation affected only those parts of the country that were in rebellion against the United States on the date it was issued, January 1, 1863. The slaveholding border states of Delaware,…

  17. The Lincoln Legal Papers Curriculum: Understanding Illinois Social History through Documents from the Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln, 1836-1861.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Lawrence W., Ed.; Drake, Frederick D., Ed.

    This curriculum considers the social history of Illinois during the years of 1836-1861 by studying Abraham Lincoln's legal papers from his time as a lawyer. Nearly 100,000 documents have been discovered in the archives of local, county, state, federal courts, libraries, and other repositories. The documents include detailed information about the…

  18. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize. PMID:17469121

  19. PAI-OFF: A new proposal for online flood forecasting in flash flood prone catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G. H.; Cullmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe Process Modelling and Artificial Intelligence for Online Flood Forecasting (PAI-OFF) methodology combines the reliability of physically based, hydrologic/hydraulic modelling with the operational advantages of artificial intelligence. These operational advantages are extremely low computation times and straightforward operation. The basic principle of the methodology is to portray process models by means of ANN. We propose to train ANN flood forecasting models with synthetic data that reflects the possible range of storm events. To this end, establishing PAI-OFF requires first setting up a physically based hydrologic model of the considered catchment and - optionally, if backwater effects have a significant impact on the flow regime - a hydrodynamic flood routing model of the river reach in question. Both models are subsequently used for simulating all meaningful and flood relevant storm scenarios which are obtained from a catchment specific meteorological data analysis. This provides a database of corresponding input/output vectors which is then completed by generally available hydrological and meteorological data for characterizing the catchment state prior to each storm event. This database subsequently serves for training both a polynomial neural network (PoNN) - portraying the rainfall-runoff process - and a multilayer neural network (MLFN), which mirrors the hydrodynamic flood wave propagation in the river. These two ANN models replace the hydrological and hydrodynamic model in the operational mode. After presenting the theory, we apply PAI-OFF - essentially consisting of the coupled "hydrologic" PoNN and "hydrodynamic" MLFN - to the Freiberger Mulde catchment in the Erzgebirge (Ore-mountains) in East Germany (3000 km 2). Both the demonstrated computational efficiency and the prediction reliability underline the potential of the new PAI-OFF methodology for online flood forecasting.

  20. uPA and PAI-1-Related Signaling Pathways Differ between Primary Breast Cancers and Lymph Node Metastases12

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Wolff, Claudia; Berg, Daniela; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Mannsperger, Heiko; Schmidt, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The supporting role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in migration and invasion is well known. In addition, both factors are key components in cancer cell-related signaling. However, little information is available for uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling pathways in primary cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling proteins in 52 primary breast cancers and corresponding metastases. Proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the primary tumors and metastases. Protein lysates were subsequently analyzed by reverse phase protein array for the expression of members of the PI3K/AKT (FAK, GSK3-β, ILK, pGSK3-β, PI3K, and ROCK) and the MAPK pathways (pp38, pSTAT3, and p38). A solid correlation of uPA expression existed between primary tumors and metastases, whereas PAI-1 expression did not significantly correlate between them. The correlations of uPA and PAI-1 with signaling pathways found in primary tumors did not persist in metastases. Analysis of single molecules revealed that some correlated well between tumors and metastases (FAK, pGSK3-β, ILK, Met, PI3K, ROCK, uPA, p38, and pp38), whereas others did not (PAI-1 and GSK3-β). Whether the expression of a protein correlated between tumor and metastasis or not was independent of the pathway the protein is related to. These findings hint at a complete deregulation of uPA and PAI-1-related signaling in metastases, which might be the reason why uPA and PAI-1 reached clinical relevance only for lymph node-negative breast cancer tissues. PMID:22496926

  1. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  2. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  3. Cell density-dependent nuclear accumulation of ELK3 is involved in suppression of PAI-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shu; Nakao, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2013-07-01

    Cell-cell contact regulates the proliferation and differentiation of non-transformed cells, e.g., NIH/3T3 cells show growth arrest at high cell density. However, only a few reports described the dynamic behavior of transcription factors involved in this process. In this study, we showed that the mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) decreased drastically at high cell density, and that ELK3, a member of the Ets transcription factor family, repressed PAI-1 expression. We also demonstrated that while ELK3 was distributed evenly throughout the cell at low cell density, it accumulated in the nucleus at high cell density, and that binding of DNA by ELK3 at the A domain facilitated its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, we found that ETS1, a PAI-1 activator, occupied the ELK3-binding site within the PAI-1 promoter at low cell density, while it was released at high cell density. These results suggest that at high cell density, the switching of binding of transcription factors from ETS1 to ELK3 occurs at a specific binding site of the PAI-1 promoter, leading to the cell-density dependent suppression of PAI-1 expression. PMID:23708702

  4. Modeling self-potential data in the Abraham and Meadow-Hatton geothermal systems: The search for upflow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Schima, S.; Wilt, M.; Ross, H.

    1995-07-01

    Computer code SPXCL is a finite difference modeling algorithm that calculates the response of embedded point sources within a rectangular, two-dimensional medium. The code calculates the electrical potential anywhere in the medium from thermal or pressure sources. This code is useful in calculating self-potential measurements that may be used to locate upflow zones in geothermal systems. Beginning in 1991 data on self-potential was collected at Abraham and Meadow-Hatton Hot Springs, two of the largest thermal spring systems in Utah. In this paper, these data were modeled to determine upflow zones and source characteristics using the SPXCL code. The forward solution for fluid and heat flow models and the resulting self-potential anomalies were calculated.

  5. Amount of earnings during prize contingency management treatment is associated with post-treatment abstinence outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Roll, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments that provide patients with the opportunity to earn chances of winning prizes of varying magnitudes are becoming increasingly popular. In the CM literature, magnitude of reinforcement is linked with effect sizes, such that CM treatments that provide larger magnitude reinforcement are more efficacious than those that provide lower magnitude reinforcement. With prize CM, even when magnitudes of overall expected prize earnings are constant, some patients win more prizes than others. Thus, patients who win larger overall amounts of prizes during treatment may have better outcomes than those who win fewer prizes. This study evaluated the impact of overall amounts of prizes won on long-term abstinence outcomes. The dollar amount of prizes won during prize CM treatments was determined from 78 cocaine abusing methadone maintenance patients who were randomized to prize CM treatments in three clinical trials. Abstinence three months following the end of the CM intervention was the primary dependent variable. The dollar amount of prizes won during CM treatment was a significant predictor of submission of cocaine-negative urine samples and self reports of cocaine abstinence at the follow-up evaluation, even after controlling for other variables associated with long-term abstinence such as pre-treatment urinalysis results and longest duration of abstinence achieved during treatment. These results suggest that magnitudes of earnings during prize CM may impact outcomes and call for further experimentation of parameters related to the efficacy of prize CM. PMID:21707189

  6. Chandra Telescope Designer Wins 2002 Rossi Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts has been awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society. The Rossi Prize recognizes significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics. It is awarded annually in honor of the late Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of X-ray astronomy. The prize also includes an engraved certificate and a $1,500 award. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the X-ray mirrors for NASA's premier X­ray observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision X-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Hughes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the X-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory. "Leon is one of the master mirror designers of our time," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Chandra X-ray Center. "His contributions were crucial to the spectacular success of the Chandra mission." The Chandra mirrors are the most precise mirrors ever made, smooth with tolerances of a few atoms. If the state of Colorado had the same relative smoothness as the surface of the Chandra X-ray Observatory mirrors, Pike's Peak would be less than an inch tall. The smoothness and alignment of the Chandra's mirrors are enabling scientists to make new discoveries about black holes, neutron stars, and galactic explosions. "Many, many other people made essential contributions to the Chandra program, and hopefully some of them will receive proper recognition," said Van Speybroeck. "In the meantime, I am thoroughly enjoying

  7. Global Gene Expression Profiling in PAI-1 Knockout Murine Heart and Kidney: Molecular Basis of Cardiac-Selective Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Asish K.; Murphy, Sheila B.; Kishore, Raj; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as an abnormal matrix remodeling due to excessive synthesis and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in tissues during wound healing or in response to chemical, mechanical and immunological stresses. At present, there is no effective therapy for organ fibrosis. Previous studies demonstrated that aged plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) knockout mice develop spontaneously cardiac-selective fibrosis without affecting any other organs. We hypothesized that differential expressions of profibrotic and antifibrotic genes in PAI-1 knockout hearts and unaffected organs lead to cardiac selective fibrosis. In order to address this prediction, we have used a genome-wide gene expression profiling of transcripts derived from aged PAI-1 knockout hearts and kidneys. The variations of global gene expression profiling were compared within four groups: wildtype heart vs. knockout heart; wildtype kidney vs. knockout kidney; knockout heart vs. knockout kidney and wildtype heart vs. wildtype kidney. Analysis of illumina-based microarray data revealed that several genes involved in different biological processes such as immune system processing, response to stress, cytokine signaling, cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, matrix organization and transcriptional regulation were affected in hearts and kidneys by the absence of PAI-1, a potent inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Importantly, the expressions of a number of genes, involved in profibrotic pathways including Ankrd1, Pi16, Egr1, Scx, Timp1, Timp2, Klf6, Loxl1 and Klotho, were deregulated in PAI-1 knockout hearts compared to wildtype hearts and PAI-1 knockout kidneys. While the levels of Ankrd1, Pi16 and Timp1 proteins were elevated during EndMT, the level of Timp4 protein was decreased. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on the influence of PAI-1 on global gene expression profiling in the heart and kidney and its implication in fibrogenesis and

  8. Prize Contingency Management for Smoking Cessation: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, David M.; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjunctive behavioral smoking cessation treatments have the potential to improve outcomes beyond standard care. The present study had two aims: 1) compare standard care (SC) for smoking (four weeks of brief counseling and monitoring) to SC plus prize-based contingency management (CM), involving the chance to earn prizes on days with demonstrated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide (CO) ≤6ppm); and 2) compare the relative efficacy of two prize reinforcement schedules - one a traditional CM schedule, and the second an early enhanced CM schedule providing greater reinforcement magnitude in the initial week of treatment but equal overall reinforcement. Methods Participants (N = 81 nicotine-dependent cigarette smokers) were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. Results Prize CM resulted in significant reductions in cigarette smoking relative to SC. These reductions were not apparent at follow-up. We found no meaningful differences between the traditional and enhanced CM conditions. Conclusions Our findings reveal that prize CM leads to significant reductions in smoking during treatment relative to a control intervention, but the benefits did not extend long-term. PMID:24793364

  9. Randomized Trial of Prize-Based Reinforcement Density for Simultaneous Abstinence from Cocaine and Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Epstein, David H.; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effect of reinforcer density in prize-based abstinence reinforcement, heroin/cocaine users (N = 116) in methadone maintenance (100 mg/day) were randomly assigned to a noncontingent control group (NonC) or to 1 of 3 groups that earned prize draws for abstinence: manual drawing with standard prize density (MS) or computerized drawing…

  10. Background to the Nobel Prize to the Braggs.

    PubMed

    Liljas, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Nobel Committees have to follow the nominations submitted for a specific year. During the early phase of X-ray crystallography, a limited number of scientists were active. In 1914 Max von Laue and William Henry Bragg were both nominated and could have been awarded a joint Nobel Prize. However, a member of the Nobel Committee for Physics, Allvar Gullstrand, was well aware of the activities in the field and strongly recommended that only von Laue should receive the prize since a main contributor, William Laurence Bragg, was not nominated. Next year, when the First World War had started, there were few nominations, but now both Braggs, father and son, were nominated. Gullstrand was very pleased and recommended them both for the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics. The rest of the committee agreed and this then became the decision of the Royal Academy for Sciences, Stockholm. PMID:23250055

  11. Testing the predictive validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in relation to inmate misconduct and violence.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Thomas J; Sorensen, Jon R; Davidson, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) has been widely employed in correctional settings as a screening tool to assess inmates' risk for committing various types of institutional misconduct. Evaluations have generally found the PAI scales Antisocial Features (ANT), Aggression (AGG), and the Violence Potential Index (VPI) to be modestly related to institutional misbehavior, thus supporting its construct validity. The current study provides the most comprehensive examination of the predictive and incremental validity of the PAI and its subscales among a large sample of imprisoned offenders to date. In particular, the size of the sample (n = 15,546) and follow-up period (mean time at risk of 2.2 years) allowed for the disaggregation of institutional misconduct by levels of seriousness and separate examinations by conviction offense and criminal history variables. The 3 scales most strongly related to general rule infractions were ANT, AGG, and the VPI. After controlling for age at intake, violent conviction history, prior violent arrests, and time at risk, the PAI scales were shown to add incremental validity to the classification of 4 types of disciplinary infractions ranging from 2 to 4 percentage points. The study also explored the relationship of the PAI's response bias scales to institutional misconduct. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26460899

  12. No-Ghost Theorem for the Fourth-Order Derivative Pais-Uhlenbeck Oscillator Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Carl M.; Mannheim, Philip D.

    2008-03-21

    A new realization of the fourth-order derivative Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator is constructed. This realization possesses no states of negative norm and has a real energy spectrum that is bounded below. The key to this construction is the recognition that in this realization the Hamiltonian is not Dirac Hermitian. However, the Hamiltonian is symmetric under combined space reflection P and time reversal T. The Hilbert space that is appropriate for this PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is identified and it is found to have a positive-definite inner product. Furthermore, the time-evolution operator is unitary.

  13. The Hermann Weyl Prize - Laudatio for Guilio Chiribella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Olmo, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    The Hermann Weyl Prize was created in 2000 by the Standing Committee of the International Group Theory Colloquium. The purpose of the Weyl Prize is to provide recognition for young scientists (younger than 35) who have performed original work of significant scientific quality in the area of understanding physics through symmetries. The Hermann Weyl Prize consists of a certificate citing the accomplishments of the recipient, prize money of $500 and an allowance towards the attendance of the bi-annual International Group Theory Colloquium at which the award is presented. The previous winners of the award were: Edward Frenkel (2002), Nikita A Nekrasov (2004), Boyko Bakalov (2006) and Mohammad M Sheikh-Jabbari (2008). The Selection Committee of the Weyl Prize 2010 consisted of S T Ali (Concordia University), E Corrigan (Durham Univeristy), P Kulish (St Petersburg Mathematical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences), R Mosseri (CNRS Paris) and M A del Olmo (University of Valladolid, chairman). This committee has made the following announcement: The Weyl Prize for the year 2010 was awarded to Dr Giulio Chiribella, in recognition of his pioneering work on the application of group theoretical methods in Quantum Information Theory. In particular, for providing a general solution to the problem of optimal estimation of symmertry transformations based on the notion of quantum entanglement between representation and multiplicity spaces, for the derivation of optimal protocols for the alignment of quantum reference frames, for the characterization of extreme quantum measurements in finite dimensions, for the proof of equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation and for the proof of the optimality of measure-and-reprepare for quantum learning of unitary transformations. The Laudatio of Guilio Chiribella, delivered by M A del Olmo, is included in the PDF.

  14. Pioneers in ozone research receive Nobel Prize in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded its 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three AGU members for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. Only one other Nobel prize has ever been awarded in the realm of atmospheric research. The honorees are professors Paul Crutzen of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany; Mario Molina of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and F. Sherwood Rowland of the University of California, Irvine. The Academy credits the three with contributing to “our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

  15. Ecosystems Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. H.; Frame, M. T.; Ferriter, O.; Recker, J.

    2014-12-01

    Stimulating innovation and private sector entrepreneurship is an important way to advance the preparedness of communities, businesses and individuals for the impacts of climate change on certain aspects of ecosystems, such as: fire regimes; water availability; carbon sequestration; biodiversity conservation; weather-related hazards, and the spread of invasive species. The creation of tools is critical to help communities and natural resource managers better understand the impacts of climate change on ecosystems and the potential resulting implications for ecosystem services and conservation efforts. The Department of the Interior is leading an interagency effort to develop the Ecosystems Vulnerability theme as part of the President's Climate Action Plan. This effort will provide seamless access to relevant datasets that can help address such issues as: risk of wildfires to local communities and federal lands; water sensitivity to climate change; and understanding the role of ecosystems in a changing climate. This session will provide an overview of the proposed Ecosystem Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition, outlining the intended audience, scope, goals, and overall timeline. The session will provide an opportunity for participants to offer new ideas. Through the Challenge, access will be made available to critical datasets for software developers, engineers, scientists, students, and researchers to develop and submit applications addressing critical science issues facing our Nation today. Application submission criteria and guidelines will also be discussed. The Challenge will be open to all sectors and organizations (i.e. federal, non-federal, private sector, non-profits, and universities) within the United States. It is anticipated the Challenge will run from early January 2015 until spring of 2015.

  16. Elevated Cytokines, Thrombin and PAI-1 in Severe HCPS Patients Due to Sin Nombre Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bondu, Virginie; Schrader, Ron; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; McGuire, Paul; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Hjelle, Brian; Buranda, Tione

    2015-01-01

    Sin Nombre Hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae Hantavirus) is a Category A pathogen that causes Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS) with case fatality ratios generally ranging from 30% to 50%. HCPS is characterized by vascular leakage due to dysregulation of the endothelial barrier function. The loss of vascular integrity results in non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, shock, multi-organ failure and death. Using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) measurements, we found that plasma samples drawn from University of New Mexico Hospital patients with serologically-confirmed HCPS, induce loss of cell-cell adhesion in confluent epithelial and endothelial cell monolayers grown in ECIS cultureware. We show that the loss of cell-cell adhesion is sensitive to both thrombin and plasmin inhibitors in mild cases, and to thrombin only inhibition in severe cases, suggesting an increasing prothrombotic state with disease severity. A proteomic profile (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) of HCPS plasma samples in our cohort revealed robust antifibrinolytic activity among terminal case patients. The prothrombotic activity is highlighted by acute ≥30 to >100 fold increases in active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) which, preceded death of the subjects within 48 h. Taken together, this suggests that PAI-1 might be a response to the severe pathology as it is expected to reduce plasmin activity and possibly thrombin activity in the terminal patients. PMID:25674766

  17. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  18. Preparing medical students for the continual improvement of health and health care: Abraham Flexner and the new "public interest".

    PubMed

    Berwick, Donald M; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2010-09-01

    In 1910, in his recommendations for reforming medical education, Abraham Flexner responded to what he deemed to be the "public interest." Now, 100 years later, to respond to the current needs of society, the education of physicians must once again change. In addition to understanding the biological basis of health and disease, and mastering technical skills for treating individual patients, physicians will need to learn to navigate in and continually improve complex systems in order to improve the health of the patients and communities they serve. Physicians should not be mere participants in, much less victims of, such systems. Instead, they ought to be prepared to help lead those systems toward ever-higher-quality care for all. A number of innovative programs already exist for students and residents to help integrate improvement skills into professional preparation, and that goal is enjoying increasing support from major professional organizations and accrediting bodies. These experiences have shown that medical schools and residency programs will need to both teach the scientific foundations of system performance and provide opportunities for trainees to participate in team-based improvement of the real-world health systems in which they work. This significant curricular change, to meet the social need of the 21st century, will require educators and learners to embrace new core values, in addition to those held by the profession for generations. These include patient-centeredness, transparency, and stewardship of limited societal resources for health care. PMID:20736631

  19. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    ScienceCinema

    Thiel, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  20. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology. PMID:20004159

  1. Harry Smith — recipient of the 2008 Molecular Ecology Prize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harry Smith is a scholar, mentor, internationally renowned researcher, eloquent speaker and author, pioneering journal editor and highly valued colleague who has contributed greatly in multiple ways to plant science and the community. He richly deserves the honour of the Molecular Ecology Prize....

  2. Award of EC Television Prize for Broadcasts on Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    The European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) is endeavoring to encourage television to provide more and better information on vocational and continuing education in the European Community (EC). Therefore, it held its first competition to award prizes for broadcasts presenting information on vocational training,…

  3. SunShot Catalyst Prize Competition Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Catalyst Energy Innovation Prize, an open innovation program launched in 2014 by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This program aims to catalyze the rapid creation and development of products and solutions that address near-term challenges in the U.S. solar energy marketplace.

  4. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  5. The 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlstein, Linda

    2013-01-01

    For millions of Americans, community colleges provide an essential pathway to well-paying jobs and continuing higher education. The Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence honors those institutions that strive for and achieve exceptional levels of success for all students, while they are in college and after they graduate. Community colleges…

  6. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  7. Defining Excellence: Lessons from the 2013 Aspen Prize Finalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In many respects, one couldn't find a group of 10 schools more diverse than the finalists for the 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. One community college serves 1,500 students, another 56,000. There are institutions devoted primarily--even solely--to technical degrees, and ones devoted mainly to preparing students for further…

  8. What Is Community College Excellence? Lessons from the Aspen Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year, in a process to select the winner of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Aspen Institute has convened national experts to define and determine how to measure "excellence," to identify community colleges with high levels of student success, and to help more community colleges understand what can be done to…

  9. Reclaiming "Lost Prizes": An Interview with Ken McCluskey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Ken McCluskey, Dean and Professor of Education at the University of Winnipeg. He is known internationally for his work in several areas including: (1) mentoring; (2) attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (3) at-risk children and youth (where his "Lost Prizes" and related projects serve as models…

  10. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school district,…

  11. Pat Thiel talks about attending the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Pat Thiel, Ames Laboratory senior scientist and Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, was invited to be a guest at the ceremony on December 10th, in Stockholm, Sweden, where Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory scientist, received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Following her return to the Lab, Thiel shared some of her recollections of the momentous event.

  12. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y.; Żuberek, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  13. Prizes in Cereal Boxes: An Application of Probability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwiller, Bonnie H.; Duncan, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents four cases of real-world probabilistic situations to promote more effective teaching of probability. Calculates the probability of obtaining six of six different prizes successively in six, seven, eight, and nine boxes of cereal, generalizes the problem to n boxes of cereal, and offers suggestions to extend the problem. (MDH)

  14. Whose Big Prize? A Response to Hall and Gunter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, John

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Hall and Gunter who accuse the author of trying to mount "a stout defence" of New Labour's reforms of the teaching profession. Hall and Gunter go further and accuse the author of "triumphalism" in his use of the title "Tony Blair's big prize". Their second and more serious challenge concerns the…

  15. How Robert A. Millikan Got the Physics Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panusch, Martin; Heering, Peter; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    In 1923, R.A. Millikan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the elementary charge of electricity and on the photoelectric effect. Recently, historical research had a focus on Millikan's publication practice, as well as on the role of his assistant, Harvey Fletcher. Several studies have raised doubts on whether Millikan can…

  16. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  17. Grand Prize and Citation Winners: Ten School with Soaring Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design features of the grand prize winners of the 2002 "Learning by Design" contest--an addition to West Linn High School in West Linn, Oregon, and the renovation of Beaver Brook Academic Center/The Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, Connecticut. Also describes the designs of the eight citation winners. (EV)

  18. 78 FR 40132 - Wave Energy Converter Prize Administration Webinar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wave Energy Converter Prize Administration Webinar AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice... available for public review on the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Web site...

  19. Modular Curriculum: English, American Nobel Prize Winners in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James A.

    This independent study module treats those Americans who have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. They include Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Pearl Buck. Selections from the writings of these authors are included. Their works represent many literary genres and also…

  20. Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    The life and personality of Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes established by his will are discussed. Nobel was a 19th century Swedish industrialist who was fluent in six languages. He invented dynamite. At his death in 1896, his estate amounted to $9,200,000. His will stipulated that the income from his estate should be divided annually into five…

  1. The Nobel Prize Economics Lectures as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahka, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes using some of the 26 Nobel Prize lectures as teaching tools in economics courses. Notes lectures are reprinted in economic journals. Lists titles of lectures from 1969 to 1988; identifies level of difficulty; and categorizes the lectures by subject field. Outlines George Stigler's 1982 Nobel lecture and gives suggestions for teaching. (NL)

  2. An Elusive Honor: Psychology, Behavior, and the Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickren, Wade E.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from economics, the human sciences have not generally been rewarded with high honors from the world community. Psychology has been awarded the distinction of a Nobel Prize only when it has served a role in explicating human behavior in relation to economics. Yet psychological science has played no small part in the work of a number of Nobel…

  3. What to do to win a Nobel prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foundationeer, Second; chrischievious; Hasler, John; nvrao; dedalus22; Martin

    2014-11-01

    In reply to the infographic "Illustrating a century of Nobels" and a related physicsworld.com blog post "What type of physics should you do if you want to bag a Nobel prize?" (2 October, http://ow.ly/CmCzl, see also pp22-23).

  4. Sources of Financial Support for Research Prize Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The principal objective of this study was to determine the organizational sources of support for the scientists and engineers who have received the Nobel and other major scientific prizes. A secondary objective was to determine what role the National Science Foundation (NSF) may have played in the recipients' research careers. The results of the…

  5. Pulitzer Prize Speakers Enhance Credibility of San Antonio Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aradillas, Elaine

    1994-01-01

    Describes a mass communications program at Texas's San Antonio College that invites Pulitzer Prize recipients to give guest lectures. Includes a list of the speakers who have lectured since the program's inception in 1978, a description of the speakers' accomplishments, and a description of program activities. (MAB)

  6. Training Quality: Before and after Winning the Deming Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magennis, Jo P.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Quality Improvement Program developed by Florida Power and Light's Nuclear Training organization that was awarded the Deming Application Prize for quality control. Training quality, team activities, training's role in business planning, customer involvement and evaluation, and continuous improvement of training are discussed. (LRW)

  7. "Not Censorship but Selection": Censorship and/as Prizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This essay calls for a fresh critical approach to the topic of censorship, suggesting that anticensorship efforts, while important and necessary, function much like literary prizing. The analysis draws especially on James English's recent study "The Economy of Prestige." There are two central arguments: first, that the librarian ethic of…

  8. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  9. German History. A Pupils' Competition for the Federal President's Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Borries, Bodo

    The Pupils' Competition for the Federal President's German History Prize is one of the many youth competitions held every year in West Germany and sponsored by government offices, industries, common interest groups, and foundations. In this competition, which draws over 1,000 entries from all age groups, participants are expected to make an…

  10. John Hardy is the UK's first Breakthrough Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2015-12-01

    John Hardy, Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and Editorial Board member of The FEBS Journal, has been awarded The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in recognition of his work identifying mutations that cause amyloid build-up in the brain--research that has transformed the study of Alzheimer's disease and other major neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26573785

  11. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present. PMID:22166484

  12. More than Prize Lists: Head Teachers, Student Prize Winners, School Ceremonies and Educational Promotion in Colonial South Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Marisa

    2007-01-01

    Australian educators now operate in environments that frequently stress marketing activities. This article highlights the ways that colonial school prize ceremonies were deliberately developed to promote teaching activities. These ceremonies were part of carefully considered strategies that helped to boost the status of entrepreneurial teachers…

  13. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  14. The Nobel Peace Prize and Peace Studies. "Styles of Leadership: An Undergraduate Course Based upon the Prize."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merikangas, Robert J.

    An undergraduate honors course on the Nobel Peace Prize winners at the University of Maryland focuses on styles of leadership and includes three main areas of attention: (1) the inner journey, or heart of the peacemaker, (2) leadership exercised through organizations and movements, and (3) the rhetoric of the leader. The course was divided into a…

  15. Relation between osteonecrosis of the femoral head and PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zheng; Wang, Bing; Pan, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G gene polymorphism and osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Methods: The pooled relative risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using the the RevMan 5.0 software. Results: The present study included 969 patients with ONFH and 419 healthy controls. The Meta analysis results showed: There is association between PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphism and the increasing risk of ONFH (allele model: RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.16 ~ 1.33; dominant genetic model: RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.05 ~ 1.18). It was found that the association between PAI-1 gene 4 G/5 G polymorphism and the susceptibility of ONFH (P < 0.05) through the comparison of Caucasian population and Asian people according to the analysis of different races. Conclusions: There is association between PAI-1 gene 4 G/5 G polymorphism and the increasing of the susceptibility of ONFH. PMID:26884949

  16. Peritoneal adhesion index (PAI): proposal of a score for the "ignored iceberg" of medicine and surgery.

    PubMed

    Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; Manfredi, Roberto; Campanati, Luca; Poiasina, Elia; Bertoli, Paolo; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Cucchi, Michele; Lazzareschi, Daniel; Pisano, Michele; Catena, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions describe a condition in which pathological bonds form between the omentum, the small and large bowels, the abdominal wall, and other intra-abdominal organs. Different classification systems have been proposed, but they do not resolve the underlying problem of ambiguity in the quantification and definition of adhesions. We therefore propose a standardized classification system of adhesions to universalize their definition based on the macroscopic appearance of adhesions and their diffusion to different regions of the abdomen. By scoring with these criteria, the peritoneal adhesion index (PAI) can range from 0 to 30, unambiguously specifying precise adhesion scenarios. The standardized classification and quantification of adhesions would enable different studies to more meaningfully integrate their results, thereby facilitating a more comprehensive approach to the treatment and management of this pathology. PMID:23369320

  17. Higher order Lagrangians inspired by the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator and their cosmological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulgar, Gustavo; Saavedra, Joel; Leon, Genly; Leyva, Yoelsy

    2015-05-01

    We study higher derivative terms associated with scalar field cosmology. We consider a coupling between the scalar field and the geometry inspired by the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator, given by α∂μ∂μphi∂ν∂νphi. We investigate the cosmological dynamics in a phase space. For α > 0, we provide conditions for the stability of de Sitter solutions. In this case the crossing of the phantom divide wDE = -1 occurs once; thereafter, the equation of state parameter remains under this line, asymptotically reaching towards the de Sitter solution from below. For α < 0, which is the portion of the parameter space where in addition to crossing the phantom divide, cyclic behavior is possible, we present regions in the parameter space where, according to Smilga's classification the ghost has benign or malicious behavior.

  18. PASTIS 57: Autonomous light sensors for PAI continuous monitoring. Principles, calibration and application to vegetation phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecerf, R.; Baret, F.; Hanocq, J.; Marloie, O.; Rautiainen, M.; Mottus, M.; Heiskanen, J.; Stenberg, P.

    2010-12-01

    The LAI (Leaf Area Index) is a key variable to analyze and model vegetation and its interactions with atmosphere and soils. The LAI maps derived from remote sensing images are often validated with non-destructive LAI measures obtained from digital hemispherical photography, LAI-2000 or ceptometer instruments. These methods are expensive and time consuming particularly when human intervention is needed. Consequently it is difficult to acquire overlapping field data and remotely sensed LAI. There is a need of a cheap, autonomous, easy to use ground system to measure foliage development and senescence at least with a daily frequency in order to increase the number of validation sites where vegetation phenology is continuously monitored. A system called PASTIS-57 (PAI Autonomous System from Transmittance Instantaneous Sensors oriented at 57°) devoted to PAI (Plant Area Index) ground measurements was developed to answer this need. PASTIS-57 consists in 6 sensors plugged on one logger that record data with a sampling rate of 1 to few minutes (tunable) with up to 3 months autonomy (energy and data storage). The sensors are plugged to the logger with 2x10m wires, 2x6m wires and 2x2m wires. The distance between each sensor was determined to obtain a representative spatial sampling over a 20m pixel corresponding to an Elementary Sampling Unit (ESU). The PASTIS-57 sensors are made of photodiodes that measure the incoming light in the blue wavelength to maximize the contrast between vegetation and sky and limit multiple scattering effects in the canopy. The diodes are oriented to the north to avoid direct sun light and point to a zenithal angle of 57° to minimize leaf angle distribution and plant clumping effects. The field of view of the diodes was set to ± 20° to take into consideration vegetation cover heterogeneity and to minimize environmental effects. The sensors were calibrated after recording data on a clear view site during a week. After calibration, the sensors

  19. Analysis of serpin inhibitory function by mutagenesis of ovalbumin and generation of chimeric ovalbumin/PAI-2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B J; Worrall, D M

    1997-04-01

    Ovalbumin is a non-inhibitory serpin which lacks the ability to undergo the S --> R transition or conformational change. Amino acid residues in the hinge region (P11 to P14) of ovalbumin and other non-inhibitory serpins differ from the concensus sequence of this region of inhibitory serpins, and have been proposed to be responsible for lack of inhibitory properties, particularly the P14 charged residue. Site directed mutagenesis using PCR overlap extension was performed on these residues in ovalbumin to create a mutant with three amino acid changes, R340T, V342A and V343A. However analysis of the mutant recombinant ovalbumin with the consensus residues failed to show inhibitory activity or decreased stability, indicating that the hinge region alone is not responsible for lack of inhibition. A series of three fusion proteins were then constructed by replacing varying C-terminal regions of ovalbumin with the corresponding region of the inhibitory ov-serpin PAI-2 in order to further analyse serpin inhibitory function. Fusion proteins F1 and F2 contained approximately 16% and 35% PAI-2, respectively. This resulted in the replacing of structural features such as the reactive site loop, hinge region and beta sheet strands 5A and 6A. However both fusion proteins showed no inhibitory activity with the PAI-2 target protease urokinase (uPA) and no decrease in stability as analysed by transverse urea gradient (TUG) gels. The third chimeric fusion protein constructed (F3) contained 64% PAI-2 and did demonstrate inhibition of uPA, SDS-PAGE stable complex formation with uPA and increased instability on TUG gels. Structural differences between the inactive F2 and active F3 include the replacement of helix F and beta sheet strand 3A of ovalbumin with those of PAI-2, suggesting that these features may have a key role in serpin beta-sheet opening and inhibitory function. PMID:9126838

  20. What’s Behind a Name: The Kaufman Prize of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Kaufman Prize has been given by the Canadian Geriatrics Society for nearly 30 years, but few Society members are aware of who Kaufman was or why the Prize was named after him. They are equally unclear about the objectives established for the Prize and how successful it has been in achieving them. This paper reviews the history of the Kaufman Prize and the eponymous A.R. Kaufman. The original objectives of the award were to encourage clinical research in geriatric medicine and to foster research interest in medical residents. Over the years the Prize has allowed the Society to both recognize and encourage excellence in age-related research among trainees. With the renaming of the Prize, now would be an opportune time for the Society to review both its objectives and its format. PMID:23251314

  1. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  2. In Brief: IPCC and Gore share Nobel Peace Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-10-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, Jr. have been named as co-recipients of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced on 12 October. The Committee cited them "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change."

  3. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Horie, Shuichi

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR

  4. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine. PMID:25554824

  5. Kevin E. Trenberth Receives 2013 Climate Communication Prize: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    I am delighted to be recognized with this prize. I want to first thank AGU and the prize committee and, especially, Nature's Own for establishing this prize in a field that has become contentious and highly political. It did not used to be this way. Following the media frenzy with the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, there was hope at the 2009 Conference of Parties meeting in Copenhagen that an international framework agreement on climate change might be achieved. It was not to be. Planned actions to address issues of climate change were undermined by huge funding of misinformation by vested interests. It was not helped by so-called "climategate" in which many emails illegally hacked from a computer server at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom were released, cherry picked, distorted, and misused by climate change deniers. Minor errors in the IPCC report were blown out of all proportion and ineffectively addressed. I was caught up in all this, and one of my many emails went viral: the "travesty" quote in which I bemoaned the inability to close the global energy balance associated with short-term climate variability but which was misinterpreted as saying there was no global warming. These examples highlight failures of communication.

  6. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  7. Was Abraham Lincoln gay?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scholars and historians are blind to Lincoln's same-sex inclinations in part because of a personal aversion to male homosexuality, but more importantly because they fail to perceive the vast differences between the sexual culture of antebellum America and that of our own time, especially in regard to male-male physical and emotional intimacy. This article brings those differences to light and sets Lincoln's life in the context of the sexual culture of his own time. This enables one to see that Lincoln's same-sex sexuality was not only unproblematic, but commonplace, if not typical, in his day. Revising the Myth of Lincoln in regard to his same-sex inclinations will have a positive effect on contemporary culture, especially on the education and socialization of young boys. PMID:20924927

  8. Aggravation of gingival inflammatory symptoms during pregnancy associated with the concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) in gingival fluid.

    PubMed

    Kinnby, B; Matsson, L; Astedt, B

    1996-05-01

    Gingival inflammatory symptoms are aggravated during pregnancy. In vitro studies suggest a hormonal influence on the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2), and a disturbed balance of the fibrinolytic system could help to explain pregnancy gingivitis. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was sampled in 14 women in pregnant and post-pregnant states. The gingival condition was assessed by the gingival index of Løe & Silness (GI) and the amount of bacterial plaque by the plaque index of Silness & Løe (PI). The ratio of sites with gingivitis to sites with bacterial plaque was calculated (G/P-ratio). Antigen levels of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitors type 1 (PAI-1) and PAI-2 in GCF were determined with ELISAs and 17 beta-oestradiol and progesterone in serum with radioimmunoassays. For each individual the differences (delta) in hormone levels and PAs and PAIs between pregnancy and post-pregnancy were calculated. Based on differences in G/P-ratio between pregnancy and post-pregnancy, subgrouping was done into a high-reacting and a low-reacting group. For the total group, the mean G/P-ratio was 2.0 during and 1.2 after pregnancy (p = 0.064). A statistically significant correlation between delta progesterone and delta PAI-2 was noted: the higher delta progesterone, the lower delta PAI-2. No other significant correlations between hormone levels and components of the fibrinolytic system were found. For the total group of women, the concentrations of PAI-2, PAI-1 and t-PA were significantly higher during than after pregnancy. The individuals in the high-reacting group, however, showed a lower or unchanged production of PAI-2 during pregnancy, while those in the low-reacting group showed a greatly increased production. The lower inhibitory capacity in terms of a low production of PAI-2 during pregnancy in women with a higher inflammatory reaction indicates that the components of the

  9. The Epigenetic Reader BRD2 as a Specific Modulator of PAI-1 Expression in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Mouse Primary Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Soon; Hong, Seong Hwi; Sim, Seobo; Cho, Kyu Suk; Kim, Ji-Woon; Yang, Sung Min; Jeon, Se Jin; You, Jueng Soo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-11-01

    The post translational modification of lysine acetylation is a key mechanism that regulates chromatin structure. Epigenetic readers, such as the BET domains, are responsible for reading histone lysine acetylation which is a hallmark of open chromatin structure, further providing a scaffold that can be accessed by RNA polymerases as well as transcription factors. Recently, several reports have assessed and highlighted the roles of epigenetic readers in various cellular contexts. However, little is known about their role in the regulation of inflammatory genes, which is critical in exquisitely tuning inflammatory responses to a variety of immune stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of epigenetic readers BRD2 and BRD4 in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses in mouse primary astrocytes. Inflammatory stimulation by LPS showed that the levels of Brd2 mRNA and protein were increased, while Brd4 mRNA levels did not change. Knocking down of Brd2 mRNA using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in cultured mouse primary astrocytes inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression and secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, no other pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as Il-6, Il-1β and Tnf-α, were affected. Indeed, treatment with bromodomain-containing protein inhibitor, JQ1, blocked Pai-1 mRNA expression through the inhibition of direct BRD2 protein-binding and active histone modification on Pai-1 promoter. Taken together, our data suggest that BRD2 is involved in the modulation of neuroinflammatory responses through PAI-1 and via the regulation of epigenetic reader BET protein, further providing a potential novel therapeutic strategy in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26349765

  10. Evaluation of the effect of cagPAI genes of Helicobacter pylori on AGS epithelial cell morphology and IL-8 secretion.

    PubMed

    Salih, Barik A; Guner, Ahmet; Karademir, Ahu; Uslu, Merve; Ovali, Mehmet Akif; Yazici, Duygu; Bolek, Bora Kazim; Arikan, Soykan

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori cagPAI genes play an important role in pathogenesis, however little is known about their functions in isolates from Turkish patients. We aimed to evaluate the intactness and the effect of the cagPAI genes (cagT, cagM, cagE, cagA) and cagA EPIYA motifs on the AGS morphological changes and IL-8 induction. Of 53 patients 38 were found infected with H. pylori. PCR amplification of the cagPAI genes showed 42.1 % intact, 39.5 % partially deleted and 18.4 % with complete deletions. Isolates from gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer patients with intact and partially deleted cagPAI genes induced higher IL-8 secretion than those with complete deletions. Isolates from gastritis patients had higher deletion frequencies of the cagT and cagM genes than the other two genes. Infection of AGS cells with isolates that possess intact cagPAI and EPIYA-ABC resulted in the formation of the hummingbird phenotype. The cagA positive isolates induced higher IL-8 secretion than cagA negative isolates. Isolates from DU patients with more than one EPIYA-C motif induced higher concentrations of IL-8 than those with EPIYA-ABC. In conclusion, the intactness of the cagPAI in our isolates from different patients was not conserved. An intact cagPAI was found to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DU but not GU or gastritis. The cagA gene, but not other cagPAI genes, was associated with the induction of IL-8 and the morphological changes of the AGS cells. An increase in the number of EPIYA-C motifs had noticeable effect on the formation of the hummingbird phenotype. PMID:24170115

  11. Ionizing Radiation Shifts the PAI-1/ID-1 Balance and Activates Notch Signaling in Endothelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Kruse, Jacqueline; Sprong, Debbie; Russell, Nicola S.; Dijke, Peter ten; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) and Notch signaling pathways are important regulators of vascular homeostasis and vessel remodeling; mutations in these pathways can lead to vascular disorders. Similar vascular phenotypes develop in the normal tissues of cancer patients as a long-term effect of radiotherapy. Irradiation most severely affects the capillaries, which become leaky and dilated and might eventually rupture. To investigate the mechanism of such capillary damage, we studied the effect of TGF-{beta} and Notch signaling in microvascular endothelial cells. Methods and Materials: Human microvascular endothelial cells were irradiated with 5 or 10 Gy and activation of TGF-{beta} and Notch signaling pathways was assessed by biochemical methods and a cell migration assay. Results: Ionizing radiation induced Smad2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation and increased mRNA and protein expression of the activin-like kinase 5 (ALK5) target gene plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). At the same time, we observed diminished Smad1/5/8 activation and downregulation of the ALK1 downstream target, inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID-1). We also measured an upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged-1 and the target gene Hey1. Decreased inhibitor of DNA binding-1 levels coincided with a reduced ability of the cells to migrate. Conclusion: Ionizing radiation shifts the balance from ALK1 to ALK5 signaling and activates the Notch pathway in endothelial cells. This combination of anti-angiogenic signals contributes to reduced cell migration after irradiation.

  12. 77 FR 56697 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The English Prize: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The English Prize: The Capture of... ``The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour,'' imported...

  13. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  14. 45 CFR 73.735-505 - Acceptance of awards and prizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of awards and prizes. 73.735-505 Section 73.735-505 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-505 Acceptance of awards and prizes. (a) Employees may accept awards, including cash...

  15. 77 FR 58114 - SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... installation cost of rooftop solar energy systems. DATES: Registration opened on September 12, 2012, and will... about the SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop competition rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html . Teams that wish to enter the competition can register at...

  16. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1956: Hinshelwood and Semenov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-04-01

    This is the fifth in a series of thirteen monthly essays reviewing the Nobel Prizes in chemical dynamics during the 20th century. Cyril Hinshelwood and Nikolay Semenov received the Nobel Prize in 1956 "for their researches into the mechanism of chemical reactions," in particular, chain reactions.

  17. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced Through the Nobel Prizes. 1967: Eigen, Norrish, and Porter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-05-01

    The third Nobel Prize for research in chemical dynamics awarded during the middle decades of the Twentieth Century is reviewed. Manfred Eigen, Ronald Norrish, and George Porter received the Nobel Prize in 1967 "for studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equilibrium by means of very short impulses of energy," i.e., temperature jump, pressure jump, and flash photolysis.

  18. Vouchers Versus Prizes: Contingency Management Treatment of Substance Abusers in Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Marx, Jacqueline; Austin, Mark; Tardif, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions usually use vouchers as reinforcers, but a new technique awards chances of winning prizes. This study compares these approaches. In community treatment centers, 142 cocaine- or heroin-dependent outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST with vouchers, or ST with prizes for 12 weeks.…

  19. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  20. A PAI-1 (SERPINE1) polymorphism predicts osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    French, Deborah; Hamilton, Leo H.; Mattano, Leonard A.; Sather, Harland N.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Nachman, James B.

    2008-01-01

    As glucocorticoid use increased in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, osteonecrosis became an increasingly frequent complication. Besides increased age, host risk factors are poorly defined. We tested whether 12 polymorphisms were associated with osteonecrosis among patients 10 years and older treated on the CCG1882 protocol. Candidate genes (TYMS, MTHFR, ABCB1, BGLAP, ACP5, LRP5, ESR1, PAI-1, VDR, PTH, and PTHR) were chosen based on putative mechanisms underlying osteonecrosis risk. All children received dexamethasone, with doses varying by treatment arm. A PAI-1 polymorphism (rs6092) was associated with risk of osteonecrosis in univariate (P = .002; odds ratio = 2.79) and multivariate (P = .002; odds ratio = 2.89) analyses (adjusting for gender, age, and treatment arm). Overall, 21 of 78 (26.9%) children with PAI-1 GA/AA genotypes, versus 25 of 214 (11.7%) children with GG genotype, developed osteonecrosis. PAI-1 polymorphisms and PAI-1 serum levels have previously been associated with thrombosis. We conclude that PAI-1 genetic variation may contribute to risk of osteonecrosis. PMID:18285546

  1. ["If Berger had survived the second world war - he certainly would have been a candidate for the Nobel Prize". Hans Berger and the legend of the Nobel Prize].

    PubMed

    Gerhard, U-J; Schönberg, A; Blanz, B

    2005-03-01

    The public opinion pays much attention to the Nobel Prize as an indicator for the scientific efficiency of a university or a country in connection with foundation of so-called elite universities. The former holder of the psychiatric chair in Jena and discoverer of the electroencephalogram Hans Berger (1873 - 1941) came into discussion as candidate for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The current medical-historical publications maintain the view that Berger should have received the Nobel Prize in 1936 as well as in 1949. This was prevented in 1936 by an enactment from Hitler, which forbid him to accept the prize, and later in 1949 by Berger's own death. According to documents of the Nobel archives these statements can be disproved. Berger was only nominated three times out of 65 nominations in 1940. Because of his death the other two recommendations in 1942 and 1947 were never evaluated. PMID:15747225

  2. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  3. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck. PMID:16802565

  4. GFP: from jellyfish to the Nobel prize and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Marc

    2009-10-01

    On December 10, 2008 Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP". The path taken by this jellyfish protein to become one of the most useful tools in modern science and medicine is described. Osamu Shimomura painstakingly isolated GFP from hundreds of thousands of jellyfish, characterized the chromophore and elucidated the mechanism of Aequorean bioluminescence. Martin Chalfie expressed the protein in E. coli and C. elegans, and Roger Tsien developed a palette of fluorescent proteins that could be used in a myriad of applications. PMID:19771329

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 are associated with acute normal tissue toxicity in Chinese rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Mengyun; Shi, Tingyan; Shen, Lijun; Zhu, Ji; Sun, Menghong; Deng, Yun; Liang, Liping; Li, Guichao; Wu, Yongxin; Fan, Ming; Wei, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) are crucial mediators of the intestinal microenvironment and are involved in radiation-induced acute and chronic injury. To evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 were predictors of radiation-induced injury in patients with rectal cancer, we retrospectively evaluated 356 rectal cancer patients who had received pelvic radiotherapy and analyzed the association of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 with acute toxicities after radiotherapy. Acute adverse events were scored, including dermatitis, fecal incontinence (anal toxicity), hematological toxicity, diarrhea, and vomiting. The patients were grouped into grade ≥2 and grade 0–1 toxicity groups to analyze the acute toxicities. Genotyping of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAI-1 and PAR-1 was performed using TaqMan assays. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 356 individuals, 264 (72.5%) had grade ≥2 total toxicities; within this group, there were 65 (18.3%) individuals who reached grade ≥3 toxicities. There were 19.5% (69/354) and 36.9% (130/352) patients that developed grade ≥2 toxicities for diarrhea and fecal incontinence, respectively. The variant genotype GG of rs1050955 in PAI-1 was found to be negatively associated with the risk of diarrhea and incontinence (P<0.05), whereas the AG and GG genotypes of rs2227631 in PAI-1 were associated with an increased risk of incontinence. The CT genotype of PAR-1 rs32934 was associated with an increased risk of total toxicity compared with the CC allele. Our results demonstrated that SNPs in the PAI-1 and PAR-1 genes were associated with acute injury in rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic irradiation. These SNPs may be useful biomarkers for predicting acute radiotoxicity in patients with rectal cancer if validated in future studies. PMID:26347502

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 are associated with acute normal tissue toxicity in Chinese rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Mengyun; Shi, Tingyan; Shen, Lijun; Zhu, Ji; Sun, Menghong; Deng, Yun; Liang, Liping; Li, Guichao; Wu, Yongxin; Fan, Ming; Wei, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) are crucial mediators of the intestinal microenvironment and are involved in radiation-induced acute and chronic injury. To evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 were predictors of radiation-induced injury in patients with rectal cancer, we retrospectively evaluated 356 rectal cancer patients who had received pelvic radiotherapy and analyzed the association of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 and PAR-1 with acute toxicities after radiotherapy. Acute adverse events were scored, including dermatitis, fecal incontinence (anal toxicity), hematological toxicity, diarrhea, and vomiting. The patients were grouped into grade ≥2 and grade 0-1 toxicity groups to analyze the acute toxicities. Genotyping of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAI-1 and PAR-1 was performed using TaqMan assays. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 356 individuals, 264 (72.5%) had grade ≥2 total toxicities; within this group, there were 65 (18.3%) individuals who reached grade ≥3 toxicities. There were 19.5% (69/354) and 36.9% (130/352) patients that developed grade ≥2 toxicities for diarrhea and fecal incontinence, respectively. The variant genotype GG of rs1050955 in PAI-1 was found to be negatively associated with the risk of diarrhea and incontinence (P<0.05), whereas the AG and GG genotypes of rs2227631 in PAI-1 were associated with an increased risk of incontinence. The CT genotype of PAR-1 rs32934 was associated with an increased risk of total toxicity compared with the CC allele. Our results demonstrated that SNPs in the PAI-1 and PAR-1 genes were associated with acute injury in rectal cancer patients treated with pelvic irradiation. These SNPs may be useful biomarkers for predicting acute radiotoxicity in patients with rectal cancer if validated in future studies. PMID:26347502

  7. p53- and PAI-1-mediated induction of C-X-C chemokines and CXCR2: importance in pulmonary inflammation due to cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nivedita; Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Fu, Jian; Shetty, Sreerama

    2016-03-15

    We previously demonstrated that tumor suppressor protein p53 augments plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure-induced lung injury. Chronic lung inflammation with elevated p53 and PAI-1 expression in AECs and increased susceptibility to and exacerbation of respiratory infections are all associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We recently demonstrated that preventing p53 from binding to the endogenous PAI-1 mRNA in AECs by either suppressing p53 expression or blockading p53 interactions with the PAI-1 mRNA mitigates apoptosis and lung injury. Within this context, we now show increased expression of the C-X-C chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and their receptor CXCR2, and the intercellular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. We also found a similar increase in lung tissues and AECs from wild-type (WT) mice exposed to passive CS for 20 wk and in primary AECs treated with CS extract in vitro. Interestingly, passive CS exposure of mice lacking either p53 or PAI-1 expression resisted an increase in CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCR2, and ICAM-1. Furthermore, inhibition of p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression by treatment of WT mice exposed to passive CS with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide reduced CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2 levels and lung inflammation. Our study reveals that p53-mediated induction of PAI-1 expression due to chronic CS exposure exacerbates lung inflammation through elaboration of CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCR2. We further provide evidence that targeting this pathway mitigates lung injury associated with chronic CS exposure. PMID:26747783

  8. Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac versus Landau-Lifshitz radiation friction force in the ultrarelativistic electron interaction with electromagnetic wave (exact solutions)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Bulanov, Stepan S.

    2011-11-15

    When the parameters of electron-extreme power laser interaction enter the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the electron dynamics changes qualitatively. The adequate theoretical description of this regime becomes crucially important with the use of the radiation friction force either in the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac form, which possesses unphysical runaway solutions, or in the Landau-Lifshitz form, which is a perturbation valid for relatively low electromagnetic wave amplitude. The goal of the present paper is to find the limits of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation force applicability in terms of the electromagnetic wave amplitude and frequency. For this, a class of the exact solutions to the nonlinear problems of charged particle motion in the time-varying electromagnetic field is used.

  9. Jeffrey T. Kiehl Receives 2012 Climate Communication Prize: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    I thank James Hurrell for his gracious citation of my work on communicating climate science to the public. I am deeply moved by his summary of my work over these past years. It clearly reflects how passionately I feel about this work and how important communication is for our field. I thank the Prize Committee for their recognition of my work and Nature's Own for supporting this important AGU prize. As climate scientists, I feel we have a duty to convey our research to the public in meaningful ways. This is especially true given that much of our scientific research is supported by tax-paying citizens. I also believe there is a moral imperative to communicate our research to the world. Our understanding of the significant climatic changes occurring now and those that will occur in the future places a great burden on all of us as scientists. We cannot hold onto our science like some protected treasure but must convey both the facts and the serious implications of our science to more than just our peers.

  10. Leon Van Speybroeck Wins Astrophysics Bruno Rossi Prize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leon Van Speybroeck of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge Massachusetts was awarded the 2002 Bruno Rossi Prize of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomy Society. The Rossi Prize is an arnual recognition of significant contributions in high-energy astrophysics in honor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's late Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of x-ray astronomy. Van Speybroeck, who led the effort to design and make the x-ray mirrors for NASA's premier Chandra X-Ray Observatory, was recognized for a career of stellar achievements in designing precision x-ray optics. As Telescope Scientist for Chandra, he has worked for more than 20 years with a team that includes scientists and engineers from the Harvard-Smithsonian, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, TRW, Inc., Huhes-Danbury (now B.F. Goodrich Aerospace), Optical Coating Laboratories, Inc., and Eastman-Kodak on all aspects of the x-ray mirror assembly that is the heart of the observatory.

  11. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  12. Yellow fever and Max Theiler: the only Nobel Prize for a virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Norrby, Erling

    2007-01-01

    In 1951, Max Theiler of the Rockefeller Foundation received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of an effective vaccine against yellow fever—a discovery first reported in the JEM 70 years ago. This was the first, and so far the only, Nobel Prize given for the development of a virus vaccine. Recently released Nobel archives now reveal how the advances in the yellow fever vaccine field were evaluated more than 50 years ago, and how this led to a prize for Max Theiler. PMID:18039952

  13. Prizes to solve problems in and beyond medicine, big and small: it can work.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    This article complements Dr. Charlton's follow-up of David Horrobin's suggestion in Nature two decades ago to offer sizeable prizes for practical approaches to either eliminate a problem in medicine or reduce the cost of its solution. Examples from the 20th and 21st centuries illustrate that prizes--small and big--have generated sustained and successful attacks on defined problems in biology, physics and, lately, mathematics. Provided that glittering prizes are offered and awarded with care, they can lead to effective problem-solving in medicine and related biomedical sciences as well. PMID:17207938

  14. Association of a PAI-1 Gene Polymorphism and Early Life Infections with Asthma Risk, Exacerbations, and Reduced Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Young; Oh, Sam S.; Torgerson, Dara R.; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Hu, Donglei; Sen, Saunak; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Farber, Harold J.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Serebrisky, Denise; Thyne, Shannon M.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Williams, L. Keoki; DuPont, William; Seibold, Max A.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Avila, Pedro C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is induced in airways by virus and may mediate asthmatic airway remodeling. We sought to evaluate if genetic variants and early life lower respiratory infections jointly affect asthma risk. Methods We included Latino children, adolescents, and young adults aged 8–21 years (1736 subjects with physician-diagnosed asthma and 1747 healthy controls) from five U.S. centers and Puerto Rico after excluding subjects with incomplete clinical or genetic data. We evaluated the independent and joint effects of a PAI-1 gain of function polymorphism and bronchiolitis / Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) or other lower respiratory infections (LRI) within the first 2 years of life on asthma risk, asthma exacerbations and lung function. Results RSV infection (OR 9.9, 95%CI 4.9–20.2) and other LRI (OR 9.1, 95%CI 7.2–11.5) were independently associated with asthma, but PAI-1 genotype was not. There were joint effects on asthma risk for both genotype-RSV (OR 17.7, 95% CI 6.3–50.2) and genotype-LRI (OR 11.7, 95% CI 8.8–16.4). A joint effect of genotype-RSV resulted in a 3.1-fold increased risk for recurrent asthma hospitalizations. In genotype-respiratory infection joint effect analysis, FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC % predicted were further reduced in the genotype-LRI group (β -2.1, 95% CI -4.0 to -0.2; β -2.0, 95% CI -3.1 to -0.8 respectively). Similarly, lower FEV1% predicted was noted in genotype-RSV group (β -3.1, 95% CI -6.1 to -0.2) with a trend for lower FEV1/FVC % predicted. Conclusions A genetic variant of PAI-1 together with early life LRI such as RSV bronchiolitis is associated with an increased risk of asthma, morbidity, and reduced lung function in this Latino population. PMID:27556405

  15. Nobel Prize for Physical Therapy? Rise, Fall, and Revival of Medico-Mechanical Institutes.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Ottosson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    This historical vignette explores the considerations of the Nobel Prize Committee for Physiology or Medicine by vetting the Nobel Prize chances of Dr Gustaf Zander (1835-1920). His way to stardom started 150 years ago when he began mechanizing the passive and active movements that physical therapists manually used to treat diseases. A glance at his machines shows that they parallel surprisingly well what can be found in modern fitness studios. By combining files from the Nobel Prize Archive and sources from the first physical therapists, this vignette pieces together why Zander was considered one of the best candidates for the Nobel Prize in 1916. By providing this glimpse of history, questions about the origin of physical therapy concepts and the profession of the physical therapist are raised. PMID:25655882

  16. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26676474

  17. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-10-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize story may attract and motivate high school students to open-up to scientific topics and thus be spurred to pursue science. The two major arguments for the method are that if presented in story form Nobel Prizes naturally incorporate the philosophical and historical aspects of science and therefore enable teaching about science as well as teaching science itself; and that such instruction implements case-based teaching principles, which is how humans naturally think, learn, and remember. Finally, the paper presents the storycase of the Nobel Prize Einstein received for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect as a concrete illustration of classroom implementation.

  18. The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science: three years of honouring outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchet, T.; Chatzichristou, E.; Heward, A.

    2012-09-01

    Europlanet launched an annual Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Sciences at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) in 2009. At EPSC 2012, the prize will be presented for the third time. To date, the prize has been awarded to: • 2010 - Dr Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble for his development and dissemination of his 'planeterrella' experiment; • 2011 - The Austrian Space Forum for their coordinated programme of outreach activities, which range from simple classroom presentations to space exhibitions reaching 15 000 visitors; • 2012 - Yaël Nazé, for the diverse outreach programme she has individually initiated over the years, carefully tailored to audiences across the spectrum of society, including children, artists and elderly people. These three prizes cover a spectrum of different approaches to outreach and provide inspiration for anyone wishing to become engaged in public engagement, whether at an individual and institutional level.

  19. "Often a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride": Frank Grimes and the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marler, Charles H.

    1985-01-01

    Argues that Grimes, editor of the "Abilene Reporter-News" for more than 40 years, was denied the Pulitzer because of the manuevering of Arthur Krock, a powerful figure on the Pulitzer Prize Advisory Board. (FL)

  20. From Tomato King to World Food Prize laureate.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical article describes my early years, education, and career at Purdue University. Helping form and expand the Department of Food Science at Purdue was exciting and gratifying, and working with students in the classroom and on research projects was rewarding and kept me feeling young. My research on bulk aseptic processing allowed me to help solve problems relevant to the tomato industry, but I learned later that it had much broader relevance. I certainly never expected the impact and visibility of the work to result in my being awarded the World Food Prize. Being the first food scientist to win this award has enabled me to focus increased attention on the need to reduce food losses. PMID:24328431

  1. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality. PMID:27372164

  2. Homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize Nelore bull.

    PubMed

    Lobreiro, J

    2007-01-01

    Treatments for infertility in bulls are not described in homeopathic literature. A few treatments, such as changing the protein content of the diet, giving extra minerals, etc have been proposed. This case report describes homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize bull. A Nelore bull, considered infertile for 3 years, was treated with homeopathic Pulsatilla nigricans 200 CH. Decreased total sperm defects, increased sperm motility and a very impressive increased number of doses of semen produced were observed. The bull relapsed after treatment was withdrawn, but again responded when it was resumed. Since only one animal was observed one cannot assume that the observed changes were due only to this treatment. Further studies may establish the real benefits of a homeopathic medicine in bull infertility. PMID:17227749

  3. John Bennett Fenn: A Curious Road to the Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Michael A.

    2011-08-01

    John Bennett Fenn shared the 2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of electrospray ionization (ESI). There are several excellent, in-depth biographical reviews of Fenn's scientific career Fenn (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 42, 3871-3894, 2003) and Fenn (Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 47, 1-41, 1996). The focus of this report is to trace the random walk nature of Fenn's career path and to highlight those critical events along that path that led him to the important work for which he was recognized, the development of ESI as a means of ionizing large molecules and interfacing the liquid chromatograph to the mass spectrometer. In addition, this report should hopefully convey something of the curious, generous, kind, and outgoing nature of the man.

  4. The utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for discriminating PTSD, depression, and social phobia in trauma-exposed college students.

    PubMed

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Weathers, Frank W; Flood, Amanda M; Eakin, David E; Benson, Trisha A

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a sample of college students with mixed civilian trauma exposure. Participants were 90 trauma-exposed undergraduates (16 male, 74 female) classified into one of four groups: PTSD, depressive disorders, social phobia, and well-adjusted. For both the PAI and the MMPI-2, profile analysis revealed that the groups differed in the elevation and shape of their profiles. The PAI Traumatic Stress subscale demonstrated good discriminant validity. PMID:17504890

  5. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  6. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  7. Introducing the Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Benson Prize Sponsored by Space Development Corporation The Benson Prize for Discovery Methods of Near Earth Objects by Amateurs is an annual competition which awards prizes to the best proposed methods by which amateur astronomers may discover such near earth objects as asteroids and comet cores. The purpose of the Benson Prize is to encourage the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers. The utilization of valuable near earth resources can provide many new jobs and economic activities on earth, while also creating many new opportunities for opening up the space frontier. The utilization of near earth resources will significantly contribute to the lessening of environmental degradation on the Earth caused by mining and chemical leaching operations required to exploit the low grade ores now remaining on Earth. In addition, near earth objects pose grave dangers for life on earth. Discovering and plotting the orbits of all potentially dangerous near earth objects is the first and necessary step in protecting ourselves against the enormous potential damage possible from near earth objects. With the high quality, large size and low cost of todays consumer telescopes, the rapid development of powerful, high resolution and inexpensive CCD cameras, and the proliferation of inexpensive software for todays powerful home computers, the discovery of near earth objects by amateur astronomers is more attainable than ever. The Benson Prize is sponsored by the Space Development Corporation, a space resource exploration and utilization company. In 1997 one prize of \\500 will be awarded to the best proposed method for the amateur discovery of NEOs, and in each of the four following years, Prizes of \\500, \\250 and \\100 will be awarded. Prizes for the actual discovery of Near Earth Asteroids will be added in later years.

  8. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  9. From Stealing Fire to Cellular Reprogramming: A Scientific History Leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize

    PubMed Central

    Lensch, M. William; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming was recently “crowned” with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context. PMID:24052937

  10. Nobel Prizes for surgeons: In recognition of the surgical healing strategy.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Theodor Kocher (1909), Alexis Carrel (1912), Antonio Egas Moniz (1949) and Joseph E. Murray (1990) received Nobel Prizes for their accomplishments in the field of surgery. This essay puts these achievements in the context of the history of surgery, in particular its recognition of a field of modern medicine. It characterizes the view of the body that is associated with modern surgery and the specific surgical healing strategy that the Nobel Prizes acknowledged. PMID:17448978

  11. PAI-1 secretion of endometrial and endometriotic cells is Smad2/3- and ERK1/2-dependent and influences cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Cong; Mecha, Ezekiel; Omwandho, Charles OA; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Stammler, Angelika; Tinneberg, Hans-Rudolf; Konrad, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In the endometrium transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-βs) are involved mainly in menstruation and endometriosis. After binding of the ligands to the high-affinity receptors, TGF-β receptors (TBR1 and TBR2), TGF-βs activate Smad signaling to modulate gene expression and cellular functions. However, recently also Smad-independent pathways have been studied in more details. To evaluate both pathways, we have analyzed TGF-β signaling in human endometrial and endometriotic cells. Although endometrial and endometriotic cells secrete TGF-β1, secretion by stromal cells was higher compared to epithelial cells. In contrast, secretion of TGF-β2 was higher in endometriotic stromal and endometriotic epithelial cells compared to normal endometrial cells. Treatment of endometrial and endometriotic stromal and epithelial cells with TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 increased Smad-dependent secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) dramatically in all three cell lines. Of note, endometriotic cells secreted clearly higher levels of PAI-1 compared to endometrial cells. Whereas a TBR1 kinase inhibitor completely blocked the TGF-β1 or TGF-β2-induced PAI-1 secretion, an ERK1/2 inhibitor only partially reduced PAI-1 secretion. This inhibition was not dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation by phosphorylation but on kinase activity of the TBR1. Finally, treatment of endometrial and endometriotic cell lines with recombinant PAI-1 showed reduced cell adhesion, especially of the endometrial cells. In summary, our results demonstrate that both Smad-dependent and TBR1-dependent ERK1/2 pathways are necessary for TGF-β-dependent high level secretion of PAI-1, which might increase cellular deadhesion. PMID:27347347

  12. When a misperception favors a tragedy: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Couto, Lucélio B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-11-20

    Carlos Chagas, the discoverer of Chagas' disease was nominated to the Nobel Prize in 1921, but none did win the prize in that year. As a leader of a young scientist team, he discovered all aspects of the new disease from 1909 to 1920. It is still obscure why he did not win the Nobel Prize in 1921. Chagas was discarded by Gunnar Hedrèn on April 16, 1921. Hedrèn should have made a written report about the details of his evaluation to the Nobel Committee. However, such a document has not been found in the Nobel Committee Archives. No evidence of detractions made by Brazilian scientists on Chagas was found. Since Chagas nomination was consistent with the Nobel Committee requirements, as seen in the presentation letter by until now unknown Cypriano de Freitas, it become clear that Chagas did not win the Nobel Prize exclusively because the Nobel Committee did not perceive the importance of his discovery. Thus, it would be fair a posthumous Nobel Prize of 1921 to Carlos Chagas. A diploma of the Nobel Prize, as precedent with Dogmack in 1947, would recognize the merit of the scientist who made the most complete medical discovery of all times. PMID:24063910

  13. Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Miranda, E.; Candia, A.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.; Li, B.

    Given a graph G = (V,E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex in V, and a target set V' ⊆ V, the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree (PCST) problem is to find a tree T interconnecting vertices in V' that has minimum total costs on edges and maximum total prizes at vertices in T. This problem is NP-hard in general, and it is polynomial-time solvable when graphs G are restricted to 2-trees. In this paper, we study how to deal with PCST problem with uncertain costs and prizes. We assume that edge e could be included in T by paying cost x_ein[c_e^-,c_e^+] while taking risk c_e^+-x_e/ c_e^+-c_e^- of losing e, and vertex v could be awarded prize p_vin [p_v^-,p_v^+] while taking risk y_v-p_v^-/p_v^+-p_v^- of losing the prize. We establish two risk models for the PCST problem, one minimizing the maximum risk over edges and vertices in T and the other minimizing the sum of risks. Both models are subject to upper bounds on the budget for constructing a tree. We propose two polynomial-time algorithms for these problems on 2-trees, respectively. Our study shows that the risk models have advantages over the tradional robust optimization model, which yields NP-hard problems even if the original optimization problems are polynomial-time solvable.

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate and interleukin 1 independently regulate PAI-1 and uPAR expression in glioblastoma cells; implications for invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Lauren; Paugh, Barbara S.; Kapitonov, Dmitri; Wilczynska, Katarzyna M.; Alvarez, Silvina M.; Singh, Sandeep K.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Kordula, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an invasive primary brain tumor, which evades the current standard treatments. The invasion of glioblastoma cells into healthy brain tissue partly depends on the proteolytic and non-proteolytic activities of the plasminogen activator system proteins, including the urokinase-type (uPA) plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), and a receptor for uPA (uPAR). Here we demonstrate that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and the inflammatory mediator IL-1, increase the mRNA and protein expression of PAI-1 and uPAR, and enhance the invasion of U373 glioblastoma cells. Although IL-1 enhanced the expression of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), the enzyme that produces S1P, downregulation of SphK1 had no effect on the IL-1-induced uPAR or PAI-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that these actions of IL-1 are independent of S1P production. Indeed, the S1P-induced mRNA expression of uPAR and PAI-1 was blocked by the S1P2 receptor antagonist JTE013, and by the downregulation of S1P2 using siRNA. Accordingly, the inhibition of MEK1/2 and Rho-kinase, two downstream signaling cascades activated by S1P2, blocked the activation of PAI-1 and uPAR mRNA expression by S1P. More importantly, the attachment of glioblastoma cells was inhibited by the addition of exogenous PAI-1 or siRNA to uPAR, while the invasion of glioblastoma cells induced by S1P or IL-1 correlated with their ability to enhance the expression of PAI-1 and uPAR. Collectively, these results indicate that S1P and IL-1 activate distinct pathways leading to the mRNA and protein expression of PAI-1 and uPAR, which are important for glioblastoma invasiveness. PMID:18819934

  15. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities. PMID:25946543

  16. Potential clinical relevance of uPA and PAI-1 levels in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up.

    PubMed

    Buta, Marko; Džodić, Radan; Đurišić, Igor; Marković, Ivan; Vujasinović, Tijana; Markićević, Milan; Nikolić-Vukosavljević, Dragica

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) prognostic value in postmenopausal, node-negative breast cancer patients bearing tumors with estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) expression, treated with locoregional therapy alone, within an early follow-up. We focused our analysis on tumors of histological grade II in order to improve its prognostic value and, consequently, to improve a decision-making process. The cytosol extracts of 73 tumor samples were used for assessing several biomarkers. ER and PR levels were measured by classical biochemical method. Cathepsin D was assayed by a radiometric immunoassay while both uPA and PAI-1 level determinations were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. HER-2 gene amplification was determined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) in primary tumor tissue. Patients bearing tumors smaller than or equal to 2 cm (pT1) or those with low PAI-1 levels (PAI-1 < 6.35 pg/mg) showed favorable outcome compared to patients bearing tumors greater than 2 cm (pT2,3) or those with high PAI-1 levels, respectively. Analyses of 4 phenotypes, defined by tumor size and PAI-1 status, revealed that patients bearing either pT1 tumors, irrespective of PAI-1 levels, or pT2,3 tumors with low PAI-1 levels, had similar disease-free interval probabilities and showed favorable outcome compared to those bearing pT2,3 tumors with high PAI-1 levels. Our findings suggest that tumor size and PAI-1, used in combination as phenotypes are not only prognostic but might also be predictive in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up period. PMID:25994573

  17. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  18. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    SciTech Connect

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow [Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240]. Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher [Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233] and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of {beta}-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development [Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805]. Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time. According to background

  19. FETTU Wins International Year of Astronomy 2009 Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    The "From Earth to the Universe" (FETTU) project -- a worldwide series of exhibitions featuring striking astronomical imagery -- has won the first Mani Bhaumik prize for excellence in astronomy education and public outreach. This award was given for the best of the tens of thousands of activities conducted during the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009. NASA was a major sponsor of the project, which was led by the Chandra X-ray Center, that placed these images into public parks, metro stations, libraries, and other non-traditional locations around the world. The exhibit showcases some of the best astronomical images taken from telescopes both on the ground and in space, representing the wide variety of wavelengths and objects observed. While FETTU has been a worldwide effort, a NASA grant provided the primary funding for the FETTU exhibits in the US. NASA funds also supplied the project's infrastructure as well as educational and other materials that helped the FETTU international efforts to thrive. "We are truly thrilled to see how many people FETTU has reached both in the US and around the world," said Hashima Hasan, NASA's Single Point of Contact for IYA2009. "It's an investment we feel has been well spent." In the US, FETTU has been placed on semi-permanent display at Chicago's O'Hare and Atlanta's Hartsfield airports. In addition, a traveling version of the exhibit has visited over a dozen US cities such as Washington, DC, Anchorage, AK, Memphis, TN, and New York City. Three tactile and Braille versions of the FETTU exhibit were also made possible by the NASA funds, each of which has traveled to multiple locations around the country. "It's been so rewarding to see how people - many of whom had never seen these images - have embraced the wonders of astronomy through these exhibits," said Kimberly Kowal Arcand, co-chair of the FETTU project at the Chandra X-ray Center, which is located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. "The

  20. The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the Evolution of Neuro-Trauma Care: Would the 16th President Have Survived in the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    Yan, Sandra C; Smith, Timothy R; Bi, Wenya Linda; Brewster, Ryan; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2015-11-01

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16(th) President of the United States of America. On April 14, 1865, shortly after his re-election and the conclusion of the Civil War, Lincoln was shot and killed by John Wilkes Booth. Although numerous physicians tended to the President shortly after his injury, he passed away the next morning. Today, we recognize Lincoln as one of the greatest Presidents in American history. His assassination profoundly influenced the future of the United States, especially as the country was coming back together again following the Civil War. Testaments to his lasting legacy can be seen in many places, from the stone carving of him on Mount Rushmore to his image gracing the $5 bill. What if the President had survived his injury? Would he have had a different outcome utilizing current critical care treatment? Neurotrauma care in 1865 was not yet developed, and head wounds such as the one Lincoln sustained were almost always fatal. The medical attention he received is considered by historians and physicians today to be excellent for that time. We look at the evolution of neurotrauma care during the last 150 years in the US. Particular focus is paid to the advancement of care for penetrating brain injuries in modern trauma centers. PMID:26092530

  1. The Utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for Discriminating PTSD, Depression, and Social Phobia in Trauma-Exposed College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Weathers, Frank W.; Flood, Amanda M.; Eakin, David E.; Benson, Trisha A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a sample…

  2. Effect of Fagonia arabica on thrombin induced release of t-PA and complex of PAI-1 tPA in cultured HUVE cells.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Prutha D; Nayak, Amit R; Chaurasia, Sweta R; Deopujari, Jayant Y; Chourasia, Chhaya; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-07-01

    Fagonia arabica (FA) possesses a thrombolytic property which has been earlier reported in our laboratory. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of FA on thrombin-induced tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) release from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVE) for studying its clot lytic activity. For this, establishment of cell line model has been done by isolating the cells from human umbilical cord. Cell toxicity was evaluated using XTT assay. Estimation of t-PA and PAI-1 t-PA complex were done using ELISA technique. Thrombin treatment induces the t-PA and PAI-1 release from HUVE cell line, and FA treatment was found to antagonize the thrombin induced t-PA and PAI-1 release. Our preliminary results suggest that FA may be used as an alternative to thrombolytic drug. However, study demands further experiments using animal model of thrombosis to establish the role of FA as a novel thrombolytic drug. PMID:27419084

  3. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  4. Nobel Prize Literature; A Selection of the Works of Forty-Four Nobel Prize Winning Authors in the Library of Dutchess Community College, with Biographical and Critical Sketches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Terry E., Comp.

    This bibliography is a compilation of works by 44 Nobel Prize winning authors presently available at the Dutchess Community College library. Each entry describes the piece of literature for which the author received an award, provides a brief sketch of the writer, includes a commentary on the themes of major works, and lists the writer's works. An…

  5. PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in non-hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, Linda; Pasta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the different roles of thrombophilia in patients with and without viral etiology. The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 1079 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), enrolled from January 2000 to January 2014. METHODS: All Caucasian LC patients consecutively observed in a fourteen-year period were included; the presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS) was registered. The differences between the proportions of each THRGF with regard to the presence or absence of viral etiology and the frequencies of the THRGF genotypes with those predicted in a population by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were registered. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventeen/one thousand and seventy-six patients (38.6%) showed thrombophilia: 217 PAI-1 4G-4G, 176 MTHFR C677TT, 71 V Leiden factor and 41 prothrombin G20210 A, 84 with more than 1 THRGF; 350 presented with no viral liver cirrhosis (NVLC) and 729 with, called viral liver cirrhosis (VLC), of whom 56 patients were hepatitis C virus + hepatitis B virus. PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR C677TT, the presence of at least one TRHGF and the presence of > 1 THRGF, were statistically more frequent in patients with NVLC vs patients with VLC: All χ2 > 3.85 and P < 0.05. Patients with PVT and/or BCS with at least one TRHGF were 189/352 (53.7%). The Hardy-Weinberg of PAI-1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes deviated from that expected from a population in equilibrium in patients with NVLC (respectively χ2 = 39.3; P < 0.000 and χ2 = 27.94; P < 0.05), whereas the equilibrium was respected in VLC. CONCLUSION: MTHFR 677TT was nearly twofold and PAI-1 4G-4G more than threefold more frequently found in NVLC vs patients with VLC; the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of these two polymorphisms confirms this data in NVLC. We suggest that PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT could be considered as factors of fibrosis and thrombosis mechanisms, increasing

  6. Genome-wide association study for circulating levels of PAI-1 provides novel insights into its regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Tregouet, David; Shin, So-Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Johnson, Andrew D.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M.; Ikram, Mohammad A.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Frances M. K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M. C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming-Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Hofman, Albert; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D.; Becker, Lewis C.; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel associations between genetic variants and circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) concentration, and examined functional implications of variants and genes that were discovered. A discovery meta-analysis was performed in 19 599 subjects, followed by replication analysis of genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10−8) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 796 independent samples. We further examined associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease, assessed the functional significance of the SNPs for gene expression in human tissues, and conducted RNA-silencing experiments for one novel association. We confirmed the association of the 4G/5G proxy SNP rs2227631 in the promoter region of SERPINE1 (7q22.1) and discovered genome-wide significant associations at 3 additional loci: chromosome 7q22.1 close to SERPINE1 (rs6976053, discovery P = 3.4 × 10−10); chromosome 11p15.2 within ARNTL (rs6486122, discovery P = 3.0 × 10−8); and chromosome 3p25.2 within PPARG (rs11128603, discovery P = 2.9 × 10−8). Replication was achieved for the 7q22.1 and 11p15.2 loci. There was nominal association with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease at ARNTL (P < .05). Functional studies identified MUC3 as a candidate gene for the second association signal on 7q22.1. In summary, SNPs in SERPINE1 and ARNTL and an SNP associated with the expression of MUC3 were robustly associated with circulating levels of PAI-1. PMID:22990020

  7. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2010 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 is awarded to M M Paulides et al from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for their paper on hyperthermia treatment: The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement M M Paulides, J F Bakker, M Linthorst, J van der Zee, Z Rijnen, E Neufeld, P M T Pattynama, P P Jansen, P C Levendag and G C van Rhoon 2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2465 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Alonzo-Proulx O, Packard N, Boone J M, Al-Mayah A, Brock K K, Shen S Z and Yaffe M J 2010 Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms Phys. Med. Biol. 55 3027 Bian J, Siewerdsen J H, Han X, Sidky E Y, Prince J L, Pelizzari C A and Pan X 2010 Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat-panel-detector cone-beam CT Phys. Med. Biol. 55 6575 Brun M-A, Formanek F, Yasuda A, Sekine M, Ando N

  8. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-07-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2009 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have a clear, and very worthy, winner this year. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the 2009 Roberts Prize is awarded to E Z Zhang et al from University College London for their paper on photoacoustic tomography. In vivo high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy E Z Zhang, J G Laufer, R B Pedley and P C Beard 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1035-46 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Cheng Y-C N , Neelavalli J and Haacke E M 2009 Limitations of calculating field distributions and magnetic susceptibilities in MRI using a Fourier based method Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1169-89 Cho S, Ahn S, Li Q and Leahy R M 2009 Exact and approximate Fourier rebinning of PET data from time-of-flight to non time-of-flight 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 467-84 Davidson S R H, Weersink R A, Haider M A, Gertner M R, Bogaards A, Giewercer D, Scherz A, Sherar M D, Elhilali M, Chin J L, Trachtenberg J and Wilson B C 2009 Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial

  9. Peter Agre, 2003 Nobel Prize winner in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Knepper, Mark A; Nielsen, Soren

    2004-04-01

    Peter C. Agre, an American Society of Nephrology member, is the recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of the aquaporin water channels. The function of many cells requires that water move rapidly into and out of them. There was only indirect evidence that proteinaceous channels provide this vital activity until Agre and colleagues purified aquaporin-1 from human erythrocytes and reported its cDNA sequence. They proved that aquaporin-1 is a specific water channel by cRNA expression studies in Xenopus oocytes and by functional reconstitution of transport activity in liposomes after the incorporation of the purified protein. These findings sparked a veritable explosion of work that affects several long-standing areas of investigation such as the biophysics of water permeation across cell membranes, the structural biology of integral membrane proteins, the physiology of fluid transport in the kidney and other organs, and the pathophysiological basis of inherited and acquired disorders of water balance. Agre's discovery of the first water channel has spurred a revolution in animal and plant physiology and in medicine. PMID:15034115

  10. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-07-01

    A review is given of the crucial work performed by Paul C. Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield that lead to their being awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2003. Lauterbur first expounded the idea of mapping spatial information from spectral data in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through the application of magnetic field gradients (P. C. Lauterbur, Nature 1973 , 242, 190-191). One year later Mansfield and co-workers introduced the idea of selective excitation to NMR imaging (A. N. Garroway, P. K. Grannell, and P. Mansfield. J. Phys. C: Solid State Physics 1974 , 7, L457-L462). A major step in making the technique useful for clinical imaging came with Mansfield's publication of the method known as echo planar imaging (P. Mansfield, J. Phys. C: Solid State Physics 1977, 10 (3) , L55-L58). Lauterbur's and Mansfield's work captured the essence of scientific discovery, collaboration, and concerted effort to overcome significant technical issues, and were key to the development of the technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Examples of how MRI technology can be extended to chemical research are given, and limitations of the technique in this regard are discussed. Discussion of how to use commonly available NMR spectrometers for chemical imaging is also provided.

  11. The curious case of the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    The 1960 Nobel Prize was awarded to Macfarlane Burnet and Peter Medawar for immunological tolerance. The Nobel Archives reveal that the two were never nominated together by anyone; Burnet had repeatedly been nominated for his virology studies, and the Medawar group (including Rupert Billingham and Leslie Brent) had been nominated independently for their transplantation work. A review of the 1950s literature suggests that tolerance had not yet, by 1960, reached the level of acceptance and acclaim in the immunological community to appear to justify the award. Burnet probably should have received the Prize for his virus work, and perhaps also for his Clonal Selection Theory, whereas Billingham and Brent should have shared in a Prize with Medawar for transplantation. If a Prize were to be given for tolerance, most agree that Ray Owen should have shared in it, for his work on cattle chimerism. It is suggested that the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar for immunological tolerance may have been given for the wrong reasons and to the wrong associates. PMID:26790994

  12. Prize-based Contingency Management for the Treatment of Substance Abusers: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benishek, L. A.; Dugosh, K. L.; Kirby, K. C.; Matejkowski, J.; Clements, N. T.; Seymour, B. L.; Festinger, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To review randomized controlled trials to assess efficacy of a prize-based contingency management procedure in reducing substance use (where a drug-free breath or urine sample provides a chance of winning a prize). Methods A meta-analysis was conducted on articles published from January 2000 to February 2013 to determine the effect size of studies comparing prize-based contingency management to a treatment-as-usual control condition (k=19 studies). Parallel analyses evaluated the efficacy of both short- (k=9 studies) and long-term outcomes (k=6 studies) of prize-based contingency management . Results The average end-of-treatment effect size (Cohen's d) was .46 [95% CI=0.37,0.54). This effect size decreased at the short-term (≤ 3-month) post-intervention follow-up to .33 (95% CI=0.12,0.54) and at the 6-month follow-up time point there was no detectable effect (d=-.09 (95% CI=−0.28,0.10)). Conclusion Adding prize-based contingency management to behavioral support for substance use disorders can increase short-term abstinence but the effect does not appear to persist to 6 months. PMID:24750232

  13. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  14. The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education: Ten Years of Learning for Peace. Peace Education Miniprints, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Unku Abdul; Reardon, Betty A.

    The UNESCO Prize for Peace Education was established in 1981. The purpose of the award is to honor outstanding contributions to the field of peace education in its most broadly defined sense. In this paper, two members of the international jury for the prize review the recipients of the awards from 1981 to 1991, and thus demonstrate the variety of…

  15. Randomized Trial Comparing Two Treatment Strategies Using Prize-Based Reinforcement of Abstinence in Cocaine and Opiate Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kenzie L.; Ghitza, Udi E.; Schmittner, John P.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Epstein, David H.

    2008-01-01

    We compared two strategies of prize-based contingency management (CM) in methadone-maintained outpatients. Urine was tested thrice weekly for 5 weeks pre-CM, 12 weeks CM, and 8 weeks post-CM. Participants were randomly assigned to a cocaine contingency (four prize draws for each cocaine-negative urine, N = 29) or an opiate-cocaine contingency (one…

  16. Prospective multi-center study for quantification of chemotherapies and CTX-related direct medication costs avoided by use of biomarkers uPA and PAI-1 in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Augustin, Doris; Wischnik, Arthur; Kiechle, Marion; Höss, Cornelia; Steinkohl, Oliver; Rack, Brigitte; Kapitza, Thomas; Krase, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Biomarkers uPA/PAI-1 as recommended by ASCO and AGO are used in primary breast cancer to avoid unnecessary CTX in medium risk-recurrence patients. This study verified how many CTX cycles and CTX-related direct medication costs can be avoided by uPA/PAI-1 testing. A prospective, non-interventional, multi-center study was performed among six Certified Breast Centers to analyze application of uPA/PAI-1 and consecutive decision-making. CTX avoided were identified and direct costs for CTX, CTX-related concomitant medication and febrile neutropenia (FN) prophylaxis with G-CSF calculated. In n = 93 breast cancers n = 35 CTX (37.6%) with 210 CTX cycles were avoided according to uPA/PAI-1 test result. uPA/PAI-1 testing saved direct medication costs for CTX of 177,453 €, CTX-related concomitant medication of 27,482 € and FN prophylaxis of 20,599 €, overall 225,534 €. At test costs at 287.50 € uPA/PAI-1 testing resulted in additional costs of 26,737.50 €. uPA/PAI-1 has proven to be cost-effective at a return-on-investment ratio of 8.4:1. Indirect cost savings further increase this ROI. These results support decision-making for cost-effective diagnostics and therapy in breast cancer. PMID:23643802

  17. The MAPK pathway and HIF-1 are involved in the induction of the human PAI-1 gene expression by insulin in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Elitsa Y; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Enhanced levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are considered to be a risk factor for pathological conditions associated with hypoxia or hyperinsulinemia. The expression of the PAI-1 gene is increased by insulin in different cells, although, the molecular mechanisms behind insulin-induced PAI-1 expression are not fully known yet. Here, we show that insulin upregulates human PAI-1 gene expression and promoter activity in HepG2 cells and that mutation of the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE)-binding hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) abolished the insulin effects. Mutation of E-boxes E4 and E5 abolished the insulin-dependent activation of the PAI-1 promoter only under normoxia, but did not affect it under hypoxia. Furthermore, the insulin effect was associated with activation of HIF-1alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) but not PDK1 and PKB in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, mutation of a putative FoxO1 binding site which was supposed to be involved in insulin-dependent PAI-1 gene expression influenced the insulin-dependent activation only under normoxia. Thus, insulin-dependent PAI-1 gene expression might be regulated by the action of both HIF-1 and FoxO1 transcription factors. PMID:17384280

  18. [Posthumous nomination for Medicine Nobel Prizes II. The positivism era (1849-1899)].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1997-06-01

    The author proposes the nomination of great physicians of the second half of the XIX century for a posthumous Medicine Nobel Prize. The valorization given by medical historians Garrison, Lavastine, Castiglioni, Lain Entralgo and Guerra, is used to select the better candidates. One to three names are assigned by year from 1849 to 1899. Four categories of Nobel prizes are assigned: a) Basic biological disciplines, b) Clinical and surgical medicine, pathology and specialties, c) Discoverers of transcendental diseases that are eponyms and d) New medical technologies. A total of 84 nominees for the Nobel Prize are presented. These lists are presented as preliminary and tentative to allow an extensive debate about the history of medicine during the nineteenth century. PMID:9515294

  19. [Posthumous nomination for Medicine Nobel Prizes. I. The Romantic Era (1800-1848)].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1997-04-01

    In the centennial of Alfred Nobel's death, the author proposes the nomination of great physicians of XIX century for a posthumous Medicine Nobel Prize. The valorization given by medical historians such as Garrison, Lavastine, Castiglioni, Lain Entralgo and Guerra, was used to select the best candidates. One to three names were assigned per year, from 1800 to 1848. Four categories of "Romantic Nobel Prizes" are assigned: a) Founders of basic disciplines (anatomy, chemistry, physiology etc); b) Masters of clinical and surgical medicine, pathology and specialties; c) Discoverers of transcendental diseases that are eponyms and d) Other great inventors or discoverers. A total of 66 nominees for the Nobel Prize, equally distributed between French, German and English physician, are presented. The omissions and limitation of this proposals are discussed. PMID:9460293

  20. Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

    2012-04-24

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions

  1. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Spatial Model for Cognitive Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O’Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.” This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  2. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. PMID:25521374

  3. Mega-prizes in medicine: big cash awards may stimulate useful and rapid therapeutic innovation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Following Horrobin's suggestion of 1986, I argue that offering very large prizes (tens of millions of US dollars, or more) for solving specific therapeutic problems, would be an excellent strategy for promoting the rapid development of effective new treatments. The two mainstream ways of paying for medical research are funding the process with grants or funding the outcome via patent protection. When grants are used to fund the process of research the result tends to be 'pure' science, guided by intrinsic scientific objectives. Practical results, such as useful therapeutic advances, are a by-product. Patent-seeking research, by contrast, is more focused on technology than science. It seeks practical results; and aims to pay for itself (and make a profit) in the long term by generating a patentable product or procedure. Prize-seeking research is subject to different incentives and applicable to different situations than either process-funded or patent-seeking research. Prize seeking researchers have a strong incentive to solve the specified problem as rapidly as possible, but the problem may be solved using old ideas that are scientifically mundane or unpatentable technologies and methods. Prizes therefore seem to generate solutions which are incremental extensions, new applications or novel combinations of already-existing technologies. The main use of mega-prizes in medicine would be to accelerate therapeutic progress in stagnant fields of research and to address urgent problems. For example, medical charities focused on specific diseases should consider accumulating their resources until they can offer a mega-prize for solving a clinical problem of special concern to their patients. Prize money should be big enough to pay for the research and development, the evaluation of the new treatment in a clinical trial, and with a large profit left-over to compensate for the intrinsic risk of competing. Sufficiently large amounts of money, and the prestige and publicity

  4. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1999: Ahmed H. Zewail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-12-01

    The 1999 Nobel Prize was awarded to Ahmed Zewail "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy." His pioneering investigation of fundamental chemical reactions using ultra-short flashes allowed chemists, for the first time, to monitor reactions on the time scale on which the atoms are actually moving as bonds are broken and formed. The fundamental limit of femtosecond resolution represents the culmination of a century of progress in chemical dynamics that began with the first Nobel Prize awarded to Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901.

  5. [Avermectin, from winning the Nobel Prize to "innovation in China"].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    The uprise of the superpower nations is always accompanied by the breakthrough and advances of technologies and innovations in the history. Natural products play very important role in human health, such as anticancer molecular taxol, anti-infection drug artemisinin that save a lot of lives, metabolic disease treatment, nutrition and health care. However, more has never been explored. With the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded to William C. Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu for the discovery of avermectins and artemisinin respectively, the second "Golden age" in the development of natural product is dawning. China is a "world factory" and natural drugs-rich country, but how to upgrade and advance the industry and realize the China dream? Avermectins, produced by Streptomyces avermitilis, are pesticide with high efficiency and low levels of side effects. However, the low producer and expensive development pattern of high consumption, high contamination is not sustainable. Solving the problem, increasing the production and utilization of raw material, reducing the energy consumption and cost of production, decreasing environmental pollution are key to transform China into a power house. In this paper, we case-study avermectins to review the industry development driven by fundamental research. Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy.of Sciences increased the production of avermectin 1000 folds to 9 g/L, which out licensed to new Veyong biochemical Ltd and avermectin Coalitions. As a result, Merck Sharp and Dohme ceased the manufacture of avermectins. The success also shed lights on the improvement of other natural product drugs in China. PMID:27382795

  6. The fabulous legacy of a Nobel Prize Laureate

    PubMed Central

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Merad, Miriam; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medecine 2011 was awarded to Ralph M. Steinman, Jules A. Hoffman and Bruce A. Beutler for the discovery of essential elements of innate immunity, in particular dendritic cells (DCs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antigens become immunogenic and capable of triggering an adaptive immune response involving antigen-specific, MHC- restricted effector T cells, only if they are captured and presented by “accessory” cells. In 1972, Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil Cohn identified in lymphoid tissues, cells with treelike, arborescent morphology that they named “dendritic cells” (DC) (from the greek word “tree” for tree, δένδρον) with a superior ability to induce alloreactive T cell proliferation in vitro (1978) and to stimulate the rejection of kidney allotransplants in rodents (1982). Thirty years after their discovery, DCare now known to play a seminal role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, In addition DC are being used in numerous clinical studies all over the world to increase immunity to infectious or tumor-associated antigens. This effort involved the contribution of an international network of basicand clinical scientists spearheaded by Ralph M. Steinman to defineappropriate culture conditions to generate ex vivo DC from circulating or bone marrow precursors, to definefunctionally distinct DC subsets, to identifytheir maturation pathways including those relying on the stimulation of TLRs, and finally to develop DC based-vaccines to immunize patients infected with HIV or affected by cancer. Here, we will detail the history of DC and outline the therapeutic implications of Ralph M. Steinman’s seminal discovery.

  7. [Tuberculosis 110 years after the Nobel Prize awarded to Koch].

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Viviana; Kantor, Isabel N

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1905 to Robert Koch "for his investigations and discoveries in relation to tuberculosis (TB)". He discovered the causal agent of TB, described the four principles that since then have guided research in communicable diseases and also prepared the old tuberculin, a bacillary extract that failed as a healing element but allowed the early diagnosis of TB infection and promoted the understanding of cellular immunity. After his death, the most conspicuous achievements against TB were the BCG vaccine, and the discovery of streptomycin, the antibiotic that launched the era of the effective treatment of TB. Drug-resistance soon appeared. In Argentina, studies on drug resistance began in the 60s. In the 70s, shortened anti-TB drug schemes were introduced consisting in two-month treatment with four drugs, followed by four months with two drugs. The incidence of TB decreased worldwide, but the immune depression associated with awarded together with the misuse of anti-TB drugs allowed the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensive resistance, with the emergence of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, including Argentina. New rapid diagnostic methods based on molecular biology were developed and also new drugs, but the treatment of multidrug resistant and extensively resistant TB is still difficult and expensive. TB research has marked several milestones in medical sciences, including the monumental Koch postulates, the tuberculin skin test that laid the basis for understanding cell-mediated immunity, the first design of randomized clinical trials and the use of combined multi-drug treatments. PMID:26707664

  8. Revisiting the 1981 Nobel Prize to Roger Sperry, David Hubel, and Torsten Wiesel on the occasion of the centennial of the Prize to Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    In 1981 the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology was awarded to Roger Sperry for his work on the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, and to David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel for their work on information processing in the visual system. The present paper points to some important links between the work of Sperry and that of Hubel and Wiesel and to their influences on neuroscience in the best tradition going back to Cajal. PMID:16997764

  9. Fructose Rich Diet-Induced High Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) Production in the Adult Female Rat: Protective Effect of Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Alzamendi, Ana; Ongaro, Luisina; Giovambattista, Andrés; Gaillard, Rolf C.; Spinedi, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The effect of progesterone (P4) on fructose rich diet (FRD) intake-induced metabolic, endocrine and parametrial adipose tissue (PMAT) dysfunctions was studied in the adult female rat. Sixty day-old rats were i.m. treated with oil alone (control, CT) or containing P4 (12 mg/kg). Rats ate Purina chow-diet ad libitum throughout the entire experiment and, between 100 and 120 days of age drank ad libitum tap water alone (normal diet; CT-ND and P4-ND) or containing fructose (10% w/v; CT-FRD and P4-FRD). At age 120 days, animals were subjected to a glucose tolerance test or decapitated. Plasma concentrations of various biomarkers and PMAT gene abundance were monitored. P4-ND (vs. CT-ND) rats showed elevated circulating levels of lipids. CT-FRD rats displayed high (vs. CT-ND) plasma concentrations of lipids, leptin, adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Lipidemia and adiponectinemia were high (vs. P4-ND) in P4-FRD rats. Although P4 failed to prevent FRD-induced hyperleptinemia, it was fully protective on FRD-enhanced plasma PAI-1 levels. PMAT leptin and adiponectin mRNAs were high in CT-FRD and P4-FRD rats. While FRD enhanced PMAT PAI-1 mRNA abundance in CT rats, this effect was absent in P4 rats. Our study supports that a preceding P4-enriched milieu prevented the enhanced prothrombotic risk induced by FRD-elicited high PAI-1 production. PMID:23016136

  10. John Bardeen: The Only Person to Win Two Nobel Prizes in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-01-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity.…

  11. Following Zahka: Using Nobel Prize Winners' Speeches and Ideas to Teach Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin P.; Wilson, John K.; Becker, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, the late William Zahka (1990, 1998) outlined how the acceptance speeches of those who received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science could be used to teach undergraduates. This article updates and expands Zahka's work, identifying some of the issues discussed by recent Nobel Laureates, classifying their speeches by topic…

  12. A Nobel Prize for membrane traffic: Vesicles find their journey’s end

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cell biologists everywhere rejoiced when this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof for their contributions to uncovering the mechanisms governing vesicular transport. In this article, we highlight their achievements and also pay tribute to the pioneering scientists before them who set the stage for their remarkable discoveries. PMID:24215073

  13. Richard Willstätter and the 1915 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    One hundred years after his Nobel Prize, Richard Willstätter's achievements and the fascinating role he played in 20th century chemistry are discussed in this Essay. Several of his discoveries, such as the anthocyanidins, cyclooctatetraene, the ortho-quinones, and the structure of cocaine, will forever be associated with his name. PMID:26291186

  14. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected…

  15. Charting the Course: Four Years of the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Entremont, Chad; Norton, Jill; Bennett, Michael; Piazza, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, the Thomas W. Payzant School on the Move (SOM) Prize has been awarded annually to a Boston public school that has made significant progress in improving student achievement. This case study identifies the structures and strategies that best serve students in prizewinning schools, provides a profile of each of the four winning schools…

  16. Children's spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mandy; Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children's level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children's happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children's expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize. PMID:26441776

  17. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p < 0.0001) during an intervention period of 2.5 school weeks. The school with the longest intervention period, 6 months, showed a PP selection increase of from 3.9% to 26.4% (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, giving small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children. PMID:26914228

  18. Languages for Learning: Granting All Students Access to New Skills. Fishman Prize Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Steven; Zunkiewicz, Kelly; Strait, Laura; Towne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A single great teacher can change a life by introducing a new language, helping you master a new skill or opening a door you never knew was there. That's why every year, TNTP awards the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice: to celebrate a select cohort of public school teachers who demonstrate exceptionally effective teaching with…

  19. Prizing Children's Science Information Books: The Text, Reading and the Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Joy; Jarman, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Society Young People's Book Prize is awarded annually in the United Kingdom for the best science information book, and the winning book is chosen by panels of young people. This article discusses the findings of a study of the responses to the books and to their judging experience of young people who participated on panels in the 2011…

  20. Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics Lecture: Understanding Nonequilibrium via Rare Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona-Lasinio, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Irreversible processes are a hot subject in statistical mechanics. During the last decade through the effort of several people, including the recipient of the prize and his collaborators, a progress in understanding stationary nonequilibrium states has been achieved. The key has been the study of rare fluctuations. The talk will review some basic ideas, results and perspectives.

  1. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Affordable Rooftop rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html . DATES: DOE will accept comments... ``America's Most Affordable Rooftop'' in the Subject line Mail: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Solar....S. Department of Energy, Solar Program, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585....

  2. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  3. Subsequent dental research output of South African division of the IADR Colgate Prize entrants.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michelle I; McAlpine, Alistair J; Mkhaliphi, Diana S; Grossman, Elly S

    2005-11-01

    This study recorded the research output of all participants for the IADR (South African Division; SA) Colgate Prize for 1967-2004 to establish whether, in their later careers, prize winners had a greater research output than runners-up. Using a list of all entrants, each individual was classified as winner or runner-up and by gender, race, and research field of presentation. The publication output for each individual was obtained from PubMed. A Poisson regression set at P < 0.05 compared publication numbers between winners and runners-up. There were two groups of entrants: 101 participated once, and twenty-two participated twice or thrice. Winners had significantly more publications than runners-up, more so for the multiple entrants (winners 27.5+/-22.4; runners-up 16.5+/-25.5) than single entrants (winners 16.0+/-40.8; runners-up 12.0+/-27.7). The number of individuals participating in the Colgate Prize has declined, but representivity for race and gender is improving. This is the first study to establish that SA IADR Colgate Prize participants fulfil the long-term IADR ideal of research promotion among young investigators. PMID:16275690

  4. Chiara Lubich's 1977 Templeton Prize Acceptance Speech: Case Study in the Mystical Narrative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cali, Dennis D.

    1993-01-01

    Illuminates Kenneth Burke's characteristics of a mystical rhetoric as they issue from "purpose" as a dominant dramatistic element. Offers a case study in mystical rhetoric by identifying the essential qualities of a mystical narrative and demonstrating how these qualities operate in Chiara Lubich's 1977 Templeton Prize Acceptance Speech. (SR)

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1981: Fukui and Hoffmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-06-01

    The 1981 Nobel Prize was awarded to Kenichi Fukui and Roald Hoffmann "for their theories, developed independently, concerning the course of chemical reactions." Those theories, which have come to be known as "frontier orbital theory" and the "Woodward-Hoffmann rules" respectively, remain important tools for predicting the course of organic reactions and they are frequently taught in courses in mechanistic organic chemistry.

  6. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  7. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshach, Haim; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-06-01

    Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS). The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story), showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  8. In Sciences, the Reflected Prestige of the Nobel Prize Extends Far Beyond Anything Its Creator Imagined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Kim

    1987-01-01

    As the ultimate symbol of excellence, the Nobel Prize has had a tremendous effect on scholars, institutions, and national pride. Topics discussed include: recruitment and fund raising, salaries and other perks, "raids" from other institutions, students seeking out winners, publication declines, etc. (MLW)

  9. Using prize-based incentives to enhance daily interactive voice response (IVR) compliance: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Jan A.; Minard, Charles G.; Hudson, Sonora; Green, Charles E.; Schmitz, Joy M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a prize-based contingency-management (CM) approach to encourage interactive voice response (IVR) compliance in a cocaine-treatment study and explored the association between IVR call rate and outcome during a cocaine abstinence-induction trial. Subjects called into the IVR system daily to complete a brief interview assessing cocaine use for past 24 hours. One group earned $1 for each call; the other earned one draw per call from a “prize bowl” with a range of awards. Abstinence was rewarded according to a high-value voucher incentive schedule, which was the same for both groups, and confirmed by thrice-weekly urine testing at clinic visits. Odds of calling were 4.7 times greater (95% CI: 1.23, 17.91) in the prize-CM group than in the fixed dollar CM group. In addition, the percent of IVR calls was significantly associated with abstinence achievement, χ2 (1) = 5.147, p<0.023. The use of prize-based CM to increase the use of IVR is feasible and deserves examination as an innovation for helping participants engage in treatment. PMID:24029622

  10. Renal transplantation experience in a patient with factor V Leiden homozygous, MTHFR C677T heterozygous, and PAI heterozygous mutation.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Bora; Tavil, Betül; Gümrük, Fatma; Aki, Tuncay F; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2015-08-01

    Vascular complications are important causes of allograft loss in renal transplantation. A two and a half-month-old boy was diagnosed with posterior urethral valve and progressed to end-stage renal disease at eight yr of age. During the HD period, a central venous catheter was replaced three times for repeated thrombosis. The boy was found to be homozygous for FVL and heterozygous for both MTHFR (C677T) and PAI. At the age of 12, renal transplantation was performed from a deceased donor. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy was initiated with continuous intravenous administration of heparin at the dose of 10 IU/kg/h. HD was performed for the first three days. By the fourth day of transplantation, his urine output had increased gradually. Heparin infusion was continued for 18 days during hospitalization at the same dosage. Thereafter, he was discharged with LMWH. On the third month after transplantation, his serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dL and eGFR was 75.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2). He has still been using LMWH, and his eGFR was 78.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) eight months after transplantation. Postoperative low-dose heparin treatment is a safe strategy for managing a patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors. PMID:25996881

  11. The Aula Espazio Observatory At The Universidad Del Pais Vasco (Spain): Planetary Observations For Graduate And Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Hueso, R.; Rojas, J. F.

    2010-10-01

    The Aula Espazio Gela is a facility at the School of Technical Engineering of the Universidad del Pais Vasco (Bilbao, Spain) dedicated to the education of undergarduated and gratuated students in the research and technology of space science activities. It also promotes the collaboration between the University and industrial spatial sector. One of the main elements of this facility is an astronomical observatory that is oriented to the activities of the students of the Master in Space Science and Technology. The main instrument is a 50 cm aperture Dall-Kirham telescope with equatorial mount completely robotized that includes different CCD cameras. Here we present some of the projects developed by graduate and under-graduate students in the field of the solar system. Explicitly we present some studies dedicated to the studies of planetary atmospheres and to acquire skills on the software management of planetary images. Aknowledgements: This project is supported by the Dpto. Innovación y Promoción Económica de la Diputación Foral de Bizkaia (Basque Country).

  12. SERPINE1, PAI-1 protein coding gene, methylation levels and epigenetic relationships with adiposity changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features under dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Legarrea, Patricia; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Zulet, Marian Angeles; Martinez, Jose Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with metabolic disorders, through different mechanisms, which could involve changes in DNA methylation. This work aimed to assess the potential relationships of the cytosine methylation levels within SERPINE1 gene transcriptional regulatory region, which codes for PAI-1, in peripheral white blood cells with anthropometrical, metabolic and inflammatory features. Forty-six obese subjects with metabolic syndrome features followed Control or Metabolic Syndrome Reduction in Navarra (RESMENA) energy-restricted (−30%E) diets for 8 weeks. SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region methylation at baseline was analyzed by a microarray technical. Both dietary strategies reduced anthropometric and biochemical parameters. The Control group significantly reduced plasma PAI-1 concentrations but not the RESMENA group. Participants from both nutritional interventions with higher SERPINE1 methylation levels at baseline showed significantly major reductions in body weight, total fat mass, android fat mass, total cholesterol and triglycerides, as compared with those with lower initial SERPINE1 methylation levels. In conclusion, the DNA methylation levels of SERPINE1 transcriptional regulatory region were associated with some metabolic and anthropometric changes in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome under energy restriction, suggesting a complex epigenetic network in the regulation of this recognized pro-inflammatory marker. (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086) PMID:24249967

  13. Differential response patterns on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in compensation-seeking and non-compensation-seeking mild traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Galbreath, Jennifer; Brown, Michelle; Turnbull, Jane

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively little research on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) populations. There is also little research on how compensation-seeking status affects personality assessment results in MTBI patients. The current study examined the PAI scales and subscales in two MTBI groups, one composed of compensation-seeking MTBI patients and the other consisting of non-compensation-seeking MTBI patients. Results indicated significant differences on several scales and subscales between the two MTBI groups, with the compensation-seeking MTBI patients having significantly higher elevations on scales related to somatic preoccupation (Somatic Complaint Scale, SOM), emotional distress (Anxiety Scale, ANX; Anxiety Related Disorders Scale, ARD; Depression Scale, DEP), and the Negative Impression Management, NIM, validity scale. All the SOM subscales and the Anxiety Cognitive (ANX-C) and ANX Affective, ANX-A, subscales were also elevated in the compensation-seeking group. Results indicated that several scales on the PAI were sensitive to group differences in compensation-seeking status in MTBI patients. PMID:22136511

  14. Effect of aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid on the protein expression of PAI-1 and p22(phox) in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Zaghetto, Francesca; Pagnin, Elisa; Davis, Paul A; De Mozzi, Paola; Sartorato, Paola; Martire, Giuseppe; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio

    2004-04-01

    Aldosterone excess can produce heart and kidney fibrosis, which seem to be related to a direct effect of aldosterone at the level of specific receptors. We report a direct, mineralocorticoid-mediated effect on the protein expression of two markers of oxidative stress after incubation of mononuclear leukocytes with 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.38 +/- 0.05 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.05). The same effect was also found with 3 x 10(-5) M glycyrrhetinic acid, the principal constituent of licorice root (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.37 +/- 0.97 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.04). The effect of both aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid is blocked by incubation with added 1 x 10(-6) M of receptor-antagonist canrenone. Canrenone alone did not show any effect. PAI-1 related protein was also found using 4 x 10(-9) M aldosterone. Incubations with 1 x 10(-9) M for 3 hours as well as 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone for 5, 10, and 20 minutes were ineffective for both proteins. These data support the previous finding of an involvement of mononuclear leukocytes in the pathogenesis of the oxidative stress induced by hyperaldosteronism. In addition, the results confirm our previous data on a direct effect of glycyrrhetinic acid at the level of mineralocorticoid receptors. PMID:15070972

  15. Lack of association between Ser413/Cys polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) and premature coronary atherosclerotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Babak; Jooyan, Najmeh; Bahari, Marzieh; Senemar, Sara; Yavarian, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system produced predominantly by the macrophages and monocytes. It has been demonstrated that fibrinolysis regulation has a great importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic plaques. Thus in the current investigation, we sought to determine whether Ser413/Cys polymorphism (rs6104) of PAI-2 gene could be associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors. Ser413/Cys polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP technique using Mwo I restriction enzyme for 184 men under 50 years of age and 216 women less than 55 years of age who underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. Data on the history of familial myocardial infarction or other heart diseases, hypertension, and smoking habit were collected by a simple questionnaire. Fasting levels of blood sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were also measured by enzymatic methods. Frequencies of the Ser413 and Cys413 alleles were 0.760 and 0.240 in the whole population, respectively. The PAI-2 gene variant analyzed was not significantly associated with either the prevalence of premature CAD or the classical risk factors of CAD development such as diabetes, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, hypertension, familial history of heart dysfunction or smoking.

  16. The Limit of a strong Lobby: Why did August Bier and Ferdinand Sauerbruch never receive the Nobel Prize?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    August Bier (1861-1949) and Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) have remained two of the most influential figures during the first half of the 20th century in German and even in international surgery. They were jointly awarded Adolf Hitler's German Science Prize in 1937, but never the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, although no other German surgeons were nominated as often as Bier and Sauerbruch for the prestigeful award from 1901 to 1950. This contribution gives an overview of the reasons why and by whom Bier and Sauerbruch were nominated, and discusses the reasons of the Nobel Prize Committee for not awarding them. PMID:25094023

  17. Nobel Centennial Essays: A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1901: Jacobus van't Hoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2001-12-01

    December 2001 marks the centenary of the Nobel Prize. During the 20th century, the Nobel Prize was awarded 13 times, to a total of 22 recipients, for work involving various aspects of chemical dynamics--beginning with Jacobus van't Hoff in 1901, and continuing through Ahmed Zewail in 1999. Examining those prizes provides some interesting insights into the history and the evolution of chemical dynamics. In this essay, the first of a series of articles commemorating the Nobel centennial, the work of the first Nobel Laureate in chemical dynamics, Jacobus van't Hoff (1901), is examined.

  18. [The Nobel Prize for nitric oxide. The unjust exclusion of Dr. Salvador Moncada].

    PubMed

    de Berrazueta, J R

    1999-04-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded jointly to North-American scientists, Dr Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro and Ferid Murad, for their discoveries in relation to "nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". This has raised an important polemic because of the exclusion the South-American scientist, now nationalized British, Dr. Salvador Moncada. This short historical review examines some of the fundamental contributions to the knowledge in this field. It shows the sequence of the discoveries and the communication of them to the scientific community by the rewarded scientists and by Dr. Moncada. It is based on some fundamental publications in order to better understand this story, which does not coincide with the writing in 1996 by the Lasker Prize Committee, and which in 1998 was re-written again by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy. More than 90 universities, academies and societies have acknowledged Dr. Moncada up to now with priority in the discovery of the fact that nitric oxide is released by endothelial cells, and the revealing of its metabolic way. More than 20,000 citations of their fundamental papers endorse in the scientific community his primacy in this field. Even Robert Furchgott, author of the brilliant discovery of the endothelium derived relaxing factor, that opened this field to the science, declared about the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize: "I feel that the Nobel Prize Committee could have made an exception this year and chosen a fourth person, Salvador Moncada (to share the prize)". PMID:10217961

  19. How the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Golgi and Cajal.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gunnar

    2007-10-01

    In 1906 the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Camillo Golgi and Ramón y Cajal in recognition of their work on the structure of the nervous system. Golgi's most impressive contribution was his method, described in 1873. This was applied in studies of the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, hippocampus and the spinal cord. These studies together with his earlier work were included in his Opera Omnia, published in 1903. His method was highly praised by Cajal. His adherence to the reticular theory was opposed by Cajal, however, who had spelled out the neuron theory already in the late 1800s. Cajal's extraordinary contributions to the structure of the nervous system, based largely on the Golgi method and Ehrlich's methylene blue stain, were published in his Textura del Sistema Nerviosa de Hombre y de los Vertebrados, three volumes published from 1897 to 1904. Documents from the Nobel Archives reveal that Kölliker, Retzius and Fürst were the ones who proposed Golgi and Cajal for a shared prize. Golgi was nominated by Hertwig, as well. Cajal was proposed by Ziehen and Holmgren, and also by Retzius, as an alternative to a shared prize. Holmgren, who was commissioned to write the report to the Nobel Committee, found Cajal far superior to Golgi. Sundberg, asked for another evaluation, was more positive to Golgi's contributions than Holmgren. Gadelius supported Holmgren's views. The final vote gave a majority for a shared prize. The prize ceremony and the lectures were described in detail in Cajal's autobiography. PMID:17306375

  20. Society News: PhD theses could win prizes; Last chance for IYA2009 grants; New Fellows; RAS Fellows win prizes; Need a job? Need staff? RAS Library Saturdays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    Fellows who are PhD student supervisors should be on the lookout for exceptionally good work from research students submitting their theses this year, for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston Astronomy Prize and the RAS Keith Runcorn Prize. The RAS is offering one last chance to apply for grants towards International Year of Astronomy activities, but you'll have to apply soon. The Society sends congratulations to Fellows of the RAS who have recently received prestigious awards for their work.

  1. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2013-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award the Roberts prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 is awarded to Michel Defrise, Ahmadreza Rezaei and Johan Nuyts from the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium for their breakthrough paper that describes how the information needed for attenuation correction in PET imaging can be extracted, to within a constant, from time-of-flight emission data: Time-of-flight PET data determine the attenuation sinogram up to a constant 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 885 Michel Defrise1, Ahmadreza Rezaei2 and Johan Nuyts2 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium This paper represents an important and timely contribution to the literature as time-of-flight PET scanners are now offered by several manufacturers. In hybrid PET/CT scanners, the PET attenuation correction, necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution, can be derived directly from the CT data. Sometimes, however, the PET and CT scans may be poorly aligned due to patient motion and other approaches are needed. In addition, hybrid PET/MRI scanners also, have been developed recently, and in

  2. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2012-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 is awarded to Matthew Hough et al from the University of Florida, the Francis Marion University and the National Cancer Institute, USA for their paper on a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of skeletal tissues in the adult male: An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309 Matthew Hough1, Perry Johnson1, Didier Rajon2, Derek Jokisch3, Choonsik Lee4 and Wesley Bolch1,5 1Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC, USA 4Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Bone marrow is one of the more radiosensitive tissues in the human body and is housed within a complex structure of bone. This paper describes a comprehensive model of energy deposition by internal electron or beta particle emitters for the ICRP reference adult male based upon ex vivo CT and microCT images of

  3. A Dialogue with Abraham Maslow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardeman, Mildred

    1979-01-01

    This question-and-answer session was conducted at the New School for Social Research in the spring of 1962. Maslow comments on creativity, peak experiences, drug use, self-actualization, religion, and his psychology of Being. (SJL)

  4. Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry 2014: Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015, commemorating the Old Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL), while the physics and chemistry Nobel Prizes 2014 are both about light. The work leading to the two prizes share the same basic theoretical foundation: when an electron jumps from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, the energy difference is transformed into a photon. This basic way of light generation is a key part of the Old Quantum Theory. Interestingly, the date of announcing the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics coincided with the birthdays of Niels Bohr and, especially, of Planck's blackbody radiation formula. In connection with the two 2014 Nobel Prizes, we recall the development of the Old Quantum Theory by Planck, Einstein and Bohr.

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1986: Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-08-01

    The 1986 Nobel Prize was awarded to Dudley Herschbach, Yuan Lee, and John Polanyi for their work extending chemical dynamics to the level of individual atoms and molecules, using molecular beam and infrared chemiluminescence experiments.

  6. SerpinB2 (PAI-2) Modulates Proteostasis via Binding Misfolded Proteins and Promotion of Cytoprotective Inclusion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Farrawell, Natalie; Shearer, Robert F.; Constantinescu, Patrick; Hatters, Danny M.; Schroder, Wayne A.; Suhrbier, Andreas; Wilson, Mark R.; Saunders, Darren N.; Ranson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    SerpinB2 (PAI-2), a member of the clade B family of serine protease inhibitors, is one of the most upregulated proteins following cellular stress. Originally described as an inhibitor of urokinase plasminogen activator, its predominant cytoplasmic localisation suggests an intracellular function. SerpinB2 has been reported to display cytoprotective properties in neurons and to interact with intracellular proteins including components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the current study we explored the potential role of SerpinB2 as a modulator of proteotoxic stress. Initially, we transiently transfected wild-type SerpinB2 and SerpinB2-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with Huntingtin exon1-polyglutamine (fused C-terminally to mCherry). Inclusion body formation as result of Huntingtin aggregation was evident in the SerpinB2 expressing cells but significantly impaired in the SerpinB2-/- cells, the latter concomitant with loss in cell viability. Importantly, recovery of the wild-type phenotype and cell viability was rescued by retroviral transduction of SerpinB2 expression. SerpinB2 modestly attenuated Huntingtin and amyloid beta fibril formation in vitro and was able to bind preferentially to misfolded proteins. Given the modest chaperone-like activity of SerpinB2 we tested the ability of SerpinB2 to modulate UPS and autophagy activity using a GFP reporter system and autophagy reporter, respectively. Activity of the UPS was reduced and autophagy was dysregulated in SerpinB2-/- compared to wild-type MEFs. Moreover, we observed a non-covalent interaction between ubiquitin and SerpinB2 in cells using GFP-pulldown assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that SerpinB2 plays an important role in proteostasis as its loss leads to a proteotoxic phenotype associated with an inability to compartmentalize aggregating proteins and a reduced capacity of the UPS. PMID:26083412

  7. Factors Associated with Fear of Falling among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the Shih-Pai Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Chou, Pesus

    2016-01-01

    Background Fear of falling is an important risk indicator for adverse health related outcomes in older adults. However, factors associated with fear of falling among community-dwelling older adults are not well-explored. Objectives To explore the quality of life and associated factors in fear of falling among older people in the Shih-Pai area in Taiwan. Methods This community-based survey recruited three thousand eight hundred and twenty-four older adults aged ≥ 65 years. The measurements included a structured questionnaire, including quality of life by using Short-Form 36, and information of fear of falling, fall history, demographics, medical conditions, insomnia, sleep quality, depression and subjective health through face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 53.4% of participants reported a fear of falling. The rate of fear of falling was higher in female subjects. Subjects with fear of falling had lower Short Form-36 scores both for men and women. Falls in the previous year, older age, insomnia, depression and worse subjective health were correlates of fear of falling for both sexes. Male-specific associations with fear of falling were the accessibility of medical help in an emergency, diabetes mellitus and stroke. In parallel, cardiovascular diseases were a female-specific correlate for fear of falling. Conclusions Fear of falling is prevalent among community-dwelling older adults. It is seems that there are gender differences in fear of falling with respect to the prevalence and associated factors in older adults. Gender differences should be considered when planning prevention and intervention strategies for fear of falling among older people. PMID:26933882

  8. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1913: The Highest Honor for the Lowest Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif-Acherman, Simón

    2013-12-01

    One century ago this year the Dutch experimental physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853-1926) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in low-temperature physics, in particular for his production of liquid helium. I trace the route to his Nobel Prize within the context of his and his colleagues' research in his laboratory at the University of Leiden, and in light of his nominators and the nominations he received in the five years 1909-1913.

  9. Standard magnitude prize reinforcers can be as efficacious as larger magnitude reinforcers in cocaine-dependent methadone patients

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Barry, Danielle; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Contingency management (CM) reduces cocaine use in methadone patients, but only about 50% of patients respond to CM interventions. This study evaluated whether increasing magnitudes of reinforcement will improve outcomes. Methods Cocaine-dependent methadone patients (N = 240) were randomized to one of four 12-week treatment conditions: usual care (UC), UC plus “standard” prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $300, UC plus high magnitude prize CM in which average expected prize earnings were about $900, or UC plus voucher CM with an expected maximum of about $900 in vouchers. Results All three CM conditions yielded significant reductions in cocaine use relative to UC, with effect sizes (d) ranging from 0.38 to 0.59. No differences were noted between CM conditions, with at least 55% of patients in each CM condition achieving one week or more of cocaine abstinence versus 35% in UC. During the 12 weeks after the intervention ended, CM increased time until relapse relative to UC, but the effects of CM were no longer significant at a 12-month follow-up. Conclusions Providing the standard magnitude of $300 in prizes was as effective as larger magnitude CM in cocaine-dependent methadone patients in this study. Given its strong evidence base and relatively low costs, standard magnitude prize CM should be considered for adoption in methadone clinics to encourage cocaine abstinence, but new methods need to be developed to sustain abstinence. PMID:25198284

  10. Promoting public health research in BRICS through a multinational public health prize fund.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes the establishment of a prize fund to incentivise public health research within the BRICS association, which comprises the five major emerging world economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. This would stimulate cooperative healthcare research within the group and, on the proviso that the benefits of the research are made freely available within the association, would be rewarding for researchers. The results of the research stimulated by the prize would provide beneficial new healthcare technologies, targeting the most vulnerable and needy groups. The proposed fund is consistent with current international patent law and would not only avoid some of the problems associated with the "Health Impact Fund", but also create a new model for healthcare research. PMID:24509109

  11. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  12. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  13. [Nitric oxide (NO)--Nobel prize in medicine and physiology for 1998].

    PubMed

    Derentowicz, P; Markiewicz, K; Wawrzyniak, M; Czerwińska-Kartowicz, I; Buława, E; Siwińska-Gołebiowska, H

    2000-01-01

    On October 12, 1998. The Nobel Assembly announced the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology to pharmacologists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad. The Nobel Committee decided to award the prize for their discoveries concerning--nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Nitric oxide (NO) has a key importance for vascular tonus, acts as a signal molecule in the nervous system and plays an important function in the immunological system. Nitric oxide is a multifunction molecule which controls the blood pressure, modulates gastrointestinal motility. It is produced in abnormal level intensifies septic shock and destruction of nervous tissue. NO is important in different branches of medicine. For instance NO gas has been used to reduced high blood pressure in the lung of infants. Several unknown NO applications in medicine are waiting for discovery. PMID:11013875

  14. Oswald Avery: the professor, DNA, and the Nobel Prize that eluded him.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Tarunendu

    2004-01-01

    In 1944, two Canadians, Oswald Avery and Colin MacLeod, and an American, MacLyn McCarty, published a paper in The Journal of Experimental Medicine that demonstrated genes to be the chemical, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Even though this paper is now regarded as the single mos important publication in biology of the 20th century, Avery was not awarded the Nobel Prize. This raises the question as to why his work did not earn him the Prize. These are several possible reasons: the discovery may have been ahead of tis time; all three authors were physician-scientists ans not recognized chemists or geneticists; and Avery, the principal author, had reached an advanced age and characteristically took an extremely cautious and low-key approach to his work. Discussion of these reasons in turn raises other issues surrounding the recognition of the work of celebrated scientist, from Galileo and Copernicus onwards. PMID:15202433

  15. The discovery of artemisinin and Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xin-zhuan; Miller, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Professor Youyou Tu for her key contributions to the discovery of artemisinin. Artemisinin has saved millions of lives and represents one of the significant contributions of China to global health. Many scientists were involved in the previously unknown 523 Project, and the Nobel Prize given to a single person has not been without controversy. Here we summarized some key events in the 523 Project and present our views on the Award to help the public better understand the rationale of the Nobel committee’s decision, the significance of the discovery, and current issues related to artimisinin in treating malaria. PMID:26481135

  16. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-10-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON-OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment.

  17. Preliminary efficacy of prize-based contingency management to increase activity levels in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Washington, Wendy Donlin; Banna, Kelly M; Gibson, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 30% of Americans meet the criteria for obesity. Effective, low-cost interventions to increase physical activity are needed to prevent and treat obesity. In this study, 11 healthy adults wore Fitbit accelerometers for 3 weeks. During the initial baseline, subjects earned prize draws for wearing the Fitbit. During intervention, percentile schedules were used to calculate individual prize-draw criteria. The final week was a return to baseline. Four subjects increased step counts as a result of the intervention. A bout analysis of interresponse times revealed that subjects increased overall step counts by increasing daily minutes active and within-bout response rates and decreasing pauses between bouts of activity. Strategies to improve effectiveness are suggested, such as modification of reinforcement probability and amount and identification of the function of periods of inactivity. PMID:24740477

  18. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Y.

    2011-11-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize.

  19. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    ScienceCinema

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department?s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics ?for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.? DOE?s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter?s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  20. Fermi Prize: J. Robert Oppenheimer Named to Receive Annual AEC Award.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J R

    1963-04-12

    The White House announced last week that J. Robert Oppenheimer would be the recipient of the Atomic Energy Commission's 1963 Fermi prize. The prize, which is accompanied by a $50,000 award, is given for "especially meritorious contribution to the development, use or control of atomic energy," and, as such, is strictly a recognition of scientific merit. This fact cannot be overstated. Nevertheless, because of the bitter and emotional controversy that surrounded the removal of Oppenheimer's security clearance in 1954, the Oppenheimer case has come to symbolize the dark hour to which nonconformity and scientific integrity were subjected in the McCarthy era. Oppenheimer's selection for the award is thus widely regarded as an effort by the scientific community and the Kennedy administration to right a long-standing wrong. The following account is an appreciation of Oppenheimer, written especially for Science by his colleague, Hans Bethe, of Cornell University. PMID:17819826

  1. Chemistry in the News: 1998 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jennifer B.

    1999-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Walter Kohn (University of California at Santa Barbara) for his development of the density-functional theory and to John A. Pople (Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois) for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Robert F. Fuchgott (State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn), Louis J. Ignarro (University of California at Los Angeles), and Ferid Murad (University of Texas Medical School at Houston) for identifying nitric oxide as a key biological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

  2. [Great Scandinavian Jahre Prize 1993. Studies of cartilage and bone yields new knowledge of tissue homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Heinegård, D

    1994-01-01

    Increased knowledge of connective tissue, such as cartilage and bone, has improved our understanding of tissue replenishment under normal and pathological conditions. Although developments in this field are still at an early stage, it is already possible to discern avenues for future development leading to new diagnostic and therapeutic methods in connective tissue diseases. In this article, Dick Heinegård, the second recipient of the Jahre Prize for 1993, gives an account of his research. PMID:8121785

  3. Theodore William Richards: apostle of atomic weights and Nobel Prize winner in 1914.

    PubMed

    Herschbach, Dudley R

    2014-12-15

    In recognition of his exact determinations of the atomic weights of a large number of the chemical elements, T. W. Richards received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1914. His meticulous techniques resulted in "a degree of accuracy never before attained". This Essay follows Richards from his precocious youth to becoming a celebrated chemist and emphasizes his dedication to forseeing likely sources of error and how to avoid them. PMID:25323411

  4. Let there be light--with gallium nitride: the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics.

    PubMed

    Von Dollen, Paul; Pimputkar, Siddha; Speck, James S

    2014-12-15

    Significant gains in energy savings now underway can be traced to a single invention--the blue light-emitting diode. GaN-based blue LED technology not only resulted in efficient white light sources, but continues to enable a host of applications and scientific inquiries. The researchers primarily responsible for the development of the blue LED were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics. PMID:25411140

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1983: Henry Taube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-07-01

    The 1983 Nobel Prize was awarded to Henry Taube for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes. Taube's work represents a watershed in the development of the mechanistic chemistry of inorganic transition metal complexes. His studies of those reactions is a central feature in courses in mechanistic inorganic chemistry, and his description of inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron transfer mechanisms remain as the textbook examples.

  6. John Bardeen: the only person to win two Nobel Prizes in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-11-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity. The transistor made possible the information revolution; the BCS theory helped lay the microscopic foundation for the modern theory of condensed matter physics.

  7. Nils Gustav Dalén, the Unknown Nobel Prize Winner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Hanging on the wall of my museum is a large "Map of Physics" published by the Central Scientific Company in 1938. On it is a list of the Nobel Prizes in physics, starting with Roentgen in 1901 and ending with Fermi in 1938. I can recognize every name except the one for 1912: Nils Gustav Dalén. Perhaps you have had the same experience when looking through the updated list.

  8. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  9. Dissecting slander and crying for justice: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-10-01

    Chagas disease was discovered by Carlos Chagas in 1909. Chagas worked at Oswaldo Cruz Institute, where the bases of experimental medicine were settled in Brazil, and that had no connection with the Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. Chagas had several enemies at Oswaldo Cruz Institute mainly because of his election to Head of Service in 1910, and for the position of Oswaldo Cruz Directorship in 1917. Furthermore, Chagas gained enemies at Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, which did not like to see the economical political autonomy of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. This allowed the Institute not only to perform top experimental research, but also to take the leadership of research in the country. Chagas was nominated to the Nobel Prize of 1921 in December, 1920. None was awarded the Nobel Prize in that year. He seems to have been evaluated by the Noble Committee of Karolinska Institute from March to May of 1921. At that time, his enemies were denying his discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi, a key point in Chagas' nomination by Karolinska Institute, and giving no epidemiological importance for the disease. By the same way, the obligation of small pox vaccination was tarnishing his public image. Having taken into account the epidemiologic importance of Chagas disease, the strong historical mistake in the process of Chagas evaluation, and the inequity behind all these facts, we insist on a posthumous Nobel Prize for the man who made the most complete medical-scientist discovery of all time. PMID:23410487

  10. Why there should be more science Nobel prizes and laureates - And why proportionate credit should be awarded to institutions.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The four science Nobel prizes (physics, chemistry, medicine/physiology and economics) have performed extremely well as a method of recognizing the highest level of achievement. The prizes exist primarily to honour individuals but also have a very important function in science generally. In particular, the institutions and nations which have educated, nurtured or supported many Nobel laureates can be identified as elite in world science. However, the limited range of subjects and a maximum of 12 laureates per year mean that many major scientific achievements remain un-recognized; and relatively few universities can gather sufficient Nobel-credits to enable a precise estimate of their different levels of quality. I advocate that the Nobel committee should expand the number of Nobel laureates and Prize categories as a service to world science. (1) There is a large surplus of high quality prize candidates deserving of recognition. (2) There has been a vast expansion of research with a proliferation of major sub-disciplines in the existing categories. (3) Especially, the massive growth of the bio-medical sciences has created a shortage of Nobel recognition in this area. (4) Whole new fields of major science have emerged. I therefore suggest that the maximum of three laureates per year should always be awarded in the categories of physics, chemistry and economics, even when these prizes are for diverse and un-related achievements; that the number of laureates in the 'biology' category of physiology or medicine should be increased to six or preferably nine per year; and that two new Prize categories should be introduced to recognize achievements in mathematics and computing science. Together, these measures could increase the science laureates from a maximum of 12 to a minimum of 24, and increase the range of scientific coverage. In future, the Nobel committee should also officially allocate proportionate credit to institutions for each laureate, and a historical task

  11. Physiological regulation of MMPs and tPA/PAI in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nedra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero; Kacem, Kamel

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II), and their direct effects in vitro on the enzymes involved in vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, were examined. Rats were treated with guanethidine, losartan or the combined treatments. mRNA, protein and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and mRNA of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) were quantified in abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA). Norepinephrine (NE) or ANG II with adrenergic (β, α1 and α2) or losartan antagonists was tested for MMP mRNA response in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Combined treatment enhances the inhibition of MMP-2 mRNA and protein level induced by simple treatment in AA. However MMP-9 in AA and MMP mRNA in FA were reduced in the same order by treatments. MMP activities were not affected by treatments. The t-PA/PAI-1 ratio, which reflects the fibrinolytic balance, remained higher after treatments. In cultured VSMCs, NE induced stimulation of MMP mRNA via α2 and β adrenergic receptors and MMP-2 activity via β adrenergic receptors, while ANG II-induced stimulation was abrogated by losartan. Overall, there is a synergic inhibition of both systems on the level of MMP-2 in AA. PMID:22071631

  12. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT. PMID:25987440

  13. Scientometric identification of elite 'revolutionary science' research institutions by analysis of trends in Nobel prizes 1947-2006.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Most research is 'normal science' using Thomas Kuhn's term: checking, trial-and-error improvement and incremental extrapolation of already existing paradigms. By contrast, 'revolutionary science' changes the fundamental structures of science by making new theories, discoveries or technologies. Science Nobel prizes (in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology/Medicine and Economics) have the potential to be used as a new metric for measuring revolutionary science. Nobel laureates' nations and research institutions were measured between 1947 and 2006 in 20 year segments. The minimum threshold for inclusion was 3 Nobel prizes. Credit was allocated to each laureate's institution and nation of residence at the time of award. Over 60 years, the USA has 19 institutions which won three-plus Nobel prizes in 20 years, the UK has 4, France has 2 and Sweden and USSR 1 each. Four US institutions won 3 or more prizes in all 20 year segments: Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley and CalTech. The most successful institution in the past 20 years was MIT, with 11 prizes followed by Stanford (9), Columbia and Chicago (7). But the Western United States has recently become the world dominant region for revolutionary science, generating a new generation of elite public universities: University of Colorado at Boulder; University of Washington at Seattle; and the University of California institutions of Santa Barbara, Irvine, UCSF, and UCLA; also the Fred Hutchinson CRC in Seattle. Since 1986 the USA has 16 institutions which have won 3 plus prizes, but elsewhere in the world only the College de France has achieved this. In the UK Cambridge University, Cambridge MRC unit, Oxford and Imperial College have declined from 17 prizes in 1967-86 to only 3 since then. Harvard has also declined as a revolutionary science university from being the top Nobel-prize-winning institution for 40 years, to currently joint sixth position. Although Nobel science prizes are sporadically won by numerous nations and institutions

  14. The new date, new format, new goals and new sponsor of the Archon Genomics X PRIZE competition.

    PubMed

    Kedes, Larry; Campany, Grant

    2011-11-01

    The Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by MEDCO is a $10 million prize for whole human genome sequencing that will test 100 samples and establish a defined method for determining quality and cost per genome. The contest will entail a head-to-head competition starting on 3 January 2013. The $10 million grand prize will be awarded to the first team to meet all the quality standards. If there is no grand prize winner, lesser awards will be made for single achievements in the three categories of accuracy, completeness and haplotype phasing. Similar to the open comment period offered earlier this year for the validation protocol, the X PRIZE Foundation seeks commentary from the scientific community on the revised competition format and judging criteria prior to publishing final rules as part of a master agreement with competing teams next year. The official validation protocol will make the competition judging transparent and fair using multiple standard techniques and robust bioinformatics. With sponsorship from Medco Health Solutions (MEDCO), the 100 samples will be derived from genomes of appropriately consented centenarian subjects. At the conclusion of the contest, the data from the redundantly sequenced genomes will be deposited into a scientific database and provide a heretofore unrealized depth of sequence data based on multiple technologies. The sample set and the bioinformatic pipeline will also be made available to the scientific community. PMID:22030612

  15. James P. Allison received the 2014 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Scully, Peter; Ba, Sujuan

    2014-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)—a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting innovative cancer research on the global scale that aims to cure cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher whose original discoveries have expanded our understanding of cancer and resulted in notable advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. The prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the history and mission of the Szent-Györgyi Prize, its role in promoting discovery-oriented cancer research, and the pioneering work led by the 2014 prize winner, Dr. James Allison. Dr. Allison's work in the area of cancer immunotherapy led to the successful development of immune checkpoint therapy, and the first drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:25189714

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sarah M.

    2008-05-01

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Grünberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Grünberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future.

  17. Association of G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms with susceptibility to myocardial infarction in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Hassani Idrissi, Hind; Hmimech, Wiam; Diakite, Brehima; Korchi, Farah; Baghdadi, Dalila; Habbal, Rachida; Nadifi, Sellama

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) is a common multifactorial disease. Numerous studies have found that genetic plays an essential role in MI occurrence. The main objective of our case–control study is to explore the association of G894T eNOS (rs1799983), 4G/5G PAI (rs1799889) and T1131C APOA5 (rs662799) polymorphisms with MI susceptibility in the Moroccan population. Methods and results 118 MI patients were recruited vs 184 healthy controls. DNA samples were genotyped by PCR-RFLP method using MboI, BslI and MseI restriction enzymes respectively for the G894T eNOS, 4G/5G PAI and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms. Our results show that the G894T eNOS was significantly associated with increased risk of MI under the three genetic transmission models (dominant: OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.05–2.58, P = 0.003; recessive: OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 0.74–6.16, P = 0.03; additive: OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.06–2.23, P = 0.001). The T1131C APOA5 polymorphism was associated to MI risk in recessive and additive models (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.72–3.2, P = 0.04 and OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.26–2.51, P = 0.03 respectively). For the 4G/5G PAI variant, even the cases and controls groups were not in Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), the dominant and additive models show a statistically significant association with MI risk (OR = 7.96, 95%CI = 3.83–16.36, P = 0.01 and OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.4–2.72, P = 0.03 respectively). Conclusion Our results suggest that G894T eNOS and T1131C APOA5 polymorphisms may be considered as genetic markers of MI among the Moroccan population. Further studies including larger sample sizes and exploring more genetic associations are needed to confirm our results and to better understand the susceptibility to MI. PMID:27222817

  18. Youyou Tu: significance of winning the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxiu; Liu, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Youyou Tu, a female scientist at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, is the first Chinese winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Based on the study of recipes which had been used for thousands of years to treat fever, Tu's group discovered that the plant artemesia annua, sweet wormwood, showed substantial inhibition of rodent malaria parasites. Her achievement and experience have inspired other researchers and emphasized the development of traditional Chinese medicine. Her award has led to a heated discussion about scientific research investment, fair treatment of research staff, and intellectual property right (IPR) protection in China. PMID:26885485

  19. Youyou Tu: significance of winning the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenxiu

    2016-01-01

    Youyou Tu, a female scientist at the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing, is the first Chinese winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Based on the study of recipes which had been used for thousands of years to treat fever, Tu’s group discovered that the plant artemesia annua, sweet wormwood, showed substantial inhibition of rodent malaria parasites. Her achievement and experience have inspired other researchers and emphasized the development of traditional Chinese medicine. Her award has led to a heated discussion about scientific research investment, fair treatment of research staff, and intellectual property right (IPR) protection in China. PMID:26885485

  20. The mantle of the heavens: Reflections on the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G M

    2015-06-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 2014 for the discovery of place and grid cells was both a personal award to three great scientists and also a mark of the maturity of systems neuroscience as a discipline. This article offers both personal and scientific reflections on these discoveries, detailing both how getting to know all three winners had an impact on my life and the research questions that we shared in common work together. It ends with brief reflections on three important outstanding questions. PMID:25786661

  1. Nobel prize: 3 named for medicine, physiology award (George Wald, Ragnar Granit and Haldan Keffer Hartline).

    PubMed

    Dolwing, J E; Ratliff, F

    1967-10-27

    Three scientists, George Wald, Ragnar Granit, and Haldan Keffer Hartline, were named last week to share the 1967 Nobel prize in medicine or physiology. Wald is professor of biology at Harvard University. Granit is retired director of the Neurophysiological Institute of the Royal Medical School in Stockholm; at present he is serving as a visiting professor at St. Catherine's College in Oxford. Hartline is professor of biophysics at Rockefeller University. The following are appreciations and descriptions of Wald's work by John E. Dowling and of Granit's and Hartline's work by Floyd Ratliff. PMID:4860394

  2. Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner

    SciTech Connect

    Yalow, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

  3. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-02-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Yves Chauvin of the Institut Français du Pétrole, Robert H. Grubbs of CalTech, and Richard R. Schrock of MIT "for development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction now used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other products. This article tells the story of how olefin metathesis became a truly useful synthetic transformation and a triumph for mechanistic chemistry, and illustrates the importance of fundamental research. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  4. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1998: Walter Kohn and John Pople

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-11-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize was awarded to Walter Kohn "for his development of the density-functional theory" and to John Pople "for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry." They enabled improved energy calculations on molecules and other multi-atom systems. Chemists have taken advantage of those developments to perform calculations on systems during reactive encounters, thereby obtaining a better understanding of chemical dynamics and allowing for predictions regarding the course of chemical reactions based on the energies of various possible transition states.

  5. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1909: Wilhelm Ostwald

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-02-01

    This, the third of a series of thirteen articles on Nobel Laureates in chemical dynamics, features the work of Wilhelm Ostwald, who won the Nobel Prize in 1909 for his work on catalysis, equilibria, and reaction rates. The first two articles in this series discussed two of Ostwald's students--Jacobus van't Hoff (Nobel 1901) and Svante Arrhenius (Nobel 1903). Ostwald's own studies of catalysis were guided by the work of those two former students. Ostwald's name remains associated with the catalytic process used to manufacture nitric acid from ammonia.

  6. Chemistry in the News: 1997 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-12-01

    Chemistry The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1997 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with one half to Paul D. Boyer (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) and John E. Walker (Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK) for elucidation of the mechanism of action of ATP synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); and one half to Jens C. Skou (Aarhus University, Denmark) for the first discovery of an ion-transporting enzyme, Na+,K+-ATPase. The three laureates have performed pioneering work on enzymes that catalyze reactions of the "high-energy" compound adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

  7. X-ray Studies Key to Nobel Prize Winning Work on Protein Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Janet Smith; Robert Fischetti

    2013-02-04

    It was the advent of the first micro X-ray beam for structural biology at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory that enabled the research that earned the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and lays the groundwork for countless new pharmaceuticals. 00:00 Introduction: Brian Stephenson, director Advanced Photon Source 02:50 An overview of the research: Janet Smith, scientific director of the GM/CA beamline at the APS 17:53 How X-rays were used: Robert Fischetti, associate division director for structural biology in Argonne National Laboratory's APS X-ray Science Division

  8. Announcing the winner of the John J. Sciarra IJGO Prize Paper Award for 2014.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K

    2015-06-01

    The editors of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (IJGO) are pleased to announce the winner of the prize paper award for the best clinical research paper from a low- or middle-income country published in the IJGO during 2014. The winning paper is: Dan K. Kaye, Othman Kakaire, Annettee Nakimuli, Scovia N. Mbalinda,Michael O. Osinde, Nelson Kakande. Survivors' understanding of vulnerability and resilience to maternal near-miss obstetric events in Uganda. Int J Gynecol Obstet 2014;127(3):265–8. It was published in the December 2014 issue of the IJGO. PMID:25920580

  9. [C. E. Alken (1909-1986) and the Alken-Prize].

    PubMed

    Konert, J

    2016-06-01

    C. E. Alken is regarded as the Nestor of German urology post World War II. His development path is given in brief and his specific contributions to the emancipation of the field are pointed out. In 1948 he received a teaching assignment in urology at Saarland State University Homburg, where in 1952, a Chair of Urology was established, and in 1958 he received the Ordinariat. The "Alken-Prize" which was named after him, is also presented. PMID:27160773

  10. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  11. Portal Vein Thrombosis in a Preterm Newborn with Mutation of the MTHFR and PAI-1 Genes and Sepsis by Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, Mario; Verso, Clelia Lo; Serra, Gregorio; Moceri, Giovanni; Cimador, Marcello; Corsello, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Objective This report discusses the role of both congenital and acquired risk factors in the pathogenesis of portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Study Design We describe the clinical management and treatment of PVT in a preterm newborn with a homozygous mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) genes and sepsis by Candida parapsilosis. Results Although literature data suggest a minor role of genetic factors in thrombophilia in the case of only one mutation, we hypothesize that combined thrombophilic genetic defects may have a cumulative effect and significantly increase the thrombotic risk. Conclusion It could be appropriate to include more detailed analyses of procoagulant and fibrinolytic factors in the diagnostic workup of neonatal thrombosis, also through the investigation of genetic polymorphisms. The anticoagulant therapy and the removal of concurrent risk factors remain basic steps for the adequate management and prevention of complications. PMID:27603544

  12. Effect of different doses of equine chorionic gonadotropin on follicular and luteal dynamics and P/AI of high-producing Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Ayres, H; Sales, J N S; Souza, A H; Rodrigues, C A; Baruselli, P S

    2013-07-01

    The hypotheses of this study were (1) that the administration of 400IU eCG in a TAI protocol would increase ovarian follicular growth and diameter of the largest follicle (LF), volume of the CL, and produce an earlier rise on serum concentration of progesterone (P4) to ultimately improve P/AI compared to non-treated high-producing Holstein cows; and (2) that 600IU of eCG could enhance any potential effects of a greater gonadotropin treatment upon follicular and luteal size and function, improving P/AI. Cows were subjected to a protocol of synchronization of ovulation for timed artificial insemination (TAI): D0-P4 device insert and estradiol benzoate, D8-P4 device removal and PGF2α; Experiment 1, D10PM - GnRH plus TAI; and Experiment 2, D10AM - GnRH, D10PM - TAI. In Experiment 1, at P4 device removal, cows were assigned to one of the two treatments to receive none (n=232) or 400IU (n=232) of eCG. In Experiment 2, again at P4 device removal, cows were assigned to one of the three treatments to receive no eCG, (n=166) 400 (n=145) or 600IU (n=145) of eCG. Pregnancy was diagnosed 35 days after TAI. Ultrasonographic examination of both ovaries was done in a subset of cows in Experiments 1 [no eCG (n=27) and 400IU eCG (n=14)], and 2 [no eCG (n=15), 400IU eCG (n=14) and 600IU eCG (n=11)]. Exams were conducted at device removal (D8) and TAI (D10) to measure the diameter of the LF; then twice daily from D10 to 13, to determine time to ovulation and the maximum diameter of the LF; and then 3 (D14), 6 (D17), 9 (D20) and 12 (D23) days after presumed ovulation, concurrent with blood sampling, to measure the volume of the CL and serum concentration of P4. In both studies, eCG (400 or 600IU)-treated cows had similar diameter of the LF on D8 and D10, growth rate of the LF from Days 8 to 10, ovulation rate, time to ovulation, volume of the CL, serum concentration of P4 and P/AI as compared to control animals. Thus, adding either 400 or 600IU eCG to TAI protocols was inefficient to

  13. Selman A. Waksman, Winner of the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The history of the discovery and development of streptomycin is reviewed here from the personal standpoint of a member of Dr. Selman Waksman's antibiotic screening research team. The team approach of eight individuals illustrates how the gradual enhancement of the screening methodology was developed. I illustrate three study periods with key aspects in the development of streptomycin which led to a Nobel Prize being granted to Professor Waksman. One item not previously emphasized is the employment of a submerged culture technique for large-scale production of streptomycin, thus enabling rapid animal testing and human clinical trials with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Another is that purified streptomycin was shown by Dr. Waksman to be distinctly different from the substances called natural products, which are no longer patentable in the United States; therefore, streptomycin was found to be patentable. A third item not previously emphasized is his emphasis on the screening of actinomycetes, including the newly named Streptomyces genus. All of these factors contributed to the success of streptomycin in the treatment of tuberculosis. In combination, their successes led to Dr. Waksman's department becoming a new pharmacological research area, specializing in drug discovery. These unique accomplishments all burnish the prior rationales used by the Karolinska Institute in granting Dr. Waksman alone the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. PMID:24162573

  14. The matilda effect in science: awards and prizes in the US, 1990s and 2000s.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Anne E; Pincus, Stephanie; Koster, Janet Bandows; Leboy, Phoebe S

    2012-04-01

    Science is stratified, with an unequal distribution of research facilities and rewards among scientists. Awards and prizes, which are critical for shaping scientific career trajectories, play a role in this stratification when they differentially enhance the status of scientists who already have large reputations: the 'Matthew Effect'. Contrary to the Mertonian norm of universalism--the expectation that the personal attributes of scientists do not affect evaluations of their scientific claims and contributions--in practice, a great deal of evidence suggests that the scientific efforts and achievements of women do not receive the same recognition as do those of men: the 'Matilda Effect'. Awards in science, technology, engineering and medical (STEM) fields are not immune to these biases. We outline the research on gender bias in evaluations of research and analyze data from 13 STEM disciplinary societies. While women's receipt of professional awards and prizes has increased in the past two decades, men continue to win a higher proportion of awards for scholarly research than expected based on their representation in the nomination pool. The results support the powerful twin influences of implicit bias and committee chairs as contributing factors. The analysis sheds light on the relationship of external social factors to women's science careers and helps to explain why women are severely underrepresented as winners of science awards. The ghettoization of women's accomplishments into a category of 'women-only' awards also is discussed. PMID:22849001

  15. Expressing gambling-related cognitive biases in motor behaviour: rolling dice to win prizes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Matthew S M; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive perspectives on gambling propose that biased thinking plays a significant role in sustaining gambling participation and, in vulnerable individuals, gambling problems. One prominent set of cognitive biases include illusions of control involving beliefs that it is possible to influence random gaming events. Sociologists have reported that (some) gamblers believe that it is possible to throw dice in different ways to achieve gaming outcomes (e.g., 'dice-setting' in craps). However, experimental demonstrations of these phenomena are lacking. Here, we asked regular gamblers to roll a computer-simulated, but fair, 6 sided die for monetary prizes. Gamblers allowed the die to roll for longer when attempting to win higher value bets, and when attempting to hit high winning numbers. This behaviour was exaggerated in gamblers motivated to keep gambling following the experience of almost-winning in gambling games. These results suggest that gambling cognitive biases find expression in the motor behaviour of rolling dice for monetary prizes, possibly reflecting embodied substrates. PMID:23620161

  16. Special Issue on "Neutrino Oscillations: Celebrating the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015" in Nuclear Physics B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita from the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration and Arthur B. McDonald from the SNO Collaboration "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Furthermore, the Daya Bay, K2K and T2K, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande Collaborations shared the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Prize the same year. In order to celebrate this successful and fruitful year for neutrino oscillations, the editors and the publisher of Nuclear Physics B decided to publish a Special Issue on neutrino oscillations. We invited prominent scientists in the area of neutrino physics that relates to neutrino oscillations to write contributions for this Special Issue, which was open to both original research articles as well as review articles. The authors of this Special Issue consist of e.g. the two Nobel Laureates, International Participants of the Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden (August 19-24, 2004), selected active researchers, and members from large experimental collaborations with major results in the last ten years. In total, this Special Issue consists of 28 contributions. Please note that the cover of this Special Issue contains a figure from each of the 26 contributions that have figures included.

  17. Paul Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Abraham; Jacob, Maurice; Olive, David I.; Atiyah, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    Preface Peter Goddard; Dirac memorial address Stephen Hawking; 1. Paul Dirac: aspects of his life and work Abraham Pais; 2. Antimatter Maurice Jacob; 3. The monopole David Olive; 4. The Dirac equation and geometry Michael F. Atiyah.

  18. Paul Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Abraham; Jacob, Maurice; Olive, David I.; Atiyah, Michael F.

    2005-09-01

    Preface Peter Goddard; Dirac memorial address Stephen Hawking; 1. Paul Dirac: aspects of his life and work Abraham Pais; 2. Antimatter Maurice Jacob; 3. The monopole David Olive; 4. The Dirac equation and geometry Michael F. Atiyah.

  19. Society News: RAS Fellows are honoured with awards; Patrick Moore Medal; Best theses win prizes; New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    Congratulations to several Fellows of the RAS who have received prestigious awards this year. Congratulations to the winners of the annual prizes for the best PhD theses in astronomy and geophysics, awarded by the RAS and sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell. Winners receive a cheque for £1000, runners-up £50.

  20. Next X-Prize: L1 Base with Linked Asteroid Mining as Prime Catalyst for Space Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Ken R.

    2006-01-01

    We are at a cusp in our emergence as a space-faring race. Development of space resources offers unparalleled economic opportunities. Entrepreneurs with fortunes from the computer and internet revolutions are heavily investing in space. Their goal: to make space accessible to civilians at affordable prices, and build their next fortunes off-planet. The Ansari X-Prize showed that economic incentives can augment the pace and efficiency of this venture. Lunar and Martian missions are being touted as the top priorities by the US and other nations. However, serious and profitable expansion into space is best achieved by the establishment of an L1 base, its economic lifeblood based on processing asteroidal materials to provide the staples of all human space enterprise: oxygen, water, fuel and shielding. This paper outlines the components of an ``L1-prize'' modeled on the Ansari X-prize competition that led to the first private manned flight into space by Scaled Composites. The economic costs, crucial components and profit potential of a primary L1 base with asteroid mining technology intimately tied to it are detailed. The technical and economic benefits of the L1 location are contrasted to alternatives. The likely revenue sources are estimated, including contracting nations and industries; and orbital, lunar and Martian interplanetary enterprises. These are discussed as realistically and conservatively as possible in terms of the potential future profits for the winner of the prize.

  1. Giving Prizes and Awards: A New Way to Recognize and Encourage Activities That Promote Equity for Women in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Bonny; Sandler, Bernice

    The use of awards to stimulate activities designed to help women in education is considered. Using the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business award as a model, attention is directed to why awards are important, who can give them and to whom, and how to develop an awards program. An award or prize is defined as any form of recognition…

  2. Super-resolved fluorescence microscopy: Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner.

    PubMed

    Möckl, Leonhard; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    A big honor for small objects: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was jointly awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". This Highlight describes how the field of super-resolution microscopy developed from the first detection of a single molecule in 1989 to the sophisticated techniques of today. PMID:25371081

  3. Remembering Charles B. Huggins' Nobel Prize for Hormonal Treatment of Prostatic Cancer at its 50th Anniversary.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Moll, Friedrich; Schultheiss, Dirk; Krischel, Matthis

    2016-06-01

    Charles B. Huggins received the Nobel Prize in 1966. Based on archival sources from the Nobel archive we have found that nominators emphasised the practical therapeutic applications of his discoveries that were showing 25 yr after his key publications. PMID:26838478

  4. Unlocking Student Effort: How Five Irreplaceable Teachers Engage, Challenge and Inspire Students to Excellence. Fishman Prize Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Shira; Henderson, Whitney; Irish, Jamie; Lyons, Katie; Ross, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Founded by TNTP, the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice is an annual award for the nation's best teachers in high-poverty public schools. The goal is to shine a spotlight on great teaching and amplify the voices of some of the nation's best educators so that others can gain insight into their remarkable classrooms. No more than five…

  5. Children’s spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (un)wanted prizes in the presence of peers

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Mandy; Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large) first prize or a (substantially smaller) consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children’s level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children’s happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children’s expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their non-verbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize. PMID:26441776

  6. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including "cold temperature," "thermoneutral temperature," and "warm-sensitive" and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  7. [The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine].

    PubMed

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize archives, with the revelation of the names of nominators, nominees and prizewinners spanning the years 1901-1951, brought information not only about what was considered to be a scientific achievement at that time, but also about who the important scientists were and what the relationships between them were. The non-recognition of Carlos Chagas' discoveries by the Nobel Committee appears to be more correctly explained by these factors than by the negative impact of the local opposition. PMID:19287939

  8. News and Views: ALMA examines Centaurus A; WMAP team wins Gruber Prize; EUCLID moves closer to launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-08-01

    Charles Bennett (right) and the team behind the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe received the 2012 Gruber Prize, in recognition of the precision of their results that have turned an “appealing scenario into precise science”. ESA's dark energy and dark matter mission, EUCLID, has received approval from the Science Programme Committee to move into the full contruction phase, ahead of launch in 2020.

  9. ["In Stockholm they apparently had some kind of countermovement" - Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) and the Nobel prize].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, is a remarkable repository that contains reports and dossiers of the Nobel Prize nominations of senior and junior physicians from around the world. Although this archive has begun to be used more by scholars, it has been insufficiently examined by historians of surgery. No other German surgeon was nominated as often as Ferdinand Sauerbruch for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in the first half of the 20th century. This contribution reconstructs why and by whom Sauerbruch was nominated, and discusses the Nobel committee evaluations of his work. Political factors did not play an obvious role in the Nobel committee discussions, in spite of the fact that Adolf Hitler in 1937 had prohibited all German citizens to accept the Nobel Prize. The main reasons why Sauerbruch ultimately was not considered prize- worthy were that Sauerbruch's achievements were marked by scientific priority disputes, and that his work was not seen as original enough. PMID:25205399

  10. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Scully, Peter; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientific research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, significant research to the fight against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pioneering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt's work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene amplification and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine. PMID:26843073

  11. ["A change in medical thinking?" or "over-eager literary activity?" August Bier, homeopathy and the Nobel Prize 1906-1936].

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    This essay explains the nomination and evaluation procedure for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. Its research is based on original files and on the example of August Karl Gustav Bier (1861-1949). It discusses the minutes of the Nobel Committee for physiology or medicine, which are kept in the Nobel Archives, as well as the unusually high number of nominations of August Bier and the nominations submitted by him; it also describes the reasons why August Bier, in the end, never received the Nobel Prize. The essay focuses mainly on the reception of Bier's homeopathic theses by the Nobel Prize Committee and his nominators. PMID:26137648

  12. The Nobel Prize as a Reward Mechanism in the Genomics Era: Anonymous Researchers, Visible Managers and the Ethics of Excellence.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Hub

    2010-09-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is regarded by many as one of the major scientific achievements in recent science history, a large-scale endeavour that is changing the way in which biomedical research is done and expected, moreover, to yield considerable benefit for society. Thus, since the completion of the human genome sequencing effort, a debate has emerged over the question whether this effort merits to be awarded a Nobel Prize and if so, who should be the one(s) to receive it, as (according to current procedures) no more than three individuals can be selected. In this article, the HGP is taken as a case study to consider the ethical question to what extent it is still possible, in an era of big science, of large-scale consortia and global team work, to acknowledge and reward individual contributions to important breakthroughs in biomedical fields. Is it still viable to single out individuals for their decisive contributions in order to reward them in a fair and convincing way? Whereas the concept of the Nobel prize as such seems to reflect an archetypical view of scientists as solitary researchers who, at a certain point in their careers, make their one decisive discovery, this vision has proven to be problematic from the very outset. Already during the first decade of the Nobel era, Ivan Pavlov was denied the Prize several times before finally receiving it, on the basis of the argument that he had been active as a research manager (a designer and supervisor of research projects) rather than as a researcher himself. The question then is whether, in the case of the HGP, a research effort that involved the contributions of hundreds or even thousands of researchers worldwide, it is still possible to "individualise" the Prize? The "HGP Nobel Prize problem" is regarded as an exemplary issue in current research ethics, highlighting a number of quandaries and trends involved in contemporary life science research practices more broadly. PMID:20730106

  13. Prophet in his own country: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Lewinsohn, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    In 1909, Carlos Chagas (1878-1934) discovered a new protozoon, Trypanosoma cruzi, and the (previously unknown) disease that it causes. Within a few months, virtually single-handed, he described the pathogen, its vector, and the clinical features of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), a feat unique in medical history. He headed the Oswaldo Cruz Institute after the death of its founder (1917) until his own death; and from 1920 until 1926 he also directed the Brazilian Department of Public Health. His discovery brought him worldwide acclaim, but at home antagonism against Chagas, muted for years, finally flared up in a campaign that was acted out in the 1921-22 plenary sessions of the National Academy of Medicine. Chagas's name was repeatedly proposed for the Nobel Prize but he never received it; this hostile campaign may have been instrumental in costing him the award. PMID:14593222

  14. Nobel Prize centenary: Robert Bárány and the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    The hundredth anniversary of Robert Bárány's Nobel Prize in Medicine offers the opportunity to highlight the importance of his discoveries on the physiology and pathophysiology of the vestibular organs. Bárány developed the method of caloric vestibular stimulation that revolutionized the investigation of the semicircular canals and that is still widely used today. Caloric vestibular stimulation launched experimental vestibular research that was relevant to comprehend the evolution of human locomotion, and Bárány's tests continue to be used in neuroscience to understand the influence of vestibular signals on bodily perceptions, cognition and emotions. Only during the last 20 years has caloric vestibular stimulation been merged with brain imaging to localize the human vestibular cortex. PMID:25517362

  15. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Thomas A. Steitz and the Structure of the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 200 years, there have been countless groundbreaking discoveries in biology and medicine at Yale University. However, one particularly noteworthy discovery with profoundly important and broad consequences happened here in just the past two decades. In 2009, Thomas Steitz, the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “studies of the structure and function of the ribosome,” along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. This article covers the historical context of Steitz’s important discovery, the techniques his laboratory used to study the ribosome, and the impact that this research has had, and will have, on the future of biological and medical research. PMID:21698044

  16. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  17. [The 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation].

    PubMed

    Neefjes, J; Groothuis, T A M; Dantuma, N P

    2004-12-25

    This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Herskho and Irwin Rose for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments these scientists described the basic principles for a unique posttranslational modification based on the conjugation of the small protein ubiquitin to proteins deemed for degradation. Although ubiquitin started in 1980 as an unusual modification of certain proteins, it is now clear that it functions as a signal for degradation when it forms a polymer. Hundreds of proteins are involved in the controlled destruction of ubiquitin-labelled proteins in the cell. And hundreds of other proteins are involved in protein modification by mono-ubiquitin, so that other processes, such as the formation of another degradation compartment, the lysosome, can proceed normally. PMID:15646859

  18. [The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2006 for molecular unravelment of DNA transcription].

    PubMed

    Brouwer, J

    2006-12-30

    This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Roger D.Kornberg for his ground-breaking research into the structural basis of transcription. Transcription is the process by which the enzyme RNA polymerase II copies specific genetic information to messenger-RNA. This messenger-RNA is used in the translation of genetic information into the proteins it codes for. Kornberg described tens of proteins relevant to the transcription process. He developed and optimalized methods that finally led to the complete clarification of the atomic structure of RNA polymerase. Kornberg's work has provided more insight into the various stages of the transcription process and possible disruptions that lead to illness. PMID:17319215

  19. Gombosi Receives 2013 Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert P.

    2014-08-01

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy section of AGU awards the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize to Tamas Gombosi of the University of Michigan. Gombosi, the founding director of the Center for Space Environment Modeling, has been a leader in space weather research, a visionary in space weather numerical modeling for several decades, and a pioneer of international space physics collaboration. Gombosi's major contributions to space weather include the development of the first time-dependent numerical model of the terrestrial polar wind and the creation of the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model, a powerful and versatile numerical tool widely used today for modeling the global geospace, the heliosphere, and the solar interior.

  20. [The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 awarded for discoveries concerning molecular channels in cell membranes].

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, C D

    2003-12-27

    About 70% of the human body consists of salt water. The Nobel Prize 2003 in Chemistry rewards Peter Agre for the discovery of water channels and Roderick MacKinnon for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels. Their studies have demonstrated how ions and water are transported through cell membranes. This transport is essential for the regulation of size and osmotic pressure in cells and organelles and it plays a major role in salt and water homoeostasis and in the generation of electrical signals in nerve cells. Agre succeeded in isolating a membrane protein which later studies revealed to be a long-postulated water channel, MacKinnon succeeded in determining the spatial structure of a potassium channel. PMID:14723023

  1. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) in collaboration with scientists at NIH. PALM achieves 10-fold improvement in spatial resolution of cells, going from the resolution limit of approximately 250 nm in standard optical microscopy down to approximately 20 nm, thus producing a so-called “super-resolution” image. Spatial resolution refers to the clarity of an image or, in other words, the smallest details that can be observed from an image.

  2. The meaning of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize. Microcredit evangelism, health, and social policy.

    PubMed

    Bond, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The awarding of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank, provides an opportunity to consider the use and abuse of microfinancing, especially because credit continues to be touted as a poverty-reduction strategy associated with health education and health care financing strategies. Not only is the Grameen diagnosis of poverty dubious, but many structural problems also plague the model, ranging from financial accounting to market failures. In Southern Africa, to illustrate, microcredit schemes for peasants and small farmers have been attempted for more than 70 years, on the basis that modem capitalism and peasant/informal system gaps can be bridged by an expanded financial system. The results have been disappointing. A critical reading of political economy posits an organic linkage between the "developed" and "underdeveloped" economies that is typically not mitigated by capitalist financial markets, but instead is often exacerbated. When applied to health and social policy, microcredit evangelism becomes especially dangerous. PMID:17665721

  3. The 2010 millennium technology grand prize: dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gerald J

    2010-08-24

    The 2010 Millennium Technology Grand Prize was awarded to Michael Gratzel for his ground-breaking research that has led to the practical application of dye-sensitized solar cells. Although Gratzel began his research well before nanotechnology had the "buzz" that it does today, the mesoscopic thin films he has developed have paved the way for generations of scientists to exploit the nanoscale for energy conversion. In addition to practical application, his research has led to a deeper understanding of photoinitiated charge-transfer processes at semiconductor interfaces. Here, the key scientific developments that guided early progress in dye-sensitized solar cells are summarized, with emphasis on fundamental advances that have enabled practical application. PMID:20731419

  4. News and Views: Diamond is new head of SKA; Did you read our `A&G' mobile issue? BBC writer wins astro journalism prize; Kavli prize recognizes work on Kuiper Belt objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    Philip Diamond will become director general of the Square Kilometre Array this month, moving from Australia to the new SKA headquarters at Jodrell Bank Radio Observatory. Technology writer Katia Moskvitch has won the first European Astronomy Journalism Prize for her series of articles on the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. Moskvitch will be the guest of the ESO at the inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama desert in March 2013. The 2012 Kavli Prize in Astrophysics is shared between David C Jewitt (University of California, USA), Jane X Luu (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Laboratory, USA), and Michael E Brown (California Institute of Technology, USA) “for discovering and characterizing the Kuiper Belt and its largest members, work that led to a major advance in the understanding of the history of our planetary system”.

  5. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  6. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  7. A novel tumor-promoting role for nuclear factor IA in glioblastomas is mediated through negative regulation of p53, p21, and PAI1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Sung; Xiao, Jiping; Patel, Parita; Schade, Jake; Wang, Jinhua; Deneen, Benjamin; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Song, Hae-Ri

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor IA (NFIA), a transcription factor and essential regulator in embryonic glial development, is highly expressed in human glioblastoma (GBM) compared with normal brain, but its contribution to GBM and cancer pathogenesis is unknown. Here we demonstrate a novel role for NFIA in promoting growth and migration of GBM and establish the molecular mechanisms mediating these functions. Methods To determine the role of NFIA in glioma, we examined the effects of NFIA in growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. We used gain-of-function (overexpression) and loss-of-function (shRNA knockdown) of NFIA in primary patient-derived GBM cells and established glioma cell lines in culture and in intracranial xenografts in mouse brains. Results Knockdown of native NFIA blocked tumor growth and induced cell death and apoptosis. Complementing this, NFIA overexpression accelerated growth, proliferation, and migration of GBM in cell culture and in mouse brains. These NFIA tumor-promoting effects were mediated via transcriptional repression of p53, p21, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) through specific NFIA-recognition sequences in their promoters. Importantly, the effects of NFIA on proliferation and apoptosis were independent of TP53 mutation status, a finding especially relevant for GBM, in which TP53 is frequently mutated. Conclusion NFIA is a modulator of GBM growth and migration, and functions by distinct regulation of critical oncogenic pathways that govern the malignant behavior of GBM. PMID:24305710

  8. Comorbid antisocial and substance misuse proclivity and mental health service utilization by female inmates: testing the worst of both worlds hypothesis with the PAI.

    PubMed

    Walters, Glenn D; Magaletta, Philip R

    2015-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to establish whether female inmates with comorbid proclivity for antisocial behavior and substance misuse, as measured by the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 2007), use more mental health-related services than female inmates with either antisocial or substance misuse proclivity alone. A second purpose was to determine whether the effect of comorbid antisocial and substance misuse proclivity on mental health service utilization is cumulative or interactive. In a survey of 421 female federal prison inmates, it was noted that proclivity for both antisocial behavior and substance misuse was associated with significantly greater subsequent use of mental health services in female inmates than either proclivity alone, even after preexisting mental health diagnoses and treatment were controlled. In addition, the effect was additive rather than interactive. These findings provide further support for the "worst of both worlds" hypothesis, which holds that comorbid antisocial and substance involvement/proclivity portend poorer future outcomes than either antisocial or substance involvement/proclivity alone. The implications of these results for development of a comprehensive training model that provides mental health professionals with the skills to properly screen and effectively treat female inmates are discussed, along with the need to clarify the theory behind the "worst of both worlds" hypothesis. PMID:25222110

  9. No Silver Medal for Nobel Prize Contenders: Why Anesthesia Pioneers Were Nominated for but Denied the Award.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Fangerau, Heiner; Tuffs, Annette; Polianski, Igor J

    2016-07-01

    Taking the examples of the pioneers Carl Ludwig Schleich, Carl Koller, and Heinrich Braun, this article provides a first exploratory account of the history of anesthesiology and the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. Besides the files collected at the Nobel Archive in Sweden, which are presented here for the first time, this article is based on medical literature of the early 20th century. Using Nobel Prize nominations and Nobel committee reports as points of departure, the authors discuss why no anesthesia pioneer has received this coveted trophy. These documents offer a new perspective to explore and to better understand aspects of the history of anesthesiology in the first half of the 20th century. PMID:26982509

  10. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious

    PubMed Central

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including “cold temperature,” “thermoneutral temperature,” and “warm-sensitive” and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception? PMID:27226997

  11. The van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics awarded in 2014 to Nikos C. Kyrpides.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Senate of the University of Queensland is pleased to present the van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics for the triennium 2011-2014 to Dr Nikos C. Kyrpides in recognition of the contributions made to the field of bacterial systematics. The award established by Professor V. B. D. Skerman of the University of Queensland honours the contribution of scholarship in the field of microbiology by Professor Cornelis Bernardus van Niel. PMID:26184666

  12. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  13. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1995: Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-10-01

    The 1995 Nobel Prize was awarded to Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina "for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone". Collectively, their work established atmospheric chemistry as a major focus at the end of the twentieth century. The results have drawn attention to significant environmental issues in particular, the threat posed to the ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons.

  14. Understanding Fear of Opportunism in Global Prize-Based Science Contests: Evidence for Gender and Age Differences.

    PubMed

    Acar, Oguz Ali; van den Ende, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Global prize-based science contests have great potential for tapping into diverse knowledge on a global scale and overcoming important scientific challenges. A necessary step for knowledge to be utilized in these contests is for that knowledge to be disclosed. Knowledge disclosure, however, is paradoxical in nature: in order for the value of knowledge to be assessed, inventors must disclose their knowledge, but then the person who receives that knowledge does so at no cost and may use it opportunistically. This risk of potential opportunistic behavior in turn makes the inventor fearful of disclosing knowledge, and this is a major psychological barrier to knowledge disclosure. In this project, we investigated this fear of opportunism in global prize-based science contests by surveying 630 contest participants in the InnoCentive online platform for science contests. We found that participants in these science contests experience fear of opportunism to varying degrees, and that women and older participants have significantly less fear of disclosing their scientific knowledge. Our findings highlight the importance of taking differences in such fears into account when designing global prize-based contests so that the potential of the contests for reaching solutions to important and challenging problems can be used more effectively. PMID:26230086

  15. Understanding Fear of Opportunism in Global Prize-Based Science Contests: Evidence for Gender and Age Differences

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Oguz Ali; van den Ende, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Global prize-based science contests have great potential for tapping into diverse knowledge on a global scale and overcoming important scientific challenges. A necessary step for knowledge to be utilized in these contests is for that knowledge to be disclosed. Knowledge disclosure, however, is paradoxical in nature: in order for the value of knowledge to be assessed, inventors must disclose their knowledge, but then the person who receives that knowledge does so at no cost and may use it opportunistically. This risk of potential opportunistic behavior in turn makes the inventor fearful of disclosing knowledge, and this is a major psychological barrier to knowledge disclosure. In this project, we investigated this fear of opportunism in global prize-based science contests by surveying 630 contest participants in the InnoCentive online platform for science contests. We found that participants in these science contests experience fear of opportunism to varying degrees, and that women and older participants have significantly less fear of disclosing their scientific knowledge. Our findings highlight the importance of taking differences in such fears into account when designing global prize-based contests so that the potential of the contests for reaching solutions to important and challenging problems can be used more effectively. PMID:26230086

  16. The Nobel Prize as a Reward Mechanism in the Genomics Era: Anonymous Researchers, Visible Managers and the Ethics of Excellence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is regarded by many as one of the major scientific achievements in recent science history, a large-scale endeavour that is changing the way in which biomedical research is done and expected, moreover, to yield considerable benefit for society. Thus, since the completion of the human genome sequencing effort, a debate has emerged over the question whether this effort merits to be awarded a Nobel Prize and if so, who should be the one(s) to receive it, as (according to current procedures) no more than three individuals can be selected. In this article, the HGP is taken as a case study to consider the ethical question to what extent it is still possible, in an era of big science, of large-scale consortia and global team work, to acknowledge and reward individual contributions to important breakthroughs in biomedical fields. Is it still viable to single out individuals for their decisive contributions in order to reward them in a fair and convincing way? Whereas the concept of the Nobel prize as such seems to reflect an archetypical view of scientists as solitary researchers who, at a certain point in their careers, make their one decisive discovery, this vision has proven to be problematic from the very outset. Already during the first decade of the Nobel era, Ivan Pavlov was denied the Prize several times before finally receiving it, on the basis of the argument that he had been active as a research manager (a designer and supervisor of research projects) rather than as a researcher himself. The question then is whether, in the case of the HGP, a research effort that involved the contributions of hundreds or even thousands of researchers worldwide, it is still possible to “individualise” the Prize? The “HGP Nobel Prize problem” is regarded as an exemplary issue in current research ethics, highlighting a number of quandaries and trends involved in contemporary life science research practices more broadly. PMID:20730106

  17. From nerves and hormones to bacteria in the stomach; Nobel prize for achievements in gastrology during last century.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, J W; Pawlik, W W

    2005-12-01

    Rapid progress in gastroenterological research, during past century, was initiated by the discovery by W. Prout in early 18th century of the presence of inorganic, hydrochloric acid in the stomach and by I.P. Pavlov at the end of 19th century of neuro-reflex stimulation of secretion of this acid that was awarded by Nobel prize in 1904. Then, J. W. Black, who followed L. Popielski's concept of histamine involvement in the stimulation of this secretion, was awarded second Nobel prize in gastrology within the same century for the identification of histamine H2-receptor (H2-R) antagonists, potent gastric acid inhibitors, accelerating ulcer healing. The concept of H2-R interaction with other receptors such as muscarinic receptors (M3-R), mediating the action of acetylocholine released from local cholinergic nerves, and those mediating the action of gastrin (CCK2-R) on parietal cells, has been confirmed both in vivo studies and in vitro isolated parietal cells. The discovery of H2-R antagonists by Black and their usefulness in control of gastric secretion and ulcer healing, were considered as real breakthrough both in elucidation of gastric secretory mechanisms and in ulcer therapy. Discovery of even more powerful gastric acid inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors (PPI), also highly effective in acceleration of ulcer healing was, however, not awarded Nobel prize. Unexpectedly, two Australian clinical researchers, R.J. Warren and B.J. Marshall, who discovered in the stomach spiral bacteria, named Helicobacter pylori, received the third in past century Nobel prize in gastrology for the finding that this bacterium, is related to the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer. They documented that eradication of H. pylori from the stomach, using antibiotics and potent gastric inhibitors, not only accelerates healing of ulcer but also prevents its recurrence, the finding considered as greatest discovery in practical gastrology during last century. Thus, the outstanding

  18. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange. PMID:26456097

  19. Bernard Lerer: recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Vural; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Aynacıoğlu, Sükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J D; Llerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Umit

    2014-04-01

    This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21(st) century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry--pharmacoepigenetics--that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a long way

  20. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  1. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  2. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the univerre, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the Jarnes Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where rtars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  3. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  4. Joseph Erlanger (1874-1965): the cardiovascular investigator who won a Nobel Prize in neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2014-11-01

    Born in San Francisco in 1874 into the family of German immigrants in which he was the only one to proceed beyond elementary education, Joseph Erlanger graduated from the University of California (Berkeley) in 1894. He was about to enter the local Cooper Medical School when he was told that the new medical school in Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore) aimed to surpass all others, and there he graduated and was later coached for a career in academic life by William H Howell (1860-1945). In due course he held the Chairs of Physiology in the University of Wisconsin (Madison) and Washington University at St Louis, Missouri. He showed that the Bundle of His is indeed the functional link between the atria and the ventricles in the mammalian heart and that the Korotkoff sounds are produced by a 'breaker' phenomenon resulting from instability of the pulse wave in a partially occluded artery. With Herbert S Gasser (1888-1963) he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1944 for their work on action currents in peripheral nerve fibres. The history of science occupied him during his retirement. He died at St Louis in 1965. PMID:24585622

  5. Turbulence theory and infrared images falsify the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl

    2012-11-01

    Turbulence defined by the inertial vortex force explains Planck scale big bang processes as temporary, rendering a permanent Einstein cosmological constant Λ and a positive expansion rate of the universe driven by anti-gravitational dark energy forces unnecessary. Large kinematic viscosity stresses during the plasma epoch from 1011 s to 1013 s cause fragmentation by proto-super-cluster-voids at 1012 s and proto-galaxies at the 1013 s transition to gas. Fragmentation of gas proto-galaxies is at Earth-mass planet viscous scales in Jeans mass clumps of a trillion planets. These Proto-Globular-star-Clusters (PGCs) freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies according to the Gibson (1996) Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) theory, and as observed by Schild (1996) by quasar microlensing. White dwarf carbon stars explode as Supernovae Ia events (SNeIa) when their mass increases to 1.44 solar, providing the standard candles used to justify the Nobel Prize claim of a positive expansion rate. However, if all stars form from primordial planet mergers in PGC clumps as claimed by HGD cosmology, the SNeIa become subject to a systematic dimming error depending on the line of sight to the event. New space telescope infrared images strongly support HGD cosmology.

  6. A review of Nobel prizes in medicine or physiology, 1901-87.

    PubMed

    Kantha, S S

    1989-03-01

    This review examines the awards of Nobel Prizes for Medicine or Physiology discipline between 1901 and 1987, in order to evaluate the advances made in biomedical sciences in the twentieth century. A total of 78 awards had been made amounting to 144 laureates. Countrywise, scientists from the USA lead the tally of Nobelists with 62 laureates, followed by those from Britain and Germany. In the first quarter (1901-25), majority of the awards were given to pioneering studies in microbiology and physiology. Following three decades (1926-55) show the emergence of biochemists as preferred winners with many of the nutrition-related discoveries receiving the recognition. During and immediately after the Second World War (between 1939 and 1957), pharmacology related studies were also awarded Nobel merit. Molecular biology, genetics and immunology had become the prime areas for recipients during the last three decades beginning with 1958. Apart from these four distinct speciality areas, classic discoveries in the fields of neurosciences and behavior, clinical medicine, experimental biology endocrinology had also been recognized at regular intervals. PMID:2654450

  7. Simultaneous Reconstruction of Multiple Signaling Pathways via the Prize-Collecting Steiner Forest Problem

    PubMed Central

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Braunstein, Alfredo; Pagnani, Andrea; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Chayes, Jennifer; Borgs, Christian; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Signaling and regulatory networks are essential for cells to control processes such as growth, differentiation, and response to stimuli. Although many “omic” data sources are available to probe signaling pathways, these data are typically sparse and noisy. Thus, it has been difficult to use these data to discover the cause of the diseases and to propose new therapeutic strategies. We overcome these problems and use “omic” data to reconstruct simultaneously multiple pathways that are altered in a particular condition by solving the prize-collecting Steiner forest problem. To evaluate this approach, we use the well-characterized yeast pheromone response. We then apply the method to human glioblastoma data, searching for a forest of trees, each of which is rooted in a different cell-surface receptor. This approach discovers both overlapping and independent signaling pathways that are enriched in functionally and clinically relevant proteins, which could provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies. Although the algorithm was not provided with any information about the phosphorylation status of receptors, it identifies a small set of clinically relevant receptors among hundreds present in the interactome. PMID:23383998

  8. The Bohr paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-05-01

    In his book Niels Bohr's Times, the physicist Abraham Pais captures a paradox in his subject's legacy by quoting three conflicting assessments. Pais cites Max Born, of the first generation of quantum physics, and Werner Heisenberg, of the second, as saying that Bohr had a greater influence on physics and physicists than any other scientist. Yet Pais also reports a distinguished younger colleague asking with puzzlement and scepticism "What did Bohr really do?".

  9. MnTE-2-PyP reduces prostate cancer growth and metastasis by suppressing p300 activity and p300/HIF-1/CREB binding to the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiang; Weaver, Michael R; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; O'Connor, Brian P; Harmacek, Laura; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E

    2016-05-01

    To improve radiation therapy-induced quality of life impairments for prostate cancer patients, the development of radio-protectors is needed. Our previous work has demonstrated that MnTE-2-PyP significantly protects urogenital tissues from radiation-induced damage. So, in order for MnTE-2-PyP to be used clinically as a radio-protector, it is fully necessary to explore the effect of MnTE-2-PyP on human prostate cancer progression. MnTE-2-PyP inhibited prostate cancer growth in the presence and absence of radiation and also inhibited prostate cancer migration and invasion. MnTE-2-PyP altered p300 DNA binding, which resulted in the inhibition of HIF-1β and CREB signaling pathways. Accordingly, we also found that MnTE-2-PyP reduced the expression of three genes regulated by HIF-1β and/or CREB: TGF-β2, FGF-1 and PAI-1. Specifically, MnTE-2-PyP decreased p300 complex binding to a specific HRE motif within the PAI-1 gene promoter region, suppressed H3K9 acetylation, and consequently, repressed PAI-1 expression. Mechanistically, less p300 transcriptional complex binding is not due to the reduction of binding between p300 and HIF-1/CREB transcription factors, but through inhibiting the binding of HIF-1/CREB transcription factors to DNA. Our data provide an in depth mechanism by which MnTE-2-PyP reduces prostate cancer growth and metastasis, which validates the clinical use of MnTE-2-PyP as a radio-protector to enhance treatment outcomes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26944191

  10. Abraham Lincoln and the Pillars of Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Diana J.

    2002-01-01

    In this essay, Diana Schaub, associate professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Loyola College in Maryland, asserts that the 9/11 attack on America showed students the fallacy not of relativism, but of toleration. They are now aware that there are limits to toleration. By giving such a vivid display of the horrors of…

  11. Essay: Samuel Abraham Goudsmit (1902 1978)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2008-07-01

    When Sam Goudsmit was 23, he and George Uhlenbeck hypothesized that the electron had spin. Sam was a well-known atomic physicist working at the University of Michigan when World War II began. During the war he first worked on radar at the MIT Radiation Lab, and then in the waning days of the war in Europe he led a mission to determine how far the Nazis had gotten in developing an atomic bomb. After chairing the Physics Department at Brookhaven, in 1950 APS named Goudsmit Managing Editor of Physical Review and Reviews of Modern Physics; in 1966 he was named Editor-in-Chief. He founded Physical Review Letters in 1958.

  12. Mélanome cutané épais: facteurs de mortalité et de survenue de métastases

    PubMed Central

    Tarwate, Mariam; Benchikhi, Hakima; Adarmouch, Latifa; Benider, Abdelatif; Amine, Mohamed; Zamiati, Soumya; Boukind, El Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Au Maroc peu d’études ont été menées concernant les facteurs pronostiques du mélanome. L'objectif de cette étude était d'identifier les facteurs de survenue de métastases viscérales à distance à 1an et de mortalité à 2ans chez des patients atteints de mélanome cutané épais. Ont été colligés rétrospectivement tous les cas de mélanomes suivis au service de dermatologie et d'oncologie du CHU de Casablanca de 2006 à 2010. On été inclus les patients qui présentaient un mélanome à localisation cutanée et/ou muqueuse buccogénitale, confirmés histologiquement ayant un Breslow>2mm. Ont été exclus les patients présentant des métastases viscérales à distance au moment du diagnostic. Les données socio-démographiques, cliniques et thérapeutiques ont été recueillies au niveau des dossiers; celles relatives à l’évolution ont été complétées par contact téléphonique. L'analyse statistique était de type uni et bivarié. Soixante patients ont été inclus:41hommes et19femmes (sexe ratio de 2,15). La moyenne d’âge était de 60 ans (17-96). L'indice de Breslow était en moyenne de10mm+/-7et78%des patients(32) avaient un Breslow>4mm. Vingt trois patients (38,3%) avaient des adénopathies régionales. Quatorze patients ont présenté des métastases à distance après 1an (23,3%) et13patients étaient décédés après 2ans d’évolution (21,7%). Les facteurs associés à la survenue de métastases à distance étaient l'indice de Breslow. Des métastases à 1an ont été retrouvées chez 61,5%des patients avec un Breslow >10mm contre18,8% avec un Breslow PMID:25368733

  13. Reflections on the Nobel Prize for Medicine 2015--The Public Health Legacy and Impact of Avermectin and Artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H; Ward, Steve A

    2015-12-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize to Dr Bill Campbell and Professor Satoshi Ōmura for their role in the discovery of avermectin and Professor Youyou Tu for her work on the development of artemisinin has been universally welcomed by the International Health community for what the Nobel Committee described as 'The discoveries of Avermectin and Artemisinin have revolutionized therapy for patients suffering from devastating parasitic diseases. Campbell, Ōmura and Tu have transformed the treatment of parasitic diseases. The global impact of their discoveries and the resulting benefit to mankind are immeasurable'. PMID:26552892

  14. The question of nepotism in the award of Nobel prizes: a critique of the view of Hans Krebs.

    PubMed

    Sri Kantha, S

    1991-01-01

    While reviewing his development as a scientist, in 1967, Hans Krebs traced his scientific geneology to the von Baeyer 'family'. Almost every other member of this scientific family became a Nobel laureate. Krebs was of the opinion that there was no nepotism in the selection of the Nobel awards. This paper presents evidence, based on the recently released census of Nobel nominees and nominators for the chemistry prize between 1901 and 1937, that the von Baeyer 'family' of scientists had in fact practised a sort of 'nomination-nepotism'. PMID:2056924

  15. Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids: Optical spectroscopy and mechanisms of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, Dirk

    vibrations of the lattice, and where the electron-electron interaction is purely repulsive. Invited talk because of the Frank Isakson Prize 2016.

  16. Nobel Centennial Essays. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1903: Svante Arrhenius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-01-01

    This, the second of a series of thirteen articles on Nobel Laureates in chemical dynamics, features the work of Svante Arrhenius, who won the Nobel Prize in 1902 for his electrolytic theory of dissociation. The first article in this series, which appeared in the December 2001 issue of this Journal discussed Jacobus van't Hoff's contribution to our understanding of the nature of molecules in solution and to the study of solution-phase reaction dynamics. Arrhenius's electrolytic dissociation theory extended van't Hoff's ideas about the nature of molecules in solution into the realm of aqueous salts and acids and bases. Not only did this allow for correction of the van't Hoff equation as applied to electrolytes (the so-called van't Hoff i-factor), but it also showed how van't Hoff's principles of chemical dynamics could be applied to ionic solutions. The studies of catalysis by Ostwald (Nobel 1909, to be discussed in the February 2002 issue of this Journal in the next essay in this series) were guided by the work of van't Hoff and Arrhenius, both of whom had worked with Ostwald. Although it was not mentioned specifically in his Nobel presentation, the well-known Arrhenius equation relating reaction rate constants to activation energies and temperature is fundamental to all subsequent studies of reaction energetics and catalysis, and no modern discussion of chemical dynamics could begin without it. Arrhenius is best remembered today by teachers and students of chemistry because the definition of acids and bases and also the equation relating reaction rate constants to temperature through the activation energy that are both named for him.

  17. [An illustrious unknown. Giuseppe Levi among science, anti-fascism and Nobel Prizes].

    PubMed

    Grignolio, Andrea; De Sio, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The anatomist Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965) is unanimously considered one of the major figures of Italian biomedical sciences in the 20th century. His fame, however, is mainly derived from having nurtured three Nobel Prize winners, namely Salvador E. Luria, Rita Levi Montalcini and Renato Dulbecco. In reappraising Levi's role in the development of Italian science and culture in general, this article aims at questioning both the narrowness of earlier accounts and a certain kind of genealogical approach to the history of scientific disciplines and academic schools. We will here consider Giuseppe Levi as an instance of two major cultural phenomena: the development of experimental biology in Italy and continental Europe and the anti-fascist socialist culture expressed by a part of the Italian intellectuals. In so doing, we will reassess the historical specificity of the scientific maturation of Levi's three famous students, on the one hand, while on the other we will consider in some depth the cultural and moral environment in which Levi thrived and his role as a moral example for his students. Such revision, we will argue, have a direct bearing on more general historiographical issues, namely, the need for a stronger contextualization of the birth and consolidation of research traditions, implying a rejection of simplistic genealogical reconstructions, and the role of academic schools and institutional settings in the definition of novel, multidisciplinary scientific approaches. Finally, the following will highlight the importance of a more careful outlook on the master-pupil relationship in academic context, addressing issues of both continuity and rupture. The article is subdivided in two main sections, the first devoted to Levi as a scientist, the second to his Anti-fascism. PMID:21563384

  18. Performance in the Duke–Elder ophthalmology undergraduate prize examination and future careers in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, L; Shanmuganathan, V A; Kneebone, R L; Amoaku, W

    2011-01-01

    Aims Cognitive factors (eg, academic achievement) have had a significant role in selecting postgraduate surgical trainees in the past. This project sought to determine the role of a national undergraduate ophthalmology prize examination (Duke–Elder examination) in the selection of postgraduate ophthalmology trainees. This would also serve as a quality assurance exercise for the assessment, in which the ultimate aim is to encourage trainees into ophthalmology. Methods A retrospective analysis of the top 20 ranked candidates in the Duke–Elder examination from 1989 to 2005 (except 1995) was carried out to determine which of them subsequently entered the ophthalmic training and General Medical Council Specialist Registers. Results Out of the top 20 candidates in the exam, 29.5% went into specialist training in ophthalmology. Some appeared in the top 20 more than once, with 56% of them going into ophthalmic training, but they had a similar median time to enter training as those who appeared in the top 20 once. There was no significant evidence to suggest that the overall median ranking scores between the UK medical schools differed (P=0.23; Kruskal–Wallis test). However, there was a marked difference in frequency of top 20 candidates from each medical school, which could not be explained by the size of the medical school alone. Conclusion It is difficult to conclude from these findings the importance that the Duke–Elder examination has in the selection of trainees into ophthalmology. The role of cognitive factors in selection into postgraduate medical/surgical training is discussed, along with the potential academic criteria, which may influence interview scores. PMID:21587276

  19. The contributions of Paul Ehrlich to pharmacology: a tribute on the occasion of the centenary of his Nobel Prize.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Fèlix; Rosich, Laia

    2008-01-01

    On the centenary of Paul Ehrlich's Nobel Prize, this German researcher deserves to be remembered as a pioneer in a large number of scientific disciplines. As a result of his enthusiasm and scientific abilities, dedication, and contacts with other scientists of his time, he was able to make countless contributions in fields as diverse as histology, haematology, immunology, oncology, microbiology and pharmacology, among others. Although the Swedish award was meant to recognize the standardization of the manufacture of antidiphtheria serum, it was the discovery of arsphenamine (Salvarsan) for the treatment of syphilis which won him wider international acclaim. From a pharmacological perspective, Ehrlich's outstanding contributions include dissemination of the 'magic bullet' concept for the synthesis of antibacterials, introduction of concepts such as chemoreceptor and chemotherapy, and linking the chemical structure of compounds to their pharmacological activity. These achievements took place within the framework he established for the transition from experimental pharmacology to therapeutic pharmacology. He introduced a modern research system based on the synthesis of multiple chemical structures for pharmacological screening in animal models of disease states. These contributions were undoubtedly decisive in propitiating the wider development of antibiotics decades later. For these reasons, it is fitting to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to this great scientist by commemorating the importance of his contributions to the advance of pharmacology. PMID:18679046

  20. The Contributions of Paul Ehrlich to Pharmacology: A Tribute on the Occasion of the Centenary of His Nobel Prize

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Fèlix; Rosich, Laia

    2008-01-01

    On the centenary of Paul Ehrlich's Nobel Prize, this German researcher deserves to be remembered as a pioneer in a large number of scientific disciplines. As a result of his enthusiasm and scientific abilities, dedication, and contacts with other scientists of his time, he was able to make countless contributions in fields as diverse as histology, haematology, immunology, oncology, microbiology and pharmacology, among others. Although the Swedish award was meant to recognize the standardization of the manufacture of antidiphtheria serum, it was the discovery of arsphenamine (Salvarsan) for the treatment of syphilis which won him wider international acclaim. From a pharmacological perspective, Ehrlich's outstanding contributions include dissemination of the ‘magic bullet’ concept for the synthesis of antibacterials, introduction of concepts such as chemoreceptor and chemotherapy, and linking the chemical structure of compounds to their pharmacological activity. These achievements took place within the framework he established for the transition from experimental pharmacology to therapeutic pharmacology. He introduced a modern research system based on the synthesis of multiple chemical structures for pharmacological screening in animal models of disease states. These contributions were undoubtedly decisive in propitiating the wider development of antibiotics decades later. For these reasons, it is fitting to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to this great scientist by commemorating the importance of his contributions to the advance of pharmacology. PMID:18679046