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Sample records for abramson cancer center

  1. Links Between Metabolism and Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Speaker Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD John H. Glick Professor of Medicine Director, Abramson Cancer Center and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Philadelphia, PA |

  2. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  3. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  4. Meeting report: The 13th Annual Meeting of the Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3); Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment, Columbus, Ohio; March 1-2, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Carson, William E; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Wei, Wei-zen; Kalinski, Pawel; Lotze, Michael T; June, Carl H; Petros, William; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Olencki, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3) is a cancer immunotherapy network, established to promote biologic therapeutics in the Midwestern and Northeastern regions of The United States. The 13th Annual Meeting of the TrC3 was hosted by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and took place at The Blackwell Hotel and Conference Center in Columbus, OH on March 1-2, 2010 (http://www.osuccc.osu.edu/TrC3/index.htm). This year's theme was "Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment." The meeting consisted of 21 oral presentations, a roundtable discussion focused on enhancing collaborative relationships within the consortium, and a poster session with 54 abstracts from predoctoral or postdoctoral researchers. This annual meeting brought together more than 170 investigators from 9 regional cancer centers including: Abramson Cancer Center at The University of Pennsylvania, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute at Wayne State University, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn State Cancer Institute, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. The proceedings of this year's meeting are summarized in this report.

  5. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Cancer Treatment Affecting the Central Nervous System (HLMCC 0707) • Melatonin and sleep hygiene for the treatment of insomnia following cancer...Determinants of Diabetes in the Young. (PI: Jeffrey Krischer, Ph.D.) Moffitt Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base (PI: Jeffrey Krischer

  6. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... disseminate evidence-based findings into communities that can benefit from these findings, but the centers can also, through the experience of working with those patients, help inform national research and ...

  7. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approaches, CCG aims to accelerate structural, functional and computational research to explore cancer mechanisms, discover new cancer targets, and develop new therapeutics.

  8. Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial Disparities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    Psychological Outcomes for Gynecologic Cancer Survivors. Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Apr 17. [Epub ahead of print]. 3. Simonelli LE, Fowler J, Maxwell GL, Andersen...Maxwell GL, Andersen BL: Does sexual morbidity predict psychological outcomes in gynecologic cancer survivors? Poster presented at Society of Behavioral...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-2-0065 TITLE: Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial

  9. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing app

  10. Implementing personalized medicine in a cancer center.

    PubMed

    Fenstermacher, David A; Wenham, Robert M; Rollison, Dana E; Dalton, William S

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with patients, community clinicians, industry, academia, and 17 hospitals in the United States to begin a personalized cancer care initiative called Total Cancer Care. Total Cancer Care was designed to collect tumor specimens and clinical data throughout a patient's lifetime, with the goal of finding "the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time." Because Total Cancer Care is a partnership with the patient and involves collection of clinical data and tumor specimens for research purposes, a formal protocol and patient consent process was developed, and an information technology platform was constructed to provide a robust "warehouse" for clinical and molecular profiling data. To date, more than 76,000 cancer patients from Moffitt and consortium medical centers have been enrolled in the protocol. The Total Cancer Care initiative has developed many of the capabilities and resources that are building the foundation of personalized medicine.

  11. Cancer centers prepare for sequestration cuts.

    PubMed

    Bender, Eric

    2013-04-01

    With automatic U.S. federal budget cuts kicking in, cancer centers are readying for a significant downturn in spending, especially because the cost savings must be achieved in the remaining half of the federal fiscal year.

  12. Improving the Safety of Oral Chemotherapy at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Erica; Capozzi, Donna; McGettigan, Suzanne; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Schuchter, Lynn; Myers, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Over the last decade, the use of oral chemotherapy (OC) for the treatment of cancer has dramatically increased. Despite their route of administration, OCs pose many of the same risks as intravenous agents. In this quality improvement project, we sought to examine our current process for the prescription of OC at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and to improve on its safety. Methods: A multidisciplinary team that included oncologists, advanced-practice providers, and pharmacists was formed to analyze the current state of our OC practice. Using Lean Six Sigma quality improvement tools, we identified a lack of pharmacist review of the OC prescription as an area for improvement. To address these deficiencies, we used our electronic medical system to route OC orders placed by treating providers to an oncology-specific outpatient pharmacist at the Abramson Cancer Center for review. Results: Over 7 months, 63 orders for OC were placed for 45 individual patients. Of the 63 orders, all were reviewed by pharmacists, and, as a result, 22 interventions were made (35%). Types of interventions included dosage adjustment (one of 22), identification of an interacting drug (nine of 22), and recommendations for additional drug monitoring (12 of 22). Conclusion: OC poses many of the same risks as intravenous chemotherapy and should be prescribed and reviewed with the same oversight. At our institution, involvement of an oncology-trained pharmacist in the review of OC led to meaningful interventions in one third of the orders. PMID:26733627

  13. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374.

  14. Cancer center jumps hoops to issue bonds.

    PubMed

    Nemes, J

    1991-04-08

    If community hospital executives think they have a tough time trying to issue tax-exempt debt these days, it could be worse. Case in point--the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The world-renowned center, which was seeking financing for replacement facilities, faced a tough sell after it found itself with a couple of strikes against it, namely a high reliance on federal grants and balking credit-rating agencies. But a long-awaited government exemption and letter-of-credit guarantees got the project going.

  15. Connection: Schwartz Center Rounds at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, Lidia; Mack, Sally; Stanzler, Marjorie; Lynch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital, founded the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center®, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care. The Center sponsors Schwartz Rounds®, a multidisciplinary forum in which doctors, nurses, chaplains, social workers, and other staff reflect on important psychosocial issues that arise in caring for patients. Attendees participate in an interactive discussion about issues anchored in a case presentation and share their experiences, thoughts, and feelings. The patient narratives may center on wonderful events and transcendent experiences or tragic stories, during which staff can only bear witness to the suffering. The Rounds focus on caregivers' experiences, and encourage staff to share insights, own their vulnerabilities, and support each other. The primary objective is to foster healing relationships and provide support to professional caregivers, enhance communication among caregivers, and improve the connection between patients and caregivers. Currently, >50,000 clinicians attend monthly Schwartz Rounds at 195 sites in 31 states, numbers that are rapidly growing. In this article we explore the reasons that contribute to the success of this model of multidisciplinary reflection. PMID:20584809

  16. Collaboration with the community cancer center: benefit for all.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Nicholas J; Grusenmeyer, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    Developing successful programs in a community cancer center involves collaborative efforts between employed and private practice physicians, hospital and cancer center administrations, support personnel, and significant resources, coupled with a vision that will lead to improved patient care and outcomes. Collaboration through a strong state cancer control program is another important component for a successful community cancer center. Delaware has one of the best state cancer control programs in the United States. In 2001, the Delaware Cancer Consortium was formed, which, in 2002, launched its first statewide program to screen all Delawareans older than 50 years with colonoscopy.

  17. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    characterizing SOX10-zyxin interaction on molecular basis. Aim4. Development of novel Ruthenium (Ru)-compounds as anti-cancer reagents. Previous studies...In order to further evaluate ruthenium (Ru) complexes as potential anti-cancer agents, we synthesized and evaluated ruthenium (Ru) –arene complexes...and metastasis by blocking multiple processes for patients with various forms of cancer. Publication: Inhibition of cancer cell growth by ruthenium

  19. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Łyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Łaskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step. PMID:23346132

  20. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Matys, Robert; Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Lyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Laskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step.

  1. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  2. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer. |

  3. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Hypnosis Intervention, Dr. Guy Montgomery, Associate Professor, Oncological Sciences 12/14/2005 Patient Navigation for CRC Screening with Low Income...Attending Psychologist Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 4/20/2006 "It’s all in your head: The use of MRI in

  4. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qianlai; Asher, Gary N

    2016-05-04

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among cancer patients, but the majority of CAM studies do not specify the time periods in relation to cancer diagnoses. We sought to define CAM use by cancer patients and investigate factors that might influence changes in CAM use in relation to cancer diagnoses. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2012 at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Questionnaires were sent to 1794 patients. Phone calls were made to nonrespondents. Log binomial/Poisson regressions were used to investigate the association between cancer-related changes in CAM use and conversations about CAM use with oncology providers. Results We received 603 (33.6 %) completed questionnaires. The mean age (SD) was 64 (11) years; 62% were female; 79% were white; and 98% were non-Hispanic. Respondents reported the following cancer types: breast (47%), prostate (27%), colorectal (14%), lung (11%). Eighty-nine percent reported lifetime CAM use. Eighty-five percent reported CAM use during or after initial cancer treatment, with category-specific use as follows: mind-body medicine 39%, dietary supplements 73%, body-based therapies 30%, and energy medicine 49%. During treatment CAM use decreased for all categories except energy medicine. After treatment CAM use returned to pretreatment levels for most CAMs except chiropractic. Initiation of CAM use after cancer diagnosis was positively associated with a patient having a conversation about CAM use with their oncology provider, mainly driven by patient-initiated conversations. Conclusions Consistent with previous studies, CAM use was common among our study population. Conversations about CAM use with oncology providers appeared to influence cessation of mind-body medicine use after cancer diagnosis.

  6. Promoting cancer screening within the patient centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    While consensus has grown that primary care is the essential access point in a high-performing health care system, the current model of primary care underperforms in both chronic disease management and prevention. The Patient Centered Medical Home model (PCMH) is at the center of efforts to reinvent primary care practice, and is regarded as the most promising approach to addressing the burden of chronic disease, improving health outcomes, and reducing health spending. However, the potential for the medical home to improve the delivery of cancer screening (and preventive services in general) has received limited attention in both conceptualization and practice. Medical home demonstrations to date have included few evidence-based preventive services in their outcome measures, and few have evaluated the effect of different payment models. Decreasing use of hospitals and emergency rooms and an emphasis on improving chronic care represent improvements in effective delivery of healthcare, but leave opportunities for reducing the burden of cancer untouched. Data confirm that what does or does not happen in the primary care setting has a substantial impact on cancer outcomes. Insofar as cancer is the leading cause of death before age 80, the PCMH model must prioritize adherence to cancer screening according to recommended guidelines, and systems, financial incentives, and reimbursements must be aligned to achieve that goal. This article explores capacities that are needed in the medical home model to facilitate the integration of cancer screening and other preventive services. These capacities include improved patient access and communication, health risk assessments, periodic preventive health exams, use of registries that store cancer risk information and screening history, ability to track and follow up on tests and referrals, feedback on performance, and payment models that reward cancer screening.

  7. Cancers in Eastern Libya: First results from Benghazi Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Azzuz, Raouf; Bendardaf, Riyad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the pattern of cancer incidence and determine the incidence rates in Eastern Libya (for the first time in a decade). METHODS: A hospital-based registry of cancer patients was formed using records from the primary oncology center in eastern Libya - focusing on those diagnosed in the year 2012. RESULTS: The most common malignancies in men were cancers of the colon (22.3%, n = 90), lung (20.3%, n = 82), prostate (16.1%, n = 65), pancreas (4.2%, n = 17) and liver (4.2%, n = 17). For women, they were found to be cancers of the breast (41.5%, n = 213), colon (16.4%, n = 84), uterus (8%, n = 41), ovary (5.5%, n = 28) and pancreas (3.1%, n = 16). Additionally age-standardized rates (ASR) were determined for Libya. The different cities and towns in eastern Libya were compared for any variation. The city of Beida in particular was found to have a remarkably high incidence of gastric cancer. The different findings were discussed and comparisons were made with past literature as well as the incidence rates for neighbouring countries. The incidence rates given for the eastern region showed differences from previously reported values (i.e., the rate of colon cancer was the highest in North Africa whereas other malignancies occurred less frequently). Potential explanations for the urban-rural difference as well as the difference in incidence rates were put forth. The significance of this study is that it establishes a baseline of cancer incidence which should be the backbone for any future national cancer plan in Libya. CONCLUSION: Proper surveillance programs need to be in place and healthcare policy should be adjusted to take into account the more prevalent and pressing cancers in society. PMID:24876750

  8. At the center of cancer care. For-profit outpatient centers playing bigger role in treatment, clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Saphir, A

    1999-05-31

    New treatments and technological advances mean the vasty majority of cancer patients are receiving their care on an outpatient basis. Increasingly, for-profit cancer centers are providing that care. Although some hospitals have embraced the centers as partners, others see them as interlopers, drawing off lucrative business and threatening patients' continuity of care.

  9. Procedures for handling antineoplastic injections in comprehensive cancer centers.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, M L; Roberts, M J; Theisen, J A

    1983-04-01

    The procedures for handling injectable antineoplastic drugs in comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S. are summarized. In May 1982, a survey was sent to directors of pharmacy at 27 institutions designated as comprehensive cancer centers. Some questions duplicated a 1979 survey, while others addressed points in recently published guidelines on handling antineoplastic medications. Representatives of 21 institutions responded. These institutions represented 13,638 beds, 1,848 of which were oncology beds. Seventeen institutions had written policies for the preparation of antineoplastics, but only nine had a training program. The pharmacist or pharmacy technician prepared these medications in 12 institutions. Ten institutions prepared antineoplastics in a vertical laminar-flow hood. Gloves and masks were worn by employees in 20 and 13 of the institutions, respectively. Six institutions in some way assessed the health of employees handling antineoplastics. Eleven institutions had written policies on disposal of antineoplastics; 13 institutions disposed of this waste separately. Ten institutions had a training program for administration of antineoplastics. Compared with 1979, the trend is toward increased protection of persons handling injectable antineoplastic agents, but the procedures used at comprehensive cancer centers are not uniform.

  10. Strategies for expanding colorectal cancer screening at community health centers.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Doroshenk, Mary; Hotz, James; Brooks, Durado; Hayashi, Seiji; Davis, Terry C; Joseph, Djenaba; Stevens, David; Weaver, Donald L; Potter, Michael B; Wender, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers are uniquely positioned to address disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening as they have addressed other disparities. In 2012, the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, which is the funding agency for the health center program, added a requirement that health centers report CRC screening rates as a standard performance measure. These annually reported, publically available data are a major strategic opportunity to improve screening rates for CRC. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act enacted provisions to expand the capacity of the federal health center program. The recent report of the Institute of Medicine on integrating public health and primary care included an entire section devoted to CRC screening as a target for joint work. These developments make this the ideal time to integrate lifesaving CRC screening into the preventive care already offered by health centers. This article offers 5 strategies that address the challenges health centers face in increasing CRC screening rates. The first 2 strategies focus on improving the processes of primary care. The third emphasizes working productively with other medical providers and institutions. The fourth strategy is about aligning leadership. The final strategy is focused on using tools that have been derived from models that work.

  11. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  12. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  13. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  14. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC1): Genetic Disruption of CTCF Destabilizes DNA Methylation | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center identified the DNA binding protein CTCF as a tumor suppressor and regulator of DNA methylation. Read the abstract Experimental Approaches Read the detailed Experimental Approaches

  15. The handling of antineoplastic drugs in a major cancer center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D M

    1980-06-01

    It has long been known that many commonly used antineoplastic agents are carcinogenic. Yet most health care professionals take few precautions, if any, when handling these drugs. Recent findings suggest a possible hazard to personnel as evidenced by increased mutagenicity of urine of nurses exposed to anticancer drugs during preparation and administration of doses. Although more study is needed to determine the significance of these data, it would seem prudent to take measures to prevent any unnecessary exposure to these drugs by those preparing and administering them. The policies and procedures at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center require that chemotherapeutic drugs be prepared in a vertical laminar flow containment hood by personnel wearing sterile disposable gloves. Chemotherapeutic agents are specially labeled to ensure segregated disposal of waste, which is subsequently incinerated.

  16. Accreditation for excellence of cancer research institutes: recommendations from the Italian Network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Pier Luigi; La Pietra, Leonardo; Pierotti, Marco; Collazzo, Raffaele; Paradiso, Angelo; Belardelli, Filippo; De Paoli, Paolo; Nigro, Aldo; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, Piergiuseppe; Pierotti, Marco; Roli, Anna; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Scala, Stefania; Amadori, Alberto; Chiusole, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino; Fusco, Vincenzo; Storto, Giovanni; De Maria, Ruggero; Canitano, Stefano; Apolone, Giovanni; Ravelli, Maria; Mazzini, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Bernabini, Marna; Ancarani, Valentina; Lombardo, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    A panel of experts from Italian Comprehensive Cancer Centers defines the recommendations for external quality control programs aimed to accreditation to excellence of these institutes. After definition of the process as a systematic, periodic evaluation performed by an external agency to verify whether a health organization possesses certain prerequisites regarding structural, organizational and operational conditions that are thought to affect health care quality, the panel reviews models internationally available and makes final recommendations on aspects considered of main interest. This position paper has been produced within a special project of the Ministry of Health of the Italian Government aimed to accredit, according to OECI model, 11 Italian cancer centers in the period 2012-2014. The Project represents the effort undertaken by this network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers to find a common denominator for the experience of all Institutes in external quality control programs. Fourteen shared "statements" are put forth, designed to offer some indications on the main aspects of this subject, based on literature evidence or expert opinions. They deal with the need for "accountability" and involvement of the entire organization, the effectiveness of self-evaluation, the temporal continuity and the educational value of the experience, the use of indicators and measurement tools, additionally for intra- and inter-organization comparison, the system of evaluation models used, the provision for specific requisites for oncology, and the opportunity for mutual exchange of evaluation experiences.

  17. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites.

  18. Incidence of Atypical Femur Fractures in Cancer Patients: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Beatrice J; Sun, Ming; West, Dennis P; Guindani, Michele; Lin, Yan Heather; Lu, Huifang; Hu, Mimi; Barcenas, Carlos; Bird, Justin; Feng, Chun; Saraykar, Smita; Tripathy, Debasish; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gagel, Robert; Murphy, William A

    2016-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are rare adverse events attributed to bisphosphonate (BP) use. Few cases of AFF in cancer have been described; the aim of this study is to identify the incidence and risk factors for AFF in a large cancer center. This retrospective study was conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The incidence rate of AFF among BP users was calculated from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2013. The control group (n = 51) included 2 or 3 patients on BPs matched for age (≤1 year) and gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between clinical characteristics and AFF. Twenty-three AFF cases were identified radiographically among 10,587 BP users, the total BP exposure was 53,789 months (4482 years), and the incidence of AFF in BP users was 0.05 cases per 100,000 person-years. Meanwhile, among 300,553 patients who did not receive BPs there were 2 cases of AFF as compared with the 23 cases noted above. The odds ratio (OR) of having AFF in BP users was 355.58 times higher (95% CI, 84.1 to 1501.4, p < 0.0001) than the risk in non-BP users. The OR of having AFF in alendronate users was 5.54 times greater (OR 5.54 [95% CI, 1.60 to 19.112, p = 0.007]) than the odds of having AFF among other BP users. Patients who were on zoledronic acid (ZOL) had smaller odds of developing AFF compared with other BP users in this matched case control sample. AFFs are rare, serious adverse events that occur in patients with cancer who receive BP therapy. Patients with cancer who receive BPs for prior osteoporosis therapy or for metastatic cancer are at higher risk of AFF. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Clinical Perspectives on Colorectal Cancer Screening at Latino-Serving Federally Qualified Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Petrik, Amanda F.; Spofford, Mark; Talbot, Jocelyn; Do, Huyen Hoai; Taylor, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States, and rates of screening for colorectal cancer are low. We sought to gather the perceptions of clinic personnel at Latino-serving Federally Qualified Health Centers (operating 17 clinics) about barriers to utilization of screening services for colorectal…

  20. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  1. ReCAP: Impact of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program on Clinical Trial and Related Activities at a Community Cancer Center in Rural Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, Ryan; Gönen, Mithat; Gulzow, Mary; Hadenfeldt, Rebecca; Fuller, Courtney; Scott, Jenifer; Einspahr, Sarah; Benzel, Heather; Mickey, Mary; Norvell, Max; Clark, Douglas; Gauchan, Dron; Kurbegov, Dax

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: What is the impact of participating in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) on the number of clinical trials available, number of patients enrolled in trials, and trial-related services provided to patients at a rural community-based cancer program? SUMMARY ANSWER: Significant increases in the number and percentage of patients enrolled in clinical trials, in the number of available treatment and non-treatment (eg, prevention, biospecimen, cancer control) trials, in clinical trial staffing, and in the number of tissue samples collected and/or stored were observed during the 5-year period of NCCCP. Biospecimen trials helped promote standardization of collection and storage processes in our community cancer program. Employment and utilization of a genetic counselor, smoking cessation counselor, outreach project coordinator, and two nurse navigators enabled delivery of improved cancer care continuum services to our rural patient population. METHODS: SFCTC clinical trial activities data from July 2002 to June 2007, the 5 years before participation in the NCCCP, and from July 2007 to June 2012, the 5 years during the program, were gathered and compared. Data capture included information on the number and percentage of patients on clinical trials, number and type of available clinical trials, percentage of underserved patients in clinical trials, clinical trial staffing, collection and storage of tissue samples, organizational infrastructure, linkage to NCI-designated cancer centers, and availability of new cancer care services. Percentages of patients in clinical trials were calculated as the ratio of the number of patients enrolled onto clinical trials over the number of analytic new patient cases of cancer through our tumor registry per year. Percentages of tissue samples collected and/or stored were similarly measured as the number of biospecimens collected over the number of analytic new patient cases of cancer per

  2. Innovative Approaches to Reducing Cancer Health Disparities: The Moffitt Cancer Center Patient Navigator Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kristen J.; Meade, Cathy D.; Calcano, Ercilia; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Rivers, Desiree; Roetzheim, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    The Moffitt Cancer Center Patient Navigation Research Program (Moffitt PNRP) is evaluating the efficacy of patient navigation in reducing delays from screening abnormality to diagnostic resolution of a breast or colorectal abnormality. The Moffitt PNRP was conducted in three phases: (1) developing an acceptable, appealing, and culturally appropriate patient navigation program; (2) conducting a group randomized controlled trial to evaluate the patient navigation program; and (3) disseminating research findings and Moffitt PNRP intervention model. The patient navigation program was developed through significant formative research, input from the Moffitt PNRP Community Advisory Board, and through a close collaboration with the Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network. 1367 patients are enrolled in the Phase 2 group randomized trial of the Moffitt PNRP. Most Moffitt PNRP group randomized trial participants are Hispanic, female, and Spanish speaking, with minimal education and income. The intervention is being disseminated in primary care clinics in west central Florida. PMID:21573740

  3. Does a Standalone Cancer Center Improve Head and Neck Microsurgical Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Tamplen, Matthew L; Tamplen, Jesse; Torrecillas, Vanessa; Seth, Rahul; Ricceri, Santo; Hemmat, Shirin; Heaton, Chase; Ryan, William R; Knott, P Daniel

    2017-01-06

    Objectives To evaluate the role of hospital setting (standalone cancer center vs. large multidisciplinary hospital) on free tissue transfer (FTT) outcomes for head and neck reconstruction. Methods Medical records were reviewed of 180 consecutive patients undergoing FTT for head and neck reconstruction. Operations occurred at either a standalone academic cancer center (n = 101) or a large multidisciplinary academic medical center (n = 79) by the same surgeons. Patient outcomes, operative comparisons, and hospital costs were compared between the hospital settings. Results The cancer center group had higher mean age (65.2 vs. 60 years; p = 0.009) and a shorter mean operative time (12.3 vs. 13.2 hours; p = 0.034). Postoperatively, the cancer center group had a significantly shorter average ICU stay (3.45 vs. 4.41 days; p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in medical or surgical complications between the groups. Having surgery at the cancer center was the only significant independent predictor of a reduced ICU stay on multivariate analysis (Coef 0.73; p < 0.020). Subgroup analysis, including only patients with cancer of the aerodigestive tract, demonstrated further reduction in ICU stay for the cancer center group (3.85 vs. 5.1 days; p < 0.001). A cost analysis demonstrated that the reduction in ICU saved $223,816 for the cancer center group. Conclusion Standalone subspecialty cancer centers are safe and appropriate settings for FTT. We found both reduced operative time and ICU length of stay, both of which contributed to lower overall costs. These findings challenge the concept that FTT requires a large multidisciplinary hospital. Level of Evidence 4.

  4. Enhancing Quality Improvements in Cancer Care Through CME Activities at a Nationally Recognized Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal. PMID:23608956

  5. Enhancing quality improvements in cancer care through CME activities at a nationally recognized cancer center.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-06-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal.

  6. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  7. University of Kansas Medical center Cancer Research Equipment Award Type: Construction Grant

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Jamie

    2016-12-09

    A major mechanism to strengthen the overall cancer focus of KUCC and expand specific research programs is through targeted recruitment of additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research needs, and enable new collaborative projects. Over the last five years KUCC has demonstrated the ability to recruit nationally recognized basic, translational and clinical scientists to fill key leadership positions and strengthen our research programs. These researchers require new and renovated research facilities require state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. This includes standard equipment for the renovated laboratories and more specialized equipment as part of new investigator start-up packages. This funding is used to support recruitment, facilities, equipment, shared resources, administration, and patient care services. KUCC is committed to recruiting additional cancer researchers to increase the national and international status of the Cancer Center, enhance the number of NCI/cancer-related grants, fill critical research positions and build the four cancer research programs. Each purposeful hire aims to further the scientific vision, mission, and goals of the Cancer Center research programs. The funds requested will be used to supplement the recruitment packages of future cancer center recruits primarily through purchase of key equipment items.

  8. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    questionnaire to assess their prostate cancer health seeking behavior. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, Dietary risk factors, Lycopene, Genetic ...Institute (NCI) state cancer profiles, the mortality rate is almost three times that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and

  9. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Cancer.gov

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  10. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  11. Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program on Community-Based Cancer Clinical Trials Activity

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Susan C.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A goal of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) was to improve cancer research capacity in community settings. We examined research capacity development during the pilot phase of the NCCCP within the context of national trends in clinical trial activity with respect to the number and phase of trials, total accrual, and accrual of underserved populations. Materials and Methods: We examined self-reported data from NCCCP sites during 2007 to 2010, supplemented with data from the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. Results: Trial availability and accrual improved more quickly at NCCCP sites compared with national trends. Phase III trial availability increased 8% nationally versus 16% across NCCCP sites, and accrual increased 30% nationally versus 133% across NCCCP sites. Accrual of racial and ethnic minorities rose 82%, from 83 to 151 patients, and accrual of patients age ≥ 65 years rose by 221%, from 200 to 641 patients. Change in trial portfolio and accrual differed by sophistication of the site and by prior experience in conducting clinical trials at the site. Conclusion: Despite the short duration, the NCCCP pilot resulted in an increase in the number of open trials as well as patient accrual at a faster rate than that observed nationally. These results, coupled with insights into the relative success of sites with varying sophistication at the outset, provide promise that lessons learned can be applied more broadly to increase research participation. PMID:27026649

  12. Prevalence of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; Karnakis, Theodora; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of abnormal glomerular filtration rate in elderly patients with solid tumors. Methods A retrospective study with patients aged >65 years diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011 in a cancer center. The following data were collected: sex, age, serum creatinine at the time of diagnosis and type of tumor. Renal function was calculated using abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulae and then staged in accordance with the clinical practice guidelines published by the Working Group of the National Kidney Foundation. Results A total of 666 patients were included and 60% were male. The median age was 74.2 years (range: 65 to 99 years). The most prevalent diagnosis in the study population were colorectal (24%), prostate (20%), breast (16%) and lung cancer (16%). The prevalence of elevated serum creatinine (>1.0mg/dL) was 30%. However, when patients were assessed using abbreviated MDRD formulae, 66% had abnormal renal function, stratified as follows: 45% with stage 2, 18% with stage 3, 3% with stage 4 and 0.3% with stage 5. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study to estimate the frequency of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in Brazil. The prevalence of abnormal renal function among our cohort was high. As suspected, the absolute creatinine level does underestimate renal function impairment and should not be used as predictor of chemotherapy metabolism, excretion and consequent toxicity. PMID:25295449

  13. Sociodemographic Parameters of Esophageal Cancer in Northwest India: A Regional Cancer Center Experience of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Kumar, Vanita; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Beniwal, Surender Kumar; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite various advances in the treatment of Esophageal Cancer (EC), being one of the least responsive tumors to cancer therapy, the overall prognosis remains poor. Therefore, it is significant to understand various sociodemographic factors associated with EC to find out various schemes for primary prevention of the disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of the EC patients registered in the regional cancer center of northwest India from January 2003 to December 2012. The site of the disease and the histology were also recorded in addition to the various sociodemographic parameters. Results: Out of 55,742 patients registered in our hospital; 3,667 were diagnosed to have EC. Male:female ratio was 1.15:1. The mean age was 54.6 ± 11.74 years; 66.15% of the patients were illiterate and 48.6% belonged to the low socioeconomic status. Smoking and alcohol consumption were identified as risk factors in 48 and 25.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The etiology in majority of the patients is linked to tobacco and alcohol, thus, modification of life style with limiting the use of addictions may be an effective strategy in the prevention of this dreaded and mostly incurable disease. PMID:26435600

  14. Fox Chase Cancer Center's Genitourinary Division: a national resource for research, innovation and patient care.

    PubMed

    Uzzo, Robert G; Horwitz, Eric M; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2016-04-01

    Founded in 1904, Fox Chase Cancer Center remains committed to its mission. It is one of 41 centers in the country designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, holds the magnet designation for nursing excellence, is one of the first to establish a family cancer risk assessment program, and has achieved national distinction because of the scientific discoveries made there that have advanced clinical care. Two of its researchers have won Nobel prizes. The Genitourinary Division is nationally recognized and viewed as one of the top driving forces behind the growth of Fox Chase due to its commitment to initiating and participating in clinical trials, its prolific contributions to peer-reviewed publications and presentations at scientific meetings, its innovations in therapies and treatment strategies, and its commitment to bringing cutting-edge therapies to patients.

  15. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    c. Measure height, weight, waist and hip circumference d. Collect blood specimens Since receiving HSRRB approval on April 16t , 2004, we have been... metabolism , and breast cancer risk: a molecular epidemiologic study" (Ambrosone, PI)--Psychological and behavioral factors are investigated as potential...Behavior, estrogen metabolism , and breast cancer risk: a molecular epidemiologic study 10 Project 1: Behavior, estrogen metabolism , and breast cancer risk

  16. Assessment of diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer cases at two cancer centers in Egypt and Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Schairer, Catherine; Soliman, Amr S; Omar, Sherif; Khaled, Hussein; Eissa, Saad; Ayed, Farhat Ben; Khalafallah, Samir; Ayoub, Wided Ben; Kantor, Elizabeth D; Merajver, Sofia; Swain, Sandra M; Gail, Mitchell; Brown, Linda Morris

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is largely clinical and therefore inherently somewhat subjective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnosis of IBC at two centers in North Africa where a higher proportion of breast cancer is diagnosed as IBC than in the United States (U.S.). Physicians prospectively enrolled suspected IBC cases at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) – Cairo, Egypt, and the Institut Salah Azaiz (ISA), Tunisia, recorded extent and duration of signs/symptoms of IBC on standardized forms, and took digital photographs of the breast. After second-level review at study hospitals, photographs and clinical information for confirmed IBC cases were reviewed by two U.S. oncologists. We calculated percent agreement between study hospital and U.S. oncologist diagnoses. Among cases confirmed by at least one U.S. oncologist, we calculated median extent and duration of signs and Spearman correlations. At least one U.S. oncologist confirmed the IBC diagnosis for 69% (39/50) of cases with photographs at the NCI-Cairo and 88% (21/24) of cases at the ISA. All confirmed cases had at least one sign of IBC (erythema, edema, peau d'orange) that covered at least one-third of the breast. The median duration of signs ranged from 1 to 3 months; extent and duration of signs were not statistically significantly correlated. From the above-mentioned outcomes, it can be concluded that the diagnosis of a substantial proportion of IBC cases is unambiguous, but a subset is difficult to distinguish from other types of locally advanced breast cancer. Among confirmed cases, the extent of signs was not related to delay in diagnosis. PMID:23634285

  17. Assessment of diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer cases at two cancer centers in Egypt and Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Catherine; Soliman, Amr S; Omar, Sherif; Khaled, Hussein; Eissa, Saad; Ayed, Farhat Ben; Khalafallah, Samir; Ayoub, Wided Ben; Kantor, Elizabeth D; Merajver, Sofia; Swain, Sandra M; Gail, Mitchell; Brown, Linda Morris

    2013-04-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is largely clinical and therefore inherently somewhat subjective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnosis of IBC at two centers in North Africa where a higher proportion of breast cancer is diagnosed as IBC than in the United States (U.S.). Physicians prospectively enrolled suspected IBC cases at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) - Cairo, Egypt, and the Institut Salah Azaiz (ISA), Tunisia, recorded extent and duration of signs/symptoms of IBC on standardized forms, and took digital photographs of the breast. After second-level review at study hospitals, photographs and clinical information for confirmed IBC cases were reviewed by two U.S. oncologists. We calculated percent agreement between study hospital and U.S. oncologist diagnoses. Among cases confirmed by at least one U.S. oncologist, we calculated median extent and duration of signs and Spearman correlations. At least one U.S. oncologist confirmed the IBC diagnosis for 69% (39/50) of cases with photographs at the NCI-Cairo and 88% (21/24) of cases at the ISA. All confirmed cases had at least one sign of IBC (erythema, edema, peau d'orange) that covered at least one-third of the breast. The median duration of signs ranged from 1 to 3 months; extent and duration of signs were not statistically significantly correlated. From the above-mentioned outcomes, it can be concluded that the diagnosis of a substantial proportion of IBC cases is unambiguous, but a subset is difficult to distinguish from other types of locally advanced breast cancer. Among confirmed cases, the extent of signs was not related to delay in diagnosis.

  18. Angiogenesis-Based Cancer Therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Urologic Oncology Branch seeks interested parties to co-develop antagonists to VEGF-A and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that block signal transduction and associated cellular responses.

  19. Center of Excellence for Individuation of Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    348-356 Hirai Y , Yoshimasu T, Oura S, Ota F, Naito K, Nishiguchi H, Hashimoto S, Okamura Y (2011) Is class III beta-tubulin a true predictive marker ...B. Leyland-Jones (2012) Gene expression combined with gene set enrichment analysis to identify markers of vinorelbine efficacy in breast cancer...Jassem, G. Sledge, B. Leyland-Jones (2011) Thymidilate synthase gene copy number as predictive marker of capecitabine efficacy in breast cancer

  20. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy: A Form of Psychotherapy for Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Emily A.; Irwin, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed “meaning-centered psychotherapy.” In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas. PMID:25182513

  1. New organizational and funds flow models for an academic cancer center.

    PubMed

    Spahlinger, David A; Pai, Chih-Wen; Waldinger, Marcy B; Billi, John E; Wicha, Max S

    2004-07-01

    The clinical impetus to develop cancer centers has been the recognition that many cancer patients require a comprehensive treatment plan coordinated across multiple specialties. Developing an effective organizational and financial structure among the multiple entities that comprise an academic cancer center has, however, been a challenge. The authors describe an effort to realize a sustainable clinical operation at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) by developing an appropriate management structure and financial model. The modified organizational structure established a clear line of administrative authority and held faculty members accountable for their effort in the UMCCC. A unified budget aligned financial incentive among all stakeholders to increase efficiency, revenue, and margin. The authors report preliminary financial evidence of the success of the new managerial structure.

  2. Treatment preference and patient centered prostate cancer care: Design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce Malkowicz, S; Lee, David; Guzzo, Thomas; Caruso, Adele; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Wein, Alan J; Sanford Schwartz, J

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a slow progressing cancer that affects millions of men in the US. Due to uncertainties in outcomes and treatment complications, it is important that patients engage in informed decision making to choose the "optimal treatment". Patient centered care that encompasses informed decision-making can improve treatment choice and quality of care. Thus, assessing patient treatment preferences is critical for developing an effective decision support system. The objective of this patient-centered randomized clinical trial was to study the comparative effectiveness of a conjoint analysis intervention compared to usual care in improving subjective and objective outcomes in prostate cancer patients. We identified preferred attributes of alternative prostate cancer treatments that will aid in evaluating attributes of treatment options. In this two-phase study, in Phase 1 we used mixed methods to develop an adaptive conjoint task instrument. The conjoint task required the patients to trade-off attributes associated with treatments by assessing their relative importance. Phase 2 consisted of a randomized controlled trial of men with localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the effect of conjoint task intervention on the association between preferences, treatment and objective and subjective outcomes. Our conjoint task instrument can lead to a values-based patient-centered decision aid tool and help tailor treatment decision making to the values of prostate cancer patients. This will ultimately improve clinical decision making, clinical policy process, enhance patient centered care and improve prostate cancer outcomes.

  3. 78 FR 22794 - World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC Responders and Survivors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... turn, may alter gene expression in cancer- related pathways . NTP has not yet examined the evidence for... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC... Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related...

  4. Laryngeal Cancer: 12-Year Experience of a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Calkovsky, V; Wallenfels, P; Calkovska, A; Hajtman, A

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer is about the twentieth most common cancer in the world and more than 150,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. The aim of the study was to evaluate the history, diagnostics, treatment outcomes, and prognosis in patients with laryngeal cancer in Northern Slovakia. We analyzed retrospectively 227 patients (207 males, 20 females) with laryngeal carcinoma treated in the period 2003-2014 at the Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery of the Jessenius Faculty of Medicine and Martin University Hospital in Martin, Slovakia. The majority of patients were in the sixth (38.0 %) and seventh decade of life (30.8 %). Two hundred and seventeen patients (95.6 %) were smokers or ex-smokers. Sixty-six percent of patients were diagnosed with glottic or transglottic carcinoma, related probably to the anatomical structure of the larynx and exposure to inhalation pollutants. It is alarming that the majority of patients with malignant laryngeal disease were admitted to the hospital in advanced stages. In 151 (66.5 %) of patients, the extent of infiltration was T3 or T4, and 156 (68 %) patients were in disease stage III and IV. The incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer suggest the need to intensify the prevention and to search for an early clinical stage of laryngeal cancer using a targeted screening.

  5. Developing a multidisciplinary geriatric oncology program in a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mary Pat; Marcone, Dana; Kagan, Sarah H

    2007-12-01

    Cancer is a disease of older adults, and with unprecedented growth in the number of people entering late adulthood, an increasing need exists for specialized services and programs to address the needs of older adults with cancer. Few examples in the literature detail development of a geriatric oncology program. This article describes a pilot project undertaken by a community cancer center to develop a specialized program for older adults with cancer by identifying local demographics and population needs. It also describes a replicable plan for the development of a geriatric oncology program, which demonstrates how nursing can benefit from collaboration with other disciplines such as social work and psychology in service provision.

  6. The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers: Transdisciplinary Research on the Role of the Environment in Breast Cancer Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Robert A.; Haslam, Sandra Z.; Osuch, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We introduce and describe the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC), a research network with a transdisciplinary approach to elucidating the role of environmental factors in pubertal development as a window on breast cancer etiology. We describe the organization of four national centers integrated into the BCERC network. Data sources Investigators use a common conceptual framework based on multiple levels of biologic, behavioral, and social organization across the life span. The approach connects basic biologic studies with rodent models and tissue culture systems, a coordinated multicenter epidemiologic cohort study of prepubertal girls, and the integration of community members of breast cancer advocates as key members of the research team to comprise the network. Data extraction Relevant literature is reviewed that describes current knowledge across levels of organization. Individual research questions and hypotheses in BCERC are driven by gaps in our knowledge that are presented at genetic, metabolic, cellular, individual, and environmental (physical and social) levels. Data synthesis As data collection on the cohort, animal experiments, and analyses proceed, results will be synthesized through a transdisciplinary approach. Conclusion Center investigators are addressing a large number of specific research questions related to early pubertal onset, which is an established risk factor for breast cancer. BCERC research findings aimed at the primary prevention of breast cancer will be disseminated to the scientific community and to the public by breast cancer advocates, who have been integral members of the research process from its inception. PMID:20049199

  7. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; p<0.001). Benefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; p<0.001) but rarely quantified (2%). Few advertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  8. NYU Lung Cancer Biomarker Center — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A. SPECIFIC AIMS 1. To develop and prospectively follow a large cohort at high-risk for lung cancer. Individuals are recruited to one of two different study groups: The Screening Cohort includes people with and without increased risk for lung cancer. The Rule-Out Lung Cancer Patient Group is recruited from patients referred for evaluation of suspicious nodules. All individuals answer a questionnaire, obtain PFTs, chest CT scan, sputum induction and phlebotomy. For patients undergoing lung resections or biopsies, tissue samples are collected and banked. Individuals are recruited for research bronchoscopy. All participants are then followed prospectively. The specimens obtained are banked and used for biomarker discovery and validation studies. 2. To identify and validate biomarkers for the early detection of lung cancer, and to describe preneoplastic cellular changes and lesions. Biomarker studies include DNA adducts, DNA methylation, protein markers, and other collaborations. Preneoplasia studies include: fluorescence and Superdimension bronchoscopies to obtain biopsies of preneoplastic lesions and biomarker studies in individuals with preneoplasias.

  9. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    45 Core B: Molecular Diagnostics and Research Core...Project used all of the Cores, which were dedicated to: Core A: Recruitment, Tracking, and Interviewing; Core B: Molecular Diagnostic and Research...exploratory qualitative study, Cancer Nurs 2006; 29(6):478-87. • Choi JY, Nowell SA, Blanco JG, Ambrosone CB: The role of genetic variability in drug

  10. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    IHSCR) Center for Survey Research ( CSR ) at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC. Because there was a two-year delay in getting the grant transferred from Shaw...project goals and objectives are met. As with The Fathers Study, the Sons survey will be conducted at CSR which is now located at Johns Hopkins

  11. HIV Testing in Patients With Cancer at the Initiation of Therapy at a Large US Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Granwehr, Bruno P.; Torres, Harrys A.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Giordano, Thomas P.; Barbo, Andrea G.; Lin, Heather Y.; Fisch, Michael J.; Chiao, Elizabeth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rates of HIV testing and infection among patients with cancer at initiation of systemic cancer therapy. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adults with cancer who registered at a comprehensive cancer center from January 2004 through April 2011 and received systemic cancer therapy. We determined rates of HIV-1/2 and/or Western blot testing and HIV positivity at initiation of systemic cancer therapy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of HIV testing. Results: Of 18,874 patients with cancer who received systemic cancer therapy during the study period, 3,514 (18.6%) were tested for HIV at initiation of cancer therapy. The prevalence of positive HIV test results was 1.2% (41 of 3,514), and the prevalence of newly diagnosed HIV was 0.3% (12 of 3,514). The HIV testing rate was lower in black than in white patients (13.7% v 19.2%), but the prevalence of positive test results was higher in black patients (4.5%) than in any other racial/ethnic group. Among patients with AIDS-defining cancers (eg, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and cervical cancer), predictors of HIV testing were history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, younger age, and registration after 2006. Among patients with non–AIDS-defining cancers, predictors of HIV testing were younger age, registration after 2006, male sex, history of illicit drug use or sexually transmitted disease, having a hematologic malignancy, and black race. Conclusion: The prevalence of HIV infection among patients with cancer was 1.2%, higher than the 0.1% prevalence threshold above which national guidelines recommend routine opt-out testing; however, the overall HIV testing rate was low. PMID:26243649

  12. Cancer Incidence in World Trade Center Rescue and Recovery Workers, 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    Wallenstein, Sylvan; Shapiro, Moshe; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Stevenson, Lori; Kochman, Anne; Kaplan, Julia; Dellenbaugh, Cornelia; Kahn, Amy; Biro, F. Noah; Crane, Michael; Crowley, Laura; Gabrilove, Janice; Gonsalves, Lou; Harrison, Denise; Herbert, Robin; Luft, Benjamin; Markowitz, Steven B.; Moline, Jacqueline; Niu, Xiaoling; Sacks, Henry; Shukla, Gauri; Udasin, Iris; Lucchini, Roberto G.; Boffetta, Paolo; Landrigan, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: World Trade Center (WTC) rescue and recovery workers were exposed to a complex mix of pollutants and carcinogens. Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate cancer incidence in responders during the first 7 years after 11 September 2001. Methods: Cancers among 20,984 consented participants in the WTC Health Program were identified through linkage to state tumor registries in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare cancers diagnosed in responders to predicted numbers for the general population. Multivariate regression models were used to estimate associations with degree of exposure. Results: A total of 575 cancers were diagnosed in 552 individuals. Increases above registry-based expectations were noted for all cancer sites combined (SIR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.25), thyroid cancer (SIR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.70, 3.27), prostate cancer (SIR = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.44), combined hematopoietic and lymphoid cancers (SIR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.71), and soft tissue cancers (SIR = 2.26; 95% CI: 1.13, 4.05). When restricted to 302 cancers diagnosed ≥ 6 months after enrollment, the SIR for all cancers decreased to 1.06 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.18), but thyroid and prostate cancer diagnoses remained greater than expected. All cancers combined were increased in very highly exposed responders and among those exposed to significant amounts of dust, compared with responders who reported lower levels of exposure. Conclusion: Estimates should be interpreted with caution given the short follow-up and long latency period for most cancers, the intensive medical surveillance of this cohort, and the small numbers of cancers at specific sites. However, our findings highlight the need for continued follow-up and surveillance of WTC responders. PMID:23613120

  13. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care.

  14. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  15. Service of Remembrance: a comprehensive cancer center's response to bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Knight, Louise; Cooper, Rhonda S; Hypki, Cinder

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive cancer centers that offer an array of clinical trials and treatment options often experience significant patient mortality rates. Bereavement resources may not be routinely incorporated into the service delivery model in these specialty hospitals. In response, an interdisciplinary team at one cancer center proposed, planned, and implemented an annual Service of Remembrance. The incorporation of music, poetry, and visual arts was important in designing a program that would provide a meaningful, spiritual experience. A community artist who designed an interactive memorial art piece played a pivotal role. This article outlines the process of institutional culture change and describes future challenges in the implementation of this type of bereavement service.

  16. A vision for using online portals for surveillance of patient-centered communication in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Arora, Neeraj K.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Street, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is charged with providing high-quality health care, not only in terms of technical competence but also with regard to patient-centered care experiences. Patient-centered coordination of care and communication are especially important in cancer care, as deficiencies in these areas have been implicated in many cases of delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, because cancer care facilities are concentrated within the VHA system, geographical and system-level barriers may present prominent obstacles to quality care. Systematic assessment of patient-centered communication (PCC) may help identify both individual veterans who are at risk of suboptimal care and opportunities for quality improvement initiatives at the service, facility, or system-wide level. In this manuscript, we describe our vision to implement an assessment of PCC through patient self-report to improve the quality of cancer care and other health services in the VHA. We outline a possible strategy to assess PCC that leverages the VHA’s existing initiative to promote use of an online personal health record for veterans (MyHealtheVet). Questionnaires administered periodically or following specific episodes of care can be targeted to assess PCC in cancer care. Assessment of PCC can also be tied to clinical and administrative data for more robust analysis of patient outcomes. Ultimately, the goal of any assessment of PCC is to gather valid, actionable data that can assist VHA clinicians and staff with providing the best possible care for veterans with cancer.

  17. The benefits of cancer screening in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Abe, Toyofumi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-02-01

    The frequency of malignancy is increasing in kidney transplant recipients. Posttransplant malignancy (PTM) is a major cause of long-term graft survival inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and prognosis of PTM at our center and examined the efficacy of cancer screening. Between 1972 and 2013, 750 patients were followed-up at our center. Annual physical examinations and screenings were performed to detect PTM. We investigated the detail of two distinctive cancer groups: screening-detected cancers and symptom-detected cancers. Seventy-seven PTM were identified during the follow-up period. The mean age at the initial PTM detection was 43.6 ± 12.8 years. The mean interval from transplantation to cancer diagnosis was 134.5 ± 11.3 months. Among the 77 patients, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) was the most common cancer (19.5%, 15/77), followed by renal cell carcinoma (15.6%, 12/77). Of the cancer cases, 46.8% (36/77) were detected via screening. The most frequently screening-detected cancer was renal cell carcinoma of the native kidney and breast cancer (22.2%, 8/36). However, it was difficult to detect PTLD, urothelial carcinoma, and colorectal cancer via screening. Interestingly, Cox proportional regression analyses revealed nonscreened recipients to be a significant prognostic factor for PTM (P < 0.001). This study is the first to report that appropriate screening tests play a key role in early PTM diagnosis and lead to reduce the mortality rate in kidney transplant recipients. These findings support the provision of long-term appropriate screening for kidney transplant recipients.

  18. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. Extending Comprehensive Cancer Center Expertise in Clinical Cancer Genetics and Genomics to Diverse Communities: The power of partnership

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Deborah J.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving genetic and genomic technologies for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) are revolutionizing our approach to targeted therapy and cancer screening and prevention, heralding the era of personalized medicine. Although many academic medical centers provide GCRA services, most people receive their medical care in the community setting. Yet, few community clinicians have the knowledge or time needed to adequately select, apply and interpret genetic/genomic tests. This article describes alternative approaches to the delivery of GCRA services, profiling the City of Hope Cancer Screening & Prevention Program Network (CSPPN) academic and community-based health center partnership as a model for the delivery of the highest quality evidence-based GCRA services while promoting research participation in the community setting. Growth of the CSPPN was enabled by information technology, with videoconferencing for telemedicine and web conferencing for remote participation in interdisciplinary genetics tumor boards. Grant support facilitated the establishment of an underserved minority outreach clinic in the regional County hospital. Innovative clinician education, technology and collaboration are powerful tools to extend GCRA expertise from a NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, enabling diffusion of evidenced-base genetic/genomic information and best practice into the community setting. PMID:20495088

  20. Development of a Center for Personalized Cancer Care at a Regional Cancer Center: Feasibility Trial of an Institutional Tumor Sequencing Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brian R; Bissonnette, Jeffrey; Waldherr, Tracy; Ritz-Holland, Deborah; Chesla, Dave; Cottingham, Sandra L; Alberta, Sheryl; Liu, Cong; Thompson, Amanda B; Graveel, Carrie; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Noyes, Sabrina L; Smith, Judy; Lakhani, Nehal; Steensma, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) capabilities can affect therapeutic decisions in patients with complex, advanced, or refractory cancer. We report the feasibility of a tumor sequencing advisory board at a regional cancer center. Specimens were analyzed for approximately 2800 mutations in 50 genes. Outcomes of interest included tumor sequencing advisory board function and processes, timely discussion of results, and proportion of reports having potentially actionable mutations. NGS results were successfully generated for 15 patients, with median time from tissue processing to reporting of 11.6 days (range, 5 to 21 days), and presented at a biweekly multidisciplinary tumor sequencing advisory board. Attendance averaged 19 participants (range, 12 to 24) at 20 days after patient enrollment (range, 10 to 30 days). Twenty-seven (range, 1 to 4 per patient) potentially actionable mutations were detected in 11 of 15 patients: TP53 (n = 6), KRAS (n = 4), MET (n = 3), APC (n = 3), CDKN2A (n = 2), PTEN (n = 2), PIK3CA, FLT3, NRAS, VHL, BRAF, SMAD4, and ATM. The Hotspot Panel is now offered as a clinically available test at our institution. NGS results can be obtained by in-house high-throughput sequencing and reviewed in a multidisciplinary tumor sequencing advisory board in a clinically relevant manner. The essential components of a center for personalized cancer care can support clinical decisions outside the university.

  1. 78 FR 39670 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.... Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... 1986 for the purpose of monitoring disease status in prostate cancer, and in 1994 for the detection...

  2. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noah

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice. PMID:26629435

  3. A Review of Advocate–Scientist Collaboration in Federally Funded Environmental Breast Cancer Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Baralt, Lori B.; McCormick, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    Background The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project was the first federally funded study of environmental causes of breast cancer. Although advocates were expected to participate in this study, the details of their participation were not adequately clarified in project guidelines, which resulted in confusion over their role in the project. The Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) are funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Cancer Institute; these centers continue to conduct research into environmental links to breast cancer and to clarify advocate–scientist guidelines for collaboration. Objectives Practitioners in community-based participatory research (CBPR) are grappling with how to improve CBPR projects for all groups involved in breast cancer and environmental studies. The ever-growing body of literature on CBPR elaborates on a number of factors that make CBPR particularly challenging, specifically regarding partnerships between advocate and scientific communities. This study draws on CBPR principles to evaluate advocate–scientist collaboration in the BCERCs. Methods We conducted surveys at BCERC annual meetings in 2005 and 2007 and 11 in-depth open-ended interviews with key stakeholders such as primary investigators within the centers to assess the perceptions of the advocates and scientists regarding collaboration between advocates and scientists who were engaged in CBPR studies. Results We found that although participatory guidelines were a focus of BCERCs, underlying differences between advocates and scientists with regard to paradigms of scientific inquiry, priorities, and desired outcomes need to be addressed for more effective collaboration to take place. Conclusion Our findings contribute to the broader CBPR literature by highlighting the role of underlying assumptions that may hinder the collaborative process and suggest the need for continued assessment research into participatory

  4. Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions in a General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Joanna-Grace M.; Gadiraju, Sahitya; Hiremath, Adarsh; Lin, Heather Yan; Farroni, Jeff; Halm, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hospital readmissions are considered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid as a metric for quality of health care delivery. Robust data on the readmission profile of patients with cancer are currently insufficient to determine whether this measure is applicable to cancer hospitals as well. To address this knowledge gap, we estimated the unplanned readmission rate and identified factors influencing unplanned readmissions in a hospitalist service at a comprehensive cancer center. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed unplanned 30-day readmission of patients discharged from the General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a comprehensive cancer center between April 1, 2012, and September 30, 2012. Multiple independent variables were studied using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models, with generalized estimating equations to identify risk factors associated with readmissions. Results: We observed a readmission rate of 22.6% in our cohort. The median time to unplanned readmission was 10 days. Unplanned readmission was more likely in patients with metastatic cancer and those with three or more comorbidities. Patients discharged to hospice were less likely to be readmitted (all P values < .01). Conclusion: We observed a high unplanned readmission rate among our population of patients with cancer. The risk factors identified appear to be related to severity of illness and open up opportunities for improving coordination with primary care physicians, oncologists, and other specialists to manage comorbidities, or perhaps transition appropriate patients to palliative care. Our findings will be instrumental for developing targeted interventions to help reduce readmissions at our hospital. Our data also provide direction for appropriate application of readmission quality measures in cancer hospitals. PMID:26152375

  5. Performance Observations of Scanner Qualification of NCI-Designated Cancer Centers: Results From the Centers of Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) Program

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Mark; Kinahan, Paul E.; Gimpel, James F.; Opanowski, Adam; Siegel, Barry A.; Hill, G. Craig; Weiss, Linda; Shankar, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) program, which was initiated in 2010 to establish a resource of clinical trial-ready sites within the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Cancer Centers (NCI-CCs) network. The intent was to enable imaging centers in the NCI-CCs network capable of conducting treatment trials with advanced quantitative imaging end points. We describe the motivations for establishing the CQIE, the process used to initiate the network, the methods of site qualification for positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, and the results of the evaluations over the subsequent 3 years. PMID:28395794

  6. The application of clinical variables and models to predict pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: a comprehensive single cancer center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Asem; Ismael, Yousef; Abunasser, Mahmoud; Hammode, Emad; Turfa, Rim; Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prompt diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) can help reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography chest angiography (CTA) scanning is the most widely used diagnostic modality. In noncancer patients, only 10% of such studies are positive for PE. Clinical variables, individual or in combination, that can predict test positivity are highly needed. Materials and methods All CTAs requested to confirm or exclude a diagnosis of PE in a single comprehensive cancer center were reviewed. In addition to the Wells score, other clinical variables known to increase the risk of PE were analyzed. Results A total of 778 adult cancer patients were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) and were included in this study; the majority of patients (64.2%) had stage 4 disease. Overall, 129 (16.6%) patients had positive scans for PE, while alternative diagnoses were made in 308 (39.6%) patients. Cancer stage and anticancer treatment had no impact on positive PE rates. However, Wells criteria classified patients into three risk groups with PE rates of 10.2%, 16.1%, and 62.5% among the patients with low, moderate, and high risk, respectively (P < 0.0001). Duration of cancer diagnosis (<12 months versus >12 months) had a significant impact on positive PE studies (22.0% versus 12.4%, respectively, P = 0.007). Conclusion The rate of positive PE studies in cancer patients is higher than previously reported in noncancer patients. Positivity for PE was higher during the first 12 months of cancer diagnosis and in those with high probability score according to the Wells criteria. Factors like primary tumor stage and anticancer therapy had no significant impact on PE-positive studies. PMID:24187488

  7. Using the accreditation journey to achieve global impact: UHN's experience at the Kuwait Cancer Control Center.

    PubMed

    Ladha-Waljee, Nafeesa; McAteer, Stephen; Nickerson, Veronica; Khalfan, Adil

    2014-01-01

    On January 1, 2011, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PM) - University Health Network (UHN) began a five-year partnership agreement with the Kuwait Ministry of Health's Kuwait Cancer Control Center (KCCC) to enhance cancer care services. Over the course of the partnership, opportunities for improvement were identified by UHN experts in order to accelerate KCCC's development toward subspecialty cancer care. Many of these opportunities involved building a robust infrastructure to support foundational hospital operation processes and procedures. Harnessing UHN's own successes in accreditation, the partnership took advantage of the national accreditation mandate in Kuwait to initiate a quality program and drive clinical improvement at KCCC. This resulted in improved staff engagement, better awareness and alignment of administration with clinical management and a stronger patient safety culture. This article discusses the successes and lessons learned at KCCC that may provide insight to healthcare providers implementing Accreditation Canada International's accreditation framework in other countries and cultures.

  8. Targeting Lymph Node Retrieval and Assessment in Stage II Colon Cancer: A Quality Outcome Community-Based Cancer Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Thomas; Hughes, Amy H.; Rimmer, Cathy C.; Less, Dale A.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Adequate lymph node evaluation is required for the proper staging of colon cancer. The current recommended number of lymph nodes that should be retrieved and assessed is 12. Methods The multidisciplinary Gastrointestinal Tumor Board at the Derrick L. Davis Forsyth Regional Cancer Center reviewed and recommended that a minimum of 12 lymph nodes be examined in all cases of colon cancer to ensure proper staging. This recommendation occurred at the end of the first quarter of 2005. To ensure this new standard was being followed, an outcomes study looking at the number of lymph nodes evaluated in stage II colon cancer was initiated. All patients with stage II colon cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 were reviewed. Results There was a statistically significant improvement in the number of stage II colon cancer patients with 12 or more lymph nodes evaluated. Before the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 49% (40 out of 82 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes evaluated was 11. After the Gastrointestinal Tumor Board's recommendation, 79% (70 out of 88 patients) had 12 or more lymph nodes sampled. The median number of lymph nodes was 16. Conclusion Multidisciplinary tumor boards can impact the quality of care of patients as demonstrated in this study. Although we do not yet have survival data on these patients, based on the previous literature referenced in this article, we would expect to see an improvement in survival rates in patients with 12 or more nodes retrieved and assessed. PMID:20856779

  9. Prostate cancer characteristics in the World Trade Center cohort, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Dana; Boffetta, Paolo; Galsky, Matthew; Oh, William; Lucchini, Roberto; Crane, Michael; Luft, Benjamin; Moline, Jaqueline; Udasin, Iris; Harrison, Denise; Taioli, Emanuela

    2016-11-24

    An increased incidence of prostate cancer was reported in three cohorts of World Trade Center (WTC) respondents. It is uncertain whether this increase is because of WTC-related exposures or enhanced surveillance. Prostate cancer cases (2002-2013) were obtained from the WTC Health Program. Age, race, and Gleason score distribution were compared with New York State Cancer Registry cases from the same time period. Multivariate models were adjusted for age and race. Analyses of clinical characteristics of prostate cancer cases within the cohort were also carried out, adjusting for age, race, and WTC exposure categories. WTC respondents had a prostate cancer age-standardized rate ratio of 1.65 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37-1.93] compared with New York State; age-specific ratios were highest for ages 30-49 (2.28; 95% CI: 1.51-3.43), 70-74 (2.05; 95% CI: 1.03-4.10), and 80-84 years (5.65; 95% CI: 1.41-22.58). High WTC exposure was associated with advanced clinical stage (5.58; 95% CI: 1.05-29.76; Ptrend=0.03). WTC respondents continue to have a higher prostate cancer rate compared with New York State as a whole. Respondents with a higher WTC exposure level may have had more advanced clinical stage of prostate cancer.

  10. Decreased Cancer Mortality-to-Incidence Ratios with Increased Accessibility of Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Swann Arp; Choi, Seul Ki; Khang, Leepao; Campbell, Dayna A.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Eberth, Jan M.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald; Xirasagar, Sudha; Yip, Mei Po; Young, Vicki M.; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) offer primary and preventive healthcare, including cancer screening, for the nation’s most vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between access to FQHCs and cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs). One-way analysis of variance was conducted to compare the mean MIRs for breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancers for each U.S. county for 2006–2010 by access to FQHCs (direct access, in-county FQHC; indirect access, adjacent-county FQHC; no access, no FQHC either in the county or in adjacent counties). ArcMap 10.1 software was used to map cancer MIRs and FQHC access levels. The mean MIRs for breast, cervical, and prostate cancer differed significantly across FQHC access levels (p < 0.05). In urban and healthcare professional shortage areas, mean MIRs decreased as FQHC access increased. A trend of lower breast and prostate cancer MIRs in direct access to FQHCs was found for all racial groups, but this trend was significant for whites only. States with a large proportion of rural and medically underserved areas had high mean MIRs, with correspondingly more direct FQHC access. Expanding FQHCs to more underserved areas and concentrations of disparity populations may have an important role in reducing cancer morbidity and mortality, as well as racial-ethnic disparities, in the United States. PMID:25634545

  11. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Samaras, Athena T.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients’ interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus–community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  12. Delays in Breast Cancer Presentation and Diagnosis at Two Rural Cancer Referral Centers in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Mpunga, Tharcisse; Hategekimana, Vedaste; Dusengimana, Jean-Marie Vianney; Habineza, Hamissy; Bigirimana, Jean Bosco; Mutumbira, Cadet; Mpanumusingo, Egide; Ngiruwera, Jean Paul; Tapela, Neo; Amoroso, Cheryl; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer incidence is increasing in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Mortality/incidence ratios in LMICs are higher than in high-income countries, likely at least in part because of delayed diagnoses leading to advanced-stage presentations. In the present study, we investigated the magnitude, impact of, and risk factors for, patient and system delays in breast cancer diagnosis in Rwanda. Materials and Methods. We interviewed patients with breast complaints at two rural Rwandan hospitals providing cancer care and reviewed their medical records to determine the diagnosis, diagnosis date, and breast cancer stage. Results. A total of 144 patients were included in our analysis. Median total delay was 15 months, and median patient and system delays were both 5 months. In multivariate analyses, patient and system delays of ≥6 months were significantly associated with more advanced-stage disease. Adjusting for other social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, a low level of education and seeing a traditional healer first were significantly associated with a longer patient delay. Having made ≥5 health facility visits before the diagnosis was significantly associated with a longer system delay. However, being from the same district as one of the two hospitals was associated with a decreased likelihood of system delay. Conclusion. Patients with breast cancer in Rwanda experience long patient and system delays before diagnosis; these delays increase the likelihood of more advanced-stage presentations. Educating communities and healthcare providers about breast cancer and facilitating expedited referrals could potentially reduce delays and hence mortality from breast cancer in Rwanda and similar settings. Implications for Practice: Breast cancer rates are increasing in low- and middle-income countries, and case fatality rates are high, in part because of delayed diagnosis and treatment. This study examined the delays experienced by patients

  13. [The management by the processes in a cancer center, an utopian initiative?].

    PubMed

    Verger, David; Mihura, Jeanne; Sallé, Françoise; Sarini, Jérôme; Colin, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    The process approach is a mode of quality improvement. It leans on the cartography's establishment, allows to redefine organization around patients trajectory, the measure of defects and their correction. The process pilot is a new actor in the management of the establishment. It is developed since 3 years in the Institute Claudius Regaud, regional cancer center treatment of Midi-Pyrénées.

  14. The current status of emergency operations at a high-volume cancer center.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawai, Ryosuke; Kawakami, Jiro; Asano, Tomonari; Iwata, Yoshinori; Kurahashi, Shintaro; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the pathogenic causes, clinical conditions, surgical procedures, in-hospital mortality, and operative death associated with emergency operations at a high-volume cancer center. Although many reports have described the contents, operative procedures, and prognosis of elective surgeries in high-volume cancer centers, emergency operations have not been studied in sufficient detail. We retrospectively enrolled 28 consecutive patients who underwent emergency surgery. Cases involving operative complications were excluded. The following surgical procedures were performed during emergency operations: closure in 3 cases (10.7%), diversion in 22 cases (78.6%), ileus treatment in 2 cases (7.1%), and hemostasis in 1 case (3.6%). Closure alone was performed only once for peritonitis. Diversion was performed in 17 cases (77.3%) of peritonitis, 4 cases (18.2%) of stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and 1 case (4.5%) of bleeding. There was a significant overall difference (P = 0.001). The frequency of emergency operations was very low at a high-volume cancer center. However, the recent shift in treatment approaches toward nonoperative techniques may enhance the status of emergency surgical procedures. The results presented in this study will help prepare for emergency situations and resolve them as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  15. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yordy, John S.; Almond, Peter R.; Delclos, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  16. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Cancer Caregivers (MCP-C): Rationale and Overview

    PubMed Central

    APPLEBAUM, ALLISON J.; KULIKOWSKI, JULIA R.; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2016-01-01

    Objective The multidimensional burden that results from providing care to a patient with cancer is well documented and a growing number of psychosocial interventions have been developed to address this burden. None, however, target existential distress, a critical, common element — and potentially driving mechanism — of caregiver burden. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy (MCP) is a structured psychotherapeutic intervention originally developed by our group to target existential distress and spiritual well-being among patients with advanced cancer. We are currently developing Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Cancer Caregivers (MCP-C). The objective of this qualitative study is to describe the application of MCP to the unique experience of caregivers of patients with advanced cancer. Methods A case study of a participant from an initial MCP-C group is presented, with a focus on the application of sources of meaning to the cancer caregiving experience. Results The exploration of critical sources of meaning in the participant’s life generally, and related to caregiving specifically, highlighted significant areas of growth, including an increased understanding of the historical context shaping her experience of providing care, the recognition of the need for improved self-care and reconnecting with meaningful activities, and the possibility for continued connectedness to others and the world, despite the limitations resulting from her husband’s terminal illness. Significance of results Existential distress is a critical and often overlooked element of burden among cancer caregivers. MCP-C is intended to target this component of burden and address this critical gap in the palliative care literature. Clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of MCP-C delivered over the Internet. Future studies are needed to evaluate the benefits of MCP-C for particularly burdened groups of caregivers, such as caregivers of patients with brain tumors and those undergoing

  17. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat N; Mansour, Asem H; Ismael, Yousef M

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE) in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described. Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness. Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD) was 57.7 (±12.4) years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77%) patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79%) patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68%) or radiotherapy (12%); none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74%) patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%), all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26%) died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated. Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension, and sudden death. PMID:21468175

  18. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea practice guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC.

  19. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guideline for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC. PMID:25995680

  20. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    PubMed

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention.

  1. The Prognostic Impact of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Ampullary Cancer - A Retrospective Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Fuellgraf, Hannah; Schilling, Oliver; Lai, Zon Weng; Kulemann, Birte; Timme, Sylvia; Makowiec, Frank; Shahinian, Jasmin H.; Hoeppner, Jens; Werner, Martin; Hopt, Ulrich T.; Wellner, Ulrich F.; Bronsert, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule (CEA) is a commonly immunohistochemically used antibody in pathological routine diagnostics with an overexpression in different cancers. We aimed to examine the immunohistochemically detectable CEA level in ampullary cancer and to correlate it with clinico-pathological data. Methods: Shot-gun proteomics revealed CEA in undifferentiated ampullary cancer cell lines. Next, tumor tissue of 40 ampullary cancers of a retrospective single center cohort of 40 patients was stained immunohistochemically for CEA; CEA expression was determined and correlated with clinico-pathological data. Results: Thirty-six patient specimens were included in statistical analysis. CEA expression and lymph node ratio (LNR) were the only independent predictors of overall survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: To our knowledge, cell line and patient cohorts are the largest and characterized cohorts examined for CEA so far. Hereby, CEA expression in ampullary cancer cells permits an estimation of outcome and suggests an opportunity for individualized CEA-directed therapy. Further trials with larger cohorts are needed to verify our results and to integrate CEA immunohistochemistry into clinical routine. PMID:28367245

  2. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in community health centers: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lasser, Karen E; Ayanian, John Z; Fletcher, Robert H; Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio

    2008-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer screening rates are low among disadvantaged patients; few studies have explored barriers to screening in community health centers. The purpose of this study was to describe barriers to/facilitators of colorectal cancer screening among diverse patients served by community health centers. Methods We identified twenty-three outpatients who were eligible for colorectal cancer screening and their 10 primary care physicians. Using in-depth semi-structured interviews, we asked patients to describe factors influencing their screening decisions. For each unscreened patient, we asked his or her physician to describe barriers to screening. We conducted patient interviews in English (n = 8), Spanish (n = 2), Portuguese (n = 5), Portuguese Creole (n = 1), and Haitian Creole (n = 7). We audiotaped and transcribed the interviews, and then identified major themes in the interviews. Results Four themes emerged: 1) Unscreened patients cited lack of trust in doctors as a barrier to screening whereas few physicians identified this barrier; 2) Unscreened patients identified lack of symptoms as the reason they had not been screened; 3) A doctor's recommendation, or lack thereof, significantly influenced patients' decisions to be screened; 4) Patients, but not their physicians, cited fatalistic views about cancer as a barrier. Conversely, physicians identified competing priorities, such as psychosocial stressors or comorbid medical illness, as barriers to screening. In this culturally diverse group of patients seen at community health centers, similar barriers to screening were reported by patients of different backgrounds, but physicians perceived other factors as more important. Conclusion Further study of these barriers is warranted. PMID:18304342

  3. Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Patients With Nonseminomatous Testicular Cancer: A Single Center Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Nowroozi, Mohamadreza; Ayati, Mohsen; Arbab, Amir; Jamshidian, Hassan; Ghorbani, Hamidreza; Niroomand, Hassan; Taheri Mahmoodi, Mohsen; Amini, Erfan; Salehi, Sohrab; Hakima, Hamid; Fazeli, Farid; Haghdani, Saeid; Ghadian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Testicular cancer accounts for about 1 - 1.5% of all malignancies in men. Radical orchiectomy is curative in 75% of patients with stage I disease, but advance stage with retroperitoneal lymph node involvement needs chemotherapy. All patients who have residual masses ≥ 1 cm after chemotherapy should undergo postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND). Objectives: Treatment of advanced nonseminomatous testicular cancer is usually a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. We described our experience about postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) in our center. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2011, patients with a history of postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) in Imam Khomeini hospital were evaluated. All patients had normal postchemotherapy serum tumor markers and primary nonseminomatous cancer. We reviewed retrospectively clinical, pathological, and surgical parameters associated with PC-RPLND in our center. Results: Twenty-one patients underwent bilateral PC-RPLND. Mean age was 26.3 years (ranged 16 - 47). Mean size of retroperitoneal mass after chemotherapy was 7.6 cm. Mean operative time was 198 minutes (120 - 246 minutes). Mean follow-up time was 38.6 months. Pathologic review showed presence of fibrosis/necrosis, viable germ cell tumor and teratoma in 8 (38.1%), 10 (47.6%) and 3 (14.28%) patients, respectively. One patient in postoperative period of surgery and three patients in two first years after surgery were expired. Of 17 alive patients, only two (11.8%) had not retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions: PC-RPLND is one the major operations in the field of urology, which is associated with significant adjunctive surgeries. In appropriate cases, PC-RPLND was associated with good cancer specific survival in tertiary oncology center. PMID:26539420

  4. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services.

  5. Risk and preventive factors for prostate cancer in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian than in Western populations. Lifestyle and dietary habits may play a major role in the etiology of this cancer. Given the possibility that risk factors for prostate cancer differ by disease aggressiveness, and the fact that 5-year relative survival rate of localized prostate cancer is 100%, identifying preventive factors against advanced prostate cancer is an important goal. Using data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, the author elucidates various lifestyle risk factors for prostate cancer among Japanese men. The results show that abstinence from alcohol and tobacco might be important factors in the prevention of advanced prostate cancer. Moreover, the isoflavones and green tea intake in the typical Japanese diet may decrease the risk of localized and advanced prostate cancers, respectively. PMID:28135193

  6. An integrated methodology for process improvement and delivery system visualization at a multidisciplinary cancer center.

    PubMed

    Singprasong, Rachanee; Eldabi, Tillal

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer centers require an integrated, collaborative, and stream-lined workflow in order to provide high quality of patient care. Due to the complex nature of cancer care and continuing changes to treatment techniques and technologies, it is a constant struggle for centers to obtain a systemic and holistic view of treatment workflow for improving the delivery systems. Project management techniques, Responsibility matrix and a swim-lane activity diagram representing sequence of activities can be combined for data collection, presentation, and evaluation of the patient care. This paper presents this integrated methodology using multidisciplinary meetings and walking the route approach for data collection, integrated responsibility matrix and swim-lane activity diagram with activity time for data representation and 5-why and gap analysis approach for data analysis. This enables collection of right detail of information in a shorter time frame by identifying process flaws and deficiencies while being independent of the nature of the patient's disease or treatment techniques. A case study of a multidisciplinary regional cancer centre is used to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed methodology and demonstrates that the methodology is simple to understand, allowing for minimal training of staff and rapid implementation.

  7. 77 FR 41188 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young... Temeika L. Fairley, Ph.D., Designated Federal Officer, Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Advisory Committee on...

  8. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Shahi, UP

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006). There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group) and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group). Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years) with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years) with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist. PMID:24455630

  9. [Implementation of the unified model of presenting cancer diagnosis in Polish pediatric onco-hematology centers].

    PubMed

    Samardakiewicz, Marzena; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Mazurowa, Mieczysława; Budziński, Waldemar; Antonowicz, Małgorzata; Borysławska, Anna; Szweda, Elzbieta; Groth, Anna; Pyka, Małgorzata; Figurska, Martyna; Chybicka, Alicja; Rokicka-Milewska, Roma; Matysiak, Michał; Balwierz, Walentyna; Sońta-Jakimczyk, Danuta; Balcerska, Anna; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of full information related to diagnosis of children with cancer should be one of principles in pediatric oncology. Multidisciplinary approach to each newly diagnosed child and its parents contributes to improving this standard. The Polish Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Group is engaged in these activities since 1998 and it resulted in implementation of several SIOP recommendations in most of Polish pediatric oncohematology centers. The unified model of presentation of diagnosis for a child, parents and family was of an importance and the efforts to introduce it in all cooperating centers was undertaken. Proposed model of informing consists of several steps. Procedure should be individually tailored according to natural history of the disease and characteristics of the family. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the informing procedure in 60 children with newly diagnosed neoplasmatic disease.

  10. Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy Paradigms for Bladder Cancer: Results from the National Cancer Center Institute Forum

    PubMed Central

    Dinney, Colin P.N.; Hansel, Donna; McConkey, David; Shipley, William; Hagan, Michael; Dreicer, Robert; Lerner, Seth; Czerniak, Bogdan; Waldman, Fred; Groshen, Susan; True, Lawrence D.; Petricoin, Emanuel; Theodorescu, Dan; Hruszkewycz, Andrew; Bajorin, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Although bladder cancer (BC) is a significant health threat to the US population, integrated clinical and laboratory investigations of this disease lag behind those of other types of cancer. Advances in BC are especially challenged due in part to a general decreased level of funding over the past 5 years. It is ironic that despite the awareness that BC is the 5th most commonly diagnosed solid malignancy in the United States, and one of the most costly to treat, funding for this organ site lags far behind that of other less common malignancies. Moreover, BC offers several unique opportunities for translational research that make it an ideal candidate for investigation. One distinct advantage over other solid tumor sites is that urine and tissue are readily available for translational studies that can direct the development of novel therapy for this disease. The NCI sponsored “Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy for Bladder Cancer” forum held in brought leading clinical and laboratory-based scientists together with the advocacy community to lay the groundwork for collaborative discovery and translation. The goal of the meeting was to bridge the gaps in translational science and develop the concepts for two novel biomarker-driven clinical trials, one in the neoadjuvant presurgical setting and the other in the setting of bladder preservation with chemoradiation. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to launch a collective effort to establish molecular-based therapy for UC. Herein, we summarize the proceedings of this meeting, and the future plans resulting from this forum. PMID:25443274

  11. Clinical features and overall survival among elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Karnakis, Theodora; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the epidemiological profile and overall survival of a large population of elderly individuals diagnosed with solid tumors in a tertiary hospital. Methods This retrospective study included patients aged >65 years, diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. The medical records were reviewed to obtain information about clinical variables and overall survival. Results A total of 806 patients were identified, and 58.4% were male. Mean age was 74 years (65 to 99 years). The most common types were prostate (22%), colorectal (21%), breast (19%), and lung cancer (13%), followed by bladder (8%), pancreas (6%), and other types (11%). The majority of patients were diagnosed at early stage disease. After a median follow-up of 27 months (15 to 45 months), 29% of the patients (234/806) died, predominantly in the group older than 70 years. For the entire cohort, the median 2-year survival rate was 71%. Median overall survival was not reached within the study period. In a multivariate analysis, age (HR: 1.35; 95%CI: 1.25-1.45; p<0.001) and disease stage (HR: 1.93; 95%CI: 1.75-2.14; p<0.001) were independent negative predictors of poor survival. Conclusion The most prevalent tumors were prostate, colorectal, breast, and lung cancer, with the larger proportion diagnosed at initial stages, reflecting the great number of patients alive at last follow-up. PMID:26676269

  12. Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Poppito, Shannon; Rosenfeld, Barry; Vickers, Andrew J.; Li, Yuelin; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Pessin, Hayley; Lichtenthal, Wendy; Sjoberg, Daniel; Cassileth, Barrie R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Spiritual well-being and sense of meaning are important concerns for clinicians who care for patients with cancer. We developed Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy (IMCP) to address the need for brief interventions targeting spiritual well-being and meaning for patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with stage III or IV cancer (N = 120) were randomly assigned to seven sessions of either IMCP or therapeutic massage (TM). Patients were assessed before and after completing the intervention and 2 months postintervention. Primary outcome measures assessed spiritual well-being and quality of life; secondary outcomes included anxiety, depression, hopelessness, symptom burden, and symptom-related distress. Results Of the 120 participants randomly assigned, 78 (65%) completed the post-treatment assessment and 67 (56%) completed the 2-month follow-up. At the post-treatment assessment, IMCP participants demonstrated significantly greater improvement than the control condition for the primary outcomes of spiritual well-being (b = 0.39; P <.001, including both components of spiritual well-being (sense of meaning: b = 0.34; P = .003 and faith: b = 0.42; P = .03), and quality of life (b = 0.76; P = .013). Significantly greater improvements for IMCP patients were also observed for the secondary outcomes of symptom burden (b = −6.56; P < .001) and symptom-related distress (b = −0.47; P < .001) but not for anxiety, depression, or hopelessness. At the 2-month follow-up assessment, the improvements observed for the IMCP group were no longer significantly greater than those observed for the TM group. Conclusion IMCP has clear short-term benefits for spiritual suffering and quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. Clinicians working with patients who have advanced cancer should consider IMCP as an approach to enhance quality of life and spiritual well-being. PMID:22370330

  13. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  14. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  15. Economic Constraints – the Growing Challenge for Western Breast Cancer Centers

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Rene P.; Lux, Michael P.; Hoellthaler, Josef; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Voigt, Wieland

    2013-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer care in Western countries has reached a considerable level of quality and standardization, which has contributed to the decline in breast cancer mortality. Certified Breast Cancer Centers (BCC) represent an important element of this development. Related to changes in reimbursement and growing costs, BCC face economic constraints which ultimately could endanger the achievements of the past. Thus, BCC have to optimize their care strategies from an economic perspective, particularly by increasing efficiency but also by adapting their service portfolio. This could result in competitive advantages and additional revenue by increasing case numbers and extra charges to patients. Furthermore, an intensification of collaboration with the outpatient sector resulting in an integrated and managed ‘trans-sectoral’ care approach which could allow to shift unprofitable procedures to the outpatient sector – in the sense of a win-win situation for both sectors and without loss of care quality – seems reasonable. Structured and specialized consulting approaches can further be a lever to fulfill economic requirements in order to avoid cuts in medical care quality for the sake of a balanced budget. In this review, economic constraints of BCC with a focus on the German healthcare system and potential approaches to ameliorate these financial burdens are being discussed. PMID:24715842

  16. A retrospective analysis of survival and prognostic factors of male breast cancer from a single center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Less than 1% of all breast cancer cases are found in men, who reportedly have inferior outcomes compared with matched women patients. Ethnic differences may also affect their prognosis. Here, we investigated overall survival (OS) and major prognostic factors for male breast cancer (MBC) in a cohort of Egyptian patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed OS in a cohort of 69 male patients with MBC who were surgically treated at the Mansoura Cancer Center, Egypt between 2000 and 2007. We registered demographic data, age, height, weight and body mass index, tumor size, histology, number of infiltrated axillary lymph nodes, hormone receptor (HR) status and metastatic presence, and TNM staging. Patients’ OS was the primary endpoint. Patients received treatment to the medical standards at the time of their diagnosis. Results In the 69 patients who met the inclusion criteria and had complete stored patient data, tumors ranged from T1c to T3. We could gather cancer-related survival data from only 56 patients. The collective 5-year survival in this cohort was 46.4%. Only five patients had distant metastasis at diagnosis, but they showed a null percent 5-year survival, whereas those with no lymph node infiltration showed a 100% 5-year survival. Lymph node status and tumor grading were the only prognostic factors that significantly affected OS. Conclusions Lymph node status and tumor grade are the most important prognostic factors for overall survival of MBC in Egyptian male patients; whereas even remarkably low HR expression in MBC did not significantly affect OS. Further research is needed to understand the factors that affect this disease. PMID:24673740

  17. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  18. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    PubMed Central

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  19. World Trade Center Health Program; amendments to list of WTC-related health conditions; cancer; revision. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-02-18

    On September 12, 2012, the Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) published a final rule in the Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health Conditions (List) in the WTC Health Program regulations; an additional final rule was published on September 19, 2013 adding prostate cancer to the List. Through the process of implementing the addition of cancers to the List and integrating cancer coverage into the WTC Health Program, the Administrator has identified the need to amend the rule to remove the ICD codes and specific cancer sub-sites, clarify the definition of ``childhood cancers,'' revise the definition of ``rare cancers,'' and notify stakeholders that the Administrator is revising WTC Health Program policy related to coverage of cancers of the brain and the pancreas. No types of cancer covered by the WTC Health Program will be removed by this action; four types of cancer--malignant neoplasms of the brain, the cervix uteri, the pancreas, and the testis--are newly eligible for certification as WTC-related health conditions as a result of this action.

  20. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Experience of Metastatic Extramammary Paget Disease 1998-2012

    PubMed Central

    Padrnos, Leslie; Karlin, Nina; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy. The most common presentation of EMPD is the vulva followed by perianal involvement. Most cases are localized to the dermis with treatment focused on surgery, topical treatment or radiotherapy. Recurrence is frequent despite therapies utilized. Metastatic extramammary Paget disease is uncommon and, as such, standard treatment guidelines do not exist. This study sought to evaluate the treatment regimens and outcomes of patients treated at a Mayo Clinic Center from 1998-2012. Cancer registry inquiry revealed 261 patients with report advanced Paget disease during these years. Ten cases of metastatic EPMD were identified with sufficient documentation for review. This review reveals support for utilizing localized radiation therapy for bulky disease sequentially with systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel or irinotecan. Further studies are necessary to define the optimal treatment regimen. PMID:27994832

  1. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  2. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Experience of Metastatic Extramammary Paget Disease 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Padrnos, Leslie; Karlin, Nina; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R

    2016-11-17

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy. The most common presentation of EMPD is the vulva followed by perianal involvement. Most cases are localized to the dermis with treatment focused on surgery, topical treatment or radiotherapy. Recurrence is frequent despite therapies utilized. Metastatic extramammary Paget disease is uncommon and, as such, standard treatment guidelines do not exist. This study sought to evaluate the treatment regimens and outcomes of patients treated at a Mayo Clinic Center from 1998-2012. Cancer registry inquiry revealed 261 patients with report advanced Paget disease during these years. Ten cases of metastatic EPMD were identified with sufficient documentation for review. This review reveals support for utilizing localized radiation therapy for bulky disease sequentially with systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and paclitaxel or irinotecan. Further studies are necessary to define the optimal treatment regimen.

  3. Measuring service quality at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions, across all four clinics the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients' expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm's evaluation of its service quality.

  4. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  5. Fulvestrant in advanced breast cancer following tamoxifen and aromatase inhibition: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; Jain, Sandeep; Coombes, Charles R; Palmieri, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Fulvestrant is a pure estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist with no agonist effects. We describe the experience of a single center involving 45 postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer where fulvestrant was utilized following progression on tamoxifen and a third generation aromatase inhibitor. Patients received fulvestrant as first line one (2%), second line 18 (40%), third line 13 (29%), fourth line 10 (22%), and fifth line three (7%) treatment. Median duration of treatment with Fulvestrant was 4 months (range 1-20 months). One patient had a partial response, 14 other (31%) experienced clinical benefit (CB) (defined as response or stable disease for at least 6 months). The median time to progression (TTP) from initiation of fulvestrant was 4 months (range 1-20 months) and the median survival was 10 months (range 1-55 months). In those patients who experienced CB the median TTP was 10 months (range 6-20) and median survival was 21 months (range 7-55). Fulvestrant was well tolerated; two patients experienced side effects severe enough to stop therapy. Despite the fact that fulvestrant was used in the majority of cases, later in the treatment sequence CB was seen in a number of patients. This data suggest fulvestrant is well tolerated and is a useful treatment option in patients with advanced breast cancer who progress on prior endocrine treatment.

  6. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Methods Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N = 90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. Results MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. Conclusions MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients’ emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. PMID:19274623

  7. Liver resection for early hepatocellular cancer: Comparison of centers in 3 different countries

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Linda L; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Kawano, Yoichi; Tang, Zhao-You; Ji, Jun-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare patients who underwent resection of early stage hepatocellular cancer (HCC) in three different countries. METHODS This retrospective study characterizes 573 stage I/II HCC patients treated with liver resection in 3 tertiary-referral centers: Tokyo (n = 250), Honolulu (n = 146) and Shanghai (n = 177). RESULTS Shanghai patients were younger, predominantly male, hepatitis-B seropositive (94%) and cirrhotic (93%). Tokyo patients were older and more likely to have hepatitis-C (67%), smaller tumors, low albumin, and normal alpha-fetoprotein. The Honolulu cohort had the largest tumors and 30% had no viral hepatitis. Age-adjusted mortality at 1 and 5-years were lower in the Tokyo cohort compared to Honolulu and there was no difference in mortality between Shanghai and Honolulu cohorts. Elevated alpha-fetoprotein, low albumin and tumor > 5 cm were associated with increased 1-year mortality. These factors and cirrhosis were independently associated with increased 5-year mortality. Independent risk factors of survival varied when examined separately by center. CONCLUSION The profile of early-stage HCC patients is strikingly different across countries and likely contributes to survival differences. Underlying differences in patient populations including risk factors/comorbidities influencing disease progression may also account for variation in outcomes. PMID:27872684

  8. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  9. Traveling to a High-volume Center is Associated With Improved Survival for Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Paul J.; Englum, Brian R.; Ganapathi, Asvin M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Hartwig, Matthew G.; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Berry, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Background An association between volume and outcomes has been observed for esophagectomy, though little is known about why or how patients choose low- or high-volume centers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how travel burden and hospital volume influence treatment and outcomes of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods Predictors of receiving esophagectomy for patients with T1-3N1M0 mid or distal esophageal cancer in the National Cancer Data Base from 2006 to 2011 were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Survival was compared using propensity score-matched groups: patients in the bottom quartile of travel distance who underwent treatment at low-volume facilities (Local) and patients in the top quartile of travel distance who underwent treatment at high-volume facilities (Travel). Results Of 4979 patients who met inclusion criteria, we identified 867 Local patients who traveled 2.7 [interquartile range (IQR): 1.6–4 miles] miles to centers that treated 2.6 (IQR: 1.9–3.3) esophageal cancers per year, and 317 Travel patients who traveled 107.1 (IQR: 65–247) miles to centers treating 31.9 (IQR: 30.9–38.5) cases. Travel patients were more likely to undergo esophagectomy (67.8% vs 42.9%, P < 0.001) and had significantly better 5-year survival (39.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) than Local patients. Conclusions Patients who travel longer distances to high-volume centers have significantly different treatment and better outcomes than patients who stay close to home at low-volume centers. Strategies that support patient travel for treatment at high-volume centers may improve esophageal cancer outcomes. PMID:28266965

  10. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  11. Measuring patient-centered communication in cancer care: a literature review and the development of a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Lauren A; Treiman, Katherine; Rupert, Douglas; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Nadler, Eric; Arora, Neeraj K; Lawrence, William; Street, Richard L

    2011-04-01

    Patient-centered communication (PCC) is a critical element of patient-centered care, which the Institute of Medicine (Committee on Quality of Health Care in America, 2001) promulgates as essential to improving healthcare delivery. Consequently, the US National Cancer Institute's Strategic Plan for Leading the Nation (2006) calls for assessing the delivery of PCC in cancer care. However, no comprehensive measure of PCC exists, and stakeholders continue to embrace different conceptualizations and assumptions about how to measure it. Our approach was grounded in the PCC conceptual framework presented in a recent US National Cancer Institute monograph (Epstein & Street, 2007). In this study, we developed a comprehensive inventory of domains and subdomains for PCC by reviewing relevant literature and theories, interviewing a limited number of cancer patients, and consulting experts. The resulting measurement domains are organized under the six core functions specified in the PCC conceptual framework: exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, recognizing and responding to emotions, managing uncertainty, making decisions, and enabling patient self-management. These domains represent a promising platform for operationalizing the complicated PCC construct. Although this study focused specifically on cancer care, the PCC measurements are relevant to other clinical contexts and illnesses, given that patient-centered care is a goal across all healthcare. Finally, we discuss considerations for developing PCC measures for research, quality assessment, and surveillance purposes. United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute (2006). The NCI Strategic Plan for Leading the Nation: To Eliminate the Suffering and Death Due to Cancer. NIH Publication No. 06-5773.

  12. Qualification of NCI-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-03-02

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to pre-qualify imaging facilities at all of the NCI-designated Comprehensive and Clinical Cancer Centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET). This paper reviews the CQIE PET/CT (Computed Tomography) scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 years, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantom, including uniform and ACR (American College of Radiology) phantoms, PET/CT images, as well as examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time points: initial submission (T0), followed by two requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for failed scanners. Quantitative results were compared: across scanners within a given time point and across time points for a given scanner. Results: 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 42 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification, with 64 passing qualification. 44 (68%) of the scanners from T0 had data submitted for T2. From T0 to T2 the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% in T1 to 67% in T2. The most common reasons for failure were: standardized uptake value (SUV) out of specifications, incomplete data submission and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and ACR phantom results between scanner manufacturers are similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process show that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, we note that for quantitative imaging-based trials the relationships between

  13. An overview of the comprehensive proton therapy machine quality assurance procedures implemented at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center-Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zullo, John R.; Wu, Richard Y.; Zhu Mingping; Ding Xiaoning; Martin, Craig; Ciangaru, George; Gillin, Michael T.

    2009-06-15

    The number of proton and carbon ion therapy centers is increasing; however, since the publication of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report, there has been no dedicated report dealing with proton therapy quality assurance. The purpose of this article is to describe the quality assurance procedures performed on the passively scattered proton therapy beams at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center in Houston. The majorities of these procedures are either adopted from procedures outlined in the American Association of Physicists in Medical Task Group (TG) 40 report or are a modified version of the TG 40 procedures. In addition, new procedures, which were designed specifically to be applicable to the synchrotron at the author's center, have been implemented. The authors' procedures were developed and customized to ensure patient safety and accurate operation of synchrotron to within explicit limits. This article describes these procedures and can be used by others as a guideline for developing QA procedures based on particle accelerator specific parameters and local regulations pertinent to any new facility.

  14. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Methods/Design Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Discussion Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571 PMID:24467861

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Postdiagnosis Initiation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Patients at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Adam; Lontok, Oliver; Huhmann, Maureen; Parrott, J. Scott; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Patrick-Miller, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer increasingly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in conjunction with conventional oncology treatments. Previous studies have not investigated postdiagnosis initiation of CAM therapies or independent correlates of use of individual CAM modalities. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of individual CAM modalities initiated after cancer diagnosis. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted of a random sample of adults with a cancer diagnosis (N = 1,228) seeking care at a National Cancer Institute–designated comprehensive cancer center within a 12-month period. Results: The majority of patients were female (64.7%), white (86.9%), and married (72.8%).Three-quarters (75.2%) used at least one CAM modality, and 57.6% of those using CAM initiated use after cancer diagnosis. For all CAM therapies combined, women were 1.7 times more likely than men to initiate any CAM therapy after cancer diagnosis. However, when CAM modalities were differentiated by type, men and women were equally likely to initiate all therapies except for psychotherapy and mind-body approaches. Postdiagnosis initiation of every CAM modality, except mind-body therapies, differed by cancer type. Conclusion: A significant proportion of patients initiated CAM use after diagnosis. However, specific type of CAM initiated varied by demographics and cancer type, suggesting there is not a “typology” of CAM user. Optimal comprehensive cancer treatment, palliation, and survivorship care will require patient and provider education regarding CAM use by modality type; improved provider-patient communication regarding potential benefits, limitations, and risks; and institutional policies to support integrated conventional and CAM treatment. PMID:23633969

  16. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-11

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  17. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-01

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  18. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  19. OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES AS ANTI-CANCER THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize anti-cancer oligodeoxynucleotides.  

  20. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  1. Advancing Cancer Systems Biology: Introducing the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT

    PubMed Central

    Deisboeck, Thomas S.; Zhang, Le; Martin, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Integrative cancer biology research relies on a variety of data-driven computational modeling and simulation methods and techniques geared towards gaining new insights into the complexity of biological processes that are of critical importance for cancer research. These include the dynamics of gene-protein interaction networks, the percolation of sub-cellular perturbations across scales and the impact they may have on tumorigenesis in both experiments and clinics. Such innovative ‘systems’ research will greatly benefit from enabling Information Technology that is currently under development, including an online collaborative environment, a Semantic Web based computing platform that hosts data and model repositories as well as high-performance computing access. Here, we present one of the National Cancer Institute’s recently established Integrative Cancer Biology Programs, i.e. the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT, which is charged with building a cancer modeling community, developing the aforementioned enabling technologies and fostering multi-scale cancer modeling and simulation. PMID:19390664

  2. San Antonio Center of Biomarkers of Risk for Prostate Cancer (SABOR) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    To determine if there are ways to predict which men will get prostate cancer, if there are ways to predict how a prostate cancer will develop (for example, slow or rapid growth) and why there are differences in prostate cancer among men from different ethnic backgrounds.

  3. Anti-Neoplastic Therapy Use in Advanced Cancer Patients Admitted to an Acute Palliative Care Unit at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: A Simultaneous Care Model

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Elsayem, Ahmed; Li, Zhijun; De La Cruz, Maxine; Palmer, J Lynn; Bruera, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer patients admitted to a palliative care unit generally have a poor prognosis. The role of antineoplastic therapy (ANT) in these patients is controversial. We examined the frequency and predictors associated with ANT use in hospitalized patients who required an acute palliative care unit (APCU) stay. METHODS We included all 2604 patients admitted over a five-year period to a 12-bed APCU located within a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, where patients can access both palliative care and ANT. We retrospectively retrieved from institutional databases patient demographics, cancer diagnosis, ANT use, length of hospital stay, and survival from time of admission. RESULTS The median hospital stay was 11 days and the median survival was 22 days. During hospitalization, 435 patients (17%) received ANT, including chemotherapy (N=297, 11%), hormonal agents (N=54, 2%) and targeted therapy (N=155, 6%). No significant change in frequency of ANT use was detected over the 5 year period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, specific cancer diagnoses and longer admissions were independently associated with ANT use. CONCLUSION The use of ANT during hospitalization that included an APCU stay was limited to a small percentage of patients, and did not increase over time. ANT use was associated with younger age, specific cancer diagnoses and longer admissions. The APCU facilitates simultaneous care where patients access palliative care while on ANT. PMID:20162701

  4. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women’s health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program’s acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p<0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  5. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  6. Colorectal cancer screening at community health centers: A survey of clinicians' attitudes, practices, and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jessica; Nelson, Christine A.; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Liss, David T.; Kaleba, Erin O.; Henley, Eric; Harigopal, Padmini; Grant, Laura; Crawford, Phil; Carroll, Joseph E.; Alperovitz-Bichell, Kari; Baker, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain lower among some racial/ethnic groups and individuals with low income or educational attainment who are often cared for within community health centers (CHCs). We surveyed clinicians in a network of CHCs to understand their attitudes, practice patterns, and perceived barriers to CRC screening. Methods A clinician survey was conducted in 2013 within the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN). Results 180 clinicians completed the survey (47.9% response rate). Participants had an average of 11.5 (SD: 9.8) years in practice, 62% were female, and 57% were physicians. The majority of respondents somewhat agreed (30.2%) or strongly agreed (57.5%) that colonoscopy was the best screening test. However, only 15.8% of respondents strongly agreed and 32.2% somewhat agreed that colonoscopy was readily available for their patients. Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), a type of fecal occult blood test (FOBT), was viewed less favorably; 24.6% rated FIT as very effective. Conclusions Although there are no data showing that screening colonoscopy is superior to FIT, CHC clinicians believe colonoscopy is the best CRC screening test for their patients, despite the high prevalence of financial barriers to colonoscopy. These attitudes could be due to lack of knowledge about the evidence supporting long-term benefits of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), lack of awareness about the improved test characteristics of FIT compared to older guaiac-based FOBT, or the absence of systems to ensure adherence to regular FOBT screening. Interventions to improve CRC screening at CHCs must address clinicians' negative attitudes towards FIT. PMID:26844165

  7. Radiation Therapy in Paediatric Orbital Granulocytic Sarcomas: Experience from a Tertiary Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesulu, Bhanu Prasad; Mallick, Supriya; Chander, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Orbital Granulocytic Sarcoma (OGS) is an uncommon manifestation associated with haematological malignancies. Chemotherapy remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The role of radiation is not well-defined. Aim To evaluate the effect of radiation in OGS and to define an optimal dose for achieving adequate local control. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 11 patients who received radiation therapy to orbit for Granulocytic Sarcoma (GS) between 2007 and 2014 at a tertiary cancer center in India. Radiotherapy was planned by three dimensional conformal (3DCRT) techniques. Demographic and disease characteristics, including clinical, imaging, histopathology and treatment details in this patient cohort were recorded and their response to therapy was assessed. Results The median age was 7 years (Range: 2-16 years). There were 3 female and 8 male patients. Eight patients were diagnosed as Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), two patients had Primary Orbital Granulocytic Sarcoma (POGS) and one had bi-phenotypic leukemia. Median dose was 24.5Gy (Range-15-45 Gy). Two anterior oblique field design were used most commonly. Out of 11 patients, 5 (45.4%) had complete response, 3 (27.27%) had partial response, 1 patient had stable disease (9%) and 2 developed progressive disease (18%). Median follow-up was 24 months (Range 24-84 months). At last follow-up, 7 (63.6%) patients were alive and 4 patients (37.4%) were dead due to progressive disease. Conclusion In patients with residual orbital disease after chemotherapy, low dose radiation can be used to improve local disease control and improve quality of life. Local conformal radiotherapy of 24-30 Gy in conventional fractionation appears optimal with excellent local control and minimal morbidity. PMID:27891440

  8. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  9. A comparative assessment of clinical whole exome and transcriptome profiling across sequencing centers: implications for precision cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Van Allen, Eliezer M; Robinson, Dan; Morrissey, Colm; Pritchard, Colin; Imamovic, Alma; Carter, Scott; Rosenberg, Mara; McKenna, Aaron; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Garraway, Levi; Nelson, Peter S

    2016-08-16

    Advances in next generation sequencing technologies provide approaches to comprehensively determine genomic alterations within a tumor that occur as a cause or consequence of neoplastic growth. Though providers offering various cancer genomics assays have multiplied, the level of reproducibility in terms of the technical sensitivity and the conclusions resulting from the data analyses have not been assessed.We sought to determine the reproducibility of ascertaining tumor genome aberrations using whole exome sequencing (WES) and RNAseq. Samples of the same metastatic tumors were independently processed and subjected to WES of tumor and constitutional DNA, and RNAseq of RNA, at two sequencing centers. Overall, the sequencing results were highly comparable. Concordant mutation calls ranged from 88% to 93% of all variants including 100% agreement across 154 cancer-associated genes. Regions of copy losses and gains were uniformly identified and called by each sequencing center and chromosomal plots showed nearly identical patterns. Transcript abundance levels also exhibited a high degree of concordance (r2 ≥ 0.78;Pearson). Biologically-relevant gene fusion events were concordantly called. Exome sequencing of germline DNA samples provided a minimum of 30X coverage depth across 56 genes where incidental findings are recommended to be reported. One possible pathogenic variant in the APC gene was identified by both sequencing centers.The findings from this study demonstrate that results of somatic and germline sequencing are highly concordant across sequencing centers that have substantial experience in the technological requirements for preparing, sequencing and annotating DNA and RNA from human biospecimens.

  10. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

  11. Female reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and pancreatic cancer risk: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yvonne; Saito, Eiko; Abe, Sarah K; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-03-31

    An association between female reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and pancreatic cancer risk has long been suggested in laboratory settings, but epidemiological findings remain mixed and inconclusive. Studies carried out on Asian populations are also limited. In this study, 45 617 women aged 40-69 years were followed for an average of 18.4 years in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective cohort and 211 pancreatic cases were identified as of 31 December 2011. We applied multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models using age as a time-scale to assess the association between female reproductive factors (menstrual status, menarche age, menopause age, number of births, age at first birth, total years of fertility, history of breastfeeding) and exogenous hormone use with the incidence of pancreatic cancer through hazard ratios and confidence intervals. No significant associations were found between our examined female reproductive factors and pancreatic cancer incidence. The use of exogenous hormones was found to be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in a multivariate-adjusted model (hazard ratio: 1.47; 95%; confidence interval: 1.00-2.14) in the Japanese female population. Our results suggest that exogenous hormones may play a role in the formation of pancreatic cancer, and further prospective studies are warranted for clarification.

  12. Pattern of prostate cancer presentation among the Egyptian population: A study in a single tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Elabbady, Ahmed; Eid, Ahmed; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer is a common health problem that in the majority of cases starts to develop at the age of 50 years, reaching its peak at 60–70 years of age. A variation in its incidence and prevalence exists between western, Asian and Arabic populations. The aim of our work was to report the pattern of prostate cancer presentation in Alexandria University that as a tertiary referral center provides care for uro–oncology cases. Material and methods Data collection for all patients diagnosed with prostate cancer at Alexandria University in Egypt through the year 2012 was done. Results The mean age of the patients was 67. Mean serum total PSA, prostate volume and PSAd were 149 ng/ml, 63 grams and 3.1 ng/ml/gm respectively. 25% of patients were asymptomatic diagnosed accidentally during screening for prostate cancer. The remaining group was presenting with LUTS, including 23 patients who presented initially with back pain. Conclusions Egyptian men with prostate cancer have a markedly high PSA density and Gleason grade at diagnosis. PMID:25667753

  13. [Awareness about breast cancer and mammography in elderly women who frequent Daycare Centers in São Paulo (SP, Brazil)].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Glenda Dias; Chubaci, Rosa Yuka Sato

    2011-05-01

    Early detection at the initial stage of breast cancer through mammography is the best way of reducing morbidity and mortality rates. The scope of this study was to establish awareness about breast cancer and mammography among elderly women, if they take the exam and discover the reasons that lead them to take the exam or not. A cross-sectional and exploratory study was conducted with 98 elderly women in three Senior Citizen Daycare Centers in São Paulo. With respect to awareness of mammography as the exam used for early detection of breast cancer, 55% of the women answered that they knew. The majority of these women (77.6%) had taken the exam and 22.4% had never done so. The reasons most frequently cited for taking a mammography were concern with health (53.8%) and medical recommendation (38.5%). The reasons for not taking the exam were not having a medical recommendation (50%), conviction that they will never have the illness (23.1%), didn't feel symptoms (19.2%) and fear (7.7%). This study showed that the subject of "breast cancer" is well known by the women, however mammography needs to be explained better. The fact that there are elderly women who have never submitted to the exam reveals the ongoing need to stage educational campaigns about breast cancer and the early detection exams.

  14. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  15. Designing Audience-Centered Interactive Voice Response Messages to Promote Cancer Screenings Among Low-Income Latinas

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Maria; Sprunck-Harrild, Kim M.; Tellez, Trinidad; Bastani, Roshan; Battaglia, Tracy A.; Michaelson, James S.; Emmons, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer screening rates among Latinas are suboptimal. The objective of this study was to explore how Latinas perceive cancer screening and the use and design of interactive voice response (IVR) messages to prompt scheduling of 1 or more needed screenings. Methods Seven focus groups were conducted with Latina community health center patients (n = 40) in need of 1 or more cancer screenings: 5 groups were of women in need of 1 cancer screening (breast, cervical, or colorectal), and 2 groups were of women in need of multiple screenings. A bilingual researcher conducted all focus groups in Spanish using a semistructured guide. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and translated into English for analysis. Emergent themes were identified by using thematic content analysis. Results Participants were familiar with cancer screening and viewed it positively, although barriers to screening were identified (unaware overdue for screening, lack of physician referral, lack of insurance or insufficient insurance coverage, embarrassment or fear of screening procedures, fear of screening outcomes). Women needing multiple screenings voiced more concern about screening procedures, whereas women in need of a single screening expressed greater worry about the screening outcome. Participants were receptive to receiving IVR messages and believed that culturally appropriate messages that specified needed screenings while emphasizing the benefit of preventive screening would motivate them to schedule needed screenings. Conclusion Participants’ receptiveness to IVR messages suggests that these messages may be an acceptable strategy to promote cancer screening among underserved Latina patients. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness of IVR messages in promoting completion of cancer screening. PMID:24625364

  16. Risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer in Japan - results from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sandin, Sven; Inoue, Manami; Shimazu, Taichi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for invasive primary epithelial ovarian cancer among Japanese women. In 1990-1994, 45,748 women aged 40-69 years were enrolled in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study cohort. Only 86 epithelial ovarian cancer cases were diagnosed during follow-up through 2008, reflecting the low ovarian cancer incidence rates in Japan. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) according to the exposure of interest. The median age at epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosis was 59 years, with a median follow-up before diagnosis of 7.6 years. There were no statistically significant associations for age at menarche or first birth, breastfeeding, use of exogenous hormones, menopausal status at cohort enrollment, height, body mass index, smoking status, second-hand smoke, alcohol consumption, physical activity and family history of cancer in a first-degree relative. The linear decrease in HR associated with each additional birth was 0.75 (95% CI 0.56-0.99). Among women who usually slept >7 h per day, an HR of 0.4 (95% CI 0.2-0.9) emerged compared to those who slept <6 h. This study did not confirm risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer among Japanese women that have been reported in studies carried out elsewhere. Usual sleep duration of >7 h per day was inversely associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk, which is a novel finding that needs to be confirmed in other studies.

  17. Clinicopathological and Prognostic Factors in 106 Prostate Cancer Patients Aged ≤55 Years: A Single-Center Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Yang, Xueling; Si, Tongguo; Yu, Haipeng; Zhang, Weihao; Li, Yong; Guo, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Early-onset prostate cancer patients (aged ≤55 years) from Western countries have been well characterized in previous studies. However, the clinicopathological and prognostic characteristics of early-onset Chinese prostate cancer patients have not yet been assessed. This study aimed to examine the clinicopathological and prognostic factors of prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years in a single Chinese center. Material/Methods One hundred six prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years with complete clinicopathological data who were treated at our hospital between January 2000 and June 2014 were selected for this study. Survival rate was investigated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, and prognostic factors were examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The median time from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 3.5 months (range, 2–55 months). The median time after endocrine therapy to development of androgen-independent prostate cancer was 10.5 months. A total of 54 patients died (50.9%), of whom 96.2% died from prostate cancer. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 88.7%, 66.2%, and 36.0%, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that T staging, visceral metastasis, pathological pattern, and Gleason sum were independent prognostic factors in these patients. Conclusions Prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years are often omitted or misdiagnosed in China. Furthermore, the pathology patterns in this age group were mostly complicated with a high degree of malignancy. Late staging, visceral metastasis, pathological pattern, and high Gleason score were independent prognostic factors in these patients. Comprehensive therapy combined with local therapy is an effective treatment strategy. PMID:27771734

  18. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients: Persisting major variation in clinical practice across European centers.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Jörg; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Voogd, Adri C; Frisell, Jan; Fredriksson, Irma; Johansson, Ulla; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Balslev, Eva; Hartmann-Johnsen, Olaf Johan; Sant, Milena; Baili, Paolo; Agresti, Roberto; van de Velde, Tony; Broeks, Annegien; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Pierre; Moreau, Michel; Mátrai, Zoltán; Sávolt, Ákos; Nagy, Péter; Kásler, Miklós; Schrotz-King, Petra; Ulrich, Cornelia; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were younger than population-based registry populations. Tumor size and lymph node status distributions varied little between settings or over time. In 2003, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) use varied between 26% and 81% for pT1 tumors, and between 2% and 68% for pT2 tumors. By 2010, SLNB use increased to 79-96% and 49-92% for pT1 and pT2 tumors, respectively. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) use for pT1 tumors decreased from between 75% and 27% in 2003 to 47% and 12% in 2010, and from between 90% and 55% to 79% and 19% for pT2 tumors, respectively. In 2014, important differences in axillary management existed for patients with micrometastases only, and for patients fulfilling the ACOSOG Z0011 criteria for omitting ALND. Conclusion This study demonstrates persisting differences in important aspects of axillary management throughout the recent decade. The results highlight the need for international comparative patterns of care studies in oncology, which may help to identify areas where further studies and consensus building may be necessary.

  19. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli at a cancer center.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, W V; Andriof, E; Oethinger, M; Kern, P; Hacker, J; Marre, R

    1994-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with fluoroquinolones of patients with profound neutropenia has been found to be useful for preventing gram-negative bacteremia and has become a standard preventive-therapy strategy in many cancer centers, but the development of bacterial resistance is a cause of concern. During the past few years, we have observed an increasing number of patients with leukemia from whom fluoroquinolone-resistant strains of Escherichia coli were isolated. The increase was significant in this patient population, and among patients with other underlying diseases, the rates of isolation of such strains per number of discharges were significantly lower and did not increase. Most of the leukemia case patients (16 of 19) had been pretreated with an oral quinolone (ofloxacin), with cumulative doses until the first isolation of a resistant E. coli strain ranging from 0 to 97.8 g (median, 14.4 g). Repeated isolation of such strains was seen in 8 of 17 patients during a follow-up period of > or = 4 weeks and in 1 of 6 patients during a follow-up period of > or = 16 weeks. Ten patients developed bacteremia (mortality, 1 of 10). On the basis of the number of patients with leukemia admitted to the hematology-oncology service, the incidence of bacteremia caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli increased from < 0.5% in 1988-1989 and 0.8% in 1990-1991 to 4.5% in 1992-1993 (P < 0.01). MICs for nine isolates obtained from cultures of blood from different patients ranged between 8 and 16 microgram/ml (ciprofloxacin and PD 131628), 8 and 32 microgram/ml (ofloxacin and BAY Y 3118), and 16 and 32 microgram/ml (sparfloxacin) and indicated resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, doxycycline, and chloramphenicol. Of nine isolates obtained from cultures of blood from different patients and that were subjected to genomic DNA typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI digests, seven were typeable. Among these, four different genotypes were identified

  20. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  1. BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

  2. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  3. Improved Vaccines for the Treatment of Prostate and Breast Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Vaccine Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to continue clinical development and/or license a multi-epitope therapeutic cancer vaccine. The research is in early-stage clinical evaluation, with in vitro and in vivo (animal and human) data available.

  4. Center for the Evaluation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Implications for the use of erythro- poiesis-stimulating agents in cancer patients. Cancer 2007;110:477–488. 12 Um M, Gross AW, Lodish HF. A ‘‘classical...hematopoi- etic disorders. Curr Opin Genet Dev 2007;17:8–14. 17 Huang LJ, Constantinescu SN, Lodish HF. The N-terminal domain of Janus kinase 2 is required

  5. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  6. Seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Inoue, Manami; Shimazu, Taichi; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-05-01

    Iodine is a suspected risk factor for thyroid cancer. Seaweed accounts for about 80% of Japanese people's iodine intake. We examined the association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in Japanese women. Women participating in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (n=52 679; age: 40-69 years) were followed up for a mean of 14.5 years; 134 new thyroid cancer cases, including 113 papillary carcinoma cases, were identified. Seaweed consumption was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire and divided into three categories: 2 days/week or less (reference); 3-4 days/week; and almost daily. The Cox proportional hazards model was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seaweed consumption was clearly associated with an increased risk of papillary carcinoma (HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=1.71; 95% CI: 1.01-2.90; trend P=0.04). After stratification for menopausal status, an increased risk was observed in postmenopausal women (papillary carcinoma HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=3.81, 95% CI: 1.67-8.68; trend P<0.01), but not in premenopausal women (HR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.44-1.91; trend P=0.76). This study identified a positive association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer (especially for papillary carcinoma) in postmenopausal women.

  7. Report of chronic myeloid leukemia from Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, 2002-2009.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Pritanjali

    2013-07-01

    Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center was established in 1993. It's one of the main Health-Care Institution in the state of Bihar. The data of 205 patients was presented in the ICON meeting and 98% of patients were diagnosed in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 91% of patients in 3 months. A total of 197 (96%) patients were alive at the time of analysis of which 179 (87%) were still in chronic phase with hematological remission.

  8. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  9. Synergistic Combination Agent for Cancer Therapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory of the Frederick National Laboratory for Biomedical Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop a ceramide and vinca alkaloid combination therapy for treatment of cancer.

  10. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  11. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence FY12-14

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    USUHS. (see abstract by Iida, J., Dorchak, J., Clancy, R., Luo, C., Chen, Y., Hu, H., Mural, R., & Shriver, C.) Aim 2. Development of DNA aptamers ...against CD44 that inhibit breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We developed and characterized DNA aptamers against the exon v10 of CD44. The... aptamers significantly inhibited migration and invasion of triple-negative breast cancer cells in vitro. We also demonstrated novel mechanisms of

  12. Pancreatic Reference Set Application: Kazufumi Honda-National Cancer Center (2014) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Among human malignancies, invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis,with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Most patients with early stage pancreatic cancer have no clinical symptoms; therefore, many of them develop progressive disease that is not detected until the late stage. To improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer, non-invasive diagnostic methods that detect the disease in its early stage must be developed.

  13. Children's Oncology Group (COG) Statistics and Data Center - Support for Childhood Cancer Research Projects Conducted through the COG

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Krailo, M

    2011-04-11

    Project Description: These monies will support statistical staff within the Children's Oncology Group's Statistics and Data Center. A portion of these funds will allow the hiring of a full time Master's level statistician within the Group Operations Center in Arcadia, CA to assist current PhD level statisticians with the analysis of completed and ongoing pediatric clinical trials conducted through the COG. Approximately 50% of this individual's effort will be shared by the PhD statisticians located within the COG Group Operations Center with percent effort assigned by the Associate Group Statistician. The remaining 50% will be used to support projects of general interest to the Statistics and Data Center including the development of tools to facilitate Clinical Data Upload System (CDUS) reporting and the production of study public and Data Safety Monitoring Committee reports. The remaining balance of monies will facilitate the hiring of one full time PhD level statistician located at the SDC office in Gainesville, FL. This individual will be focused on the most common pediatric cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

  14. Coordinating Center: Molecular and Cellular Findings of Screen-Detected Lesions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Screen‐Detected Lesions ‐ Coordinating Center and Data Management Group will provide support for the participating studies responding to RFA CA14‐10. The coordinating center supports three main domains: network coordination, statistical support and computational analysis and protocol development and database support. Support for communication is provided through an interactive web portal, management of conference calls, and meeting support. |

  15. Evaluation of the Dutch BRCA1/2 clinical genetic center referral criteria in an unselected early breast cancer population.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Alexandra J; de Ruiter, Karen; van 't Veer, Laura J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Verhoef, Senno; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974-2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers identified met the criteria for referral to the CGC based on age, family history and synchronous multiple tumors; reflected by a combined sensitivity of 75.5% and specificity of 63.2%. More than half of the BRCA1 mutation carriers, that is, 58% had a triple-negative tumor. The highest AUC was obtained by shifting the age at diagnosis threshold criterion from 40 to 35 years and by adding a 'triple-negative breast cancer' criterion with an age threshold of 45 years; the specificity increased to 71.2%, whereas the sensitivity remained the same; that is, a referral of fewer patients will lead to the identification of at least the same number of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Two-thirds of the BRCA1/2 mutation carriers identified in this research setting had been referred for counseling and testing. Our results indicate that, awaiting a possibly more extended mutation screening of all breast cancer patients, the triple-negative status of a breast cancer should be added to the CGC referral criteria.

  16. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  17. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    PubMed

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  18. Center for the Evaluation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    tablespoons nonfat Cottage cheese 2 egg yolks 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper Olive oil Yogurt Dill Sauce Makes 3/4 cup Toolbox 1/2 cup nonfat...4CANCER 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill www.cancergov.gov-National Cancer Institute 1/4 cup grated, and squeezed dry, English...3. Brush a nonstick frying pan with olive oil . Fry the salmon cakes over medium-high heat, turning so that they are crisp and golden on the outside

  19. Regional Variation across Canadian Centers in Radioiodine Administration for Thyroid Remnant Ablation in Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed in 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Rachinsky, I.; Rajaraman, M.; Zahedi, A.; Jefford, C.; McGibbon, A.; Young, J. E. M.; Pathak, K. A.; Badreddine, M.; De Brabandere, S.; Fong, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Use of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation has been reported to vary significantly between studies. We explored variation in RAI ablation care patterns between seven thyroid cancer treatment centers in Canada. Methods. The Canadian Collaborative Network for Cancer of the Thyroid (CANNECT) is a collaborative registry to describe and analyze patterns of care for thyroid cancer. We analyzed data from seven participating centers on RAI ablation in patients diagnosed with well-differentiated (papillary and follicular) thyroid cancer between 2000 and 2010. We compared RAI ablation protocols including indications (based on TNM staging), preparation protocols, and administered dose. We excluded patients with known distant metastases at time of RAI ablation. Results. We included 3072 patients. There were no significant differences in TNM stage over time. RAI use increased in earlier years and then declined. The fraction of patients receiving RAI varied significantly between centers, ranging between 20–85% for T1, 44–100% for T2, 58–100% for T3, and 59–100% for T4. There were significant differences in the RAI doses between centers. Finally, there was major variation in the use of thyroid hormone withdrawal or rhTSH for preparation of RAI ablation. Conclusion. Our study identified significant variation in use of RAI for ablation in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer both between Canadian centers and over time. PMID:28025634

  20. Pattern of skin cancer among Saudi patients attending a tertiary care center in Dhahran, Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. A 20-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Al-Dawsari, Najla A; Amra, Nasir

    2016-12-01

    Skin cancer is the ninth most common malignancy in Saudi Arabia. It represented 3.2% of all newly diagnosed cancer cases in the year 2010. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of skin cancer in relation to age, sex, and anatomic location among Saudi patients attending the Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare center in Dhahran, Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. We retrospectively reviewed the surgical pathology records of Saudi nationals from 1995 to 2014 at the Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare center, which directly provides for the healthcare needs of Saudi Aramco company employees and dependents in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Tumor metastases to skin, skin involvement by primary breast carcinoma, and B-cell leukemia/lymphoma with secondary involvement by skin were excluded. The total number of primary skin tumors was 204. The commonest cutaneous malignancies were basal cell carcinoma (36%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (23%), with the head and neck being the commonest location for both tumors. Mycosis fungoides (MF) was the third most common malignancy (11%). Malignant melanoma was the fourth commonest skin malignancy (7%) with the lower extremities being the commonest location. The four most common skin cancers in our tertiary center in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, MF, and malignant melanoma. Other regions of Saudi Arabia report a similar pattern of skin cancers as our center, with MF having a higher frequency at our center.

  1. Science, Passion & Compassion vs. Cancer: Tania Crombet MD PhD, Director of Clinical Research. Molecular Immunology Center, Havana.

    PubMed

    Gory, Conner

    2016-10-01

    Soon after the Molecular Immunology Center (CIM) was established in 1994 (a founding institution of Havana's biotechnology and pharmaceutical campus known as the scientific pole), Dr Crombet completed her master's thesis there. She joined CIM's team in 1998 and in 2004 was designated Director of Clinical Research. She has participated in the research, development and clinical trials of some of Cuba's most innovative therapies and vaccines, including CIMAvax-EGF for non-small cell lung cancer patients. In 2015, this therapy completed Phase IV clinical trials in Cuba and is now used in primary health care services throughout the country's national health system. CIM and Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, New York) received US Department of Treasury approval in 2015 to test CIMAvax-EGF and other CIM products in the United States, opening the way for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to consider joint ground-breaking Phase I and II clinical trials in the USA. Recent regulatory changes introduced by President Barack Obama may make applying for such licenses a thing of the past-at least that is what researchers hope. In any case, the work of Dr Crombet and the teams at CIM is making headway in cancer immunotherapy, within the broader goals of the institution's mandate…the subject of our interview.

  2. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy: An Effective Intervention for Improving Psychological Well-Being in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Applebaum, Allison; Kulikowski, Julia; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP) to reduce psychological distress and improve spiritual well-being in patients with advanced or terminal cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced cancer (N = 253) were randomly assigned to manualized eight-session interventions of either MCGP or supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the treatment and 2 months after treatment. The primary outcome measures were spiritual well-being and overall quality of life, with secondary outcome measures assessing depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, anxiety, and physical symptom distress. Results Hierarchical linear models that included a priori covariates and only participants who attended ≥ three sessions indicated a significant group × time interaction for most outcome variables. Specifically, patients receiving MCGP showed significantly greater improvement in spiritual well-being and quality of life and significantly greater reductions in depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and physical symptom distress compared with those receiving SGP. No group differences were observed for changes in anxiety. Analyses that included all patients, regardless of whether they attended any treatment sessions (ie, intent-to-treat analyses), and no covariates still showed significant treatment effects (ie, greater benefit for patients receiving MCGP v SGP) for quality of life, depression, and hopelessness but not for other outcome variables. Conclusion This large randomized controlled study provides strong support for the efficacy of MCGP as a treatment for psychological and existential or spiritual distress in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:25646186

  3. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  4. Novel Tumor-Associated Antigen for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutics | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Laboratory of Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of SPANX-B-based therapeutic approaches to combat cancers.

  5. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

  7. [The first anti-cancer center in Lyon (1923): surgeon Leon Berard and Auguste Lumiere].

    PubMed

    Fischer, L P; Martinet, B; Glas, P Y

    2001-01-01

    At present, little is known about the creation of cancer hospitals. I will report on that of Lyons, France, with the famous surgeon, Léon Bérard (1870-1956). A specialist of neck surgery, he was the first to carry out major thoracoplasties. The cancer hospital was inaugurated in 1923 under the Great Dome of the hôtel-Dieu hospital. (The dome is the creation of the famous architect Germain Soufflot (1748)). In 1933, the cancer hospital moved in the newly-built Edouard Herriot Hospital; it became independent in 1958, two years after the famous surgeon's death, and it was rightly named after him: "Centre anticancéreux Léon Bérard". Its creation and its quick development owes a lot to generosity of Auguste Lumière, one of the two inventors of cinematograph. Auguste Lumière sponsored radiotherapy material and, at Léon Bérard's request (as there was a lack of space in Edouard Herriot hospital), created a centre for cancer patients (Bon Abr Hospital, rue Mistral, with Dr Vigne). A Lumière gave his time as well as his money for the centre; he was the car-driver, he helped L. Bérard with his university classes, and he often comforted the patients while running a private clinic (La Clinique Lumière), which combined dispensary services with research. (Micheline Bonin)

  8. BCIP: a gene-centered platform for identifying potential regulatory genes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiaqi; Hu, Shuofeng; Chen, Yaowen; Li, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Hanyu; Shi, Qiang; Shao, Ningsheng; Ying, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease with high heterogeneity. Many issues on tumorigenesis and progression are still elusive. It is critical to identify genes that play important roles in the progression of tumors, especially for tumors with poor prognosis such as basal-like breast cancer and tumors in very young women. To facilitate the identification of potential regulatory or driver genes, we present the Breast Cancer Integrative Platform (BCIP, http://omics.bmi.ac.cn/bcancer/). BCIP maintains multi-omics data selected with strict quality control and processed with uniform normalization methods, including gene expression profiles from 9,005 tumor and 376 normal tissue samples, copy number variation information from 3,035 tumor samples, microRNA-target interactions, co-expressed genes, KEGG pathways, and mammary tissue-specific gene functional networks. This platform provides a user-friendly interface integrating comprehensive and flexible analysis tools on differential gene expression, copy number variation, and survival analysis. The prominent characteristic of BCIP is that users can perform analysis by customizing subgroups with single or combined clinical features, including subtypes, histological grades, pathologic stages, metastasis status, lymph node status, ER/PR/HER2 status, TP53 mutation status, menopause status, age, tumor size, therapy responses, and prognosis. BCIP will help to identify regulatory or driver genes and candidate biomarkers for further research in breast cancer. PMID:28327601

  9. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  10. Extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy for selected elderly bladder cancer patients: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lang; Song, Jian; Wu, Menghua; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study reports the initial experience of extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy (ELRC) and compared with transperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy (TLRC) in the treatment of selected elderly bladder cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of forty male bladder cancer patients who underwent ELRC (n=19) or TLRC (n=21) with ureterocutaneostomy were investigated. Demographic parameters, perioperative variables, oncological outcomes and follow-up data were retrospectively analyzed. Results: A significantly shorter time to exsufflation (1.5±0.7 vs 2.1±1.1 d; p=0.026) and liquid intake (1.8±0.9 vs 2.8±1.9 d; p=0.035) were observed in the ELRC group compared with the TLRC group. The incidence of postoperative ileus in the ELRC group was lower than the TLRC group (0 vs 9.5%). However, the difference had no statistical significance (p>0.05). The removed lymph node number in the ELRC group was significantly lower than the TLRC group (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in the overall and cancer-free survival rates (p>0.05). Conclusions: ELRC seems to be a safe and feasible surgical strategy for the selected elderly bladder cancer patients with ≤ T2 disease. The surgical and oncological efficacy of the ELRC is similar to that of the TLRC, but with faster intestinal function recovery. Further studies with a large series including different urinary diversions are needed to confirm our results and to better evaluate the benefit of ELRC in bladder cancer patients. PMID:27564274

  11. "Walkabout: Looking In, Looking Out": A Mindfulness-Based Art Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This brief report describes a mindfulness-based art therapy (MBAT) intervention, "Walkabout: Looking In, Looking Out," which was piloted in 2010 and has since been offered at the Abramson Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. The author adapted the original MBAT intervention using a walkabout conceptual model, which was…

  12. Acute Morbidity of Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer: The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mayahara, Hiroshi Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Kawaguchi, Atsuya; Oda, Yasue; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and influencing factors of acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal morbidities in patients with prostate cancer treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 287 patients with histologically proven Stage cT1-T4N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with proton therapy between 2003 and 2004. Of these, 204 (71%) received neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy. The patients were treated with 190-230-MeV protons using lateral-opposed techniques to a dose of 74 GyE. Dose-volume histogram analyses were performed. The incidence of acute morbidity was evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Clinical factors, including age, clinical target volume, initial prostate-specific antigen level, T stage, presence of diabetes mellitus, and the use of androgen suppression therapy, were investigated to determine whether those affected the incidence of acute GU morbidity. Results: None developed Grade 2 or higher acute gastrointestinal morbidity. In contrast, 111 (39%) and 4 (1%) patients experienced acute Grade 2 and Grade 3 GU morbidities, respectively. However, 87% of the patients were successfully relieved by the administration of a selective {alpha}-1 blocker. Multivariate analysis showed that a larger clinical target volume (p = 0.001) and the use of androgen suppression therapy (p = 0.017) were significant factors for the prediction of acute Grade 2-3 GU morbidity. Conclusion: In our experience with proton therapy, a low incidence of acute gastrointestinal morbidity was observed. In contrast, the incidence of acute GU morbidity was similar to that in other reports of photon radiotherapy. Additional follow-up is warranted to elucidate the long-term safety and efficacy of proton therapy for prostate cancer.

  13. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  14. Routine Use of Continuous, Hyperfractionated, Accelerated Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Five-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Omar S. Lester, Jason; Cameron, Alison; Ironside, Janet; Gee, Amanda; Falk, Stephen; Morgan, Sally A.; Worvill, Jackie; Hatton, Matthew Q.F.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the results from continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) used as the standard fractionation for radical RT in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in five United Kingdom centers. Methods and Materials: In 2005, the CHART consortium identified six U.K. centers that had continued to use CHART after the publication of the CHART study in 1997. All centers had been using CHART for >5 years and agreed to use a common database to audit their results. Patients treated with CHART between 1998 and December 2003 were identified to allow a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment details, and survival were recorded retrospectively. Five centers completed the data collection. Results: A total of 583 patients who had received CHART were identified. Of these patients, 69% were male, with a median age of 68 years (range, 31-89); 83% had performance status 0 or 1; and 43% had Stage I or II disease. Of the 583 patients, 99% received the prescribed dose. In only 4 patients was any Grade 4-5 toxicity documented. The median survival from the start of RT was 16.2 months, and the 2-year survival rate of 34% was comparable to that reported in the original study. Conclusion: The results of this unselected series have confirmed that CHART is deliverable in routine clinical practice, with low levels of toxicity. Importantly, this series has demonstrated that the results of CHART reported from the randomized trial can be reproduced in routine clinical practice.

  15. Center for the Evaluation of Biomarkers for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    mice that predicts human tumor antigen, and Dr. Scott Karlan, a co- investigator on the COE and breast surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center who will... human subjects review, we have yet to implement our biopsy enrollment procedures; however, we anticipate receiving final approvals from both our...internal IRB and the DoD human subjects reviewer on all protocol modifications shortly and hope to begin biopsy enrollment by Dec. 2006. TASK 3

  16. ESTIMATING PERSON-CENTERED TREATMENT (PeT) EFFECTS USING INSTRUMENTAL VARIABLES: AN APPLICATION TO EVALUATING PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENTS

    PubMed Central

    BASU, ANIRBAN

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper builds on the methods of local instrumental variables developed by Heckman and Vytlacil (1999, 2001, 2005) to estimate person-centered treatment (PeT) effects that are conditioned on the person’s observed characteristics and averaged over the potential conditional distribution of unobserved characteristics that lead them to their observed treatment choices. PeT effects are more individualized than conditional treatment effects from a randomized setting with the same observed characteristics. PeT effects can be easily aggregated to construct any of the mean treatment effect parameters and, more importantly, are well suited to comprehend individual-level treatment effect heterogeneity. The paper presents the theory behind PeT effects, and applies it to study the variation in individual-level comparative effects of prostate cancer treatments on overall survival and costs. PMID:25620844

  17. Maxillary Sinus Sarcomas: Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Experience of 25 Years in a National Reference Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa Angélica; Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saúl; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to report our experience with malignant soft tissue tumors of the maxillary sinus in the period between 1985 to 2010. This is a retrospective case study in a tertiary cancer center setting. Review of patient's records and new evaluation of pathological specimens were made for 20 patients (14 men and 6 women) still met present criteria. After review the most common histological diagnoses were malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. There are male sex predilection, the median age was 38.9 years; 95% of tumors were >5 cm, 80% were high grade, 0% have metastatic disease at the diagnosis and the tumors were initially treated by surgical resection had better survival (p = 0.02). We present the results of a one of the larger series published to date in maxillary sinus sarcomas where analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics of 20 cases.

  18. Transdisciplinary cardiovascular and cancer health disparities training: experiences of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Ferketich, Amy; Boyington, Josephine; Dugan, Sheila; Garroutte, Eva; Kaufmann, Peter G; Krok, Jessica; Kuo, Alice; Ortega, Alexander N; Purnell, Tanjala; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2015-07-01

    The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities program promotes multilevel and multifactorial health equity research and the building of research teams that are transdisciplinary. We summarized 5 areas of scientific training for empowering the next generation of health disparities investigators with research methods and skills that are needed to solve disparities and inequalities in cancer and cardiovascular disease. These areas include social epidemiology, multilevel modeling, health care systems or health care delivery, community-based participatory research, and implementation science. We reviewed the acquisition of the skill sets described in the training components; these skill sets will position trainees to become leaders capable of effecting significant change because they provide tools that can be used to address the complexities of issues that promote health disparities.

  19. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Kanamori, Masao

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  1. Characteristics and Outcomes of Second Malignant Neoplasms after Childhood Cancer Treatment: Multi-Center Retrospective Survey.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Yoo, Keon Hee; Im, Ho Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Hyo Sun; Han, Jung Woo; Yoon, Jong Hyung; Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Byung-Kiu; Baek, Hee Jo; Kook, Hoon; Lee, Jun Ah; Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Kwang Chul; Kim, Soon Ki; Park, Meerim; Lee, Young-Ho; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Seo, Jong Jin

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in survivors of childhood cancer from multiple institutions in Korea. A total of 102 patients from 11 institutions who developed SMN after childhood cancer treatment between 1998 and 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. The most common primary malignant neoplasms (PMNs) were central nervous system (CNS) tumors (n = 17), followed by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 16), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 13), and osteosarcoma (n = 12). The most common SMNs were therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs; acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 29 cases; myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS], 12 cases), followed by thyroid carcinomas (n = 15) and CNS tumors (n = 10). The median latency period was 4.9 years (range, 0.5-18.5 years). Among 45 patients with solid tumors defined as an SMN, 15 (33%) developed the lesion in a field previously subjected to radiation. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of patients with an SMN was 45% with a median follow-up time of 8.6 years. Patients with AML, MDS, and CNS tumors exhibited the poorest outcomes with 5-year OS rates of 18%, 33%, and 32%, respectively, whereas those with second osteosarcoma showed comparable outcomes (64%) to patients with primary counterpart and those with second thyroid carcinoma had a 100% OS rate. Further therapeutic efforts are recommended to improve the survival outcomes in patients with SMNs, especially in cases with t-MNs and CNS tumors.

  2. Characteristics and Outcomes of Second Malignant Neoplasms after Childhood Cancer Treatment: Multi-Center Retrospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in survivors of childhood cancer from multiple institutions in Korea. A total of 102 patients from 11 institutions who developed SMN after childhood cancer treatment between 1998 and 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. The most common primary malignant neoplasms (PMNs) were central nervous system (CNS) tumors (n = 17), followed by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 16), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 13), and osteosarcoma (n = 12). The most common SMNs were therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs; acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 29 cases; myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS], 12 cases), followed by thyroid carcinomas (n = 15) and CNS tumors (n = 10). The median latency period was 4.9 years (range, 0.5–18.5 years). Among 45 patients with solid tumors defined as an SMN, 15 (33%) developed the lesion in a field previously subjected to radiation. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of patients with an SMN was 45% with a median follow-up time of 8.6 years. Patients with AML, MDS, and CNS tumors exhibited the poorest outcomes with 5-year OS rates of 18%, 33%, and 32%, respectively, whereas those with second osteosarcoma showed comparable outcomes (64%) to patients with primary counterpart and those with second thyroid carcinoma had a 100% OS rate. Further therapeutic efforts are recommended to improve the survival outcomes in patients with SMNs, especially in cases with t-MNs and CNS tumors. PMID:27478336

  3. Primary care provider practices and beliefs related to cervical cancer screening with the HPV test in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Roland, K.B.; Benard, V.B.; Greek, A.; Hawkins, N.A.; Manninen, D.; Saraiya, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer screening using the human papillomavirus (HPV) test and Pap test together (co-testing) is an option for average-risk women ≥30 years of age. With normal co-test results, screening intervals can be extended. The study objective is to assess primary care provider practices, beliefs, facilitators and barriers to using the co-test and extending screening intervals among low-income women. Method Data were collected from 98 providers in 15 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinics in Illinois between August 2009 and March 2010 using a cross-sectional survey. Results 39% of providers reported using the co-test, and 25% would recommend a three-year screening interval for women with normal co-test results. Providers perceived greater encouragement for co-testing than for extending screening intervals with a normal co-test result. Barriers to extending screening intervals included concerns about patients not returning annually for other screening tests (77%), patient concerns about missing cancer (62%), and liability (52%). Conclusion Among FQHC providers in Illinois, few administered the co-test for screening and recommended appropriate intervals, possibly due to concerns over loss to follow-up and liability. Education regarding harms of too-frequent screening and false positives may be necessary to balance barriers to extending screening intervals. PMID:23628517

  4. Determining the Incidence of Pain Flare Following Palliative Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Bone Metastases: Results From Three Canadian Cancer Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Hird, Amanda; Chow, Edward Zhang Liying; Wong, Rebecca; Wu, Jackson; Sinclair, Emily; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Loblaw, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare following radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Materials and Methods: Patients with bone metastases treated with RT were eligible. Worst pain scores and analgesic consumption were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after treatment. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in the worst pain score (0-10) compared to baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, or a 25% increase in analgesic intake with no decrease in worst pain score. Pain flare was distinguished from progression of pain by requiring the worst pain score and analgesic intake return to baseline levels after the increase/flare (within the 10-day follow-up period). Results: A total of 111 patients from three cancer centers were evaluable. There were 50 male and 61 female patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 40-89 years). The primary cancers were mainly breast, lung, and prostate. Most patients received a single 8 Gy (64%) or 20 Gy in five fractions (25%). The overall pain flare incidence was 44/111 (40%) during RT and within 10 days following the completion of RT. Patients treated with a single 8 Gy reported a pain flare incidence of 39% (27/70) and, with multiple fractions, 41% (17/41). Conclusion: More than one third of the enrolled patients experienced a pain flare. Identifying at-risk individuals and managing potential pain flares is crucial to achieve an optimal level of care.

  5. Comparison of anal cancer outcomes in public and private hospital patients treated at a single radiation oncology center

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Danielle S.; Grew, David; Gu, Ping; Cohen, Richard F.; Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Moore, Harvey G.; Gold, Heather T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical and treatment characteristics and outcomes in locally advanced anal cancer, a potentially curable disease, in patients referred from a public or private hospital. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 112 anal cancer patients from a public and a private hospital who received definitive chemoradiotherapy at the same cancer center between 2004 and 2013. Tumor stage, radiotherapy delay, radiotherapy duration, and unplanned treatment breaks ≥10 days were compared using t-test and χ2 test. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and colostomy free survival (CFS) were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard models for OS and DFS were developed. Results The follow-up was 14.9 months (range, 0.7-94.8 months). Public hospital patients presented with significantly higher clinical T stage (P<0.05) and clinical stage group (P<0.05), had significantly longer radiotherapy delays (P<0.05) and radiotherapy duration (P<0.05), and had more frequent radiation therapy (RT) breaks ≥10 days (P<0.05). Three-year OS showed a marked trend in favor of private hospital patients for 3-year OS (72.8% vs. 48.9%; P=0.171), 3-year DFS (66.3% vs. 42.7%, P=0.352), and 3-year CFS (86.4% vs. 68.9%, P=0.299). Referral hospital was not predictive of OS or DFS on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Public hospital patients presented at later stage and experienced more delays in initiating and completing radiotherapy, which may contribute to the trend in poorer DFS and OS. These findings emphasize the need for identifying clinical and treatment factors that contribute to decreased survival in low socioeconomic status (SES) populations. PMID:26487947

  6. Factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Pessin, Hayley A.; Radomski, Julia N.; Gökbayrak, N. Simay; Katz, Aviva M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective The generalizability of palliative care intervention research is often limited by high rates of study attrition. This study examined factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial comparing meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP), an intervention designed to help advanced cancer patients sustain or enhance their sense of meaning to the supportive group psychotherapy (SGP), a standardized support group. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumor cancers (n = 153) were randomized to eight sessions of either the MCGP or SGP. They completed assessments of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical well-being pretreatment, midtreatment, and 2 months post-treatment. Attrition was assessed in terms of the percent of participants who failed to complete these assessments, and demographic, psychiatric, medical, and study-related correlates of attrition were examined for the participants in each of these categories. Results The rates of attrition at these time points were 28.1%, 17.7%, and 11.1%, respectively; 43.1% of the participants (66 of 153) completed the entire study. The most common reason for dropout was patients feeling too ill. Attrition rates did not vary significantly between study arms. The participants who dropped out pretreatment reported less financial concerns than post-treatment dropouts, and the participants who dropped out of the study midtreatment had poorer physical health than treatment completers. There were no other significant associations between attrition and any demographic, medical, psychiatric, or study-related variables. Conclusions These findings highlight the challenge of maintaining advanced cancer patients in longitudinal research and suggest the need to consider alternative approaches (e.g., telemedicine) for patients who might benefit from group interventions but are too ill to travel. PMID:21751295

  7. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family.

  8. Transarterial radioembolization with Yttrium-90 for regional management of hepatocellular cancer: the early results of a nontransplant center.

    PubMed

    Holt, Alicia; Wagman, Lawrence D; Senthil, Maheswari; McKenzie, Shaun; Marx, Howard; Chen, Yi-Jen; Vora, Nayana; Kim, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    Selective arterial radioembolization with Yttrium-90 (Y-90) microspheres has shown promise for regional management of hepatocellular cancer (HCC). Our objective was to report our early experience with this treatment modality from a nontransplant center. Treatment of patients with HCC was discussed in a multidisciplinary tumor board. Patients with unresectable disease resulting from high lesion number, ill location of the tumor, poor hepatic reserve, or medical comorbidities were offered Y-90 treatment. Liver treatment was either lobar or tumor-targeted. Response to therapy was assessed by CT scan obtained within 3 months using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. During 2007 to 2009, 40 Y-90 radioembolizations were performed in 20 patients with age that ranged from 16 to 87 years; four patients were 80 years old or older. After the first therapy, CT assessment of the treated area showed stable disease (n=15), partial response (n=3), and progression (n=2). Of the two patients who progressed, one was retreated with a subsequent complete response. The other patient died of progressive disease. The most common side effects were mild fatigue, anorexia, and nausea. In summary, our nontransplant center experience shows that Y-90 radioembolization is a well-tolerated treatment in select patients with unresectable HCC with an associated high rate of local tumor control.

  9. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    PubMed

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2016-04-21

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p < 0.05). Blacks, compared to whites, also had significantly greater post-treatment information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p < 0.05]. Pre-treatment concerns and post-treatment information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  10. Building a Protocol Expressway: The Case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    McJoynt, Terre A.; Hirzallah, Muhanad A.; Satele, Daniel V.; Pitzen, Jason H.; Alberts, Steven R.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Inconsistencies and errors resulting from nonstandard processes, together with redundancies, rework, and excess workload, lead to extended time frames for clinical trial protocol development. This results in dissatisfaction among sponsors, investigators, and staff and restricts the availability of novel treatment options for patients. Methods A team of experts from Mayo Clinic formed, including Protocol Development Unit staff and management from the three Mayo Clinic campuses (Florida, Minnesota, and Arizona), a systems and procedures analyst, a quality office analyst, and two physician members to address the identified deficiencies. The current-state process was intensively reviewed, and improvement steps were taken to accelerate the development and approval of cancer-related clinical trials. The primary goal was to decrease the time from receipt of a new protocol through submission to an approving authority, such as the National Cancer Institute or institutional review board. Results Using the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) framework infused with Lean waste-reduction methodologies, areas were identified for improvement, including enhancing first-time quality and processing new studies on a first-in/first-out basis. The project was successful in improving the mean turnaround time for internally authored protocols (P < .001) from 25.00 weeks (n = 41; range, 3.43 to 94.14 weeks) to 10.15 weeks (n = 14; range, 4.00 to 22.14 weeks). The mean turnaround time for externally authored protocols was improved (P < .001) from 20.61 weeks (n = 85; range, 3.29 to 108.57 weeks) to 7.79 weeks (n = 50; range, 2.00 to 20.86 weeks). Conclusion DMAIC framework combined with Lean methodologies is an effective tool to structure the definition, planning, analysis, and implementation of significant process changes. PMID:19564529

  11. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents.

  12. The Central Role of Meaning in Adjustment to the Loss of a Child to Cancer: Implications for the Development of Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Breitbart, William

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes research on meaning and meaning-making in parents who lost a child to cancer, suggesting the need for a meaning-centered therapeutic approach to improve their sense of meaning, purpose, and identity and to help with management of prolonged grief symptoms. Recent findings Several studies have demonstrated that parents bereaved by cancer experience unique meaning related challenges associated with the caregiving and illness experience, including struggles with making sense of their loss, benefit-finding, their sense of identity and purpose, disconnection from sources of meaning, and sustaining a sense of meaning in their child’s life. Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy, adapted from Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy, directly addresses these issues, highlighting the choices parents have in how they face their pain, how they honor their child and his/her living legacy, the story they create, and how they live their lives. Summary Given the important role that meaning plays in adjustment to the loss of a child to cancer, a meaning-focused approach such as Meaning-Centered Grief Therapy, may help improve parents’ sense of meaning and grief symptoms. It seems particularly appropriate for parents who lost a child to cancer because it does not pathologize their struggles and directly targets issues they frequently face. PMID:25588204

  13. Analysis of Sociodemographic Parameters of Patients Admitted in a Newly Established Palliative Care Center in a Regional Cancer Institute of North-West India

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Kapoor, Akhil; Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Singh, Daleep; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Narender; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: After 4 months of the establishment of palliative care center (PCC) in our institute, we present an audit of the sociodemographic parameters of admitted patients. Such an audit can help to recognize the lacuna in the management and thus help to identify the specific requirements of cancer patients that might be overlooked in a busy cancer center. Materials and Methods: A total of 234 patients were admitted in our PCC since its inception in October 2013. The study design was retrospective, collecting the data from the medical records of the patients. The descriptive statistics of all these data were calculated in terms of frequencies and percentage of categorical variables. Results: Out of 234 patients admitted in PCC, 156 (66%) were male. The median age of the patients was 54 years. A total of 44% patients had primary malignancy of head and neck, 14% of cervical, 17% of lung cancer, 6% of breast, and 5% of colon, respectively. Metastatic disease was present in 76% of the patients admitted in the PCC. Liver was the most common (46%) metastatic site. Total 13 symptoms were identified with mean number of symptoms per patient at admission in PCC being 5.17. Conclusions: Palliative care services are an indispensable part of a tertiary regional cancer care center. The oncologists should be made aware of the requirement of better relief of pain and other distressing symptoms to provide better quality of life to the patients suffering from advanced cancer. PMID:25191011

  14. Self-reported cancer family history is a useful tool for identification of individuals at risk of hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome at primary care centers in middle-income settings: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Flória-Santos, Milena; Lopes-Júnior, Luís Carlos; Alvarenga, Larissa de Melo; Ribeiro, Mayara Segundo; Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de Faria; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-06-03

    Analysis of cancer family history (CFH) offers a low-cost genetic tool to identify familial cancer predisposition. In middle-income settings, the scarcity of individual records and database-linked records hinders the assessment of self-reported CFH consistency as an indicator of familial cancer predisposition. We used self-reported CFH to identify those families at risk for hereditary cancer syndromes in community-based primary care centers of a low-income Brazilian area. We also evaluated the consistency of the information collected by reassessing CFH five years later. We interviewed 390 families and constructed their pedigrees for genetic cancer risk assessment. We found 125 families affected by cancer, 35.2% with moderate to high risk of familial susceptibility to cancer, a number that represents a relatively high prevalence of potential hereditary cancer syndromes in the overall study sample. Upon reassessment of CFH in 14/20 families that were previously identified as having at least one first-degree and one second-degree relative affected by cancer, and presented moderate to high risk for developing cancer, 90% of initial pedigrees were confirmed. These results demonstrate the reliability of self-reports as a means of early identification of healthy individuals at risk, encouraging the wider use of this method in low- and middle-income primary care settings.

  15. Self-reported cancer family history is a useful tool for identification of individuals at risk of hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome at primary care centers in middle-income settings: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Flória-Santos, Milena; Lopes-Júnior, Luís Carlos; Alvarenga, Larissa de Melo; Ribeiro, Mayara Segundo; Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de Faria; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of cancer family history (CFH) offers a low-cost genetic tool to identify familial cancer predisposition. In middle-income settings, the scarcity of individual records and database-linked records hinders the assessment of self-reported CFH consistency as an indicator of familial cancer predisposition. We used self-reported CFH to identify those families at risk for hereditary cancer syndromes in community-based primary care centers of a low-income Brazilian area. We also evaluated the consistency of the information collected by reassessing CFH five years later. We interviewed 390 families and constructed their pedigrees for genetic cancer risk assessment. We found 125 families affected by cancer, 35.2% with moderate to high risk of familial susceptibility to cancer, a number that represents a relatively high prevalence of potential hereditary cancer syndromes in the overall study sample. Upon reassessment of CFH in 14/20 families that were previously identified as having at least one first-degree and one second-degree relative affected by cancer, and presented moderate to high risk for developing cancer, 90% of initial pedigrees were confirmed. These results demonstrate the reliability of self-reports as a means of early identification of healthy individuals at risk, encouraging the wider use of this method in low- and middle-income primary care settings. PMID:27275666

  16. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy.

  17. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized.

  18. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: High-Throughput Screening Identifying Driving Mutations in Endometrial Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology have enabled the unprecedented characterization of a full spectrum of somatic alterations in cancer genomes. Given the large numbers of somatic mutations typically detected by this approach, a key challenge in the downstream analysis is to distinguish “drivers” that functionally contribute to tumorigenesis from “passengers” that occur as the consequence of genomic instability.

  19. Male Breast Cancer: 37-Year Data Study at a Single Experience Center in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Aydoğan, Fatih; Beşe, Nuran; Büyükünal, Evin; Serdengeçti, Süheyla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prognostic factors on the overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) among male breast cancer (MBC) patients treated at Cerrahpasa Medical School Hospital, along with a review of the related literature. Methods The data of 86 patients treated for MBC from 1973 to 2010 are retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics and clinical information, including the date of diagnosis, treatment, clinical course, and the date and causes of death are routinely recorded. Results Median follow-up was 66 months. Isolated local-regional recurrence and distant metastases were observed in 15 (17.4%) and 24 (34.1%) of the cases, respectively. The 5-year OS rate was 65.8%; the disease-free survival rate was 72.4%, and the LC rate was 89.7%. The prognostic factors influencing local relapse were the T stage (p=0.002) and the chest wall muscular invasion (p=0.027) in the univariate analysis. The prognostic factors influencing OS were the presence of a positive axillary lymph node (p=0.001) and the T stage (p=0.001) in the univariate analysis. The T stage (p=0.008) and node (N) stage (p=0.038) were significant prognostic factors for OS in the multivariate analyses. Also, the T stage (p=0.034) was found to be significant for LC. Conclusion We found that only the tumor size and lymph node status were independent prognostic factors for survival. In addition, only the tumor size was an independent prognostic factor for locoregional relapse. Modified radical mastectomy and conservative surgical procedures had similar outcomes for LC. PMID:23593083

  20. Is Availability of Mammography Services at Federally Qualified Health Centers Associated with Breast Cancer Mortality-to-Incidence Ratios? An Ecological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seul Ki; Eberth, Jan M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Yip, Mei Po; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D.; Wigfall, Lisa T.; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Mammography is the most effective method to detect breast cancer in its earliest stages, reducing the risk of breast cancer death. We investigated the relationship between accessibility of mammography services at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) of breast cancer in each county in the United States. Methods: County-level breast cancer mortality and incidence rates in 2006–2010 were used to estimate MIRs. We compared breast cancer MIRs based on the density and availability of FQHC delivery sites with or without mammography services both in the county and in the neighboring counties. Results: The relationship between breast cancer MIRs and access to mammography services at FQHCs differed by race and county of residence. Breast cancer MIRs were lower in counties with mammography facilities or FQHC delivery sites than in counties without a mammography facility or FQHC delivery site. This trend was stronger in urban counties (p=0.01) and among whites (p=0.008). Counties with a high density of mammography facilities had lower breast cancer MIRs than other counties, specifically in urban counties (p=0.01) and among whites (p=0.01). Breast cancer MIR for blacks was the lowest in counties having mammography facilities; and was highest in counties without a mammography facility within the county or the neighboring counties (p=0.03). Conclusions: Mammography services provided at FQHCs may have a positive impact on breast cancer MIRs. Expansion of services provided at the FQHCs and placement of FQHCs in additional underserved areas might help to reduce cancer disparities in the United States. PMID:26208105

  1. Variation in Additional Breast Imaging Orders and Impact on Surgical Wait Times at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Mehra; Losk, Katya; Mallory, Melissa A.; Camuso, Kristen; Troyan, Susan; Lin, Nancy U.; Kadish, Sarah; Bunnell, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the multidisciplinary care model, breast imagers frequently provide second opinion reviews of imaging studies performed at outside institutions. However, the need for additional imaging and timeliness of obtaining these studies has yet to be established. We sought to evaluate the frequency of additional imaging orders by breast surgeons and to evaluate the impact of this supplementary imaging on timeliness of surgery. Methods We identified 2,489 consecutive women with breast cancer who underwent first definitive surgery (FDS) at our comprehensive cancer center between 2011 and 2013. The number of breast-specific imaging studies performed for each patient between initial consultation and FDS was obtained. Chi-squared tests were used to quantify the proportion of patients undergoing additional imaging by surgeon. Interval time between initial consultation and additional imaging and/or biopsy was calculated. The delay of additional imaging on time to FDS was assessed by t-test. Results Of 2,489 patients, 615 (24.7%) had at least one additional breast-specific imaging study performed between initial consultation and FDS, with 222 patients undergoing additional biopsies (8.9%). The proportion of patients receiving imaging tests by breast surgeon ranged from 15% to 39% (p<0.0001). Patients receiving additional imaging had statistically longer wait times to FDS for BCT (21.4 to 28.5 days, p<0.0001). Conclusions Substantial variability exists in the utilization of additional breast-specific imaging and in the timeliness of obtaining these tests among breast surgeons. Further research is warranted to assess the sources and impact of this variation on patient care, cost and outcomes. PMID:26307233

  2. Radiotherapy for Patients With Metastases to the Spinal Column: A Review of 603 Patients at Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Hashii, Haruko; Murata, Hideki; Takagi, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Long- and short-course radiotherapy have similar outcomes in the treatment of spinal metastases. Long-course radiotherapy is recommended for patients with good predicted survival to reduce the risk of in-field recurrence, whereas short-course radiotherapy is used for those with poor predicted survival. Therefore, prediction of prognosis and local control is required for selecting the optimal course of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 603 patients with spinal metastases who received radiotherapy at the Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital between September 2002 and February 2007. Factors associated with survival and local control were retrospectively investigated by multivariate analyses. Local recurrence was defined as regrowth within the irradiated field or exacerbation of symptoms such as pain and motor deficits. Results: Of the 603 patients, 555 (92%) were followed for 12 months or until death. The survival rates after 6, 12, and 24 months were 50%, 32%, and 19%, respectively, with a median survival of 6.2 months. The median survival periods after long- and short-course radiotherapy were 7.9 and 1.8 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, primary tumor site, good performance status, absence of previous chemotherapy, absence of visceral metastasis, single bone metastasis, younger age, and nonhypercalcemia were associated with good survival. The local control rates after 6, 12, and 24 months were 91%, 79%, and 69%, respectively, and non-mass-type tumor, breast cancer, and absence of previous chemotherapy were predictors of good local control. Conclusions: Identification of factors associated with good local control and survival may allow selection of an optimal radiotherapy schedule for patients with spinal metastases.

  3. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Elaboration on Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guidelines Compared with Other Guidelines and Remaining Issues.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Park, Joong-Won; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed based on characteristic findings of arterial-phase enhancement and portal/delayed "washout" in cirrhotic patients. Several countries and major academic societies have proposed varying specific diagnostic criteria for HCC, largely reflecting the variable HCC prevalence in different regions and ethnic groups, as well as different practice patterns. In 2014, a new version of Korean practice guidelines for management of HCC was released by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC). According to the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, if the typical hallmark of HCC (i.e., hypervascularity in the arterial phase with washout in the portal or 3 min-delayed phases) is identified in a nodule ≥ 1 cm in diameter on either dynamic CT, dynamic MRI, or MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agent in high-risk groups, a diagnosis of HCC is established. In addition, the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines provide criteria to diagnose HCC for subcentimeter hepatic nodules according to imaging findings and tumor marker, which has not been addressed in other guidelines such as Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of the Liver. In this review, we briefly review the new HCC diagnostic criteria endorsed by the 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, in comparison with other recent guidelines; we furthermore address several remaining issues in noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, including prerequisite of sonographic demonstration of nodules, discrepancy between transitional phase and delayed phase, and implementation of ancillary features for HCC diagnosis.

  4. In Vivo Radiobiological Characterization of Proton Beam at the National Cancer Center in Korea: Effect of the Chk2 Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Soo; Choo, Dong Wan; Shin, Dongho; Baek, Hye Jung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Motoyama, Noboru; De Coster, Blanche M.; Gueulette, John; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ando, Koichi; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the presence or absence of CHK2 was estimated at the Korean National Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center (NCCPTC). Methods and Materials: The proton beam was fixed at 210 MeV with 6-cm spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) because this is expected to be the most frequently used clinical setting. X-rays were obtained using a 6-MV conventional linear accelerator. The RBE was estimated from the survival of jejunal crypt in C3H/He and Chk2{sup -/-} mice. Results: The estimated RBEs of the NCCPTC at the middle of the SOBP were 1.10 and 1.05 in the presence and absence of CHK2, respectively. The doses that reduced the number of regenerated crypt per jejunal circumference to 20 (D{sub 20}) in C3H/He mice were 14.8 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.7-15.9) for X-rays and 13.5 Gy (95% CI, 14.5-15.5) for protons. By contrast, the doses of D{sub 20} in Chk2{sup -/-} mice were 15.7 Gy (95% CI, 15.0-16.4) and 14.9 Gy (95% CI, 14.0-15.8) for X-rays and protons, respectively. Conclusions: The RBE of the NCCPTC is clearly within the range of RBEs determined at other facilities and is consistent with the generic RBE value of 1.10 for 150- to 250-MeV beams. The mutation of Chk2 gave rise to radioresistance but exhibited similar RBE.

  5. Surgical approach for ulcerated locally advanced breast cancer. A single Center experience: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Laforgia, Rita; Punzo, Clelia; Panebianco, Annunziata; Volpi, Annalisa; Minafra, Marina; Sederino, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-12

    L’obiettivo del nostro studio è la valutazione della strategia chirurgica più idonea nei casi di LABC (Locally Advanced Breast Cancer) in condizioni di ulcerazione e sanguinamento. La diagnosi clinica del LABC prevede nella maggior parte dei casi una massa mammaria estesa associata ad edema, eritema, retrazione e sanguinamento, dolore, superficie cutanea irregolare e coinvolgimento linfonodale. L’intervento chirurgico di scelta per le forme T3-T4 è la mastectomia radicale che rappresenta un trattamento adeguato per il controllo locale della patologia. In caso di forme localmente avanzate e ulcerate, pur essendo forme inoperabili, l’exeresi chirurgica si rende necessaria per una bonifica locale. La presenza di fenomeni di ulcerazione e sanguinamento non rende possibile avviare un trattamento chemioterapico neoadiuvante ed è necessario eseguire interventi chirurgici palliativi. Il trattamento chirurgico stesso richiede mutilazioni ampie ed associate procedure di chirurgia plastica. Spesso per l’estensione della malattia ed il sovvertimento del corpus mammae durante l’exeresi chirurgica della mammella, la sezione su zone esenti da neoplasia non consente la chiusura immediata dei lembi. Abbiamo considerato, su un campione di 288 pazienti affette da carcinoma mammario, 11 donne con forme avanzate fra T4a e T4c (3.8%). E’ stata posta indicazione a trattamento chirurgico perché pazienti provenienti dal Pronto Soccorso con anemizzazione per neoplasie avanzate ulcerate e sanguinanti, non candidabili in prima istanza a chemioterapia neoadiuvante citoriduttiva. Le procedure adoperate per la ricostruzione della mammella sono state in 2 pazienti la rotazione di un lembo muscolo cutaneo, in 4 casi un innesto cutaneo prelevato dalla coscia, in 4 casi è stata utilizzata una matrice dermica biologica - sostituto cutaneo (INTEGRA) che è stata poi sostituita con un successivo innesto cutaneo a distanza di circa 20-30 giorni. Sono state osservate recidive in 2 casi

  6. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lanea M.M.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Li Tianyu; Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Freedman, Gary M.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and <1.5% 'fair/poor'. For physician-reported cosmesis, boost doses {>=}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83

  7. Alcohol and smoking and subsequent risk of prostate cancer in Japanese men: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Norie; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2014-02-15

    Although alcohol and smoking have not been established as risk factors for prostate cancer, they are important risk factors for other human cancers and potentially major avoidable factors. Alcohol drinkers and smokers might be less likely to get screening, which might lead to attenuation of the positive association. Here, we investigated the association of alcohol drinking and smoking and prostate cancer according to stage, as well as prostate cancer detected by subjective symptoms, in a large prospective study among Japanese men. The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study (JPHC study) was established in 1990 for Cohort I and in 1993 for Cohort II. Subjects were 48,218 men aged 40-69 years who completed a questionnaire, which included their alcohol and smoking habits at baseline, and who were followed until the end of 2010. During 16 years of follow-up, 913 men were newly diagnosed with prostate cancer; of whom 248 had advanced cases, 635 were organ-localized and 30 were of an undetermined stage. Alcohol consumption was dose-dependently associated with advanced prostate cancer [nondrinkers: reference, 0-150 g/week: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.83-1.82; 150-300 g/week: HR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.04-2.19; ≥ 300 g/week: HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.97-2.05, p for trend = 0.02]. The positive association was not substantially changed among cancers detected by subjective symptoms. Smoking was inversely associated with prostate cancer among total subjects, but tended to increase the risk of advanced prostate cancer detected by subjective symptoms. In conclusion, abstinence from alcohol and prohibition of smoking might be important factors in the prevention of advanced prostate cancer.

  8. Organizational Strategies for Building Capacity in Evidence-Based Oncology Nursing Practice: A Case Report of an Australian Tertiary Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Bowers, Alison; Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2017-03-01

    The ever-increasing cancer care demand has posed a challenge for oncology nurses to deliver evidence-based, innovative care. Despite efforts to promote evidence-based practice, barriers remain and executives find it difficult to implement evidence-based practice efficiently. Using the successful experience of an Australian tertiary cancer center, this paper depicts 4 effective strategies for facilitating evidence-based practice at the organizational level-the Embedded Scholar: Enabler, Enactor, and Engagement (4 Es) Model-includes a 12-week evidence-based practice program that prioritizes relevant research proposed by clinical staff and endorses high-quality, evidence-based point-of-care resources.

  9. The Establishment of the First Cancer Tissue Biobank at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: A National Cancer Institute–Funded Initiative between Moffitt Cancer Center in Florida and the Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Idhaliz; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Matta, Jaime; García, Miosotis; Fenstermacher, David; Gutierrez, Sylvia; Seijo, Edward; Torres-Ruiz, Jose’; Pledger, W. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Population-based studies are important to address emerging issues in health disparities among populations. The Partnership between the Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) in Florida and the Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences (PSMHS) in Puerto Rico (the PSMHS-MCC Partnership) was developed to facilitate high-quality research, training, and community outreach focusing on the Puerto Rican population in the island and in the mainland, with funding from the National Cancer Institute. We report here the establishment of a Tissue Biobank at PSMHS, modeled after the MCC tissue biorepository, to support translational research projects on this minority population. This facility, the Puerto Rico Tissue Biobank, was jointly developed by a team of basic and clinical scientists from both institutions in close collaboration with the administrators and clinical faculty of the tissue accrual sites. The efforts required and challenges that needed to be overcome to establish the first functional, centralized cancer-related biobank in Puerto Rico, and to ensure that it continuously evolves to address new needs of this underserved Hispanic population, are described. As a result of the collaborative efforts between PSMHS and MCC, a tissue procurement algorithm was successfully established to acquire, process, store, and conduct pathological analyses of cancer-related biospecimens and their associated clinical-pathological data from Puerto Rican patients with cancer recruited at a tertiary hospital setting. All protocols in place are in accordance with standard operational procedures that ensure high quality of biological materials and patient confidentiality. The processes described here provide a model that can be applied to achieve the establishment of a functional biobank in similar settings. PMID:24836632

  10. [Historical overview and the current practice of intracavitary treatment of cervical and endometrial cancer in the Oncoradiology Center of Budapest].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Pallinger, Ágnes; Weisz, Csaba; Naszály, Attila; Landherr, László

    2015-06-01

    The aims of our study were to describe the history and development of intracavitary brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological tumors, to introduce our current practice for intracavitary brachytherapy treatments based on CT planning. Gynecological intracavitary brachytherapy has been applied in our department since the early 1930s. After a long development it has been completely renewed by 2014. In our center definitive and/or preoperative gynecological HDR-AL brachytherapy treatments were given to 25 patients (13 corpus uterine cancer patients and 12 cervical cancer patients) during the period of 01. 01. 2014-31. 01. 2015. In each case, target volumes were planned by CT images, DVH (dose volume histogram) analysis was performed in order to calculate the radiation tolerance dose of rectum and urinary bladder. Evaluation was performed by the EclipseTM 11.0.47. brachytherapy treatment planning system. During the definitive treatments of the 13 uterine cancer patients the D2cc value related to rectum tolerance was 66.3 GyEQD2 (46-91 Gy). The average D2cc value of urinary bladder tolerance was 76.5 GyEQD2 (30-112 Gy). CI was 0.72 (0.6-0.95). Average value of COIN was 0.57 (0.35-0.78). Compared to the prescribed dose D100 and D90 values were given in ratios. Compared to the volume which receives 100% of reference dose V150 and V200 values were also given in ratios. D100 and D90 were calculated to be 0.66 (0.47-0.97) and 0.91 (0.8-1.25). V150 and V200 volumes were 0.11 (0.04-0.18) and 0.06 (0.02-0.1). During the definitive treatments of 12 cervical cancer patients the D2cc value related to rectum tolerance calculated by DVH was 75.2 GyEQD2 (60-82 Gy). The average D2cc value of urinary bladder tolerance was 85 GyEQD2 based on DVH. CI was 0.66 (0.42-0.76). Average value of COIN was 0.52 (0.32-0.78). Mean value of DHI was 0.46 (0.27-0.54). D100 and D90 were calculated to be 0.72 (0.57-0.89) and 0.91 (0.84-1.11). V150 and V200 volumes were 0.057 (0.02-0.13) and 0.02 (0

  11. Electronic Monitoring Device of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Function in Improving Patient-Centered Care in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-09

    Stage I Adult Liver Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Taremi, Mojgan; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max; Pearson, Shannon; Fung, Sharon; Purdie, Thomas; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  14. Evaluation of the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer, according to the American College of Radiology criteria

    PubMed Central

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Rodrigues, Daniel Padilha; Silva, Olimpio Antonio Cornehl; Beltrani, Fabrício Henrique; de Melo, Rayssa Araruna Bezerra; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Mendes, Gustavo Gomes; Chojniak, Rubens

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, single-center study, conducted by reviewing medical records and imaging reports. We included 1060 female patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis at a cancer center between January 2013 and June 2014. The indications for performing the examination were classified according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 14.8 years, and 49.8% were perimenopausal or postmenopausal. The majority (63.9%) had a history of cancer, which was gynecologic in 29.5% and nongynecologic in 34.4%. Of the patients evaluated, 44.0% had clinical complaints, the most common being pelvic pain (in 11.5%) and bleeding (in 9.8%), and 34.7% of patients had previously had abnormal findings on ultrasound. Most (76.7%) of the patients met the criteria for undergoing magnetic resonance imaging, according to the ACR guidelines. The main indications were evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical resection (in 25.9%); detection and staging of gynecologic neoplasms (in 23.3%); and evaluation of pelvic pain or of a mass (in 17.1%). Conclusion In the majority of the cases evaluated, magnetic resonance imaging was clearly indicated according to the ACR criteria. The main indication was local recurrence after surgical treatment of pelvic malignancies, which is consistent with the routine protocols at cancer centers. PMID:28298725

  15. Incidence of infusion reactions to anti-neoplastic agents in early phase clinical trials: The MD Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Bupathi, Manojkumar; Hajjar, Joud; Bean, Stacie; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Karp, Daniel; Stephen, Bettzy; Hess, Kenneth; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Naing, Aung

    2017-02-01

    Infusion reactions (IRs) to anti-neoplastic agents require prompt recognition and immediate treatment to avert significant complications. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of consecutive patients who received anti-neoplastic therapy in the outpatient treatment center of the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics from January 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013. Of the 597 patients who received treatment, 9 (1.5 %) had IRs (all ≤ grade 2). The most common IRs observed on first occurrence were chills (n = 5), itching, rash, and facial flushing (n = 3 each). There were no IR-related deaths. All the IRs were reversible with appropriate symptomatic treatment and the therapy was completed after temporary cessation of infusion in 7 of the 9 patients. The infusion was stopped in 2 patients due to symptoms suggestive of IgE-mediated allergic reaction and cytokine storm. Five of the 8 patients who were re-challenged with the same therapy developed a similar reaction. However, the infusion was completed in 4 of the 5 patients after administration of intravenous diphenhydramine and/or hydrocortisone, or slowing the rate of infusion. And, subsequent cycles with the same agents were uneventful. IRs to anti-neoplastic agents are rare. Though the clinical presentations are overlapping, most IRs are not IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Appropriate premedication and slow rate of infusion facilitates uneventful administration of the anti-neoplastic agents in subsequent cycles. Further study in a larger cohort of patients to identify biomarkers of hypersensitivity is warranted.

  16. Sorafenib treatment of radioiodine-refractory advanced thyroid cancer in daily clinical practice: a cohort study from a single center.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Michelon, Federica; Castiglione, Anna; Felicetti, Francesco; Viansone, Alessandro Adriano; Nervo, Alice; Zichi, Clizia; Ciccone, Giovannino; Piovesan, Alessandro; Arvat, Emanuela

    2015-08-01

    Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) are inadequate. Multitargeted kinase inhibitors have recently shown promising results in phase 2-3 studies. This retrospective study aimed to document our clinical experience on the effects of sorafenib in the setting of daily clinical practice. Retrospective study evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in a cohort of patients consecutively treated with sorafenib at a single center. Twenty patients with advanced RAI-refractory thyroid carcinoma were enrolled (March 2011-March 2014). Patients generally started with 400 mg of sorafenib twice daily, tapering the dose in case of side effects. Radiological response and toxicity were measured during follow-up, together with safety parameters. CT scans were performed by a single experienced radiologist every 3-4 months. Five patients stopped sorafenib within 90 days due to severe toxicities. Median progression-free survival was 248 days. Five patients had a partial response (PR), achieved in all cases within 3 months, whereas 5 had stable disease (SD) at 12 months. Durable response rate (PR plus SD) for at least 6 months was 50 %, among those who received sorafenib for at least 3 months. Commonest adverse events included skin toxicity, gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. In our cohort of patients with advanced RAI-refractory thyroid carcinoma, sorafenib confirmed antitumor activity leading to SD or PR in the majority of cases, at the expense of clinically relevant side effects. More effective and tolerable agents are still needed in the treatment of RAI-refractory DTC.

  17. Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

    2013-03-01

    The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials.

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Fernando F. de; Puri, Dev R.; Zhung, Joanne; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Hunt, Margie; Stambuk, Hilda; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment in 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1

  19. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    projects have begun to lead to peer-reviewed extramural funding. In the case of the genistein and lycopene trials, ACDC funding has led to randomized...Unsafe Herbs Lycopene Supplements Associated with Illness or Milk Thistle Injury PC-SPES Drug/Nutrient/Supplement Interactions Prickly Ash Herbs

  20. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    patient reported outcomes. The technology that makes this possible is a PC card that accepts tone-dial (push-button) sounds and can playback pre- recorded ...then be recorded : The video resolution is adequate for many clinical applications. While not precise enough for pathological diagnosis, it is...appropriate samples at frequent intervals. State-of-the-art techniques must be used for sensitive and specific detection of candidate infectious

  1. Lung cancer screening with low-dose helical CT in Korea: experiences at the Samsung Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Rhee, Chong H

    2005-06-01

    To determine overall detection rates of lung cancer by low-dose CT (LDCT) screening and to compare histopathologic and imaging differences of detected cancers between high- and low-risk groups, this study included 6,406 asymptomatic Korean adults with >or=45 yr of age who underwent LDCT for lung cancer screening. All were classified into high- (>or=20 pack-year smoking; 3,353) and low-risk (3,053; <20 pack-yr smoking and non-smokers) groups. We compared CT findings of detected cancers and detection rates between high- and low-risk. At initial CT, 35% (2,255 of 6,406) had at least one or more non-calcified nodule. Lung cancer detection rates were 0.36% (23 of 6,406). Twenty-one non-small cell lung cancers appeared as solid (n=14) or ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n=7) nodules. Cancer likelihood was higher in GGO nodules than in solid nodules (p<0.01). Fifteen of 23 cancers occurred in high-risk group and 8 in low-risk group (p=0.215). Therefore, LDCT screening help detect early stage of lung cancer in asymptomatic Korean population with detection rate of 0.36% on a population basis and may be useful for discovering early lung cancer in low-risk group as well as in high-risk group.

  2. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Çalık Başaran, Nursel; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Durusu Tanrıöver, Mine; Akova, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN) was observed in 196 (51%) of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively). Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gram-negative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute. PMID:27095391

  3. Om.breast cancer in very young women aged 25 year-old or below in the center of Tunisia and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelkrim, Soumaya; Fathallah, Khadija; Rouatbi, Rim; Ayachi, Malak; Hmissa, Sihem; Mokni, Moncef

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer in very young women under 40 or 35 years attracted a widespread attention. Few studies have focused on women aged below 25 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the situation of breast cancer in women ≤25 years in the center of Tunisia. Retrospective review from 1993 to 2013. Clinical, histopathological, therapeutic and outcome data were recorded. Cases were classified into different molecular subtypes based on the immunohistochemistry-based definitions. The series included 25 patients. The mean duration of symptoms was 7.5 months. The most common presenting symptom was a palpable mass. Four patients had at least one relative diagnosed with breast cancer. Mammography combined with ultrasound was suggestive of malignancy in 60 % of cases. Curative surgical treatment could be offered in 19 cases. The mean tumor size was 39 mm. Nodal metastases were detected in 9/18 cases. Twenty cases could be classified into: luminal A (5 cases), luminal B (6 cases), Her-2 (1 case), triple negative (6 cases) and unclassified (2 cases). Two women experienced locoregional recurrence and 6 had distant recurrence. Asynchronous contralateral breast cancer occurred in one case. The overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 85 and 75 % respectively. The survival was significantly lower in grade III tumors (p = 0.04) and triple negative tumors (p = 0.03). Breast cancer in women ≤25 years is uncommon. An adequate medical education of young women and physicians is necessary.

  4. Ribbon-cutting ceremony occurs at grand opening of new International Space Station Center at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Celebrating the official opening of the new International Space Station (ISS) Center at Kennedy Space Center are, left to right, James Ball, chief, NASA Public Services, KSC; KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; Hugh Harris, director, NASA Public Affairs, KSC; and Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer, Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport Inc. Center Director Bridges cuts the ribbon to the new tour attraction where full-scale mockups of station modules, through which visitors can walk, are on display. These include the Habitation Unit, where station crew members will live, sleep, and work; a Laboratory Module; and the Pressurized Logistics Module, where racks and supplies will be transported back and forth from KSC to space. Guests also can take an elevated walkway to a gallery overlooking the work are where actual ISS hardware is prepared for flight into space. This new tour site, in addition to a new Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry, are part of a comprehensive effort by NASA and Delaware North to expand and improve the KSC public tour and visitor facilities.

  5. Cancer Knowledge and Opportunities for Education Among HIV-Infected Patients in an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lydia H; Stafford, Kristen A; Fantry, Lori E; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2015-06-01

    HIV-infected patients frequently present with advanced stage cancer. It is possible that late stage presentation may be related to lack of cancer knowledge and/or barriers to care. Questionnaires were administered to 285 adult HIV-infected patients to evaluate knowledge of cancer risk factors and symptoms and barriers to care between 2011 and 2012. Differences in mean and percent scores by group were assessed using a t test for independent samples and chi-square analysis, respectively. Respondents were predominantly male (64%), African-American (86%), and low income (60% < $10,000/year). Thirty-four (12%) had been diagnosed with cancer, and 169 (59%) had a family history of cancer. The mean knowledge score was 17.5 out of 24 questions (73%). Mean scores were not significantly different by sex, age, race, or income. Respondents with a college education scored significantly higher than those with less than a high school education (p < 0.01). In unadjusted analysis, a higher proportion of patients with a personal/family history of cancer (74%) scored in the highest quartile (>70% correct) compared to those without any personal history of cancer (62%) (p = 0.03). There was a higher level of cancer knowledge in this population compared to studies that have evaluated the HIV-uninfected population. Nevertheless, there were knowledge deficits, suggesting the need for further education about cancer to improve earlier detection rates and, ultimately, outcomes.

  6. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Flavia C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  7. Website Quality, Expectation, Confirmation, and End User Satisfaction: The Knowledge-Intensive Website of the Korean National Cancer Information Center

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chulmo; Wati, Yulia; Park, Keeho

    2011-01-01

    Background The fact that patient satisfaction with primary care clinical practices and physician-patient communications has decreased gradually has brought a new opportunity to the online channel as a supplementary service to provide additional information. Objective In this study, our objectives were to examine the process of cognitive knowledge expectation-confirmation from eHealth users and to recommend the attributes of a “knowledge-intensive website.”. Knowledge expectation can be defined as users’ existing attitudes or beliefs regarding expected levels of knowledge they may gain by accessing the website. Knowledge confirmation is the extent to which user’s knowledge expectation of information systems use is realized during actual use. In our hypothesized research model, perceived information quality, presentation and attractiveness as well as knowledge expectation influence knowledge confirmation, which in turn influences perceived usefulness and end user satisfaction, which feeds back to knowledge expectation. Methods An empirical study was conducted at the National Cancer Center (NCC), Republic of Korea (South Korea), by evaluating its official website. A user survey was administered containing items to measure subjectively perceived website quality and expectation-confirmation attributes. A study sample of 198 usable responses was used for further analysis. We used the structural equation model to test the proposed research model. Results Knowledge expectation exhibited a positive effect on knowledge confirmation (beta = .27, P < .001). The paths from information quality, information presentation, and website attractiveness to knowledge confirmation were also positive and significant (beta = .24, P < .001; beta = .29, P < .001; beta = .18, P < .001, respectively). Moreover, the effect of knowledge confirmation on perceived usefulness was also positively significant (beta = .64, P < .001). Knowledge expectation together with knowledge confirmation

  8. Colorectal cancer anatomic distribution patterns remain the same after sessile serrated adenoma/polyp considered cancer precursor: a 9-year comparison study from community-based endoscopy centers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juliana F.; Noffsinger, Amy E.; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background The overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States has steadily decreased. However, the incidence of right-sided CRC remains unchanged for the past two decades. The serrated neoplastic pathway (sessile serrated adenoma/polyp, SSA/P) has been considered an important pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis, especially in the right-sided CRC. The aim of this study was to compare CRC anatomic distribution patterns in a 9-year interval in the general population before and after SSA/P was recognized and treated as a CRC precursor. Methods The Miraca Life Sciences (MLS) pathology database was queried for all primary CRCs diagnosed between 8/3/2000 to 12/31/2005 (control group) and 1/1/2014 to 12/31/2014 (current group). Patients’ demographics, clinical information, and pathology reports were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 5,602 patients with 5,685 CRCs were identified, of which 2,728 patients with 2,765 CRCs in current group and 2,874 patients with 2,920 CRCs in control group. Overall, there were no statistical differences in the current group in regards to the anatomical distribution patterns of CRCs in the proximal, right-sided, distal, and left-sided colon or genders compared with the control group (all P>0.05). Among the current group, there were 33 (1.2%) patients with 38 (1.4%) CRCs arising in SSA/Ps [serrated carcinomas (SCAs)], of which 33 (86.8%) were in the right-sided colon and 5 (13.2%) in the left-sided colon. Twenty-three (69.7%) SCA patients were female with significant advanced age than male (76.4 vs. 69.6, P=0.023). Conclusions The overall current CRC anatomic distribution patterns after SSA/Ps managed as CRC precursor remain the same in the patients’ population from the community-based endoscopy centers in the U.S. It is suggested that the current SSA/P management might need to be further modified. PMID:28078114

  9. 76 FR 12740 - Request for Information on Conditions Relating to Cancer to Consider for the World Trade Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Administrator is conducting a review of all available scientific and medical evidence to determine if, based on the scientific evidence, cancer or a certain type of cancer should be added to the applicable list of... scientific and medical findings where exposure to airborne toxins, any other hazard, or any other...

  10. Cancer Therapeutic Based on T Cell Receptors Designed to Regiospecifically Release Interleukin-12 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a potential cancer therapeutic based on T cells genetically engineered to express the human interleukin 12 (IL-12) cytokine only in the tumor environment.

  11. Using computational modeling to assess the impact of clinical decision support on cancer screening improvement strategies within the community health centers.

    PubMed

    Carney, Timothy Jay; Morgan, Geoffrey P; Jones, Josette; McDaniel, Anna M; Weaver, Michael; Weiner, Bryan; Haggstrom, David A

    2014-10-01

    Our conceptual model demonstrates our goal to investigate the impact of clinical decision support (CDS) utilization on cancer screening improvement strategies in the community health care (CHC) setting. We employed a dual modeling technique using both statistical and computational modeling to evaluate impact. Our statistical model used the Spearman's Rho test to evaluate the strength of relationship between our proximal outcome measures (CDS utilization) against our distal outcome measure (provider self-reported cancer screening improvement). Our computational model relied on network evolution theory and made use of a tool called Construct-TM to model the use of CDS measured by the rate of organizational learning. We employed the use of previously collected survey data from community health centers Cancer Health Disparities Collaborative (HDCC). Our intent is to demonstrate the added valued gained by using a computational modeling tool in conjunction with a statistical analysis when evaluating the impact a health information technology, in the form of CDS, on health care quality process outcomes such as facility-level screening improvement. Significant simulated disparities in organizational learning over time were observed between community health centers beginning the simulation with high and low clinical decision support capability.

  12. [Psycho-social and religious impact of cancer diagnosis on Moroccan patients: experience from the National Oncology Center of Rabat].

    PubMed

    Errihani, H; Mrabti, H; Sbitti, Y; Kaikani, W; El Ghissassi, I; Afqir, S; Boutayeb, S; Farik, M; Riadi, A; Hammoudi, M; Chergui, H

    2010-04-01

    The impact cancer occurrence is variable according to the sociocultural issue, specific to each context and each area. In order to determine the psychosocial profile of Moroccan patients that have developed cancers, four studies were performed at the National institute of oncology (INO) in Rabat. These studies were prospective, included between 125 and 1,600 patients and were based on questionnaires developed by a medical oncologist, a psychologist and a sociologist. These studies were focused on the psychosocial characteristics of the Moroccan cancer occurrence on patients, the impact of cancer on the religious practice as well as the impact of cancer and its treatments on patients' sexuality. In this article, we will develop the particular characteristics of moroccan patients that were specific to their sociocultural context.

  13. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Lung Cancer Oncogenotype-Selective Drug Target Discovery (Natural Products Focus) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project is to use small molecules and RNAi to functionally define subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a panel of cell lines prepared and molecularly annotated by Drs. John Minna and Adi Gazdar. Experimental Approaches Lung Cancer Natural Products Screening/Chemical Library Screening

  14. How Is Anal Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... This test can be used to see how deep the cancer has grown into the tissues surrounding ... Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, ...

  15. 76 FR 17421 - Request for Information on Conditions Relating to Cancer To Consider for the World Trade Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... Trade Center (WTC) Program Administrator for certain functions related to the WTC Health Program... Section 3312(a)(5)(A) of that Act, the WTC Program Administrator is conducting a review of all available... Center Health Program. The WTC Program Administrator is requesting information on the following:...

  16. CHoosing Options for Insomnia in Cancer Effectively (CHOICE): Design of a patient centered comparative effectiveness trial of acupuncture and cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Garland, Sheila N; Gehrman, Philip; Barg, Frances K; Xie, Sharon X; Mao, Jun J

    2016-03-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent and persistent side effect of cancer, which if left unaddressed, can be unremitting and negatively influence physical and mental well-being. Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are commonly used non-pharmacological treatments that are efficacious for treating insomnia in cancer patients; however, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of these options. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine which treatments are most effective for which individuals, and patient preference for treatment is a particularly important contributor to adherence and outcomes. Here we describe the design of a clinical trial that begins to determine how best to personalize the treatment of insomnia for cancer survivors. This project is a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial with a nested qualitative study comparing acupuncture and CBT for insomnia and co-morbid symptoms in a heterogeneous sample of 160 cancer survivors. The primary aim is to determine which treatment is associated with the largest reduction in insomnia severity. The secondary aim is to examine the demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics that predict and/or moderate treatment effect. Patients will receive ten treatments of acupuncture or 7 sessions of CBT over eight weeks and complete validated patient-reported outcome measures of sleep and co-morbid symptoms at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at three-months to assess durability of effect. The results of the proposed study have the potential to improve healthcare outcomes by helping cancer survivors and their caregivers make informed and evidence-based decisions, leading to patient-centered and personalized care for cancer survivors with insomnia.

  17. World Trade Center Health Program; addition of certain types of cancer to the list of WTC-related health conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-12

    Title I of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. The WTC Health Program, which is administered by the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides medical monitoring and treatment to eligible firefighters and related personnel, law enforcement officers, and rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers who responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and to eligible survivors of the New York City attacks. In accordance with WTC Health Program regulations, which establish procedures for adding a new condition to the list of covered health conditions, this final rule adds to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions the types of cancer proposed for inclusion by the notice of proposed rulemaking.

  18. Novel Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the PH Domain of AKT for Preventing and Treating Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Medical Oncology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing and co-development collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel kinase inhibitors targeting the PH domain of AKT.

  19. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  20. Transformational leadership, transnational culture and political competence in globalizing health care services: a case study of Jordan's King Hussein Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Jeffrey L; Pappas, Gregory; Murray, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background Following the demise of Jordan's King Hussein bin Talal to cancer in 1999, the country's Al-Amal Center was transformed from a poorly perceived and ineffectual cancer care institution into a Western-style comprehensive cancer center. Renamed King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC), it achieved improved levels of quality, expanded cancer care services and achieved Joint Commission International accreditation under new leadership over a three-year period (2002–2005). Methods An exploratory case research method was used to explain the rapid change to international standards. Sources including personal interviews, document review and on-site observations were combined to conduct a robust examination of KHCC's rapid changes. Results The changes which occurred at the KHCC during its formation and leading up to its Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation can be understood within the conceptual frame of the transformational leadership model. Interviewees and other sources for the case study suggest the use of inspirational motivation, idealized influence, individualized consideration and intellectual stimulation, four factors in the transformational leadership model, had significant impact upon the attitudes and motivation of staff within KHCC. Changes in the institution were achieved through increased motivation and positive attitudes toward the use of JCI continuous improvement processes as well as increased professional training. The case study suggests the role of culture and political sensitivity needs re-definition and expansion within the transformational leadership model to adequately explain leadership in the context of globalizing health care services, specifically when governments are involved in the change initiative. Conclusion The KHCC case underscores the utility of the transformational leadership model in an international health care context. To understand leadership in globalizing health care services, KHCC suggests culture is broader

  1. Dietary pattern and breast cancer risk in Japanese women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (JPHC Study).

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangah; Saito, Eiko; Inoue, Manami; Sawada, Norie; Ishihara, Junko; Takachi, Ribeka; Nanri, Akiko; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-05-28

    Evidence that diet is associated with breast cancer risk is inconsistent. Most of the studies have focused on risks associated with specific foods and nutrients, rather than overall diet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer risk in Japanese women. A total of 49 552 Japanese women were followed-up from 1995 to 1998 (5-year follow-up survey) until the end of 2012 for an average of 14·6 years. During 725 534 person-years of follow-up, 718 cases of breast cancer were identified. We identified three dietary patterns (prudent, westernised and traditional Japanese). The westernised dietary pattern was associated with a 32 % increase in breast cancer risk (hazard ratios (HR) 1·32; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·70; P trend=0·04). In particular, subjects with extreme intake of the westernised diet (quintile (Q) Q5_5th) had an 83 % increase in risk of breast cancer in contrast to those in the lowest Q1 (HR 1·83; 95 % CI 1·25, 2·68; P trend=0·01). In analyses stratified by menopausal status, postmenopausal subjects in the highest quintile of the westernised dietary pattern had a 29 % increased risk of breast cancer (HR 1·29; 95 % CI 0·99, 1·76; P trend=0·04). With regard to hormone receptor status, the westernised dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of oestrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-positivetumours (HR 2·49; 95 % CI 1·40, 4·43; P trend<0·01). The other dietary patterns were not associated with the risk of breast cancer in Japanese women. A westernised dietary pattern is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in Japanese women.

  2. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  3. Improved Methods for the Clinical Manufacture of Proteins Used In Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is an immune system modulating protein (cytokine) that stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of T- lymphocytes.  In the clinical context, IL-15 is being investigated for use in the treatment of diseases such as cancer.  Manufacture of IL-15 for clinical use can be problematic. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to co-develop or license methods that facilitate pharmaceutical purification and processing of Interleukin-15 (IL-15).

  4. [Modalities for the functionning of a Care Center for women at high risk for breast and ovarian cancers: The French experience of Tenon Hospital].

    PubMed

    Chabbert-Buffet, N; Seroussi, B; Chopier, J; Fajac, A; Antoine, M; Boucher, C; Colas, C; Belaroussi, B; Waserman, C; Deschamps, M-O; Cuminet, J; Mottier, N; Buzzi, J-C; Rouzier, R; Soubrier, F; Uzan, S

    2010-03-01

    High risk may be defined as either an absolute risk greater than 20 % or a relative risk greater than 4. Concerning breast and ovarian cancer, high risk patients include carriers of a constitutive deleterious mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, patients with a significant family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and patients who have been diagnosed a benign breast lesion with a high risk of degeneration, i.e. atypical hyperplasia. Following up such patients relies on specific strategies. A center including a large panel of physicians involved in the various modalities for patients' management (geneticians, radiologists, gynecologists, plastic surgeons, pathologists, endocrinologists, psychologists, medical oncologists) has been created at Tenon Hospital with this purpose. The collaboration of these different specialists with the referent physician of the patient allows for the definition and the implementation of a patient-centered follow-up continuously updated to take into account the different periods of a woman's life, according to best practices recommendations and the evolving state-of-the art.

  5. Communication and care in an acute cancer center: the effects of patients' willingness to communicate about health, health-care environment perceptions, and health status on information seeking, participation in care practices, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Frey, Lawrence R

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the role of willingness to communicate about health (WTCH) among older patients in a state-of-the-art cancer center. Specifically, relationships were examined between patients' WTCH and their information seeking, perceptions of coping activities the center offered, and satisfaction with the center. The study also explored how those relationships may be mediated by patients' perceptions of the health-care environment and their health status. The results indicated that WTCH may play an important role in predicting information-seeking behaviors, perceived helpfulness of center-sponsored activities, and overall satisfaction with care received at the center. Evidence also was found that perceptions of the health-care environment mediated cancer patients' WTCH. The implications of these findings for communication theory and application, as well as limitations and future directions for research, are discussed.

  6. Patient Engagement in Cancer Survivorship Care through mHealth: A Consumer-centered Review of Existing Mobile Applications

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yimin; Myneni, Sahiti

    2015-01-01

    With improvements in early detection and treatment, the number of cancer survivors has been on the rise. Studies suggest that cancer survivors do not often receive proper follow-up care despite existing guidelines. Patient engagement is key to healthy survivorship, and mHealth provides a viable platform to empower survivors with just- in-time personalized support. However, our understanding of existing mHealth solutions in cancer survivorship is limited. In this paper, we use Patient Engagement Framework to investigate existing apps to bridge this knowledge gap. App features are mapped to the framework components to determine the level of engagement facilitated. Ability to record treatment summaries has been found in five out of seven apps examined. While collaborative care and social engagement are found minimally, the majority of features (95%) are limited to information and way finding, e-tools, and interactive forms. Limitations of the existing apps and possible improvements to the framework are discussed. PMID:26958192

  7. Resistance prediction in AML: analysis of 4601 patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Othus, M; Burnett, A K; Löwenberg, B; Kantarjian, H M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Hills, R K; Ravandi, F; Pabst, T; Evans, A; Pierce, S R; Vekemans, M-C; Appelbaum, F R; Estey, E H

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients, where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in UK Medical Research Council/National Cancer Research Institute, Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology/Oncology/Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research, US cooperative group SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death ('primary refractoriness'). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival, was even more difficult. Our limited ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pretreatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and posttreatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML.

  8. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  9. Dietary fiber intake and subsequent risk of colorectal cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ishihara, Junko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2006-09-15

    Results on the association of dietary fiber intake with colorectal cancer risk were inconsistent among previous large prospective studies, but studies in non-Western populations are lacking. Consequently, the authors investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and the subsequent risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective cohort study of a Japanese population. Dietary fiber intake was estimated from food-frequency questionnaires comprising 44 or 52 items at the baseline survey and 138 food items at a 5-year follow-up survey. The authors identified 907 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed pathologically in 86,412 subjects during a 10-year follow-up from the baseline survey. After the 5-year follow-up survey, 522 cases were identified in 78,326 subjects during a 5.8-year follow-up. The authors estimated the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of colorectal cancer for dietary fiber intake using Cox's proportional hazards model. The authors found no statistically significant association between dietary fiber intake and colorectal cancer in analyses using data either from the baseline survey or from the 5-year follow-up survey. However, the risk of only the lowest quintile was high, compared with the second to the fifth quintiles. Furthermore, the lowest subtertile in the lowest quintile was associated with an increased risk in women (hazard ratio(Sub1 vs. Q5), 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-5.2). In conclusion, although a minor effect cannot be ruled out, the results did not support a hypothesis of a dose-dependent protective effect of dietary fiber intake against colorectal cancer.

  10. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  11. Investigation of the age trends in patients with breast cancer and different sizes of tumors in Breast Cancer Research Center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2001-2010

    PubMed Central

    Tazhibi, Mehdi; Dehkordi, Zahra Fazeli; Babazadeh, Shadi; Tabatabaeian, Maryam; Rezaei, Parisa; Faghihi, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women in the age range of 35-55 years. Each year, one or two cases of breast cancer per 1000 women are diagnosed as new cases. Despite the serious prognosis and high rate of morbidity, mortality, and pathogenicity, in the case of early diagnoses, the prognosis will be better. The aim of this study was to investigate the age trends in breast cancer patients with different sizes of tumors in Breast Cancer Research Center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2001-2010. Materials and Methods: The information in radiotherapy and oncology of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Milad Hospital from 2001 to 2010 were coded and analyzed. Frequency of patients’ age groups, tumor sizes and the year of cancer diagnosis were calculated. Correlation test was used for data analysis in statistical analysis in social science (SPSS) software version 18. Findings: Among the 3722 patients with breast cancer, the highest relative frequency distribution, respectively was observed in the age of 40-49 years (34.4%), 50-59 years (26.6%), 30-39 years (17.7%), 60-69 years (13.2%), 20-29 years (2.5%), 70 years and older (5.2%) and less than 20 years. Relative frequency distribution of tumor sizes in a variety of 5 cm (T2) was with the frequency of 59.8%, and then 26% at 5 cm (T3), 10.5% at 2 cm (T1), 3.1% at T4 and 0.6 at In-situ, respectively. Conclusion: The investigation of age trends showed that diagnosis rate of breast cancer increased from 2001 to 2004. It reached its highest value in 2006 at the age range of 30-39 years. Then, the trend has been downward, and it has continued to decline until 2010, which could be the result of the equipping screening system and recording the malignant cases. 85.8% of the examined tumors in T2 and T3 group were visible and may be disturbing. Comparing the frequency distribution of the infected population showed that the highest incidence of breast cancer diagnosis were in the

  12. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26023803

  13. How to select elderly colorectal cancer patients for surgery: a pilot study in an Italian academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Ugolini, Giampaolo; Pasini, Francesco; Ghignone, Federico; Zattoni, Davide; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Parlanti, Daniele; Montroni, Isacco

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cancer is one of the most common diagnoses in elderly patients. Of all types of abdominal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC) is undoubtedly the most frequent. Median age at diagnosis is approximately 70 years old worldwide. Due to the multiple comorbidities affecting elderly people, frailty evaluation is very important in order to avoid over- or under-treatment. This pilot study was designed to investigate the variables capable of predicting the long-term risk of mortality and living situation after surgery for CRC. Methods Patients with 70 years old and older undergoing elective surgery for CRC were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were preoperatively screened using 11 internationally-validated-frailty-assessment tests. The endpoints of the study were long-term mortality and living situation. The data were analyzed using univariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis to verify the predictive value of score indices in order to identify possible risk factors. Results Forty-six patients were studied. The median follow-up time after surgery was 4.6 years (range, 2.9-5.7 years) and no patients were lost to follow-up. The overall mortality rate was 39%. Four of the patients who survived (4/28, 14%) lost their functional autonomy. The preoperative impaired Timed Up and Go (TUG), Eastern Cooperative Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) scoring systems were significantly associated with increased long term mortality risk. Conclusion Simplified frailty-assessing tools should be routinely used in elderly cancer patients before treatment in order to stratify patient risk. The TUG, ECOG-PS, IADLs and VES-13 scoring systems are potentially able to predict long-term mortality and disability. Additional studies will be needed to confirm the preliminary data in order to improve management strategies for oncogeriatric surgical patients. PMID:26779367

  14. Fatigue and Quality of Life Outcomes of Palliative Care Consultation: A Prospective, Observational Study in a Tertiary Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Damani, Anuja; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms seen in patients with advanced cancer. It is known to influence the Quality of Life (QoL) of patients. This study examines the interrelationship of fatigue and QoL in patients with advanced cancer on palliative care. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted in the outpatient clinic of the Department of Palliative Medicine from January to June 2014. Patients with advanced cancer registered with hospital palliative care unit, meeting the inclusion criteria (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] ≤3, Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale [ESAS] fatigue score ≥1), and willing to participate in the study were assessed for symptom burden (ESAS) and QoL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL Core 15-Palliative module [EORTC-QoL PAL15]). All study patients received standard palliative care consultation and management. They were followed up in person or telephonically within 15–30 days from the first consult for assessment of outcomes. Results: Of a total of 500 cases assessed at baseline, 402 were available for follow-up (median age of 52 years; 51.6% male). On the EORTC-QoL PAL15 scale, overall QoL, emotional functioning, and constipation were found to be significantly associated with severity of fatigue at baseline (P < 0.05). Statistically significant improvement in fatigue score was observed (P < 0.001) at follow-up. Improvement in physical functioning and insomnia were significantly associated with better fatigue outcomes. Conclusions: Fatigue improved with the standard palliative care delivered at our specialty palliative care clinic. Certain clinical, biochemical factors and QoL aspects were associated with fatigue severity at baseline, improvement of which lead to lesser fatigue at follow-up. PMID:27803563

  15. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer.

  16. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arne; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert; Laws, Hans Jürgen; Voigt, Sebastian; Piening, Brar; Geffers, Christine; Agyeman, Philipp; Ammann, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI). Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85%) have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD). Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD-associated BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined. PMID:27274442

  17. Surgical management of breast cancer in China: A 15-year single-center retrospective study of 18,502 patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nai-Si; Liu, Meng-Ying; Chen, Jia-Jian; Yang, Ben-Long; Xue, Jing-Yan; Quan, Chen-Lian; Mo, Miao; Liu, Guang-Yu; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to review the surgical trends in breast cancer treatment in China over the past 15 years and to explore the possible factors related to the choice of surgical modality.The medical records of 18,502 patients with unilateral early stage breast cancer who underwent surgery from January 1999 to December 2013 at our institute were retrospectively reviewed. The utilization of different surgical modalities and the associated clinicopathological factors were analyzed. Furthermore, the prognostic role of surgical modality was also evaluated.The median patient age was 50.0 years. According to the pTNM staging system, 12.5% of the patients were classified as stage 0; 30.2% as stage I; 40.0% as stage II; and 17.3% as stage III. In total, 9.3% of the patients could not be staged. Overall, 67.1% of the breast cancer cases were estrogen receptor (ER) positive. The pattern of breast cancer surgery has changed tremendously over the past 15 years (P < 0.001). The pattern of mastectomy has shifted from radical mastectomy to modified radical mastectomy and simple mastectomy + sentinel lymph node biopsy. A total of 81.7% of the patients underwent mastectomy without immediate reconstruction, 15.2% underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS), and 3.7% received immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Age, TNM staging, and pathological characteristics greatly affected the choice of surgical modality. The 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates for the mastectomy, BCS, and reconstruction groups were 87.6%, 93.2%, and 91.7%, respectively (P < 0.001); the RFS rate was likely affected by distant recurrence instead of loco-regional recurrence. We also identified improved RFS over time, stratified by surgical modality and tumor stage. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis revealed that time of treatment, tumor stage, tumor grade, LVI status, and ER status were independent prognostic factors for RFS in our cohort, whereas surgical modality was not

  18. An Evaluation of Elderly Patients (≥70 years old) enrolled in Phase I Clinical Trials at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio-Cancer Therapy Research Center from 2009-2011

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Julie; Patel, Sukeshi; Mazo-Canola, Marcela; Parra, Alberto; Goros, Martin; Michalek, Joel; Kelly, Kevin; Weitman, Steve; Karnad, Anand

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Elderly patients with cancer are under-represented in clinical trials, and there is especially scant data on their participation in early-phase trials. In an effort to provide more data, we reviewed our Phase I experience. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 461 patients enrolled in Phase I clinical trials at the Cancer Therapy Research Center (CTRC) from 2009 to 2011 to determine the rate of completion of at least 12 weeks of treatment, incidence of adverse events, prevalence of co-morbidities, functional status, and survival. Elderly (E) was defined as ≥ 70 years; non-elderly (NE) was defined as ≤ 69 years. RESULTS: The elderly represented 15% (69/461) of enrolled patients. The most common malignancies were colon (20%), hematologic (18%), lung (15%), and breast (8%). The median age of E was 72 years (range 70-85, SD 3.15), and 49% of the E was female. Co-morbidities (E vs. NE) include diabetes (28% vs. 23%), hypertension (65% vs. 44%), and chronic kidney disease (91% vs. 48%). Thirty-two percent of E vs. 37% of NE completed at least 12 weeks of treatment. Reasons for not completing in E vs. NE respectively were progression of disease (43% vs. 61%), toxicity (28% vs. 9%), and self-withdrawal (11% vs. 7%). Reasons for not completing the protocol was significantly associated with being elderly (p=0.005). There were non-significant differences in toxicity in E vs. NE. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients have a higher likelihood of not completing trials for reasons including toxicity. This highlights the need for better Phase I trial-designs incorporating ideal geriatric assessment tools. PMID:24484720

  19. [The conflict between work and private life and its relationship with burnout - results of a physician survey in breast cancer centers in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, A; Driller, E; Kowalski, C; Ansmann, L; Pfaff, H

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the conflict between work and private life (work-life conflict and life-work conflict) and its relationship with burnout among physicians in breast cancer centers in North Rhine-Westphalia (n=378). With regard to the construct burnout, we differentiated between the 3 subscales emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment of the Maslach burnout inventory. In a structural equation model it was seen that above all the work-life conflict is positively associated with emotional exhaustion whereas the life-work conflict has a stronger positive correlation with depersonalisation and a negative relationship with personal accomplishment. Altogether, the results emphasise the importance of a successful interaction between professional work and private life ("work-life balance") for the health of medical personnel.

  20. Self-reported practice, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care of nurses in a Japanese Regional Cancer Center: longitudinal study after 1-year activity of palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Koji; Imura, Chizuru; Nanba, Miki; Fukumoto, Naoko; Itoh, Tomoko

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge and skill deficits about palliative care in medical professionals are among the most common barriers to quality palliative care. This study in a Japanese regional cancer center was conducted to clarify nurses' self-reported practices, confidence, and knowledge, and the changes in these parameters after the 1-year educational and clinical activity of a palliative care team. Questionnaires were distributed to 134 nurses before and after a palliative care team conducted 6-topic educational programs and clinical consultation activity throughout the year. The nurses were asked to report their practices, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care in 5 fields (pain, dyspnea, delirium, communication, and dying-phase). In some areas of palliative care, hospital nurses did not adhere to recommended practices, had knowledge deficits, and were not generally confident with palliative care practices. However, daily palliative care team activities, including educational programs and clinical consultation service, could improve their practice and knowledge levels.

  1. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  2. Targeted NGS, array-CGH, and patient-derived tumor xenografts for precision medicine in advanced breast cancer: a single-center prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Bertucci, François; Guille, Arnaud; Garnier, Severine; Adelaide, José; Carbuccia, Nadine; Cabaud, Oliver; Finetti, Pascal; Brunelle, Serge; Piana, Gilles; Tomassin-Piana, Jeanne; Paciencia, Maria; Lambaudie, Eric; Popovici, Cornel; Sabatier, Renaud; Tarpin, Carole; Provansal, Magali; Extra, Jean-Marc; Eisinger, François; Sobol, Hagay; Viens, Patrice; Lopez, Marc; Ginestier, Christophe; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine feasibility and clinical impact of genomics-based tumor profiling in advanced breast cancer (aBC) remains to be determined. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate whether precision medicine could be prospectively implemented for aBC patients in a single center and to examine whether patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) could be obtained in this population. Results Thirty-four aBC patients were included. Actionable targets were found in 28 patients (82%). A targeted therapy could be proposed to 22 patients (64%), either through a clinical trial (n=15) and/or using already registered drugs (n=21). Ten patients (29%) eventually received targeted treatment, 2 of them deriving clinical benefit. Of 22 patients subjected to mouse implantation, 10 had successful xenografting (45%), mostly in triple-negative aBC. Methods aBC patients accessible to tumor biopsy were prospectively enrolled at the Institut Paoli-Calmettes in the BC-BIO study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01521676). Genomic profiling was established by whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 365 candidate cancer genes. For a subset of patients, a sample of fresh tumor was orthotopically implanted in humanized cleared fat pads of NSG mice for establishing PDX. Conclusions Precision medicine can be implemented in a single center in the context of clinical practice and may allow genomic-driven treatment in approximately 30% of aBC patients. PDX may be obtained in a significant fraction of cases. PMID:27765906

  3. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  4. Impact of Clinical Pharmacy Services on KAP and QOL in Cancer Patients: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Huimin; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention (PI) on chemotherapy knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP) and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was carried out at Oncology Ward in a tertiary hospital affiliated to Southern Medical University, China. Eligible patient was randomly assigned to pharmaceutical intervention (PI) group or control group. Each patient in PI group was given information booklets and was given 30 min face-to-face medication education and psychological counseling by clinical pharmacists, 2 sessions per week for 2 months. Patients in control group only received conventional treatment. All participants were asked to complete a structured Chemotherapy KAP Questionnaire and QOL Questionnaire at pre- and poststudy time. A total of 149 cancer patients (77 in PI group and 72 in control group) completed the study. The baseline scores of KAP and QOL in 2 groups were similar. At the end of study, only knowledge score was significantly increased; meanwhile no difference existed for attitude, practice, and QOL scores in control group; both KAP scores and QOL score were significantly increased in PI group. As for the between-group comparison, both KAP scores and QOL score in PI group were significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, pharmaceutical intervention has a positive role in increasing chemotherapy-related knowledge, improving patients' positive emotions, dealing with chemotherapy adverse reactions, and improving the quality of life of patients. PMID:26697487

  5. The approaches in the care for terminal cancer patients in radiotherapy and oncology clinic, Rijeka University Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Redzović, Arnela; Perić, Jana; Petranović, Duska

    2013-04-01

    We sought to determine the proportion of our admitted patients in terminal phase of ilness who recieved some kind of active oncological therapy. We conducted a pilot study on the records of patients who died in the University Hospital. We assessed the percentage of mortality, a therapeutic approach in terms of treating the underlying disease, and access to palliative treatment. Of 2097 patients hospitalized in the UHC Rijeka Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology during 2010 and 2011, 44 pts died which accounts for 2.1%. The most common primary sites of cancer in patients who died in our Department were the lungs and then the breast. Ten (22.7%) patients were admitted exclusively to receive palliative care, while others (34-77.3%) were admitted for planned active chemo- and/or radiotherapy administration. Within three months before death, 18 (40.9%) patients underwent chemotherapy treatment. The number of patients hospitalized due to providing palliative care is extremely low, which could indicate a good supply of out-patient treatment of cancer patients in the terminal stage of the disease. However, concerned about the high percentage of patients who tried to provide oncology treatments in the three months before his death. The percentages referred to in their daily work is still guided by the principles of healing "to the end" and thus we plunge into the realm disthanasia.

  6. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  7. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-12-29

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  8. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer using the Clutch Cutter: a large single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Akahoshi, Kazuya; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kubokawa, Masaru; Gibo, Junya; Kinoshita, Nobukatsu; Osada, Shigeki; Tokumaru, Kayo; Hosokawa, Taizou; Tomoeda, Naru; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Mie; Oya, Masafumi; Koga, Hidenobu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The Clutch Cutter (CC) was developed to reduce the risk of complications related to endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using knives. The CC is able to grasp and coagulate and/or incise the targeted tissue using electrosurgical current, like a biopsy technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ESD using the CC (ESD-CC) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Patients and methods: From June 2007 to March 2014, 325 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of EGC were enrolled in this prospective study. They had all satisfied the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines for ESD indication, namely confirmation by preliminary endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic biopsies. The CC was used for all steps of ESD (marking, circumferential marginal incision, submucosal dissection, and hemostatic treatment). The therapeutic efficacy and safety were assessed. Results: The en-bloc resection rate was 99.7 % (324/325) and the R0 resection rate was 95.3 % (310/325). The mean operating time was 97.2 minutes. Perforation during ESD-CC occurred in one case (0.3 %), which was managed with conservative medical treatment after endoscopic closure of the perforation. Post-ESD-CC bleeding occurred in 11 cases (3.4 %), which were successfully treated by endoscopic hemostatic treatment. The R0 resection rate was significantly low in tumors > 20 mm (88.9 %), and in the exclusion indication group (73.7 %). Significant differences were seen in the mean operating time, depending upon tumor size, histologic type, location, and indication criteria. Conclusions: ESD-CC is a technically efficient, safe, and easy method for resecting EGC. PMID:26528497

  9. Integrative Oncology Physician Consultations at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Analysis of Demographic, Clinical and Patient Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gabriel; McQuade, Jennifer; Cohen, Lorenzo; Williams, Jane T; Spelman, Amy R; Fellman, Bryan; Li, Yisheng; Bruera, Eduardo; Lee, Richard T

    2017-01-01

    Background: Integrative oncology (IO) is a relatively new field that seeks to bring evidence-based, non-conventional approaches into conventional oncology care in a coordinated and safe manner. Though complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are highly utilized by cancer patients, little is known about the characteristics of patients seeking IO consultation. Methods: Patients presenting for an outpatient IO consultation completed a CAM use questionnaire, Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCaW), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Quality of Life Short Form 12 (SF-12), and post-consultation satisfaction item. Results: 2,474 new patient IO consultations were conducted from 9/2009 to 12/2013 and 2367 (96%) completed at least one measure. Most were female (69%); the most frequent cancer type was breast (29%); 38% had distant/advanced disease; 75% had used a CAM approach in prior 12 months. The most common concerns were seeking an integrative/holistic approach (34%), herbs/supplements (34%), and diet/nutrition (21%). Overall symptom burden was low, with baseline symptom scores (ESAS) highest (worst) for sleep (4.2; SD 2.8), fatigue (4.0; SD 2.8), and well-being (3.8; SD 2.6). On the SF-12, the physical health scores (35.3; SD 7.5) were significantly lower than that of a healthy population (50), but mental health scores were not (46.8; SD 10.2). Satisfaction was high (9.4; SD 1.3) with the consultation. Conclusions: Patients presenting for IO consultation tended to have early stage disease, had previously used a CAM approach, had a relatively low symptom burden, and were most interested in developing an integrative approach to their care or discussing herbs/supplement use.

  10. Integrative Oncology Physician Consultations at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Analysis of Demographic, Clinical and Patient Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gabriel; McQuade, Jennifer; Cohen, Lorenzo; Williams, Jane T; Spelman, Amy R; Fellman, Bryan; Li, Yisheng; Bruera, Eduardo; Lee, Richard T

    2017-01-01

    Background: Integrative oncology (IO) is a relatively new field that seeks to bring evidence-based, non-conventional approaches into conventional oncology care in a coordinated and safe manner. Though complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are highly utilized by cancer patients, little is known about the characteristics of patients seeking IO consultation. Methods: Patients presenting for an outpatient IO consultation completed a CAM use questionnaire, Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCaW), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Quality of Life Short Form 12 (SF-12), and post-consultation satisfaction item. Results: 2,474 new patient IO consultations were conducted from 9/2009 to 12/2013 and 2367 (96%) completed at least one measure. Most were female (69%); the most frequent cancer type was breast (29%); 38% had distant/advanced disease; 75% had used a CAM approach in prior 12 months. The most common concerns were seeking an integrative/holistic approach (34%), herbs/supplements (34%), and diet/nutrition (21%). Overall symptom burden was low, with baseline symptom scores (ESAS) highest (worst) for sleep (4.2; SD 2.8), fatigue (4.0; SD 2.8), and well-being (3.8; SD 2.6). On the SF-12, the physical health scores (35.3; SD 7.5) were significantly lower than that of a healthy population (50), but mental health scores were not (46.8; SD 10.2). Satisfaction was high (9.4; SD 1.3) with the consultation. Conclusions: Patients presenting for IO consultation tended to have early stage disease, had previously used a CAM approach, had a relatively low symptom burden, and were most interested in developing an integrative approach to their care or discussing herbs/supplement use. PMID:28261340

  11. Internal Audit of a Comprehensive IMRT Program for Prostate Cancer: A Model for Centers in Developing Countries?

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Wee Yao; Ren Wei; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Chung, Hans T.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: With improving regional prosperity, significant capital investments have been made to rapidly expand radiotherapy capacity across Southeast Asia. Yet little has been reported on the implementation of adequate quality assurance (QA) in patient management. The objective of this study is to perform an in-depth QA assessment of our definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) program for prostate cancer since its inception. Methods and Materials: The department's prostate IMRT program was modeled after that of University of California San Francisco. A departmental protocol consisting of radiotherapy volume/dose and hormone sequencing/duration and a set of 18 dose objectives to the target and critical organs were developed, and all plans were presented at the weekly departmental QA rounds. All patients treated with definitive IMRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Protocol adherence, dosimetry data, toxicities, and outcomes were evaluated. Results: Since 2005, 76 patients received IMRT: 54 with whole-pelvis and 22 with prostate-only treatment. Of the 1,140 recorded dosimetric end points, 39 (3.3%) did not meet the protocol criteria. At QA rounds, no plans required a revision. Only one major protocol violation was observed. Two and two cases of Grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities, respectively, were observed. Five (8.8%) patients developed proctitis, but only one required argon laser therapy. Conclusions: Our comprehensive, practice-adapted QA measures appeared to ensure that we were able to consistently generate conforming IMRT plans with acceptable toxicities. These measures can be easily integrated into other clinics contemplating on developing such a program.

  12. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center.

    PubMed

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics.

  13. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Shilnikova, Irina I.; Dmitrieva, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics. PMID:26798518

  14. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook ...

  15. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved both

  16. Spectrum of renal pathology in adult patients with congenital renal anomalies-a series from a tertiary cancer center.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Jasreman; Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Tim; Sexton, Wade J; Powsang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E

    2014-02-01

    Congenital renal anomalies (CRAs) detected in adults include horseshoe kidney (HK), crossed renal ectopia, and malrotation. Congenital renal anomalies are rare, and renal lesions associated with CRA are rarer. Thirteen patients (11 men and 2 women) were referred to our center with renal masses in the context of CRAs, which included HK (10 cases), crossed renal ectopia (2 cases), and a pelvic kidney (1 case). The mean age at diagnosis was 60 years (37-76 years). All patients were treated with open surgery; 10, partial nephrectomies; 4, radical nephrectomies; and 1, nephroureterectomy with division of the renal isthmus. Pathology ranged from benign (simple cortical cysts, chronic pyelonephritis with secondary hydronephrosis) to malignant (12 cases of renal cell carcinomas [RCCs] and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma). Two patients of HKs presented with bilateral renal masses. The size of the RCC ranged from 2.5 to 13 cm. There were 11 cases of clear cell RCC, 1 case of papillary RCC (type 1), and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma. All the cases of RCC had negative surgical margins. Follow-up available in all patients ranged from 1 month up to 49 months. None of the patients developed any locoregional recurrences or distant metastases. In this patient cohort, the most common congenital anomaly associated with RCC is HK. All tumors behaved in an indolent fashion with prognosis related to pathologic tumor stage. Partial nephrectomy is a safe and effective procedure in appropriately selected patients.

  17. Multivisceral resections for rectal cancers: short-term oncological and clinical outcomes from a tertiary-care center in India

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Jatal, Sudhir; Ostwal, Vikas; Engineer, Reena; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Bal, Munita

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced rectal cancers (LARCs) involve one or more of the adjacent organs in upto 10-20% patients. The cause of the adhesions may be inflammatory or neoplastic, and the exact causes cannot be determined pre- or intra-operatively. To achieve complete resection, partial or total mesorectal excision (TME) en bloc with the involved organs is essential. The primary objective of this study is to determine short-term oncological and clinical outcomes in these patients undergoing multivisceral resections (MVRs). Methods This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database. Between 1 July 2013 and 31 May 2015, all patients undergoing MVRs for adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified from this database. All patients who had en bloc resection of an adjacent organ or part of an adjacent organ were included. Those with unresectable metastatic disease after neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Results Fifty-four patients were included in the study. Median age of the patients was 43 years. Mucinous histology was detected in 29.6% patients, and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma was found in 24.1% patients. Neoadjuvant therapy was given in 83.4% patients. R0 resection was achieved in 87% patients. Five-year overall survival (OS) was 70% for the entire cohort of population. Conclusions In Indian subcontinent, MVRs in young patients with high proportion of signet ring cell adenocarcinomas based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of response assessment (MRI 2) is associated with similar circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement and similar adjacent organ involvement as the western patients who are older and surgery is being planned on MRI 1 (baseline pelvis). However, longer follow-up is needed to confirm noninferiority of oncological outcomes. PMID:27284465

  18. A large, single-center, real-world study of clinicopathological characteristics and treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yaxiong; Yan, Fang; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Yunpeng; Hong, Shaodong; Miao, Siyu; Wu, Manli; Huang, Xiaodan; Luo, Youli; Zhou, Cong; Gong, Run; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Ningning; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2017-04-04

    Crizotinib has achieved astonishing success in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. However, no real-world studies described the clinicopathological characteristics and treatment of such patients in China. Patients were consecutively collected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. Chi-square test was applied to explore the relationship between ALK fusion status and metastasis sites. Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable analyses were used to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 291 advanced NSCLC patients (ALK (+), N = 97; both ALK & epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (-), N = 194) were enrolled. The occurrence of brain metastasis in ALK-positive patients was significantly higher than double-negative ones both at baseline (26.5% vs. 16.5%, P = 0.038) and during treatment (25.8% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.003), but opposite for pleural effusion (6.2% vs. 26.9%, P < 0.001 at baseline; 3.1% vs. 10.3%, P = 0.031 during treatment). ALK-positive patients of 53.6% used crizotinib, whereas others only received chemotherapy (37.1%) or supportive care (9.3%). Usage of crizotinib prolonged PFS compared with chemotherapy in ALK-positive patients (median PFS 17.6 m vs. 4.8 m, P < 0.001). ALK-positive NSCLC had more brain metastasis and less pleural effusion than double-negative ones. Crizotinib showed better PFS than chemotherapy in advanced ALK-positive NSCLC at any line. However, half advanced ALK-positive patients never received crizotinib, which was grim and need improving.

  19. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Good, David; Lo, Joseph; Lee, W. Robert; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Bolus 5-Fluorouracil and L-Leucovorin as Salvage Chemotherapy for Oral Fluoropyrimidine-Resistant Unresectable or Recurrent Gastric Cancer: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Muranaka, Tetsuhito; Yuki, Satoshi; Sawada, Kentaro; Harada, Kazuaki; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakatsumi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The International Organization for Standardization-5fluorouracil (FU) 10 trial found that bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was not inferior to S-1 in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). Continuous 5-FU and the rapid injection of 5-FU have different anti-cancer effects. Thus, bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all patients with S-1 or capecitabine-resistant, unresectable, or recurrent GC treated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin between January 2010 and December 2015 at Hokkaido University Hospital. The bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin regimen consisted of intravenous l-leucovorin (250 mg/m2/2 h) and bolus 5-FU (600 mg/m2) administered once weekly followed by a 2-week rest period; each cycle was repeated every 8 weeks. Results A total of 14 patients were identified. The disease control rate was 35.7%. The median progression-free survival was 1.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3~2.0 months), and the median overall survival was 6.3 months (95% CI, 4.7~7.9 months). No patient died from treatment-related causes. The most common severe adverse event associated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was neutropenia, which occurred in 21.4% of patients. Conclusions Bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. We are planning a multi-center prospective phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment for pre-treated unresectable or recurrent GC to confirm the results of this limited, retrospective study. PMID:27752395

  1. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean; Lagarde, Philippe; Aupérin, Anne; Deschamps, Frédéric; Chomy, François; Baere, Thierry de

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression.

  2. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  3. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  4. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two kinds of lymphocytes can attack and kill cancer cells: T-cells and B-cells. Immunotherapy aims to boost the ability of the T-cell and B-cell lymphocytes to kill cancer. This kind of therapy can also be used ...

  5. Open-lung biopsy in patients with undiagnosed lung lesions referred at a tertiary cancer center is safe and reveals noncancerous, noninfectious entities as the most common diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, S P; Sampsonas, F L; Rice, D; Granger, J M; Swisher, S; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic yield of open-lung biopsies (OLBs) in a large tertiary cancer center to determine the role of infectious diseases as causes of undiagnosed pulmonary lesions. All consecutive adult patients with either single or multiple pulmonary nodules or masses who underwent a diagnostic OLB over a period of 10 years (1998-2007) were retrospectively identified. Their risk factors for malignancy and clinical and radiological characteristics were reviewed, and their postoperative complications were assessed. We evaluated 155 patients with a median age of 57 years (range, 19-83 years). We identified infectious etiologies in 29 patients (19 %). The most common diagnosis in this group was histoplasmosis (12 [41 %]), followed by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (7 [24 %]) and aspergillosis (4 [14 %]). The majority of the 126 remaining patients had nonmalignant diagnoses, the most prevalent being nonspecific granuloma (26 %), whereas only 17 % had malignant diagnoses. We observed no significant differences among the patients with infectious, malignant, or both noninfectious and nonmalignant final diagnoses regarding their demographic, laboratory, and clinical characteristics. Six percent of the patients had at least one post-OLB complication, and the post-OLB mortality rate was 1 %. OLB is a safe diagnostic procedure which frequently identifies a wide variety of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  6. Assessment of multi-contaminant exposure in a cancer treatment center: a 2-year monitoring of molds, mycotoxins, endotoxins, and glucans in bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Heutte, Natacha; André, Véronique; Dubos Arvis, Catherine; Bouchart, Valérie; Lemarié, Françoise; Legendre, Patrick; Votier, Edwige; Louis, Marie-Yolande; Madelaine, Stéphane; Séguin, Virginie; Gente, Stéphanie; Vérité, Philippe; Garon, David

    2017-01-01

    Indoor air quality in health care facilities is a major public health concern, particularly for immunocompromised patients who may be exposed to microbiological contaminants such as molds, mycotoxins, endotoxins, and (1,3)-ß-D-glucans. Over 2 years, bioaerosols were collected on a monthly basis in a cancer treatment center (Centre F. Baclesse, Normandy, France), characterized from areas where there was no any particular air treatment. Results showed the complexity of mycoflora in bioaerosols with more than 100 fungal species identified. A list of major strains in hospital environments could be put forward due to the frequency, the concentration level, and/or the capacity to produce mycotoxins in vitro: Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus melleus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium herbarum, Purpureocillium lilacinum, and Penicillium brevicompactum. The mean levels of viable airborne fungal particles were less than 30.530 CFU per m(3) of air and were correlated to the total number of 0.30 to 20 μm particles. Seasonal variations were observed with fungal particle peaks during the summer and autumn. Statistical analysis showed that airborne fungal particle levels depended on the relative humidity level which could be a useful indicator of fungal contamination. Finally, the exposure to airborne mycotoxins was very low (only 3 positive samples), and no mutagenic activity was found in bioaerosols. Nevertheless, some fungal strains such as Aspergillus versicolor or Penicillium brevicompactum showed toxigenic potential in vitro.

  7. Resistance Prediction in AML: Analysis of 4,601 Patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Othus, Megan; Burnett, Alan K.; Löwenberg, Bob; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Hills, Robert K.; Ravandi, Farhad; Pabst, Thomas; Evans, Anna; Pierce, Sherry R.; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4,601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in MRC/NCRI, HOVON, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death (“primary refractoriness”). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival (RFS), was even more difficult. Our ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pre-treatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and post-treatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML. PMID:25113226

  8. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  9. Center for the Advancement of Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... YouTube CFAH PARTNERS Alliance for Quality Psychosocial Cancer Care Kellogg Health Scholars Program KP Burch Leadership Program Diversity Data Place, Migration & Health Network * The Center for ...

  10. What Are the Key Statistics about Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer About Kidney Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Kidney Cancer? The American Cancer Society’s most ... by stage .” Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Vulvar Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer About Vulvar Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Vulvar Cancer? In the United States, vulvar ... this cancer. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  12. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weaken. Talk with family, friends, or a support group about your feelings. Work with your health care providers throughout your treatment. Helping yourself can make you feel more in control. Support Groups The diagnosis and treatment of cancer often causes ...

  13. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy: Rapid Selection of Tumor-Reactive T Cells based on Expression of Specific Cell Surface Markers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  14. A randomized multi-center phase II trial of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide (EMD 121974) and gemcitabine compared with gemcitabine alone in advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Helmut; Langrehr, Jan M; Oettle, Helmut; Raedle, Jochen; Niedergethmann, Marco; Dittrich, Christian; Hossfeld, Dieter K; Stöger, Herbert; Neyns, Bart; Herzog, Peter; Piedbois, Pascal; Dobrowolski, Frank; Scheithauer, Werner; Hawkins, Robert; Katz, Frieder; Balcke, Peter; Vermorken, Jan; van Belle, Simon; Davidson, Neville; Esteve, Albert Abad; Castellano, Daniel; Kleeff, Jörg; Tempia-Caliera, Adrien A; Kovar, Andreas; Nippgen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic treatment is believed to have at least cystostatic effects in highly vascularized tumours like pancreatic cancer. In this study, the treatment effects of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide and gemcitabine were compared with gemcitabine alone in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods A multi-national, open-label, controlled, randomized, parallel-group, phase II pilot study was conducted in 20 centers in 7 countries. Cilengitide was administered at 600 mg/m2 twice weekly for 4 weeks per cycle and gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 for 3 weeks followed by a week of rest per cycle. The planned treatment period was 6 four-week cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, quality of life (QoL), effects on biological markers of disease (CA 19.9) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor), and safety. An ancillary study investigated the pharmacokinetics of both drugs in a subset of patients. Results Eighty-nine patients were randomized. The median overall survival was 6.7 months for Cilengitide and gemcitabine and 7.7 months for gemcitabine alone. The median PFS times were 3.6 months and 3.8 months, respectively. The overall response rates were 17% and 14%, and the tumor growth control rates were 54% and 56%, respectively. Changes in the levels of CA 19.9 went in line with the clinical course of the disease, but no apparent relationships were seen with the biological markers of angiogenesis. QoL and safety evaluations were comparable between treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic studies showed no influence of gemcitabine on the pharmacokinetic parameters of Cilengitide and vice versa. Conclusion There were no clinically important differences observed regarding efficacy, safety and QoL between the groups. The observations lay in the range of other clinical studies in this setting. The

  15. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports,...

  16. How Effective Are Clinical Pathways With and Without Online Peer-Review? An Analysis of Bone Metastases Pathway in a Large, Integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Flickinger, John C.; Rakfal, Susan M.; Rodgers, Edwin; Heron, Dwight E.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Clinical pathways are an important tool used to manage the quality in health care by standardizing processes. This study evaluated the impact of the implementation of a peer-reviewed clinical pathway in a large, integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network. Methods: In 2003, we implemented a clinical pathway for the management of bone metastases with palliative radiation therapy. In 2009, we required the entry of management decisions into an online tool that records pathway choices. The pathway specified 1 or 5 fractions for symptomatic bone metastases with the option of 10-14 fractions for certain clinical situations. The data were obtained from 13 integrated sites (3 central academic, 10 community locations) from 2003 through 2010. Results: In this study, 7905 sites were treated with 64% of courses delivered in community practice and 36% in academic locations. Academic practices were more likely than community practices to treat with 1-5 fractions (63% vs. 23%; p < 0.0001). The number of delivered fractions decreased gradually from 2003 to 2010 for both academic and community practices (p < 0.0001); however, greater numbers of fractions were selected more often in community practices (p < 0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that a significantly greater selection of 1-5 fractions developed after implementation online pathway monitoring (2009) with an odds ratio of 1.2 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.4) for community and 1.3 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) for academic practices. The mean number of fractions also decreased after online peer review from 6.3 to 6.0 for academic (p = 0.07) and 9.4 to 9.0 for community practices (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to examine the efficacy of a clinical pathway for radiation oncology in an integrated cancer network. Clinical pathway implementation appears to be effective in changing patterns of care, particularly with online clinical

  17. Analysis of outcomes and prognostic factors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated by MCP841 protocol: A regional cancer center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Kalwar, Ashok; Kumar, Narender; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Beniwal, Surender; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A dramatic improvement in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients in the last three decades has been observed. MCP 841 protocol is an old but effective tool with tolerable toxicities. The objective of this study was to estimate the relapse-free survival of ALL patients treated uniformly with MCP 841 protocol on the basis of various prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: The study design was retrospective and it was conducted in a regional cancer center of Northwest India. Three hundred and ten ALL patients who underwent treatment with MCP 841 protocol and regular follow-up for up to 5 years were selected for this study. Relapse-free survival was calculated by Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazards ratio (HR) using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for windows version 20.0. Results: Fifty-four percent patients were <15 years of age and 69% were males. 53.2% patients were in remission at the end of 5 years of starting the treatment. Relapse-free survival at 5 years by Kaplan–Meir analysis for B-cell ALL was 62% [HR 0.67 {95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.95}] with patients with unknown lineage taken as reference] while for T cell it was 28% [HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.19-1.63), P 0.001]. Patients with total leukocyte count (TLC) <1 lakh/cmm at presentation, relapse-free survival was 68% and those with TLC >1 lakh/cmm had 41% survival [HR 2.14 (1.76-2.48) with, P < 0.001]. Conclusion: MCP 841 protocol is a useful tool for the treatment of ALL in children when more aggressive protocols can not be used. PMID:27904561

  18. Recommendations for the implementation of distress screening programs in cancer centers: report from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS), Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) joint task force.

    PubMed

    Pirl, William F; Fann, Jesse R; Greer, Joseph A; Braun, Ilana; Deshields, Teresa; Fulcher, Caryl; Harvey, Elizabeth; Holland, Jimmie; Kennedy, Vicki; Lazenby, Mark; Wagner, Lynne; Underhill, Meghan; Walker, Deborah K; Zabora, James; Zebrack, Bradley; Bardwell, Wayne A

    2014-10-01

    In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation. A joint task force from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society, the Association of Oncology Social Work, and the Oncology Nursing Society developed consensus-based recommendations to guide the implementation of this requirement. In this review, the authors provide recommendations regarding each of the 6 components necessary to meet the ACoS standard: 1) inclusion of psychosocial representation on the cancer committee, 2) timing of screening, 3) method/mode of screening, 4) tools for screening, 5) assessment and referral, and 6) documentation.

  19. Real life cancer comorbidity in Greek patients with diabetes mellitus followed up at a single diabetes center: an unappreciated new diabetes complication.

    PubMed

    Thanopoulou, Anastasia; Pectasides, Demetrios

    2014-01-01

    We determined cancer comorbidity in patients with diabetes followed up at a single Greek academic clinic and investigated the potential related factors. Cancer comorbidity was prospectively recorded for all patients with type 2 (T2DM, n = 759) or type 1 (T1DM, n = 134) diabetes of at least 10-year duration examined during one year. Patient characteristics, diabetes age of onset, duration, treatment, control, and complication rates were compared between subjects with and without cancer. Moreover, a retrospective collection of data from similar patients examined for the first time during the last 25 years, but lost to follow-up, after at least one-year's regular visits, was performed. In regularly followed-up T2DM patients cancer comorbidity was 12.6%. Patients with cancer were older and more frequently smokers. Prostate cancer was the most frequent (24.0%) type. In T1DM cancer comorbidity was 3.0%. Similar rates of comorbidity and types of cancer were observed in lost to follow-up patients. In conclusion, our patients with T2DM of at least 10-year' duration show high cancer comorbidity. No specific characteristics discriminate patients with cancer. Therefore presymptomatic cancer detection and prevention strategies may have to be incorporated into the annual systematic evaluation of our patients.

  20. Breast Cancer Center Support Grant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    Freedman M, Steiler Artz D, Hogge J, Zuurbier RA, Jafroudi H, Lo S-CB, Mun SK. An ROC Study of Screen Film Mammography and Storage Phosphor Digital...began to recruit patients in July. Six patients have received the treatment. Wenchi and Jenny Crawford (the research nurse) will check and make sure

  1. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  2. Superusers in Social Networks for Smoking Cessation: Analysis of Demographic Characteristics and Posting Behavior From the Canadian Cancer Society's Smokers' Helpline Online and StopSmokingCenter.net

    PubMed Central

    Voci, Sabrina; Lee, Sharon; Fournier, Rachel; Selby, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Online social networks are popular components of behavior-change websites. Research has identified the participation of certain network members who assume leadership roles by providing support, advice, and direction to other members. In the literature, these individuals have been variously defined as key players, posters, active users, or caretakers. Despite their identification, very little research has been conducted on the contributions or demographic characteristics of this population. For this study, we collectively categorized key players, posters, active users, and caretakers as superusers. Objectives To analyze data from two large but distinct Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATI) to help gain insight into superuser demographic characteristics and how they use social networks. Methods We extracted cross-sectional data sets containing posting behaviors and demographic characteristics from a free, publicly funded program (the Canadian Cancer Society’s Smokers’ Helpline Online: SHO), and a free, privately run program (StopSmokingCenter.net: SSC). Results Within the reporting period (SHO: June 26, 2008 to October 12, 2010; SSC: May 17, 2007 to October 12, 2010), 21,128 individuals registered for the SHO and 11,418 registered for the SSC. Within the same period, 1670 (7.90%) registrants made at least one post in the SHO social network, and 1627 (14.25%) registrants made at least one post in the SSC social network. SHO and SSC superusers accounted for 0.4% (n = 95) and 1.1% (n = 124) of all registrants, and 5.7% (95/1670) and 7.62% (124/1627) of all social network participants, and contributed to 34.78% (29,422/84,599) and 46.22% (61,820/133,753) of social network content, respectively. Despite vast differences in promotion and group management rules, and contrary to the beliefs of group moderators, there were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics between the two superuser groups. Conclusions To our knowledge

  3. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma with Doxorubicin in Patients Progressing after Paclitaxel/Carboplatin: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience from 1995-2009

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Hensley, Martee L.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Aghajanian, Carol. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Long-term survival for patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma is poor, and limited options exist for the management of recurrent disease. Our goal was to investigate the activity of doxorubicin in the second-line setting in patients who progressed after paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma who were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-2009, and who received paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy followed by second-line doxorubicin therapy at time of recurrence. The median PFS and OS times following paclitaxel/carboplatin and following second-line doxorubicin therapy were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed by the treating physician at each visit and graded using version 4.0 of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient presentation, treatment, patterns of recurrence, and patient outcomes were summarized. Results Seventeen patients were included in study analyses. The median PFS from completion of paclitaxel/carboplatin was 8.0 months (95% CI: 4.5-13.6 months). At the time of recurrence, all 17 patients were treated with doxorubicin as second-line therapy. No patient achieved objective response of stable disease. The median PFS of this cohort following doxorubicin treatment was 2.1 months (95% CI: 0.95-2.7) months. Median OS was 5.8 months (95% CI: 1.0-15.0 months). There is only one patient still alive; her median follow-up time is 49.4 months. Predominant doxorubicin-related grade 2 toxicities included nausea/vomiting (18.8%), fatigue (18.8%), and neutropenia (12.5%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred. Conclusions Among patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma who had received adjuvant paclitaxel/carboplatin, treatment with doxorubicin at time of disease recurrence failed to achieve any objective responses and was associated with a very short (2 months) time to

  4. Long-term Outcomes and Quality of Life of 186 Patients With Primary Parotid Carcinoma Treated With Surgery and Radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Rooij, Peter van; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) of patients with primary parotid carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2010, 186 patients with parotid carcinoma were treated with parotidectomy with or without neck dissection, followed by radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) was applied to high-risk, node-negative disease. End points were locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS), late toxicity, and QOL. Results: After a median follow-up of 58 months (range, 4-172 months), the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for LRC, DFS, CSS, and OS were 89%, 83%, 80%, and 68%, respectively. Forty-five events were reported: 24 distant metastases (DM) and 21 locoregional failures (LRF). Event-free survival rates by histological types were 89%, 78%, 76%, 74%, and 70% for acinic cell, mucoepidermoid, adenoid cystic, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. More LRF were reported in patients with squamous cell and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma (21% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other histological types (p = 0.04) and more DM in patients with adenoid cystic and adenocarcinoma (20% and 19%, respectively) than in patients with other types (p = 0.03). None of the high-risk node-negative patients who received ENI developed regional failure. On multivariate analysis, T stage, N stage, grade, and presence of perineural invasion and facial paralysis correlated significantly with DFS. The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 8%. QOL scores deteriorate during and shortly after treatment but returned in almost all scales to baseline scores within 6 months. Conclusions: Of the entire group, surgery and postoperative radiotherapy resulted in excellent outcomes with minimal side effects and preservation of good QOL scores. However, in

  5. An Organizational Informatics Analysis of Colorectal, Breast, and Cervical Cancer Screening Clinical Decision Support and Information Systems within Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Timothy Jay

    2012-01-01

    A study design has been developed that employs a dual modeling approach to identify factors associated with facility-level cancer screening improvement and how this is mediated by the use of clinical decision support. This dual modeling approach combines principles of (1) Health Informatics, (2) Cancer Prevention and Control, (3) Health Services…

  6. 77 FR 35573 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... tissues (sarcomas) Malignant neoplasms of the skin (melanoma and non-melanoma), including scrotal cancer... and lymphoid tissues (including, but not limited to, lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma) Childhood... oral cavity, and pharynx; 4. Soft tissue sarcomas; 5. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers,...

  7. Menstrual and reproductive factors in the risk of thyroid cancer in Japanese women: the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangah; Sawada, Norie; Saito, Eiko; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-01-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between menstrual and reproductive factors and thyroid cancer risk among Japanese women. A total 54 776 women aged 40-69 years completed a self-administered questionnaire, which included menstrual and reproductive history. During 1990-2012, 187 newly diagnosed cases of thyroid cancer were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for menstrual and reproductive factors and incidence of thyroid cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Postmenopausal women who had natural menopause were at reduced risk of thyroid cancer than premenopausal women in the age-area-adjusted model (HR: 0.62 per 1 year increase, 95% CI: 0.39-0.99), but this association was slightly attenuated and no longer statistically significant in the multivariable-adjusted model. On analysis by menopausal status, an inverse association between age at menarche and risk of thyroid cancer was observed for premenopausal women (HR: 0.83 per 1 year increase, 95% CI: 0.70-0.98, P trend=0.03), but not for postmenopausal women. The risk of thyroid cancer increased with surgical menopause compared with natural menopause (HR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.43-3.84). Although increasing age at menopause and duration of fertility were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, this association was not observed among postmenopausal women. This study confirmed that early age at menarche for premenopausal women and surgical menopause and late age at natural menopause for postmenopausal women were associated with the development of thyroid cancer. Our results support the hypothesis that exposure to estrogens increases the risk of thyroid cancer.

  8. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  9. Cruciferous Vegetable Intake Is Inversely Associated with Lung Cancer Risk among Current Nonsmoking Men in the Japan Public Health Center Study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nagisa; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Nozue, Miho; Mutoh, Michihiro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Inoue, Manami; Takachi, Ribeka; Sunami, Ayaka; Ishihara, Junko; Sobue, Tomotaka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-04-05

    Background: Cruciferous vegetables, a rich source of isothiocyanates, have been reported to lower the risk of several types of cancer, including lung cancer. However, evidence from prospective observations of populations with a relatively high intake of cruciferous vegetables is sparse.Objective: We investigated the association between cruciferous vegetable intake and lung cancer risk in a large-scale population-based prospective study in Japan.Methods: We studied 82,330 participants (38,663 men; 43,667 women) aged 45-74 y without a past history of cancer. Participants were asked to respond to a validated questionnaire that included 138 food items. The association between cruciferous vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence was assessed with the use of Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate HRs and 95% CIs (with adjustments for potential confounding factors).Results: After 14.9 y of follow-up, a total of 1499 participants (1087 men; 412 women) were diagnosed with lung cancer. After deleting early-diagnosed cancer and adjusting for confounding factors, we observed a nonsignificant inverse trend between cruciferous vegetable intake and lung cancer risk in men in the highest compared with the lowest quartiles (multivariate HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.69, 1.06; P-trend = 0.13). Stratified analysis by smoking status revealed a significant inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and lung cancer risk among those who were never smokers and those who were past smokers after deleting lung cancer cases in the first 3 y of follow-up [multivariate HR for never smokers: 0.49 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.87; P-trend = 0.04); multivariate HR for past smokers: 0.59 (95% CI: 0.35, 0.99; P-trend = 0.10)]. No association was noted in men who were current smokers and women who were never smokers.Conclusion: This study suggests that cruciferous vegetable intake may be associated with a reduction in lung cancer risk among men who are currently nonsmokers.

  10. [Gynecology-obstetrics at the Yalgado-Ouédraogo (Ouagadougou) National Hospital Center. Cancer of the cervix uteri: epidemio-clinical and anatomopathologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Lankoandé, J; Sakandé, B; Ouédraogo, A; Ouédraogo, C M; Ouattara, T; Bonané, B; Koné, B

    1997-01-01

    We report the findings of a 3-year retrospective study aimed at describing the epidemiological, clinical, anatomical and pathological profile of cervical cancers in an African country. We studied 46 cases of invasive cervical cancer. This type of cancer accounts for 31.7% of female genital cancers. The mean waiting time for a consultation was 7 +/- 2.4 months. The average age of the patients was 48 +/- 3.7 years. They were mostly women who had had several pregnancies without paid work. The main reasons for seeking medical help were metrorrhagia (95.6%), pelvic pain (58.7%) and purulent discharge (45.6%). In 89.1% of the cases, the cancer was inoperable. Pathology results were available in 37 cases. We found 36 cases (97.3%) of epidermoid carcinoma and a single case (2.7%) of adenocarcinoma. There were associated condylomatous lesions in 21.6% of cases. These results demonstrate the importance of making cervical smear tests a routine part of medical examination and of making the public aware of the importance of screening for cervical cancer.

  11. Hyperthermia for treating cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors without surgery. Other types help radiation or chemotherapy work better. Only a few cancer centers in the ... as though they have a fever. This helps chemotherapy work better to treat cancer that has spread (metastasized). ...

  12. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  14. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  15. Recent progress in carcinogenesis, progression and management of upper GI cancer: the 21st Hiroshima Cancer Seminar--the 5th Three Universities' Consortium International Symposium, 6 November 2011, International Conference Center Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Wataru; Ito, Hisao; Peek, Richard; Tahara, Eiichi

    2012-04-01

    The 21st Hiroshima Cancer Seminar focused on recent progress of carcinogenesis, progression and management of upper gastrointestinal cancers. β-Catenin and p120 mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ-dependent proliferation induced by Helicobacter pylori in gastric epithelia. Helicobacter pylori CagA plays an important role in stomach carcinogenesis via altered signal transduction and cell polarity by interactions with several host proteins. Inflammation caused by H. pylori infection is responsible for inducing aberrant DNA methylation. The gastric gland mucin-specific αGlcNAc plays dual roles in preventing gastric cancer, inhibition of H. pylori infection and suppression of tumor-promoting inflammation. Information obtained from transcriptome dissection greatly contributes to understanding the molecular character of each mucin phenotype of gastric cancer. The standardized biomarkers will serve as good predictive and prognostic markers for gastric cancer. A microRNA expression profile may be useful for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells may provide an advantageous microenvironment for re-acquisition of stemness of gastric cancer cells. Recent progress in molecular biology research has enabled the clinical development of molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer, such as trastuzumab. The target molecule-based inhibition of the stromal reaction in the microenvironment may hold promise as an effective anti-tumor therapy. Since robotic surgery is feasible and safe, and provides adequate and precise lymph node dissection, it may be one of the good options for gastric cancer in the near future.

  16. Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The patient shown is undergoing cancer radiation treatment in a hospital-like atmosphere but he is not in a hospital. The treatment room is at NASA's Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. It is a converted portion of the Center's cyclotron facility, originally designed for radiation studies related to nuclear propulsion for aircraft and spacecraft. Under an agreement between the Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the 50 million volt cyclotron is now being used to evaluate the effectiveness of "fast neutron" therapy in the treatment of cancerous tumors.

  17. Training and mobility: a priority for the Organisation of the European Cancer Institutes. How a national mobility initiative could enhance EU cooperation in cancer research contributing to the development of an European Research Area: the example of The Italian Comprehensive Cancer Centers' Network "Alleanza Contro il Cancro".

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Claudio; Albanese, Daniela; Belardelli, Filippo; d'Alessandro, Francesca; Giacomini, Mauro; Rondanina, Tania; Spagnoli, Luigi G

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that productivity gains, sustained economic growth and employment are largely determined by technological progress, innovation and human capital. The 2000 Lisbon strategy to make Europe a competitive knowledge-based economy by 2010 and, more specifically, the Barcelona objectives agreed upon in 2002 to increase R&D investment in the EU to approach 3% of GDP, ensuring that there are sufficient human resources for research, are a preliminary step in this direction. If we want to reach this goal we have to succeed in retaining the best researchers, creating the right environment where they can perform their activities and develop their careers. To this aim the Organization of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) has set up a working group on Education and Training with the mandate to encourage continuing education in cancer research and applications and to verify the feasibility to promote mobility programs inside the network and in association with industries. Until now only few OECI training programs have been launched and a full mobility program has not been developed yet due to limited budget resources. The Italian Network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers, Alleanza Contro il Cancro, has planned the launch of a mobility program awarding 70 annual fellowships over a period of 36 months. This program, which will be open to the world research community, could represent a first interaction through mobility among the members of the OECI network also involving industries. The program is a tangible approach to sustain the translational process needed for the development of an European Research Area in the field of cancer and its related biomedical disciplines, thus providing a practical answer to the 2005 renewed Lisbon Strategy.

  18. Fish, n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and n - 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids intake and breast cancer risk: The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kiyabu, Grace Y; Inoue, Manami; Saito, Eiko; Abe, Sarah K; Sawada, Norie; Ishihara, Junko; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shibuya, Kenji; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-12-15

    Limited and inconsistent studies exist on the association between the intake of fish, n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and n - 6 PUFA and breast cancer. Fish and n - 3 PUFA support various body functions and are thought to reduce the carcinogenesis risk while n - 6 PUFA may have a positive association with cancer risk. We examined the association between intake of fish, n - 3 PUFA [including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)] and n - 6 PUFA and breast cancer with subanalyses on estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. We investigated 38,234 Japanese women aged 45-74 years from the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study (JPHC study), and during 14.1 years of follow-up time, 556 breast cancer cases were newly diagnosed. Breast cancer risk was not associated with the intake of total fish, n - 3 PUFA and n - 6 PUFA when analyzed in totality through multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models with age as the time scale. Intake of total n - 6 was positively associated with the development of ER+PR+ tumors [multivariable-adjusted HR Q4 vs. Q1  = 2.94 (95% CI: 1.26-6.89; ptrend  = 0.02)]. Intake of EPA was associated with a decreased breast cancer risk for ER+PR+ tumors [multivariable-adjusted HR Q2 vs. Q1  = 0.47 (95% CI: 0.25-0.89; ptrend =0.47)]. While the overall association between the intake of total fish, n - 3 PUFA and n - 6 PUFA and breast cancer risk is null, for ER+PR+ tumors, a positive association was seen between n - 6 intake and breast cancer, and a marginally significant inverse association was observed for EPA intake.

  19. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... consortium of three translational research centers studying the origins and pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes and decreasing the burden of the disease. One center is studying the genetic basis of ...

  20. Risk of bladder cancer among patients with diabetes treated with a 15 mg pioglitazone dose in Korea: a multi-center retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Song, Sun Ok; Jung, Chang Hee; Chang, Jin-Sun; Suh, Sunghwan; Kang, Seung Min; Jung, Inkyung; Park, Cheol-Young; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2014-02-01

    It has not yet been determined whether chronic exposure to relatively low doses of pioglitazone increases risk of bladder cancer. We aimed to assess the risk of bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone in Korean patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of diabetic patients who had ≥ 2 clinic visits between November 2005 and June 2011 at one of four tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort was conducted to further adjust confounders. A total of 101,953 control patients and 11,240 pioglitazone-treated patients were included, in which there were 237 and 30 cases of incidental bladder cancer (64.9 and 54.9 per 100,000 person-years; age, sex-adjusted HR 1.135, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.769-1.677), respectively. In the prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort, use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months, but not ever use of pioglitazone, was associated with an increased rate of bladder cancer as compared to never use of pioglitazone. In conclusion, we failed to exclude the possible association between use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months and bladder cancer.

  1. Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children with cancer: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Tragiannidis, Athanasios; Gombakis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Hatzistilianou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating early or late complication of treatment for childhood cancer related with a significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied survivors of childhood cancer. Overall, 287 patients were recorded in the databases and we identified three (1.04%) with t-MDS. The primary cancer diagnoses were Langerhans cell histiocytosis (one patient) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; two patients). The mean age of patients was 12.1 years. All patients had received systemic antifungal treatment for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis successfully treated with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B before diagnosis of t-MDS. Two patients (66%) remain alive after a median follow-up period of 3.5 years.

  2. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4–5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented. PMID:25060862

  3. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4-5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M Ángela; Melero, Ignacio; Quetglas, José I

    2014-07-24

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented.

  4. 76 FR 44598 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Member Conflict: Cancer Therapy. Date....gov . Name of Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Member Conflict:...

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Node Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastases From Unknown Head-and-Neck Primary Site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Garden, Adam S.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional therapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown primary can cause considerable toxicity owing to the volume of tissues to be irradiated. In the present study, hypothesizing that using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) would provide effective treatment with minimal toxicity, we reviewed the outcomes and patterns of failure for head-and-neck unknown primary cancer at a single tertiary cancer center. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 52 patients who had undergone IMRT for an unknown primary at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1998 and 2005. The patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the survival rates calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 52 patients, 5 presented with Stage N1, 11 with Stage N2a, 23 with Stage N2b, 6 with Stage N2c, 4 with Stage N3, and 3 with Stage Nx disease. A total of 26 patients had undergone neck dissection, 13 before and 13 after IMRT; 14 patients had undergone excisional biopsy and presented for IMRT without evidence of disease. Finally, 14 patients had received systemic chemotherapy. All patients underwent IMRT to targets on both sides of the neck and pharyngeal axis. The median follow-up time for the surviving patients was 3.7 years. The 5-year actuarial rate of primary mucosal tumor control and regional control was 98% and 94%, respectively. Only 3 patients developed distant metastasis with locoregional control. The 5-year actuarial disease-free and overall survival rate was 88% and 89%, respectively. The most severe toxicity was Grade 3 dysphagia/esophageal stricture, experienced by 2 patients. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that IMRT can produce excellent outcomes for patients who present with cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown head-and-neck primary tumor. Severe late complications were uncommon.

  6. Resolve to Reduce Your Cancer Risk This Year

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the American Cancer Society. Doctors at Philadelphia's Fox Chase Cancer Center offer some advice to help ... t use tanning beds or sun lamps. SOURCE: Fox Chase Cancer Center, news release HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  7. "Cancer Cell Biology:" A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. "Cancer Cell Biology," an interactive, multimedia,…

  8. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... on, and advocacy for, wiser health care and science policy. In addition to her leadership role at The Hastings Center, she is a professor at Harvard Medical School, where she directs the school’s Fellowship in Bioethics, a program that ...

  9. Predicting pneumonia mortality using CURB-65, PSI, and patient characteristics in patients presenting to the emergency department of a comprehensive cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carmen; Johnson, Tami; Rolston, Kenneth; Merriman, Kelly; Warneke, Carla; Evans, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic accuracy of the CURB-65 criteria and pneumonia severity index (PSI) in immunocompromised cancer patients with pneumonia is unknown. We sought to determine whether CURB-65 and PSI predict 28-day mortality in cancer patients with pneumonia, and identify other factors that predispose cancer patients with pneumonia to a high mortality risk. We assessed sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, and areas under the receiver operating curve area under the curve (AUC) of the CURB-65 and PSI in predicting the 28-day mortality of cancer patients presenting to our institution's emergency department with pneumonia. We used the DeLong and Clarke–Pearson approach to determine whether the addition of other risk factors improved the scales' performances. The overall and pneumonia-related 28-day mortality rates were 20.2% (n = 44) and 17.4% (n = 38), respectively. In predicting 28-day mortality, the CURB-65 score had sensitivity of 45% and specificity of 81%, and the PSI score had sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 34%. The CURB-65 and PSI discriminated poorly between fatal and nonfatal pneumonia cases (AUCs, 0.664 and 0.658, respectively; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57–0.75 for each). The addition of radiation therapy (RT) within 4 weeks and stem cell transplant (SCT) significantly improved the AUCs of the CURB-65 (0.75; 95% CI, 0.67–0.83) and PSI (0.73; 95% CI, 0.65-0.82). Inadequate performances of CURB-65 and PSI demonstrate that a tool for predicting pneumonia-related mortality in cancer patients and other immunocompromised populations is needed. Pneumonia patients who have undergone recent RT or (SCT) are at a high risk of dying from pneumonia and require special consideration when assessing pneumonia-related mortality risk. PMID:24802800

  10. Recent progress in carcinogenesis, progression and therapy of breast cancer: the 20th Hiroshima Cancer Seminar--the 4th Three Universities' Consortium International Symposium, October 2010: 31 October 2010, International Conference Center Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Toi, Masakazu; Yasui, Wataru; Ito, Hisao; Tahara, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    The 20th Hiroshima Cancer seminar focused upon breast cancer research and treatment particularly on the mechanism of tumorigenesis and drug resistance and development of novel therapeutics. Several molecules such as retinoblastoma and p16 were raised as key factors in tumorigenesis and invasiveness. Estrogen-related pathways seem to be closely involved in the process. For the tumor lacking hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2, some other mechanisms could be responsible. It seems that MicroRNA 22 directing some putative targets such as SIRT1, Sp1 and CDK6 plays a crucial role in breast tumor growth and metastasis. In addition, ribophorin and the associated molecules might be engaged in breast cancer stemness. Obviously, these molecules provide potential for therapeutic targets. It was also discussed about new drug development such as anti-human epidermal growth factor 2 therapy, anti-angiogenesis, pro-tumor aspects of anti-cancer therapy and application of circulating markers for monitoring, imaging and health-care system. Furthermore, we discussed risk factors, prevention and screening to reduce invasive cancers as well. Throughout the conference, panelists and attendee indicated the importance of translational research and biomarker exploration in order to realize efficient and individualized therapy for breast cancer.

  11. 78 FR 66020 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis; Panel Person-Centered Outcomes Research Resource... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower;......

  12. 75 FR 33817 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer......

  13. 76 FR 44021 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ....392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of......

  14. 75 FR 64734 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer......

  15. Can Nasopharyngeal Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook ...

  16. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook ...

  17. Does hyperthermic intraoperative chemotherapy lead to improved outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer? A single center cohort study in 111 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For recurrent disease or primary therapy of advanced ovarian cancer, cytoreductive surgery (CRS) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy is a therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer treated with hyperthermic intraoperative chemotherapy (HIPEC) and completeness of cytoreduction (CC). Methods Data were retrospectively collected from 111 patients with recurrent or primary ovarian cancer operated with the contribution of visceral surgical oncologists between 1991 and 2006 in a tertiary referral hospital. Results Ninety patients received CRS and 21 patients CRS plus HIPEC with cisplatin. Patients with complete cytoreduction (CC0) were more likely to receive HIPEC. Overall, 19 of 21 patients (90.5 %) with HIPEC and 33 of 90 patients (36.7 %) with CRS had a complete cytoreduction (P < 0.001). Incomplete cytoreduction was associated with worse survival rates with a hazard ratio (HR) of 4.4 (95%CI: 2.3-8.4) for CC1/2 and 6.0 (95%CI: 2.9-12.3) for CC3 (P < 0.001). In a Cox-regression limited to 52 patients with CC0 a systemic concomitant chemotherapy (HR 0.3, 95%CI: 0.1-0.96, P = 0.046) but not HIPEC (HR 0.98 with 95 % CI 0.32 to 2.97, P = 0.967) improved survival. Two patients (9.5 %) developed severe renal failure after HIPEC with absolute cisplatin dosages of 90 and 95 mg. Conclusions Completeness of cytoreduction was proved to be crucial for long-term outcome. HIPEC procedures in ovarian cancer should be performed in clinical trials to compare CRS, HIPEC and systemic chemotherapy against CRS with systemic chemotherapy. Concerning the safety of HIPEC with cisplatin, the risk of persistent renal failure must be considered when dosage is based on body surface. PMID:22709648

  18. Antibiotic Treatment in End-of-Life Cancer Patients—A Retrospective Observational Study at a Palliative Care Center in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Helde-Frankling, Maria; Bergqvist, Jenny; Bergman, Peter; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to elucidate whether palliative cancer patients benefit from antibiotic treatment in the last two weeks of life when an infection is suspected. Method: We reviewed medical records from 160 deceased palliative cancer patients that had been included in previous studies on vitamin D and infections. Patients treated with antibiotics during the last two weeks of life were identified and net effects of treatment (symptom relief) and possible adverse events were extracted from medical records. Results: Seventy-nine patients (49%) had been treated with antibiotics during the last two weeks in life. In 37% (n = 29), the treatment resulted in evident symptom relief and among these 50% had a positive bacterial culture, 43% had a negative culture and in 7% no culture was taken. Among the patients with no or unknown effect of antibiotics, 50% had a positive culture. When the indication for antibiotic treatment was to avoid or treat sepsis, symptom relief was achieved in 50% of the patients (n = 19). Only 4% (n = 3) of the patients experienced adverse events of the treatment (diarrhea, nausea). Conclusions: Treating infections with antibiotics in the last weeks of life may improve the quality of life for palliative cancer patients, especially if sepsis is suspected or confirmed. According to our results, the beneficial effects outweigh the potentially negative outcomes. PMID:27608043

  19. Similar Treatment Outcomes for Radical Cystectomy and Radical Radiotherapy in Invasive Bladder Cancer Treated at a United Kingdom Specialist Treatment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Sanjeev; Choudhury, Ananya; Johnston, Colin; Paul, Alan B.; Whelan, Peter; Kiltie, Anne E.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective analysis within a large university teaching hospital, comparing outcomes between patients receiving either radical surgery or radiotherapy as curative treatment for bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Between March 1996 and December 2000, 169 patients were treated radically for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Data were collected from patient notes. Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare radiotherapy and surgical outcome data. Results: There was no difference in overall, cause-specific, and distant recurrence-free survival at 5 years between the two groups, despite the radiotherapy group being older (median age, 75.3 years vs. 68.2 years). There were 31 local bladder recurrences in the radiotherapy group (24 solitary), but there was no significant difference in distant recurrence-free survival. In a more recent (2002-2006) cohort, the median age of radiotherapy patients but not the cystectomy patients was higher than in the 1996-2000 cohort (78.4 years vs. 75.3 years for radiotherapy and 67.9 years vs. 68.2 years for surgery). Conclusions: Although the patients undergoing radical cystectomy were significantly younger than the radiotherapy patients, treatment modality did not influence survival. Bladder cancer patients are an increasingly elderly group. Radical radiotherapy is a viable treatment option for these patients, with the advantage of organ preservation.

  20. Can T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI predict clinically occult inflammatory breast cancer before pathological examination? A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Watanabe, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Occult inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is defined as an invasive cancer without any clinical inflammatory signs but with pathologically proven dermal lymphovascular invasion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of 3-T breast MRI to predict occult IBC before pathological examination and compare its effectiveness with that of mammography (MMG) and ultrasound (US). A retrospective review of clinical, radiological, and pathological records of 460 consecutive breast cancers revealed five proved occult IBCs. We analyzed the findings of 3-T MRI, MMG, and US for these five occult IBCs. Primary breast lesions were detected by 3-T MRI, MMG, and US in all five breasts with occult IBCs. 3-T MRI revealed 40% mass type lesions and 60% non-mass-like type lesions. Kinetic curve analysis of the primary breast lesions showed a rapid initial kinetic phase in 80% of lesions and a delayed washout pattern in 60% of lesions. 3-T MRI showed slight skin thickness in 60% of breasts, whereas MMG and US showed slight skin thickness in 40 and 20% of breasts, respectively. Subcutaneous and prepectoral edema, as evaluated on T2-weighted images, was present in all five breasts with occult IBCs. The presence of subcutaneous and prepectoral edema on T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI is an important finding that should suggest the diagnosis of occult IBC before pathological examination.

  1. Short-Term Outcomes and Safety of Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Solitary Adrenal Metastasis from Lung Cancer: A Multi-Center Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Men, Min; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Kaixian; Bi, Jingwang; Yang, Xia; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. Materials and Methods From May 2010 to April 2014, 31 patients with unilateral adrenal metastasis from lung cancer who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous MWA were enrolled. This study was conducted with approval from local Institutional Review Board. Clinical outcomes and complications of MWA were assessed. Results Their tumors ranged from 1.5 to 5.4 cm in diameter. After a median follow-up period of 11.1 months, primary efficacy rate was 90.3% (28/31). Local tumor progression was detected in 7 (22.6%) of 31 cases. Their median overall survival time was 12 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 44.3%. Median local tumor progression-free survival time was 9 months. Local tumor progression-free survival rate was 77.4%. Of 36 MWA sessions, two (5.6%) had major complications (hypertensive crisis). Conclusion CT-guided percutaneous MWA may be fairly safe and effective for treating solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. PMID:27833402

  2. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPCPH). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INSTPH) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. Materials and methods CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPCPH and INSTPH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Results Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPCPH and INSTPH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. Conclusions IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INSTPH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPCPH and INSTPH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies. PMID:24885438

  3. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  4. Once-Daily OROS Hydromorphone for Management of Cancer Pain: an Open-Label, Multi-Center, Non-Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Extended-release osmotic extended-release oral delivery system (OROS) hydromorphone is a strong synthetic opioid designed to maintain a constant blood concentration by once daily dosing. The objective of this observational study was to investigate the clinical usefulness of OROS hydromorphone in patients with cancer pain of moderate to severe intensity. Patients with cancer pain who required strong opioids were administered with OROS hydromorphone for 4 weeks. We assessed changes in pain intensity using a numerical rating scale (NRS) as well as levels of sleep disturbance, breakthrough pain, end-of-dose failure, patient satisfaction, and overall assessment of drug effectiveness based on investigator evaluation. Of the 648 enrolled patients, 553 patients were included in the full analysis set. The mean pain intensity was significantly decreased from the NRS value of 5.07 ± 1.99 to 2.75 ± 1.94 (mean % change of 42.13 ± 46.53, P < 0.001). The degree of sleep disturbance significantly improved (mean NRS change of 1.61 ± 2.57, P < 0.001), and the incidence of breakthrough pain was significantly decreased (mean NRS change of 1.22 ± 2.30, P < 0.001). The experience of end-of-dose failure also significantly decreased from 4.60 ± 1.75 to 3.93 ± 1.70, P = 0.007). The patient satisfaction rate was 72.7%, and 72.9% of investigators evaluated the study drug as effective. OROS hydromorphone was an effective and tolerable agent for cancer pain management. It effectively lowered pain intensity as well as improved sleep disturbance, breakthrough pain, and end-of-dose failure (Identifier: NCT 01273454). PMID:27822929

  5. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence

  6. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively

  7. An Information Retrieval System for Computerized Patient Records in the Context of a Daily Hospital Practice: the Example of the Léon Bérard Cancer Center (France)

    PubMed Central

    Biron, P.; Metzger, M.H.; Pezet, C.; Sebban, C.; Barthuet, E.; Durand, T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background A full-text search tool was introduced into the daily practice of Léon Bérard Center (France), a health care facility devoted to treatment of cancer. This tool was integrated into the hospital information system by the IT department having been granted full autonomy to improve the system. Objectives To describe the development and various uses of a tool for full-text search of computerized patient records. Methods The technology is based on Solr, an open-source search engine. It is a web-based application that processes HTTP requests and returns HTTP responses. A data processing pipeline that retrieves data from different repositories, normalizes, cleans and publishes it to Solr, was integrated in the information system of the Leon Bérard center. The IT department developed also user interfaces to allow users to access the search engine within the computerized medical record of the patient. Results From January to May 2013, 500 queries were launched per month by an average of 140 different users. Several usages of the tool were described, as follows: medical management of patients, medical research, and improving the traceability of medical care in medical records. The sensitivity of the tool for detecting the medical records of patients diagnosed with both breast cancer and diabetes was 83.0%, and its positive predictive value was 48.7% (gold standard: manual screening by a clinical research assistant). Conclusion The project demonstrates that the introduction of full-text-search tools allowed practitioners to use unstructured medical information for various purposes. PMID:24734133

  8. Management of high-output chylous ascites after D2-lymphadenectomy in patients with gastric cancer: a multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Uygar; Alemdar, Ali; Ureyen, Orhan; Eryavuz, Yavuz; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to propose treatment strategies for high-output chylous ascites (CA) developed after gastric cancer surgery. Methods The data of patients with CA after gastric cancer surgery in three high volume Training and Research Hospitals between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Results Nine patients out of 436 gastrectomies were detected with CA. The mean amount of daily fistula output was 939 mL. Treatment consisted of cessation of oral feeding, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), somatostatin analogs administration, clamping and/or removal of the drainage tube, diuretic administration and diet therapy with medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) alone or in combination. The mean fistula closure time and length of hospital stay were 23 and 24 days respectively. Hemopneumothorax developed during right subclavian vein catheterisation for TPN implementation in one patient. There was no mortality. Conclusions Combined cessation of oral feeding and TPN are usually used for treatment of CA as first-line treatment. However, TPN is no harmless. Although our data are limited they do allow us to conclude that diet with MCT’s may use for medical treatment of CA as first-line. PMID:27284475

  9. Somatic mutation of EZH2 (Y641) in follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of germinal center origin | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Morin et al. describe recurrent somatic mutations in EZH2, a polycomb group oncogene. The mutation, found in the SET domain of this gene encoding a histone methyltransferase, is found only in a subset of lymphoma samples. Specifically, EZH2 mutations are found in about 12% of follicular lymphomas (FL) and almost 23% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) of germinal center origin. This paper goes on to demonstrate that altered EZH2 proteins, corresponding to the most frequent mutations found in human lymphomas, have reduced activity using in vitro histone methylation assays.

  10. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cell Line Panel | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project is to use siRNA screens to identify NSCLC-selective siRNAs from two genome-wide libraries that will allow us to functionally define genetic dependencies of subtypes of NSCLC. Using bioinformatics tools, the CTD2 center at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are discovering associations between this functional data (siRNAs) and NSCLC mutational status, methylation arrays, gene expression arrays, and copy number variation data that will help us identify new targets and enrollment biomarkers. 

  11. Cancer Detection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ratcom, Inc., has joined NASA Johnson Space Center in an active program to develop cytometry capabilities for space station freedom. This agreement results from a cooperative program that NASA entered into with the American Cancer Society to aid in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The flow cytometer is used by cancer researchers to make cellular measurements.

  12. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hans T. Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives {>=}45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans.

  13. 76 FR 5595 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Member Conflict: Immunology. Date: February... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Etiology. Date: February 28, 2011... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed...

  14. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  15. Superiority of lymph node ratio-based staging system for prognostic prediction in 2575 patients with gastric cancer: validation analysis in a large single center

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lu-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Wei-Han; Chen, Xin-Zu; Yang, Kun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Yi-Gao; Xue, Lian; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of node ratio (Nr), the ratio of metastatic to retrieved lymph nodes, and to investigate whether a modified staging system based on Nr can improve prognostic ability for gastric cancer patients following gastrectomy. A total of 2572 patients were randomly divided into training set and validation set, and the cutoff points for Nr were produced using X-tile. The relationships between Nr and other clinicopathologic factors were analyzed, while survival prognostic discriminatory ability and accuracy were compared among different staging systems by AIC and C-index in R program. Patients were categorized into four groups as follows: Nr0, Nr1: 0.00–0.15, Nr2: 0.15–0.40 and Nr3: > 0.40. Nr was significantly associated with clinicopathologic factors including macroscopic type, tumor differentiation, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, tumor size, T stage, N stage and TNM stage. Besides, for all patients, Nr and TNrM staging system showed a smaller AIC and a larger C-index than that of N and TNM staging system, respectively. Moreover, in subgroup analysis for patients with retrieved lymph nodes < 15, Nr was demonstrated to have a smaller AIC and a larger C-index than N staging system. Furthermore, in validation analysis, Nr, categorized by our cutoff points, showed a larger C-index and a smaller AIC value than those produced in previous studies. Nr could be considered as a reliable prognostic factor, even in patients with insufficient (< 15) retrieved lymph nodes, and TNrM staging system may improve the prognostic discriminatory ability and accuracy for gastric cancer patients undergoing radical gastrectomy. PMID:27363014

  16. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  17. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  18. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers ...

  19. 75 FR 3240 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  20. 76 FR 17930 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  1. 75 FR 71134 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November...

  2. 78 FR 41939 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  3. 78 FR 12766 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  4. 75 FR 14173 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ....393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March...

  5. 78 FR 27411 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ....393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 6,...

  6. Is exposure to Agent Orange a risk factor for hepatocellular cancer?—A single-center retrospective study in the U.S. veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Hazratjee, Nyla; Opris, Dan; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Markert, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% to 35% of those with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) related cirrhosis will develop hepatocellular cancer (HCC). With this burden increasing across the globe, identification of risk factors for HCC has become imperative. Exposure to Agent Orange has been implicated as a possible risk factor for liver cancer in a study from the Republic of Korea. However, there has been no study in U.S. veterans with CHC and cirrhosis that has evaluated exposure to Agent Orange as a risk factor for HCC. We conducted a retrospective study of U.S. military veterans diagnosed with CHC and cirrhosis over a period of 14 years to evaluate potential risk factors for HCC including exposure to Agent Orange. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 390 patients with confirmed CHC-related cirrhosis between 2000 and 2013 and identified patients with HCC. We compared demographic, laboratory, and other clinical characteristics of patients with and without HCC. Results The mean age of the cohort was 51 years (SD =7.5), with the majority being male (98.5%). Seventy-nine of 390 (20.2%) patients developed HCC, diagnosed on average 8 (SD =4.8) years after diagnosis of CHC. Nearly half (49.4%) were Childs A, 40.5% were Childs B, and 10.1% were Childs C. HCC patients were more likely to be African American than non-HCC patients (40.5% vs. 25.4%, P=0.009) and to be addicted to alcohol (86.1% vs. 74.3%, P=0.027). A trend toward significance was seen in the HCC group for exposure to Agent Orange (16.5% vs. 10.0%, P=0.10) and smoking addiction (88.6% vs. 80.7%, P=0.10). Consequently, race, alcohol addiction, Agent Orange exposure, and smoking addiction were included in the multivariable logistic regression (MLR) analysis. Alcohol addiction [odds ratio (OR) =2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07–4.43] and African American race (OR =2.07; 95% CI, 1.22–3.51) were found to be the only two definitive independent risk factors for HCC in our sample. Conclusions African American race and

  7. The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center: a unique resource for defining the "molecular histology" of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Mark E; Figueroa, Jonine D; Henry, Jill E; Clare, Susan E; Rufenbarger, Connie; Storniolo, Anna Maria

    2012-04-01

    "Molecular histology" of the breast may be conceptualized as encompassing the normative ranges of histologic structure and marker expression in normal breast tissues in relation to a woman's age and life experiences. Studies of molecular histology can aid our understanding of early events in breast carcinogenesis and provide data for comparison with diseased breast tissues. Until recently, lack of epidemiologically annotated, optimally prepared normal breast tissues obtained from healthy women presented a barrier to breast cancer research. The Komen Tissue Bank at Indiana University (Indianapolis, IN) is a unique biorepository that was developed to overcome this limitation. The Bank enrolls healthy donors who provide questionnaire data, blood, and up to four breast biopsies, which are prepared as both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and frozen tissues. The resource is accessible to researchers worldwide through a proposal submission, review, and approval process. As of November 2010, the Bank had collected specimens and information from 1,174 donors. In this review, we discuss the importance of studying normal breast tissues, assess the strengths and limitations of studying normal tissues obtained from different sources, and summarize the features of the Komen Tissue Bank. As research projects are completed, results will be posted on the Bank's website.

  8. Treatment of breast cancer patients from a public healthcare system in a private center: costs of care for a pilot public-private partnership in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Bognar, Cinthia Leite Frizzera Borges; Santos, Kelly Cristine Carvalho; Bromberg, Sílvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório; Karnakis, Theodora; Chen, Michael; de Andrade, Cláudia Toledo; Dantas, Joacira; Escobosa, Daísa de Mesquita; Giglio, Auro Del

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the flow and costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of patients with breast cancer who come from the public healthcare system and were treated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Methods: Between August 2009, and December 2011, 51 patients referred by the Unified Public Healthcare System (SUS) had access to Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein for diagnostic radiology, medical oncology, radiotherapy, and oncologic/ breast reconstruction surgery. The data were collected retrospectively from the hospital records, patient charts, pharmacy records, and from the hospital billing system. Results: The total sum spent for diagnosis and treatment of these 51 patients was US$ 1,457,500.00. This value encompassed expenses with a total of 85 hospitalizations, 2,875 outpatient visits, 16 emergency room visits, and all expenses associated with these stays at the hospital. The expenditure for treatment of each patient submitted to biopsy, breast conserving surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy without trastuzumab (a regime with taxane followed by anthracycline), radiotherapy, and 5 years of tamoxifen was approximately US$ 25,500.00. Conclusion: Strategies for cost-reduction of treatment in the private setting are necessary to enable future large-scale public-private partnerships in oncology. PMID:23843064

  9. HPV in Head and Neck Cancer-30 Years of History.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina; Rautava, Jaana; Syrjänen, Kari

    The interesting history of papillomavirus (PV) research has been reviewed before. The history of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck region starts in 1901 when the contagious transmission of warty lesions into the mouth via oral sex was described, although the confirmation of their viral etiology had to wait until 1907. Ullman was the first to associate the human wart virus with laryngeal warts. Parsons and Kidd described the natural history of oral PV infections in rabbits already in 1942, but these findings were corroborated in humans only recently. Koilocytotic atypia described by Koss and Durfee in 1956 was recognized as a sign of HPV infection in cervical precancer lesions only in 1976-1977 (Meisels and Fortin; Purola and Savia). This prompted systematic surveys of head and neck lesions for the detection of koilocytosis since the late 1970s, and the authors of this communication were the first to propose the HPV involvement in a subgroup of head and neck cancers. Brandsma and Abramson demonstrated HPV16 DNA in tonsillar SCCs in 1989. Since the early 2000s, HPV research of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) has made impressive progress, confirming that the specific anatomic site plays a key role in determining the susceptibility to HPV infection. The most likely cancer sites associated with HPV are the base of the tongue and palatine tonsils, followed by oral cavity, larynx, and sinonasal mucosa. There is substantial geographic variation in HPV association with HNSCC. Patients with HPV-associated HNSCC are younger, and survival is better than in the absence of HPV.

  10. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  11. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  12. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  13. Comparisons of vaginal and abdominal radical trachelectomy for early-stage cervical cancer: preliminary results of a multi-center research in China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, D Y; Yang, J X; Wu, X H; Chen, Y L; Li, L; Liu, K J; Cui, M H; Xie, X; Wu, Y M; Kong, B H; Zhu, G H; Xiang, Y; Lang, J H; Shen, K

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are limited data comparing the prognosis and fertility outcomes of the patients with early cervical cancer treated by trans-vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT) or abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART).The objective of this study was to compare the surgical and pathologic characteristics, the prognosis and fertility outcomes of the patients treated by VRT or ART. Methods: Matched-case study based on a prospectively maintained database of patients underwent radical trachelectomy in 10 centres of China was designed to compare the prognosis and fertility outcomes of the patients treated by VRT or ART. Results: Totally 150 cases, 77 in the VRT and 73 in the ART group, were included. VRT and ART provide similar surgical and pathological outcomes except larger specimens obtained by ART. In the ART group, no patient developed recurrent diseases, but, in the VRT group, 7 (9.8%) patients developed recurrent diseases and 2 (1.6%) patients died of the tumours (P=0.035). The rate of pregnancy in the VRT group was significantly higher than those of ART (39.5% vs 8.8% P=0.003). The patients with tumour size >2 cm showed significant higher recurrent rate (11.6% vs 2.4%, P<0.05) and lower pregnant rate (12.5% vs 32.1%, P=0.094) compared with the patients with tumour size <2 cm. Conclusion: Patients treated by ART obtained better oncology results, but their fertility outcomes were unfavourable compared with VRT. Tumour size <2 cm should be emphasised as an indication for radical trachelectomy for improving the outcome of fertility and prognosis. PMID:24169350

  14. Prognostic Value of Lymph Node Ratio in Patients Receiving Combined Surgical Resection for Gastric Cancer Liver Metastasis: Results from Two National Centers in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Xing; Jin, Zheng-Xiong; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ying, Jian-Ming; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Mao, Xin-Xin; Bi, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Ye-Fan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xu-Hui; Hu, Han-Jie; Zhao, Dong-Bing; Wang, Ying-Yi; Cai, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with gastric cancer liver metastasis (GCLM) who received combined surgical resection. A retrospective analysis of 46 patients from two hospitals was conducted. Patients were dichotomized into two groups (high LNR and low LNR) by the median value of LNR. The overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to carry out the subsequent multivariate analyses. And the relationship between LNR and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. The cut-off value defining elevated LNR was 0.347. With a median follow-up of 67.5 months, the median OS and RFS of the patients were 17 and 9.5 months, respectively. Six patients survived for >5 years after surgery. Patients with higher LNR had significantly shorter OS and RFS than those with lower LNR. In the multivariate analyses, higher LNR and multiple liver metastatic tumors were identified as the independent prognostic factors for both OS and RFS. Elevated LNR was significantly associated with advanced pN stage (P <0.001), larger primary tumor size (P = 0.046), the presence of microvascular invasion (P = 0.008), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.004). LNR may be prognostic indicator for patients with GCLM treated by synchronous surgical resection. Patients with lower LNR and single liver metastasis may gain more survival benefits from the surgical resection. Further prospective studies with reasonable study design are warranted. PMID:27100426

  15. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  16. Efficacy of Cabazitaxel Treatment in Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer in Second and Later Lines. An Experience from Two German Centers

    PubMed Central

    Zschäbitz, Stefanie; Vallet, Sonia; Hadaschik, Boris; Debatin, Daniel; Fuxius, Stefan; Karcher, Andreas; Pahernik, Sascha; Spath, Cathleen; Duensing, Stefan; Jäger, Dirk; Hohenfellner, Markus; Grüllich, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Several new treatment options for patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have been approved within the last years - among them cabazitaxel (CAB), abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223. The aim of this study was to assess factors predictive for efficacy of CAB. Methods: We analyzed all patients with mCRPC treated with CAB at our institutions between 2011 and 2016. Data were retrieved retrospectively from the electronical patient chart. Results: 69 patients received CAB (26.1% 2nd line, 36.2% 3rd line, 37.3% >3rd line). Median overall survival (OS) on CAB was 10.0 months (95%CI 7.1-12.9). Median progression free survival (PFS) on CAB was 3.9 months (95%CI 3.0-4.8). There were no differences in OS and PFS regarding treatment line of CAB (2nd vs. higher; 2nd/3rd vs. higher). Duration of remission on 1st line treatment (> 6 months vs.

  17. Predictive Parameters of CyberKnife Fiducial-less (XSight Lung) Applicability for Treatment of Early Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Vu, Toni; Doucet, Robert; Béliveau Nadeau, Dominic; Fortin, Bernard; Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Carrier, Jean-François; Filion, Edith

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ≥1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ≥80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.

  18. Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Patients with Advanced Penile Cancer Receiving Salvage (2nd or Later Line) Systemic Treatment: A Retrospective, Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Pond, Gregory; Cartenì, Giacomo; Scagliarini, Sarah; Rozzi, Antonio; Quevedo, Fernando J.; Dorff, Tanya; Nappi, Lucia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Pagliaro, Lance; Eigl, Bernhard J.; Naik, Gurudatta; Ferro, Matteo; Galdiero, Mariano; De Placido, Sabino; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: Metastatic penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is associated with dismal outcomes with median overall survival (OS) of 6–12 months in the first-line and <6 months in the salvage setting. Given the rarity of this disease, randomized trials are difficult. Prognostic risk models may assist in rational drug development by comparing observed outcomes in nonrandomized phase II studies and retrospective data vs. predicted outcomes based on baseline prognostic factors in the context of historically used agents. In this retrospective study, we constructed a prognostic model in the salvage setting of PSCC patients receiving second or later line systemic treatment, and also explored differences in outcomes based on type of treatment. Materials and methods: We performed a chart review to identify patients with locally advanced unresectable or metastatic PSCC who received second or later line systemic treatment in centers from North America and Europe. The primary outcome was OS from initiation of treatment, with secondary outcomes being progression-free survival (PFS) and response rate (RR). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify prognostic factors for outcomes using univariable and multivariable models. Results: Sixty-five patients were eligible. Seventeen of 63 evaluable patients had a response (27.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.6–39.7%) and median OS and PFS were 20 (95% CI = 20–21) and 12 (95% CI = 12, 16) weeks, respectively. Visceral metastasis (VM) and hemoglobin (Hb) ≤ 10 gm/dl were consistently significant poor prognostic factors for both OS and PFS, and Hb was also prognostic for response. The 28 patients with neither risk factor had a median OS (95% CI) of 24 (20–40) weeks and 1-year (95% CI) OS of 13.7% (4.4–42.7%), while the 37 patients with 1 or 2 risk factors had median OS (95% CI) of 20 (16–20) weeks and 1-year (95% CI) OS of 6.7% (1.8–24

  19. Hormonal Drug Boosts Survival After Prostate Cancer's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kutikov, an associate professor of urologic oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. For one, Kutikov ... Alexander Kutikov, M.D., associate professor, urologic oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia; Ashutosh Tewari, M.D., ...

  20. 76 FR 5182 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, PAR09-160,161,162: Cancer Health Disparities and Diversity in Basic Cancer Research. Date: March 1, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review....gov . Name of Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Cancer Diagnostics...

  1. Center of excellence in laser medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Achievements during the first six months of funding to prepare for a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include limited specific research projects within the Center's three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas -- new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics, and photosensitization, is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are an optimized laser-catheter system for reversal of vasospasm; optical detection of major skin burn depth and cancers using fluorescent drugs, and photosensitization of vascular tissues. In addition, an interdepartmental Laser Center was established at MGH to enhance collaborations and institutional committment to the Center of Excellence. Competitive postdoctoral research fellowships, with provision for matching funds from other departments, have been announced.

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  3. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  4. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  5. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  6. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  7. Advances in Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    will be scheduled in Q3 2010 Agustin Garcia, MD University of Southern California / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center 1441 Eastlake Avenue Los...A 6 6 Agustin Garcia, MD USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center • Q3 Approval by DoD Expected • June -- December Accrual Anticipated at 12

  8. 77 FR 31628 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ..., zouzhiq@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Preclinical... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support;...

  9. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  10. 77 FR 20831 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and ] Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  11. 78 FR 20118 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Biology and Therapy. Date: April...

  12. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  13. Prime Contractors | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    2015-2018 Efficacy and Intermediate Endpoint Biomarkers: The Research Institute of Fox Chase Cancer Center SRI International IIT Research Institute University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical College of Wisconsin University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Weill Medical College of Cornell University Toxicology and Pharmacology Testing: SRI International Southern Research Institute |

  14. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  15. Could a Computer Someday Guide Breast Cancer Care?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of doctors at a top cancer hospital in India, researchers say. In cases involving more complex cancers, ... of the Manipal Comprehensive Cancer Center in Bengaluru, India. The program then lists possible treatments in three ...

  16. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Probing DNA Damage and Repair Networks by Synthetic Lethal Screening. Date: April... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer...

  17. SU-E-T-529: Is MFO-IMPT Robust Enough for the Treatment of Head and Neck Tumors? A 2-Year Outcome Analysis Following Proton Therapy On the First 50 Oropharynx Patients at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S; Garden, A; Anderson, M; Rosenthal, D; Morrison, W; Gunn, B; Fuller, C; Phan, J; Zhang, X; Poenisch, F; Wu, R; Li, H; Gautam, A; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Zhu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-field optimization intensity modulated proton therapy (MFO-IMPT) for oropharyngeal tumors has been established using robust planning, robust analysis, and robust optimization techniques. While there are inherent uncertainties in proton therapy treatment planning and delivery, outcome reporting are important to validate the proton treatment process. The purpose of this study is to report the first 50 oropharyngeal tumor patients treated de-novo at a single institution with MFO-IMPT. Methods: The data from the first 50 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 2011 to December 2014 on a prospective IRB approved protocol were analyzed. Outcomes were analyzed to include local, regional, and distant treatment failures. Acute and late toxicities were analyzed by CTCAE v4.0. Results: All patients were treated with definitive intent. The median follow-up time of the 50 patients was 25 months. Patients by gender were male (84%) and female (16%). The average age was 61 years. 50% of patients were never smokers and 4% were current smokers. Presentation by stage; I–1, II–0, III– 9, IVA–37 (74%), IVB–3. 88% of patients were HPV/p16+. Patients were treated to 66–70 CGE. One local failure was reported at 13 months following treatment. One neck failure was reported at 12 months. 94% of patients were alive with no evidence of disease. One patient died without evidence of disease. There were no Grade 4 or Grade 5 toxicities. Conclusion: MFO-IMPT for oropharyngeal tumors is robust and provides excellent outcomes 2 years after treatment. A randomized trial is underway to determine if proton therapy will reduce chronic late toxicities of IMRT.

  18. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Cancer.gov

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  19. Are Certified Breast Centers Cost-Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bani, Mayada R.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Schrauder, Michael G.; Wagner, Stefanie; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Summary The German health care system has entered an era of specialist centers and certification. Hospitals are required to introduce quality management with external monitoring, refining and improving their quality of treatment. These statutory requirements can only be met through specialization, centralization, and establishing centers and networks with internal and external interdisciplinary collaboration. The breast centers certified according to the criteria of the German Cancer Society (DKG) and German Society for Mastology (DGS) are pioneers here. Simultaneously, there are increasing demands for more cost-effective medical services despite limited resources – making economic analysis of health care provision necessary. Few economic studies of the centers and certification system have been conducted, however. General long-term quality data, particularly for results, are not yet available from certified breast centers. At present, a certified breast center is not itself a proven independent prognostic parameter for treatment results. However, the individual criteria required for breast center certification show a significant positive influence on clinical efficacy. Certified breast centers involve substantial extra costs that are not reimbursed by funding bodies, so the slightest potential benefit for patients from certified centers already appears cost-effective. When the actual costs, currently usually subsidized by other departments, are considered, it is unclear whether certified breast centers remain cost-effective. PMID:20877662

  20. Gynecologic Cancer Center for Racial Disparities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    outcome. We will preliminarily evaluate the use of psychosocial intervention on decreasing morbidity among minorities. 3: Development of Vaccine strategies...Quality of Life were not conducted due to low sample size (n = 11). 17 Aim 3: Treatment (Kaumaya) Development of Vaccine strategies and

  1. Dana Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  2. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is sometimes called oral cancer or oral cavity cancer. Mouth cancer is one of several types of cancer grouped in a category called head and neck cancers. Mouth cancer and other head and neck cancers are ...

  3. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is, how cancer is tracked, and the economic impact of cancer in the United States. Lifetime Risk ... Cancer? Cancer Surveillance Programs in the United States Economic Impact of Cancer Finding Cancer Information Learn how to ...

  4. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org Cancer.Net -- www.cancer.net/coping- ...

  5. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  6. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  7. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  8. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  9. 75 FR 64735 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Cell Biology and Signaling of... timing limitations imposed by the review and funding cycle. Name of Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business: Experimental Cancer Therapeutics. Date: November...

  10. 77 FR 51032 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ....gov . Name of Committee: Vascular and Hematology Integrated Review Group Hypertension and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel Member Conflict: Cancer and Lipids. ]...

  11. 75 FR 4092 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Member Conflict: Cancer Biomarkers. Date... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: Infectious Diseases and Microbiology Integrated Review Group, Clinical Research and Field...

  12. 78 FR 13361 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Member Conflict: Cancer Therapy. Date: March... for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Member Conflict: Genes, Genomes, and Genetics....

  13. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  14. Finding Treatment Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Local Offices Volunteer Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or ... reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

  15. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. 76 FR 26310 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Population-based Research Optimizing...

  18. 78 FR 20119 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee I--Transition to Independence....

  19. 76 FR 20693 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee G--Education. Date: May 24,...

  20. 76 FR 50234 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee G--Education. Date: September...

  1. 76 FR 78013 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group, Subcommittee G--Education. Date: January 24,...

  2. 75 FR 21643 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group, Subcommittee F--Manpower & Training. Date: May...

  3. 76 FR 14675 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; IMAT. Date: April 6, 2011. Time: 3 p.m. to 5...

  4. 78 FR 18357 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group Subcommittee J--Career Development. Date: July...

  5. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI-CNP (U54) Review. Date: April 7-9,...

  6. 78 FR 28237 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Abundance Cancer-Related Proteins/ Peptides. Date: June 20, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  7. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  8. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  9. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Eye Cancer > Eye Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Eye Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... trained to treat intraocular cancer. Parts of the eye The eye is the organ that collects light ...

  10. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  11. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  12. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  13. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Midwifery Services and Birth Center Accredited 351 N. Water Street Black River Falls, WI 54615 715-284- ... 795-9912 Accredited Since December 1991 42 Del Mar Birth Center Accredited 1416 El Centro Street, Suite ...

  14. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  15. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  16. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  17. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  18. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  19. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  20. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  1. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation.

  2. Online cancer news: trends regarding article types, specific cancers, and the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Ryan J; Riles, Julius Matthew; Sangalang, Angeline

    2014-01-01

    The Internet is one of the fastest growing news sources for many worldwide (Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism, 2011), and cancer news is one frequently consumed form of online health information (Google, Inc., 2007). This content analysis of online cancer news (n = 862) retrieved from the four most frequented news websites describes trends regarding specific cancers, stages in the cancer continuum, and types of news articles. In general, treatment information received the most attention in online cancer news. Breast cancer received the most attention of each specific cancer, followed by digestive and genitourinary cancers. Research reports and profiles of people (more than 60% of which were about celebrities) were the most common article types. Risk, uncertainty, and clinical trials were also present across several types of cancer news articles. Implications of content trends are discussed as relevant to consumers, producers, health campaign designers, and researchers alike.

  3. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  4. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  5. Curriculum Development and Evaluation for a Cancer Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deslauriers, Marc P.

    1980-01-01

    The Mid-America Cancer Center Program has developed a comprehensive approach for evaluating the cancer education curriculum at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The project included a review of all cancer-related teaching objectives and the development of an interdepartmental oncology curriculum. (JMD)

  6. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  7. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  8. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  9. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  10. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  11. National Cancer Institute Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rosemary S.L. . E-mail: rw26f@nih.gov; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2006-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Perspectives this year presented information on the systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) research projects: (1) being investigated at the NCI's Intramural Center for Cancer Research; (2) funded by NCI's Radiation Research Program and other extramural programs; and (3) the appropriate National Institutes of Health/NCI funding mechanisms applicable to researchers for obtaining funds for STaRT projects.

  12. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  13. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  14. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Precision Medicine Initiative® Cancer Moonshot℠ Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Snapshots Milestones in Cancer ... Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in ...

  15. Cancer Care Initiative: Creation of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at Naval Medical Center Dan Diego

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-24

    Roundtable (2004) found that sickle - cell anemia patients required 53% less pain medication when treated in a home-like environment. Distress is also an...more often than not, have had a positive impact on quality of care. In any case, there remains no one magic cure to fixing systems; single interventions

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2, alcohol consumption, and the risk of gastric cancer: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Akihisa; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-02-01

    The association between alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and gastric cancer risk is not completely understood. We investigated the association between ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and the risk of gastric cancer among Japanese subjects in a population-based, nested, case-control study (1990-2004). Among 36 745 subjects who answered the baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples, 457 new gastric cancer cases matched to 457 controls were used in the analysis. The odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression models. No association was observed between alcohol consumption, ADH1B (rs1229984), ADH1C (rs698) and ALDH2 (rs671) polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk. However, considering gene-environmental interaction, ADH1C G allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week of ethanol had a 2.5-fold increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.05-6.17) relative to AA genotype carriers who drink 0 to <150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.02). ALDH2 A allele carriers who drink ≥150 g/week also had an increased risk (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.05-4.12) relative to GG genotype carriers who drink 0 to < 150 g/week (P for interaction = 0.08). To find the relation between alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk, it is important to consider both alcohol consumption level and ADH1C and ALDH2 polymorphisms.

  17. Dana Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  18. Center of excellence in laser medicine. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    Achievements during the first six months of funding to prepare for a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include limited specific research projects within the Center`s three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas -- new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics, and photosensitization, is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are an optimized laser-catheter system for reversal of vasospasm; optical detection of major skin burn depth and cancers using fluorescent drugs, and photosensitization of vascular tissues. In addition, an interdepartmental Laser Center was established at MGH to enhance collaborations and institutional committment to the Center of Excellence. Competitive postdoctoral research fellowships, with provision for matching funds from other departments, have been announced.

  19. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  2. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  3. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  4. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  5. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  6. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  7. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  8. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  9. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  10. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  11. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  12. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  13. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  14. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  15. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  16. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI. The CRADA partner... Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer... Technology Transfer Center, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 450, Rockville,...

  17. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    20, 2016. 2. Speaker- Kiran Mahajan (Principal Investigator), Moffitt Cancer Center, Tumor Biology Department Retreat, Tampa, Florida, Recalcitrant...cancer, cancer stem cells and targeted therapies, Dec 4, 2015. 3. Speaker-Kiran Mahajan Moffitt Cancer Center, Tumor Biology Research In

  18. Shizuko Sei, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Shizuko Sei (formerly Shizuko Aoki) is a medical officer with over 27 years of translational and clinical research experience in the field of cancer and AIDS. After completing her pediatric oncology fellowship at NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), she held various positions in the CCR and Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD) before joining the DCP in July 2015. |

  19. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.