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Sample records for abrasive dentifrice brushing

  1. A profilometry-based dentifrice abrasion Method for V8 brushing machines. Part I: Introduction to RDA-PE.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen; St John, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and standardization of a profilometry-based method for assessment of dentifrice abrasivity called Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity - Profilometry Equivalent (RDA-PE). Human dentine substrates are mounted in acrylic blocks of precise standardized dimensions, permitting mounting and brushing in V8 brushing machines. Dentin blocks are masked to create an area of "contact brushing." Brushing is carried out in V8 brushing machines and dentifrices are tested as slurries. An abrasive standard is prepared by diluting the ISO 11609 abrasivity reference calcium pyrophosphate abrasive into carboxymethyl cellulose/glycerin, just as in the RDA method. Following brushing, masked areas are removed and profilometric analysis is carried out on treated specimens. Assessments of average abrasion depth (contact or optical profilometry) are made. Inclusion of standard calcium pyrophosphate abrasive permits a direct RDA equivalent assessment of abrasion, which is characterized with profilometry as Depth test/Depth control x 100. Within the test, the maximum abrasivity standard of 250 can be created in situ simply by including a treatment group of standard abrasive with 2.5x number of brushing strokes. RDA-PE is enabled in large part by the availability of easy-to-use and well-standardized modern profilometers, but its use in V8 brushing machines is enabled by the unique specific conditions described herein. RDA-PE permits the evaluation of dentifrice abrasivity to dentin without the requirement of irradiated teeth and infrastructure for handling them. In direct comparisons, the RDA-PE method provides dentifrice abrasivity assessments comparable to the gold industry standard RDA technique.

  2. A Profilometry-Based Dentifrice Abrasion Method for V8 Brushing Machines Part II: Comparison of RDA-PE and Radiotracer RDA Measures.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen; White, Donald J; St John, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the abrasivity of commercial dentifrices by two techniques: the conventional gold standard radiotracer-based Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity (RDA) method; and a newly validated technique based on V8 brushing that included a profilometry-based evaluation of dentin wear. This profilometry-based method is referred to as RDA-Profilometry Equivalent, or RDA-PE. A total of 36 dentifrices were sourced from four global dentifrice markets (Asia Pacific [including China], Europe, Latin America, and North America) and tested blindly using both the standard radiotracer (RDA) method and the new profilometry method (RDA-PE), taking care to follow specific details related to specimen preparation and treatment. Commercial dentifrices tested exhibited a wide range of abrasivity, with virtually all falling well under the industry accepted upper limit of 250; that is, 2.5 times the level of abrasion measured using an ISO 11609 abrasivity reference calcium pyrophosphate as the reference control. RDA and RDA-PE comparisons were linear across the entire range of abrasivity (r2 = 0.7102) and both measures exhibited similar reproducibility with replicate assessments. RDA-PE assessments were not just linearly correlated, but were also proportional to conventional RDA measures. The linearity and proportionality of the results of the current study support that both methods (RDA or RDA-PE) provide similar results and justify a rationale for making the upper abrasivity limit of 250 apply to both RDA and RDA-PE.

  3. A Profilometry-Based Dentifrice Abrasion Method for V8 Brushing Machines Part III: Multi-Laboratory Validation Testing of RDA-PE.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen L; White, Donald J; Schemehorn, Bruce; Ganovsky, Tara; Haider, Amir; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Morrow, Brian R; Srimaneepong, Viritpon; Chumprasert, Sujin

    2017-09-01

    We have previously reported on progress toward the refinement of profilometry-based abrasivity testing of dentifrices using a V8 brushing machine and tactile or optical measurement of dentin wear. The general application of this technique may be advanced by demonstration of successful inter-laboratory confirmation of the method. The objective of this study was to explore the capability of different laboratories in the assessment of dentifrice abrasivity using a profilometry-based evaluation technique developed in our Mason laboratories. In addition, we wanted to assess the interchangeability of human and bovine specimens. Participating laboratories were instructed in methods associated with Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity-Profilometry Equivalent (RDA-PE) evaluation, including site visits to discuss critical elements of specimen preparation, masking, profilometry scanning, and procedures. Laboratories were likewise instructed on the requirement for demonstration of proportional linearity as a key condition for validation of the technique. Laboratories were provided with four test dentifrices, blinded for testing, with a broad range of abrasivity. In each laboratory, a calibration curve was developed for varying V8 brushing strokes (0, 4,000, and 10,000 strokes) with the ISO abrasive standard. Proportional linearity was determined as the ratio of standard abrasion mean depths created with 4,000 and 10,000 strokes (2.5 fold differences). Criteria for successful calibration within the method (established in our Mason laboratory) was set at proportional linearity = 2.5 ± 0.3. RDA-PE was compared to Radiotracer RDA for the four test dentifrices, with the latter obtained by averages from three independent Radiotracer RDA sites. Individual laboratories and their results were compared by 1) proportional linearity and 2) acquired RDA-PE values for test pastes. Five sites participated in the study. One site did not pass proportional linearity objectives. Data for this site are

  4. Dentifrice fluoride and abrasivity interplay on artificial caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Hani M; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    Incipient caries lesions on smooth surfaces may be subjected to toothbrushing, potentially leading to remineralization and/or abrasive wear. The interplay of dentifrice abrasivity and fluoride on this process is largely unknown and was investigated on three artificially created lesions with different mineral content/distribution. 120 bovine enamel specimens were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n = 10), resulting from the association of (1) lesion type [methylcellulose acid gel (MeC); carboxymethylcellulose solution (CMC); hydroxyethylcellulose gel (HEC)], (2) slurry abrasive level [low (REA 4/ RDA 69); high (REA 7/RDA 208)], and (3) fluoride concentration [0/275 ppm (14.5 mM) F as NaF]. After lesion creation, specimens were brushed in an automated brushing machine with the test slurries (50 strokes 2×/day). Specimens were kept in artificial saliva in between brushings and overnight. Enamel surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry after lesion creation, 1, 3 and 5 days. Two enamel sections (from baseline and post-brushing areas) were obtained and analyzed microradiographically. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 5%). Brushing with high-abrasive slurry caused more SL than brushing with low-abrasive slurry. For MeC and CMC lesions, fluoride had a protective effect on SL from day 3 on. Furthermore, for MeC and CMC, there was a significant mineral gain in the remaining lesions except when brushed with high-abrasive slurries and 0 ppm F. For HEC, a significant mineral gain took place when low-abrasive slurry was used with fluoride. The tested lesions responded differently to the toothbrushing procedures. Both slurry fluoride content and abrasivity directly impacted SL and mineral gain of enamel caries lesions.

  5. Abrasion of eroded and sound enamel by a dentifrice containing diamond abrasive particles

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J.; Hoegger, Vanessa G. M.; Attin, Thomas

    2017-07-24

    Eroded enamel is more susceptible to abrasive wear than sound enamel. New toothpastes utilizing diamond particles as abrasives have been developed. The present study investigated the abrasive wear of eroded enamel by three commercially available toothpastes (one containing diamond particles) and compared it to the respective wear of sound enamel caused by these toothpastes. Seventy-two bovine enamel samples were randomly allocated to six groups (S1–S3 and E1–E3; n=12). Samples were submitted to an abrasive (S1–S3) or erosion plus abrasion (E1–E3) cycling. Per cycle, all samples were brushed (abrasion; 20 brushing stokes) with the following toothpastes: S1/E1: Signal WHITE SYSTEM, S2/E2: elmex KARIESSCHUTZ and S3-E3: Candida WHITE DIAMOND (diamond particles). Groups E1–E3 were additionally eroded with HCl (pH 3.0) for 2 min before each brushing procedure. After 30, 60 and 90 cycles enamel wear was measured by surface profilometry. Within the same toothpaste and same number of cycles, enamel wear due to erosion plus abrasion was significantly higher than due to mere abrasion. After 30, 60 and 90 cycles, no significant difference in the wear in groups S1 and S2 was observed while the wear in group E1 was significantly (p<0.05, ANOVA, Scheffecyc) lower than that in group E2. After 90 cycles, wear in group S3 was about 5 times higher than that in group S2, while wear in group E3 was about 1.3 times higher than that in group E2. As compared to the other two investigated toothpastes, the dentifrice containing diamond particles caused slightly higher abrasive wear of eroded enamel and distinctly higher wear of sound enamel compared to the conventional toothpastes under investigation.

  6. An in situ investigation into the abrasion of eroded dental hard tissues by a whitening dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Turssi, C P; Faraoni, J J; Rodrigues, A L; Serra, M C

    2004-01-01

    This crossover study aimed to investigate abrasion of previously eroded hard dental tissues by a whitening dentifrice compared to a regular dentifrice. After a 3-day lead-in period, 14 volunteers were randomly assigned to use one of the toothpastes while wearing a removable appliance, containing 3 enamel and 3 root dentine slabs on each side. On the first day salivary pellicle was allowed to form. Twice daily for the following 3 days, one side of each appliance was immersed in an acidic carbonated drink ex vivo while the other side remained unexposed. Specimens were then brushed with the allocated dentifrice. After a 3-day washout period, new sets of enamel and dentine slabs were mounted in the appliances and the participants commenced period 2 using the alternative toothpaste. Acid-treated specimens always showed more wear than untreated specimens. The whitening dentifrice did not significantly increase the wear of softened enamel compared with the regular dentifrice. Brushing with the whitening toothpaste led to significantly greater wear of sound enamel and of both eroded and sound dentine than the regular dentifrice. The results suggest that whitening dentifrices may not increase the wear of acid-softened enamel but may have a more deleterious effect on dentine than regular toothpastes.

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial to Explore the Effect of Experimental Low Abrasivity Dentifrices on Enamel Gloss and Smoothness, and the Build-up of Extrinsic Tooth Stain.

    PubMed

    Milleman, Kimberly R; Milleman, Jeffery L; Young, Sarah; Parkinson, Charles

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate and compare examiner-assessed changes in enamel gloss, extrinsic dental stain, and surface smoothness following one, two, four, and eight weeks of twice-daily use of an experimental low abrasivity desensitizing dentifrice (relative dentin abrasivity [RDA] ~40) containing 5% sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) chemical cleaning agent and 1% aluminum trioxide abrasive. This was compared with an ultra-low abrasivity dentifrice (5% STP only; RDA ~13), a moderate abrasivity fluoride dentifrice (RDA ~80), and a higher abrasivity marketed whitening dentifrice (RDA ~142). This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, controlled, parallel group study in healthy adults stratified by gloss score and age. Following a washout period with a conventional silica abrasive dentifrice, subjects received a dental scale and polish and were randomized to treatment. Subjects brushed their teeth for two minutes, twice daily, with their assigned dentifrice. Enamel gloss was assessed visually by comparing the facial surfaces of the maxillary incisors to the Sturzenberger gloss standards. Extrinsic dental stain was measured on the 12 anterior teeth (facial and lingual) using the Macpherson modification of the Lobene Stain Index (MLSI). Tooth smoothness was assessed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of a silicone impression of the central incisors. Of 120 screened subjects, 95 were randomized to the study. Subjects using the low abrasivity aluminum trioxide/STP dentifrice demonstrated statistically significant (p < 0.05) and increasing improvements in surface gloss over baseline at all time points, with a significant treatment effect compared to all other study dentifrices from Week 2 (p < 0.05). With respect to dental stain, the low abrasivity dentifrice group had the lowest stain score at each post-treatment time point and demonstrated statistically significantly less stain compared to all study dentifrices at Weeks 2 (p < 0.05) and 8 (p < 0.01). For tooth

  8. In Vitro Assessment of the Abrasion Resistance of Two Types of Artificial Teeth Submitted to Brushing.

    PubMed

    Policastro, Vivian Barnabé; Giro, Gabriela; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; Mendoza-Marin, Danny Omar; Paleari, André Gustavo; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effect of brushing with different solutions on the abrasion resistance of two types of acrylic resin teeth. Maxillary premolars from two types of acrylic teeth (Biotone and Biotone IPN) were divided into six groups (n = 12), according to the solution used during brushing: distilled water (control), coconut soap, or dentifrice. A mechanical brushing machine was used to simulate approximately 1 year of brushing (11,000 strokes). The weight loss (WL) of teeth was obtained from the difference between the initial (IW) and final weight (FW) of each specimen, and the mean of percentage of weight loss (PWL) was calculated for each group. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Bonferroni's post-test comparison (α = 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found for the factor solution (p < 0.001). Brushing using dentifrice caused the highest values of weight loss (-0.50%), in comparison with the groups brushed with coconut soap (0.00%) or distilled water (0.00%). For both types of artificial teeth, brushing with dentifrice produced higher abrasion than brushing with coconut soap or water. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Effects of toothbrushing with fluoride abrasive and whitening dentifrices on both unbleached and bleached human enamel surface in terms of roughness and hardness: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bolay, Sukran; Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Gurgan, Sevil

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness and hardness of both unbleached and bleached (opalescence; 10% carbamide peroxide) human enamel brushed with water (without dentifrice), fluoride abrasive dentifrice (Colgate Total) and whitening dentifrice (Natural White). Human enamel samples were obtained from third molars and randomly divided into five groups (n = 8): G1 - Control (brushed with water without dentifrice), G2 - Colgate Total (fluoride abrasive dentifrice), G3 - Natural White (whitening dentifrice), G4 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Colgate Total, G5 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Natural White. Bleaching regimen was applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The brushing process was performed with a modified Nyffenegger's brushing machine. Surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Microhardness testing was performed with a Brinell hardness tester. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, one-way ANOVA analysis and Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks tests. There were significant differences in surface roughness values for all groups, which showed an increase in roughness (p < 0.05). When the bleaching treatment combined with brushing with whitening dentifrice was performed (G5), there was a significant decrease in hardness values (p < 0.05). The other groups (G1, G2, G3, G4) showed no significant hardness differences (p > 0.05). It was concluded that toothbrushing procedures increased the enamel surface roughness, and that bleaching regimen performed with cleaning treatment, through brushing with whitening dentifrice decreased hardness values. When applied together, bleaching and cleaning treatments may alter the enamel surface roughness and hardness values.

  10. Impact of dentifrice abrasivity and remineralization time on erosive tooth wear in vitro.

    PubMed

    Buedel, Sarah; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick T; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the in vitro effects of simulated dentifrice slurry abrasivity (L-low, M-medium and H-high) and remineralization time (0, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) on erosive tooth wear. Enamel and root dentin specimens were prepared from bovine incisors (n= 8) and submitted to a cycling protocol including erosion, remineralization at the test times, and brushing with each of the tested slurries, for 5 days. Dental surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry. Data was analyzed using mixed-model ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (alpha= 0.05). SL generally increased along with the increase in slurry abrasive level, with significance dependent upon the specific substrate and remineralization times. H showed the highest SL on both enamel and dentin; remineralization for 30 minutes reduced SL significantly (P< 0.05), but only for enamel. M showed intermediate SL values, with remineralization benefit clearly seen only after 120 minutes of remineralization (P< 0.05). L caused the least SL for both enamel and dentin, which was further reduced after remineralization for 120 and 30 minutes, respectively (both P< 0.05). Overall, root dentin had significantly higher SL than enamel. Less abrasive dentifrice slurries were able to reduce toothbrushing abrasion on both enamel and root dentin. This protection was enhanced by remineralization for all abrasive levels on enamel, but only for L on root dentin. High-risk erosion patients should avoid highly abrasive toothpastes, as remineralization can only partially compensate for their deleterious effects on eroded dental surfaces. Lower abrasive toothpastes are recommended. Copyright©American Journal of Dentistry.

  11. The effectiveness of dentifrices without and with sodium lauryl sulfate on plaque, gingivitis and gingival abrasion--a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sälzer, S; Rosema, N A M; Martin, E C J; Slot, D E; Timmer, C J; Dörfer, C E; van der Weijden, G A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a dentifrice without sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) to a dentifrice with SLS in young adults aged 18-34 years on gingivitis. One hundred twenty participants (non-dental students) with a moderate gingival inflammation (bleeding on probing at 40-70 % of test sites) were included in this randomized controlled double blind clinical trial. According to randomization, participants had to brush their teeth either with dentifrice without SLS or with SLS for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was bleeding on marginal probing (BOMP). The secondary outcomes were plaque scores and gingival abrasion scores (GA) as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS) score at exit survey. Baseline and end differences were analysed by univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test, between group differences by independent t test and within groups by paired sample t test. BOMP improved within groups from on average 0.80 at baseline to 0.60 in the group without SLS and to 0.56 in the group with SLS. No statistical difference for BOMP, plaque and gingival abrasion was found between both groups. VAS scores for taste, freshness and foaming effect were significantly in favour of the SLS-containing dentifrice. The test dentifrice without SLS was as effective as a regular SLS dentifrice on gingival bleeding scores and plaque scores. There was no significant difference in the incidence of gingival abrasion. In patients diagnosed with gingivitis, a dentifrice without SLS seems to be equally effective compared to a dentifrice with SLS and did not demonstrate any significant difference in gingival abrasion. In patient with recurrent aphthous ulcers, the absence of SLS may even be beneficial. However, participants indicate that they appreciate the foaming effect of a dentifrice with SLS more.

  12. The efficacy of a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice on bovine enamel subjected to erosion and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Polo, Renata Ocon Braga; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2008-12-01

    Researchers have proposed the use of fluoride for the prevention of enamel wear; however, only limited information is available about the impact of fluoridated dentifrices. Because tooth wear is a well-recognized dental problem, the authors conducted an in situ, ex vivo study to assess the efficacy of a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice on bovine enamel subjected to erosion and abrasion. The authors conducted a double-blind, crossover in situ study consisting of three phases (seven days each). In each phase, the authors tested one of the dentifrices (5,000 parts per million fluoride [F]; 1,100 ppm F; no F). They performed erosive challenges with the use of cola drink (60 seconds, four times per day) and abrasive challenges via toothbrushing (30 seconds, four times per day). The authors determined the enamel loss via profilometry. The authors tested the data by using two-way analysis of variance (P < .05). For the erosion-plus-abrasion condition, the study results showed that enamel wear was significantly higher than that with erosion alone. The findings showed no significant differences between the dentifrices regarding enamel wear. Within the in situ, ex vivo conditions of this study, the authors concluded that the highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice did not have a protective effect on enamel against erosion and erosion plus toothbrushing abrasion. Patients at risk of developing enamel erosion should benefit from preventive measures other than fluoride dentifrice, because even a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice does not appear to prevent enamel erosion.

  13. Effect of different concentrations of fluoride in dentifrices on dentin erosion subjected or not to abrasion in situ/ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, A C; Rios, D; Moino, A L; Wiegand, A; Attin, T; Buzalaf, M A R

    2008-01-01

    This in situ/ex vivo study assessed the effect of different concentrations of fluoride in dentifrices on dentin subjected to erosion or to erosion plus abrasion. Ten volunteers took part in this crossover and double-blind study performed in 3 phases (7 days). They wore acrylic palatal appliances containing 4 bovine dentin blocks divided in two rows: erosion and erosion plus abrasion. The blocks were subjected to erosion by immersion ex vivo in a cola drink (60 s, pH 2.6) 4 times daily. During this step, the volunteers brushed their teeth with one of three dentifrices D (5,000 ppm F, NaF, silica); C (1,100 ppm F, NaF, silica) and placebo (22 ppm F, silica). Then, the respective dentifrice slurry (1:3) was dripped on dentin surfaces. While no further treatment was performed in one row, the other row was brushed using an electric toothbrush for 30 s ex vivo. The appliances were replaced in the mouth and the volunteers rinsed with water. Dentin loss was determined by profilometry and analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Bonferroni test (a = 0.05). Dentin loss after erosive-abrasive wear was significantly greater than after erosion alone. Wear was significantly higher for the placebo than for the D and C dentifrices, which were not significantly different from each other. It can be concluded that the presence of fluoride concentrations around 1,100 ppm in dentifrices is important to reduce dentin wear by erosion and erosion + abrasion, but the protective effect does not increase with fluoride concentration. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Effects of whitening dentifrice on yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surfaces after simulating brushing.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Gimenes Olbera, Amanda Caroline; Candido, Lucas Miguel; Miotto, Larissa Natiele; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi

    2017-01-01

    The changes that occur after brushing yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) are unknown. These changes may favor the retention of microorganisms and chemisorption of water, impairing its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a whitening dentifrice on Y-TZP surfaces after simulating 10 years of brushing. Seventy-two bar-shaped specimens (20×4×1.2 mm) were divided into 4 groups: storage in distilled water (SW, control), brushing with distilled water (BW), brushing with dentifrice (BD), and brushing with whitening dentifrice (BWD). Brushing was conducted using a linear brushing machine (878400 cycles, 0.98 N, soft toothbrush). The mean roughness (Ra) was analyzed with a profilometer and the superficial topography with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at baseline and after treatment. Crystalline phases were characterized using x-ray diffraction. Baseline and posttreatment Ra were analyzed using the 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparison test; the paired t test was used for intragroup comparison (all α=.05). The Ra (μm) means (before/after treatment) were SW 0.28/0.28; BW 0.32/0.31; BD 0.28/0.36; BWD 0.30/0.20. No statistically significant difference was found for Ra at baseline (P=.108) than for posttreatment results (P<.001); the BD group had higher Ra values when compared with baseline (P=.019); the BWD group had the lowest values (P<.001). The BD surfaces showed pronounced scratches and detachment of the surface, while BWD showed smoother surfaces; similar crystallographic results among groups were observed. Brushing Y-TZP with conventional dentifrice increased roughness, while brushing with whitening dentifrice reduced roughness. Neither dentifrice changed the crystallographic phases after brushing. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of tooth-brushing force with a desensitising dentifrice on dentine tubule patency and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Mullan, F; Paraskar, S; Bartlett, D W; Olley, R C

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of a 5% NovaMin containing dentifrice on dentine tubule patency and surface roughness at 100g and 400g tooth brush abrasion forces. 75 polished human dentine samples were prepared and randomly allocated into one of five groups; control (1), Na 2 PFO 3 100g abrasion force (2), NovaMin 100g (3), Na 2 PFO 3 400g (4) and NovaMin 400g (5). The control group underwent two 2-min cycles of artificial saliva (AS), one 2-min erosion cycle; the rest underwent two toothbrush abrasion cycles in an AS/dentifrice slurry and one 2-min erosion cycle. All samples were imaged at baseline and post intervention using Tandem Scanning Microscopy and Profilometry to analyse tubule patency and roughness. Mean tubule patency increased significantly between baseline and post intervention in groups 1,2 and 4 and decreased significantly post intervention in groups 3 and 5 (p<0.01). Post intervention, there were statistically significant differences in mean patent tubules between NovaMin and the Na 2 PFO 3 and control groups (p<0.001). Surface roughness increased for all groups between baseline and post interventions (P<0.001); mean (SD) roughness increases for groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were 0.14 (0.05) μm, 0.18 (0.04) μm, 0.16 (0.06) μm, 0.19 (0.07) μm and 0.21 (0.02) μm respectively. Differences between group 1 and 5 were significant (p<0.01). Brushing with NovaMin resulted in significant dentine tubule occlusion at 100g and 400g, but brushing with Na 2 PFO 3 resulted in increased tubule patency. Surface roughness increased significantly at 400g brushing with NovaMin. There was no correlation between tubule patency and surface roughness. A NovaMin desensitising dentifrice resulted in tubule occlusion even at high brushing forces. There was minimal increase in surface roughness at the lower (100g) brushing force. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of surface abrasion produced on the enamel surface by a standard dentifrice using three different toothbrush bristle designs: A profilometric in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumari, Minal; Acharya, Shashidhar; Prasad, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess, in vitro, the effect on surface abrasivity of enamel surface caused by three different types (flat trim, zig-zag, bi-level) of toothbrush bristle design. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four freshly extracted, sound, human incisor teeth were collected for this study. The enamel slab was prepared, which were mounted, on separate acrylic bases followed by subjected to profilometric analysis. The surface roughness was measured using the profilometer. The specimen were divided into three groups, each group containing eight mounted specimens, wherein, Group 1 specimens were brushed with flat trim toothbrush; Group 2 brushed with zig-zag and Group 3 with bi-level bristle design. A commercially available dentifrice was used throughout the study. A single specimen was brushed for 2 times daily for 2 min period for 1 week using a customized brushing apparatus. The pre- and post-roughness value change were analyzed and recorded. Statistical test: Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Result: The results showed that surface abrasion was produced on each specimen, in all the three groups, which were subjected to brushing cycle. However, the bi-level bristle design (350% increase in roughness, P = 0.021) and zig-zag bristle design (160% increase in roughness, P = 0.050) showed significantly higher surface abrasion when compared with flat trim bristle design toothbrush. Conclusion: Flat trim toothbrush bristle produces least surface abrasion and is relatively safe for use. PMID:25125852

  17. Enhancement of plaque removal efficacy by tooth brushing with baking soda dentifrices: results of five clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Putt, Mark S; Milleman, Kimberly R; Ghassemi, Annahita; Vorwerk, Linda M; Hooper, William J; Soparkar, Pramod M; Winston, Anthony E; Proskin, Howard M

    2008-01-01

    An earlier clinical study demonstrated that brushing with a commercial Arm & Hammer dentifrice containing baking soda physically removed significantly more plaque than brushing with either of two commercial dentifrices which did not contain baking soda. However, little has been done to confirm these results and to compare baking soda-containing dentifrices with more recently commercialized non-baking soda dentifrice formulations. The objective of this study was to compare commercial dentifrices containing 20% to 65% baking soda and commercial dentifrices without baking soda in enhancing plaque removal efficacy of tooth brushing. Five randomized, controlled, blinded, crossover clinical studies were performed among healthy adult volunteers who provided informed consent. After approximately 24 hours without oral hygiene, subjects with sufficient plaque were enrolled in the study phase. Plaque was scored before and after supervised brushing for one minute using the Turesky, et al. modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index at six sites per tooth according to Soparkar's modification as described by Lobene, et al. In each study, wash-out periods with a regular dentifrice not evaluated in the study separated each product treatment. In all studies, every dentifrice exhibited a significant (p < 0.0001) reduction in 24-hour plaque scores. Between-group comparisons of whole mouth plaque scores in all five studies demonstrated that brushing with baking soda dentifrices resulted in statistically greater (p < 0.01) reductions in whole mouth mean plaque scores than brushing with dentifrices that did not contain baking soda. Results on other tooth surfaces, such as facial, lingual, proximal, and gingival surfaces also demonstrated statistically greater (p < 0.05) reductions in mean plaque scores for the baking soda-containing dentifrices as compared to the baking soda-free dentifrices. In three of the studies comparing different levels of baking soda, brushing with dentifrices

  18. [Brushing abrasion of the enamel surface after erosion].

    PubMed

    Lipei, Chen; Xiangke, Ci; Xiaoyan, Ou

    2017-08-01

    Objective A study was conducted to compare the effect of different enamel remineralization periods after erosion on the depth of brushing abrasion. Methods Ten volunteers were selected for a 4-day experiment. A total of 60 enamels were randomly assigned into six groups (A-F) and placed in intraoral palatal devices. On the first day, the palatal devices were placed in oral cavity (24 h) . On the following three days, brushing experiments were performed extraorally, two times per day. The specific experimental method of brushing follows these next steps. First, the group F specimens were covered with a film of wax, and then acid etched for 2 min. Subsequently, the film of wax was detached. The groups from A to D were brushed after remineralization at the following time intervals: group A, 0 min; group B, 20 min; group C, 40 min; group D, 60 min. Erosion and remineralization were performed on group E, but without brushing. Remineralization was performed on group F, but without acid etching and brushing. The depth of enamel abrasion was determined by a mechanical profilometer. The surface morphology of the enamel blocks was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Results 1) The depth of abrasion was different in varied enamel remineralization time after acid etching. The statistical significant differences between groups were as follows. 2) When the time of enamel remineralization after acid etching was short, the surface depression in the electron microscope was deep, and the surface morphology was rough. Conclusion Brushing immediately after acid etching would cause much serious abrasion to the enamel surface. Brushing after 60 min can effectively reduce the abrasion of acid etching enamel.

  19. Two Randomized Clinical Studies to Confirm Differential Plaque Removal by Sodium Bicarbonate Dentifrices in a Single Timed Brushing Model.

    PubMed

    Mason, Stephen; Karwal, Ritu; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated and compared plaque removal efficacy of commercially available dentifrices containing sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) to those without NaHCO3 in a single timed brushing clinical study model. Two randomized, examiner-blind, three-period, three-treatment, crossover studies were performed in adults with a mean Turesky modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index (TPI) score of = 2.00. In Study 1, 60 subjects were randomized to commercially available dentifrices containing: (i) 67% NaHCO3 plus 1425 ppm fluoride (F) as sodium fluoride (NaF); (ii) 45% NaHCO3 plus 1425 ppm F as NaF; or (iii) 0% NaHCO3 plus silica and 1450 ppm F as NaF. In Study 2, 55 subjects were randomized to commercially available dentifrices containing: (i) 67% NaHCO3 plus 1425 ppm F as NaF; (ii) 0% NaHCO3 plus silica and 1400 ppm F as amine F/stannous F; or (iii) 0% NaHCO3 plus chlorhexidine/aluminum lactate and silica with 1360 ppm F as aluminum F. In both studies, subjects brushed their teeth for one timed minute under supervised conditions. Plaque was assessed pre- and post-brushing according to a six-site modification of the TPI. Mean TPI score was analyzed using an analysis of covariance model with treatment and study period as fixed effects, subject as a random variable, and pre-brushing score as a covariate. In both studies, mean TPI score decreased in all groups post-brushing compared with pre-brushing. In Study 1, statistically significant improvements in mean TPI score were reported with the 67% and 45% NaHCO3 dentifrices compared with the 0% NaHCO3 dentifrice (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0005, respectively). In Study 2, improvements in mean TPI score were statistically significantly greater with the 67% NaHCO3 dentifrice compared with both 0% NaHCO3 dentifrices (p < 0.0001 for both comparisons). All dentifrices were generally well tolerated. A single timed brushing with commercially available dentifrices containing 67% or 45% NaHCO3 exerted a significantly greater effect on

  20. An epidemiologic approach to toothbrushing and dental abrasion.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J; Lavstedt, S

    1979-02-01

    Abrasion lesions were recorded in 818 individuals representing the adult population of 430,000 residents of the Stockholm region, Sweden. The subjects were asked about toothbrushing habits, toothbrush quality and dentifrice usage; these factors were related to abrasion criteria. Abrasion was prevalent in 30% and wedge-like or deep depressions were observed in 12%. The relationship between abrasion and toothbrushing was evident, the prevalence and severity of abrasion being correlated to toothbrushing consumption. The importance of the toothbrushing technique for the development of abrasion lesions was elucidated. Horizontal brushing technique was strongly correlated to abrasion. It was demonstrated by treating the data with the statistical AID analysis that toothbrushing factors related to the individual (brushing frequency and brushing technique) exert a greater influence than material-oriented toothbrushing factor such as dentifrice abrasivity and bristle stiffness.

  1. Brushing force of manual and sonic toothbrushes affects dental hard tissue abrasion.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Annette; Burkhard, John Patrik Matthias; Eggmann, Florin; Attin, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the brushing forces applied during in vivo toothbrushing with manual and sonic toothbrushes and to analyse the effect of these brushing forces on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel and dentin in vitro. Brushing forces of a manual and two sonic toothbrushes (low and high frequency mode) were measured in 27 adults before and after instruction of the respective brushing technique and statistically analysed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). In the in vitro experiment, sound and eroded enamel and dentin specimens (each subgroup n = 12) were brushed in an automatic brushing machine with the respective brushing forces using a fluoridated toothpaste slurry. Abrasion was determined by profilometry and statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA. Average brushing force of the manual toothbrush (1.6 ± 0.3 N) was significantly higher than for the sonic toothbrushes (0.9 ± 0.2 N), which were not significantly different from each other. Brushing force prior and after instruction of the brushing technique was not significantly different. The manual toothbrush caused highest abrasion of sound and eroded dentin, but lowest on sound enamel. No significant differences were detected on eroded enamel. Brushing forces of manual and sonic toothbrushes are different and affect their abrasive capacity. Patients with severe tooth wear and exposed and/or eroded dentin surfaces should use sonic toothbrushes to reduce abrasion, while patients without tooth wear or with erosive lesions confining only to enamel do not benefit from sonic toothbrushes with regard to abrasion.

  2. Impact of brushing force on abrasion of acid-softened and sound enamel.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, A; Köwing, L; Attin, T

    2007-11-01

    The study aimed to analyse the effects of different brushing loads on abrasion of acid-softened and sound enamel surfaces. Sound and acid-softened surfaces of each 10 human enamel samples were submitted to brushing abrasion in an automatic brushing machine at 1.5 N (A), 2.5 N (B), 3.5 N (C) or 4.5 N (D) brushing load. Prior to abrasion, demineralisation of half of each enamel surface was performed by storage in hydrochloric acid (pH 2.0) for 60s. Brushing was carried out (1000 strokes) using a manual toothbrush and toothpaste slurry in a ratio of 1:3. Enamel loss was measured after 10, 20, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 1000 brushing strokes (BS). Pre- and post-brushing values of Knoop indentation length (5 indentations each sample) were measured and mean enamel loss was calculated from the change in indentation depth. Within- and between-group comparisons were performed by ANOVA and t-test followed by Bonferroni-correction. Enamel loss of acid-softened surfaces was significantly influenced by the brushing load applied and was mostly significantly higher in group D (10-1000 BS: 225-462 nm) compared to A (10-1000 BS: 164-384), B (10-1000 BS: 175-370 nm) and C (10-1000 BS: 191-396 nm). Abrasion of acid-softened enamel was fourfold higher compared to sound surfaces. Sound enamel was significantly influenced by the brushing force at 20-200 brushing strokes only, but revealed no significant differences between groups A-D. Brushing load influences abrasion of briefly eroded enamel, but might be of minor importance for abrasion of sound enamel surfaces.

  3. Control of brushing variables for the in vitro assessment of toothpaste abrasivity using a novel laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Parry, Jason; Harrington, Edward; Rees, Gareth D; McNab, Rod; Smith, Anthony J

    2008-02-01

    Design and construct a tooth-brushing simulator incorporating control of brushing variables including brushing force, speed and temperature, thereby facilitating greater understanding of their importance in toothpaste abrasion testing methodologies. A thermostable orbital shaker was selected as a base unit and 16- and 24-specimen brushing rigs were constructed to fit inside, consisting of: a square bath partitioned horizontally to provide brushing channels, specimen holders for 25 mm diameter mounted specimens to fit the brushing channels and individually weighted brushing arms, able to support four toothbrush holders suspended over the brushing channels. Brush head holders consisted of individually weighted blocks of Delrin, or PTFE onto which toothbrush heads were fixed. Investigating effects of key design criteria involved measuring abrasion depths of polished human enamel and dentine. The brushing simulator demonstrated good reproducibility of abrasion on enamel and dentine across consecutive brushing procedures. Varying brushing parameters had a significant impact on wear results: increased brushing force demonstrated a trend towards increased wear, with increased reproducibility for greater abrasion levels, highlighting the importance of achieving sufficient wear to optimise accuracy; increasing brushing temperature demonstrated increased enamel abrasion for silica and calcium carbonate systems, which may be related to slurry viscosities and particle suspension; varying brushing speed showed a small effect on abrasion of enamel at lower brushing speed, which may indicate the importance of maintenance of the abrasive in suspension. Adjusting key brushing variables significantly affected wear behaviour. The brushing simulator design provides a valuable model system for in vitro assessment of toothpaste abrasivity and the influence of variables in a controlled manner. Control of these variables will allow more reproducible study of in vitro tooth wear processes.

  4. Gingival abrasion and recession in manual and oscillating-rotating power brush users.

    PubMed

    Rosema, N A M; Adam, R; Grender, J M; Van der Sluijs, E; Supranoto, S C; Van der Weijden, G A

    2014-11-01

    To assess gingival recession (GR) in manual and power toothbrush users and evaluate the relationship between GR and gingival abrasion scores (GA). This was an observational (cross-sectional), single-centre, examiner-blind study involving a single-brushing exercise, with 181 young adult participants: 90 manual brush users and 91 oscillating-rotating power brush users. Participants were assessed for GR and GA as primary response variables. Secondary response variables were the level of gingival inflammation, plaque score reduction and brushing duration. Pearson correlation was used to describe the relationship between number of recession sites and number of abrasions. Prebrushing (baseline) and post-brushing GA and plaque scores were assessed and differences analysed using paired tests. Two-sample t-test was used to analyse group differences; ancova was used for analyses of post-brushing changes with baseline as covariate. Overall, 97.8% of the study population had at least one site of ≥1 mm of gingival recession. For the manual group, this percentage was 98.9%, and for the power group, this percentage was 96.7% (P = 0.621). Post-brushing, the power group showed a significantly smaller GA increase than the manual group (P = 0.004); however, there was no significant correlation between number of recession sites and number of abrasions for either group (P ≥ 0.327). Little gingival recession was observed in either toothbrush user group; the observed GR levels were comparable. Lower post-brushing gingival abrasion levels were seen in the power group. There was no correlation between gingival abrasion as a result of brushing and the observed gingival recession following use of either toothbrush. © 2014 The Authors International Journal of Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Gingival abrasion and recession in manual and oscillating–rotating power brush users

    PubMed Central

    Rosema, NAM; Adam, R; Grender, JM; Van der Sluijs, E; Supranoto, SC; Van der Weijden, GA

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess gingival recession (GR) in manual and power toothbrush users and evaluate the relationship between GR and gingival abrasion scores (GA). Methods This was an observational (cross-sectional), single-centre, examiner-blind study involving a single-brushing exercise, with 181 young adult participants: 90 manual brush users and 91 oscillating–rotating power brush users. Participants were assessed for GR and GA as primary response variables. Secondary response variables were the level of gingival inflammation, plaque score reduction and brushing duration. Pearson correlation was used to describe the relationship between number of recession sites and number of abrasions. Prebrushing (baseline) and post-brushing GA and plaque scores were assessed and differences analysed using paired tests. Two-sample t-test was used to analyse group differences; ancova was used for analyses of post-brushing changes with baseline as covariate. Results Overall, 97.8% of the study population had at least one site of ≥1 mm of gingival recession. For the manual group, this percentage was 98.9%, and for the power group, this percentage was 96.7% (P = 0.621). Post-brushing, the power group showed a significantly smaller GA increase than the manual group (P = 0.004); however, there was no significant correlation between number of recession sites and number of abrasions for either group (P ≥ 0.327). Conclusions Little gingival recession was observed in either toothbrush user group; the observed GR levels were comparable. Lower post-brushing gingival abrasion levels were seen in the power group. There was no correlation between gingival abrasion as a result of brushing and the observed gingival recession following use of either toothbrush. PMID:24871587

  6. Calcium release rates from tooth enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents and abrasives.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Danilo Barral; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; de Araujo, Roberto Paulo Correia

    2010-01-01

    Tooth whitening agents containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide are used frequently in esthetic dental procedures. However, lesions on the enamel surface have been attributed to the action of these products. Using conventional procedures for separating and isolating biological structures, powdered enamel was obtained and treated with hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, and sodium bicarbonate, ingredients typically found in dentifrices. The enamel was exposed to different pH levels, and atomic emission spectrometry was used to determine calcium release rates. As the pH level increased, the rate of calcium release from enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents decreased. Carbamide peroxide produced the lowest amount of decalcification, while sodium bicarbonate produced the highest release rates at all pH levels.

  7. Abrasive Wear of Four Direct Restorative Materials by Standard and Whitening Dentifrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    after an acidic challenge . Enamel loss was significantly greater when erosive and abrasive effects were combined. They concluded that acid-softened...surrounding soft tissues. Another benefit of restoration is the elimination of a challenging area for the patient and hygienist to clean. These areas...abrasion challenge ; the resin cement with the smallest sized filler particles had the smallest weight loss and maintained the smoothest surface of all the

  8. Profilometric analysis of two composite resins' surface repolished after tooth brush abrasion with three polishing systems.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Mudit; Ganesh, Arathi; Balagopal, Suresh; Kaur, Gurleen

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of three polishing protocols that could be implemented at recall on the surface roughness of two direct esthetic restorative materials. Specimens (n = 40) measuring 8 mm (length) × 5 mm (width) × 4 mm (height) were fabricated in an acrylic mold using two light-cured resin-based materials (microfilled composite and microhybrid composite). After photopolymerization, all specimens were finished and polished with one of three polishing protocols (Enhance, One Gloss, and Sof-Lex polishing systems). The average surface roughness of each treated specimen was determined using 3D optical profilometer. Next all specimens were brushed 60,000 times with nylon bristles at 7200 rpm using crosshead brushing device with equal parts of toothpaste and water used as abrasive medium. The surface roughness of each specimen was measured after brushing followed by repolishing with one of three polishing protocols, and then, the final surface roughness values were determined. The data were analyzed using one-way and two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD). Significant difference (P < 0.05) in surface roughness was observed. Simulated brushing following initial polishing procedure significantly roughened the surface of restorative material (P < 0.05). Polishing protocols can be used to restore a smooth surface on esthetic restorative materials following simulated tooth brushing.

  9. Toothbrush abrasivity in a long-term simulation on human dentin depends on brushing mode and bristle arrangement.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Schmidt, Ilka; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of dentin to brushing abrasion using four different toothbrushes (rotating-oscillating, sonic and two types of manual toothbrushes) with the same brushing forces. Dentin samples (n = 72) were selected from 72 impacted third molars. Half of the surface of dentin samples was covered with an adhesive tape, creating a protected and a freely exposed area in the same specimen. Brushing was performed with either a: sonic (Sonicare PowerUp, Philips GmbH, Hamburg, Germany), b: oscillating-rotating (Oral B Vitality Precisions Clean, Procter & Gamble, Schwalbach am Taunus, Germany) or two different manual toothbrushes c: flat trim brush head toothbrush (Dr. Best: Original, Glaxo-Smith-Kline, Bühl, Germany) and d: rippled-shaped brush head toothbrush (Blend-a-Dent, Complete V-Interdental, Blend-a-med, Schwalbach, Germany) in a custom made automatic brushing machine. The brushing force was set to 2 N and a whitening toothpaste (RDA = 150) was used. The simulation period was performed over a calculated period to mimic a brushing behavior of two times a day brushing for eight years and six months. Dentin loss was quantitatively determined by profilometry and statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney-U Test (p < 0.05). The mean (standard deviation) surface loss was 21.03 (±1.26) μm for the sonic toothbrush, 15.71 (±0.85) μm for the oscillating-rotating toothbrush, 6.13 (±1.24) μm for the manual toothbrush with flat trim brush head and 2.50 (±0.43) μm for the manual toothbrush with rippled-shaped brush head. Differences between all groups were statistically significant at p<0.05. Using the same brushing force and a highly abrasive toothpaste, manual toothbrushes are significantly less abrasive compared to power toothbrushes for an 8.5-year simulation.

  10. The comparative clinical efficacy of pyrophosphate/triclosan, copolymer/triclosan and zinc citrate/triclosan dentifrices for the reduction of supragingival calculus formation.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, K J; Kowolik, M J; Curzon, M E; Müller, I; McKeown, S; Hill, C M; Hannigan, C; Bartizek, R D; White, D J

    1997-01-01

    Three triclosan-containing "multi-benefit" dentifrices were compared for clinical efficacy in reducing supragingival calculus formation following a dental prophylaxis. A total of 544 subjects completed a double-blind parallel-group clinical study using the Volpe-Manhold Index (VMI) to record severity and occurrence of supragingival calculus. The study design included a pre-test period where the calculus formation rate was measured in subjects brushing with a placebo dentifrice. Following a prophylaxis, subjects were stratified for age, gender and VMI scores and assigned to one of four treatments: 1) a dentifrice containing 5.0% soluble pyrophosphate/0.145% fluoride as NaF/silica abrasive/0.28% triclosan (hereafter PPi/TCS-comparable to Crest Complete dentifrice, Procter & Gamble, UK); 2) a commercial dentifrice containing 2.0% Gantrez acid copolymer/ 0.145% fluoride as NaF/silica abrasive/0.30% triclosan (hereafter Gan/TCS-Colgate Total dentifrice, Colgate-Palmolive Company, UK); 3) a commercial dentifrice containing 0.5% zinc citrate trihydrate/0.15% fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate/silica abrasive/0.20% triclosan (hereafter Zn/TCS-Mentadent P dentifrice, Unilever, UK); and 4) a control dentifrice comprised of 0.145% fluoride as NaF/silica abrasive (hereafter Control). Subjects were instructed to use their assigned dentifrice at least twice per day and to brush as they do normally. Supragingival calculus formation was assesed at two and four months using site-specific and whole-mouth VMI indices for both calculus severity and occurrence. Following four months of use, the PPi/TCS dentifrice provided statistically significant reductions in calculus severity (22-23%) and occurrence (15%) as compared with the Control dentifrice. The Zn/TCS dentifrice also provided significant reductions in calculus severity (17-19%) and occurrence (12-13%) as compared with the Control. The Gan/TCS produced no statistically significant reductions in calculus formation (occurrence

  11. Charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John K; Bashirelahi, Nasir; Reynolds, Mark A

    2017-09-01

    Sales of charcoal dentifrices and powders have rapidly emerged into the Internet marketplace. The authors conducted a literature review to examine the efficacy and safety of charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices. The authors searched the MEDLINE and Scopus databases for clinical studies on the use of charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices and laboratory investigations on the bioactivity or toxicity of charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices, published through February 2017. The authors used a defined search strategy to identify randomized, controlled clinical trials with a follow-up duration of 3 months or longer. In addition, the authors selected the first 50 consecutive charcoal dentifrices from Google.com and Amazon.com for ascertainment of product assortment and advertising promotions. The authors' literature search identified 118 potentially eligible articles. Thirteen studies reported brushing the teeth with raw charcoal or soot; however, none of these studies met the inclusion criteria. Two studies offered nonspecific caries reductions, 3 studies reported deleterious outcomes (increased caries, enamel abrasion, nonquantified negative impact), and 1 study indicated only that brushing with raw charcoal had no adverse effects on oral hygiene. Seven other studies reported only on the use of charcoal for oral hygiene. Internet advertisements included unsubstantiated therapeutic claims-such as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and oral detoxification, as well as potentially misleading product assertions. One-third of the charcoal dentifrices contained bentonite clay, and 1 contained betel leaves. The results of this literature review showed insufficient clinical and laboratory data to substantiate the safety and efficacy claims of charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices. Larger-scale and well-designed studies are needed to establish conclusive evidence. Dental clinicians should advise their patients to be cautious when using charcoal and charcoal

  12. Tooth brush abrasion of paint-on resins for shade modification of crown and bridge resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji; McCabe, John F

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and resistance to toothbrush abrasion of three experimental paint-on composite resins developed for the shade modification of crown and bridge resins. The paint-on resins had less filler volume fraction than restorative composites or the crown and bridge resins and consequently were of low viscosity. The maximum surface roughness (Rmax) and the maximum depth loss by abrasion for the paint-on resins following 40,000 cycles of brushing ranged from 2.45 to 4.07 microm and 8.63 to 13.67 microm, respectively. Rmax values were 37.7-67.5% lower than that for the crown and bridge resin subjected to the same test. Wear depth was 19.9-49.4% lower than for the crown and bridge resin. These results suggest that the paint-on resins are expected to have adequate resistance to toothbrush abrasion and may therefore be suitable for clinical use.

  13. The effect of various dentifrices on surface roughness and gloss of resin composites.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Juliana; Adams-Belusko, Anne; Riley, Kelly; Ferracane, Jack L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different levels of abrasiveness (RDA) of dentifrices on the gloss and surface roughness of resin composites after toothbrushing. Sixty disk-shaped composite specimens (D=10.0mm, 2-mm thick, n=15 per material) were made of: microfill (Durafill), nanofill (Filtek Supreme), minifill hybrid (Filtek 250), and nanohybrid (Premise). One side of each specimen was finished with a carbide bur and polished with Enhance and Pogo. Five specimens of each composite were randomly assigned to one of the dentifrices, Colgate Total (CT; RDA 70), Colgate baking soda & peroxide whitening (CBS; RDA 145), and Colgate tartar control & whitening (CTW; RDA 200). Surface gloss was measured with a glossmeter and surface roughness with a profilometer before and after toothbrushing with a 1:2 slurry (dentifrice/deionised water) at 5760 strokes in a brushing machine (approximately 1Hz). Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA/Tukey's (p<0.05). There was a significant reduction in gloss and increase in surface roughness after brushing with all dentifrices. There was no significant difference in gloss when Durafill was brushed with any dentifrice; the other composites showed less gloss reduction when brushed with CT. Durafill, Supreme and Premise did not show significantly different surface roughness results and CBS and CTW did not produce significantly different results. Dentifrices of lower abrasivity promote less reduction in gloss and surface roughness for composites of different particle sizes after brushing. Composites containing smaller average fillers showed less reduction in gloss and less increase in surface roughness than ones with larger fillers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Toothbrush abrasivity in a long-term simulation on human dentin depends on brushing mode and bristle arrangement

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of dentin to brushing abrasion using four different toothbrushes (rotating-oscillating, sonic and two types of manual toothbrushes) with the same brushing forces. Methods Dentin samples (n = 72) were selected from 72 impacted third molars. Half of the surface of dentin samples was covered with an adhesive tape, creating a protected and a freely exposed area in the same specimen. Brushing was performed with either a: sonic (Sonicare PowerUp, Philips GmbH, Hamburg, Germany), b: oscillating-rotating (Oral B Vitality Precisions Clean, Procter & Gamble, Schwalbach am Taunus, Germany) or two different manual toothbrushes c: flat trim brush head toothbrush (Dr. Best: Original, Glaxo-Smith-Kline, Bühl, Germany) and d: rippled-shaped brush head toothbrush (Blend-a-Dent, Complete V-Interdental, Blend-a-med, Schwalbach, Germany) in a custom made automatic brushing machine. The brushing force was set to 2 N and a whitening toothpaste (RDA = 150) was used. The simulation period was performed over a calculated period to mimic a brushing behavior of two times a day brushing for eight years and six months. Dentin loss was quantitatively determined by profilometry and statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney-U Test (p < 0.05). Results The mean (standard deviation) surface loss was 21.03 (±1.26) μm for the sonic toothbrush, 15.71 (±0.85) μm for the oscillating-rotating toothbrush, 6.13 (±1.24) μm for the manual toothbrush with flat trim brush head and 2.50 (±0.43) μm for the manual toothbrush with rippled-shaped brush head. Differences between all groups were statistically significant at p<0.05. Conclusion Using the same brushing force and a highly abrasive toothpaste, manual toothbrushes are significantly less abrasive compared to power toothbrushes for an 8.5—year simulation. PMID:28222156

  15. Effect of tooth brush abrasion and thermo-mechanical loading on direct and indirect veneer restorations.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Sawaljanow, Alexander; Behr, Michael; Kolbeck, Carola; Preis, Verena

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toothbrush abrasion and in vitro aging on ceramic (indirect technique) and composite veneers (direct technique). Identical composite and individual human incisors were restored with industrially preformed composite veneers, indirectly produced ceramic veneers, and direct composite restorations. Surface roughness was determined before and after tooth brushing. A 5-year period of oral service was simulated by thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML). After TCML, all specimens were examined with microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Specimens without failures during TCML were loaded until failure. analysis of variance; Bonferroni's post hoc analysis, Kaplan-Meier-Log Rank test (α = 0.05). Tooth brushing yielded a non-significant increase (p = 0.560) in roughness in all materials (industrial veneer, 0.12+/-0.07 μm, direct restoration, 0.18+/-0.14 μm, ceramic, 0.35+/-0.16 μm). No significant differences in roughness could be determined between the materials, neither before nor after testing (p < 0.001). After TCML of artificial teeth, direct and preformed composite veneers on composite teeth showed no failures or damages. Two ceramic veneers showed cracking in the labial area. After TCML of human teeth, transmission microscopy indicated a facial crack in a ceramic veneer and chipping in the cervical area of a preformed veneer. Two direct composite veneers lost retention. No significantly different survival rates were found between the three veneer groups. Fracture force on human teeth varied between 527.8+/-132.4 N (ceramic), 478.3+/-165.4 N (preformed composite), and 605.0+/-263.5 N (direct composite). All materials revealed comparable wear resistance. Indirect ceramic, direct restorative composite, and preformed composite veneers showed comparable failure rates and satisfying longevity. The results indicate similar longevity of the chosen materials for veneer restorations.

  16. Effect of bleaching agents and whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of human teeth enamel.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Pelin; Kansu, Gülay; Özak, Sule Tuğba; Kurtulmuş-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Kansu, Pelin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents at different times and also subjected to different superficial cleaning treatments. One hundred and forty flat enamel samples were divided into 14 groups, Group 1-Group 14 (G1-G14). G1-G7 were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide and different dentifrices, G8-G14 were treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide and different dentifrices (G1 and G8: not brushed as control groups; G2 and G9: brushed with Ipana® toothpaste; G3 and G10: brushed with Clinomyn® toothpaste; G4 and G11: brushed with Moos Dent® toothpaste; G5 and G12: brushed with Signal® toothpaste; G6 and G13: brushed with Colgate® toothpaste; G7 and G14: brushed without dentifrice). A profilometer was used to measure average roughness values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval. The bleaching was performed for 6 h a day and the surface cleaning treatment was performed 3-times a day, 2 min each time, for 4 weeks. The samples were stored in distilled water during the test period. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in surface roughness values over time for all groups except G1 and G8 (not brushed). The results of the surface roughness of all groups were nearly the same. The bleaching with 10% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with abrasive dentifrices, a significant increase in roughness values was observed.

  17. In vitro study on tooth enamel lesions related to whitening dentifrice.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Danilo Barral; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Campos, Elisângela de Jesus; Correia de Araújo, Roberto Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The tooth whitening substances for extrinsic use that are available in Brazil contain hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. Several studies have attributed the appearance of lesions in the enamel morphology, including hypersensitivity, to these substances. Such lesions justify fluoride therapy and application of infrared lasers, among other procedures. However, there is no consensus among researchers regarding the relevance of the severity of lesions detected on the tooth surface. The present study was carried out with an aim of evaluating in vitro the effects of the hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide and sodium bicarbonate contained in dentifrice formulations, on human tooth enamel. After darkening process in laboratory, human premolars were brushed using dentifrice containing the two whitening substances (Rembrandt - carbamide peroxide and Mentadent - hydrogen peroxide) and the abrasive product (Colgate - sodium bicarbonate). The degree of specimen staining before and after this procedure was determined using spectrophotometry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to obtain images, which were analyzed to show the nature of the lesions that appeared on the enamel surface. The effectiveness of the whitening caused by hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and the abrasion caused by bicarbonate were confirmed, given that the treated test pieces returned to their original coloration. Based on SEM, evaluation of the enamel surfaces subjected to the test products showed that different types of morphologic lesions of varying severity appeared. Whitening dentifrice containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide produced lesions on the enamel surface such that the greatest sequelae were associated with exposure to hydrogen peroxide.

  18. A four-week clinical study to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of a baking soda dentifrice and an antimicrobial dentifrice in reducing plaque.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Annahita; Vorwerk, Linda M; Hooper, William J; Putt, Mark S; Milleman, Kimberly R

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the effectiveness in reducing plaque of a fluoride dentifrice containing baking soda and a non-baking soda fluoride dentifrice containing an antimicrobial (triclosan/copolymer) system after a single brushing and over a four-week period of daily brushing. A total of 207 subjects completed this randomized, blinded, parallel-group clinical study. Twenty-four hour plaque buildup was scored at baseline and after two and four weeks of twice-daily use of the products. Additionally, controlled single brushing with the assigned dentifrice, followed by post-brushing plaque assessment, was performed at the start (baseline visit) and end (Week-4 visit) of the study. Plaque was scored using the Turesky, et al. modification of Quigley-Hein Index at six sites per tooth, according to Soparkar's modification. Mean baseline whole mouth plaque scores for the baking soda and triclosan dentifrice groups were 2.90 +/- 0.40 and 2.90 +/- 0.39, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. Within-group analysis showed that both products significantly reduced the amount of plaque over the four-week period (p < 0.001). Between-group analysis showed that brushing with the baking soda dentifrice exhibited significantly greater reduction in plaque scores (p < 0.001) after two and four weeks of brushing as compared to the triclosan dentifrice. After four weeks, the mean plaque reduction for the baking soda dentifrice group (0.34 +/- 0.32) was 2.22-fold greater than that observed for the triclosan dentifrice group (0.15 +/- 0.24). Similarly, single brushing with the baking soda dentifrice showed a 1.88- to 2.08-fold greater pre- to post-brushing plaque difference as compared to the triclosan dentifrice at the baseline visit (mean plaque reduction: baking soda 0.54 +/- 0.26; triclosan 0.28 +/- 0.18; ratio 1.88X) and Week-4 visit (baking soda 0.47 +/- 0.21; triclosan 0.23 +/- 0.15; ratio 2.08X). Similar to the whole mouth scores, evaluation of various

  19. Impact of toothbrushing with a dentifrice containing calcium peroxide on enamel color and roughness.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Diala Aretha de Sousa; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pinheiro, Fabio Henrique de Sa Leitao; Duarte, Rosangela Marques; Araujo, Renato Evangelista de; Braz, Rodivan; Santos, Maria Carmo Moreira da Silva; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassu Resende

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate both the bleaching potential and changes to average surface roughness (Ra) of enamel after brushing with a dentifrice. Fifty-four enamel specimens (4 x 4 x 2 mm) were divided into 3 groups (n = 18) and treated with 1 of 3 dentifrices: 1 with calcium peroxide, and 2 without. The samples were submitted to 20,000 brushing cycles. Color and Ra were measured before and after brushing. Although the Ra increased in all groups after brushing, only the dentifrice containing calcium peroxide resulted in an increase in reflectance.

  20. Abrasion resistance of direct and indirect resins as a function of a sealant veneer.

    PubMed

    Ferraz Caneppele, Taciana Marco; Rocha, Daniel Maranha; Màximo Araujo, Maria Amelia; Valera, Màrcia Carneiro; Salazar Marocho, Susana MarIa

    2014-01-01

    Abrasive wear is one of the most common type of wear that not only affect teeth, as also dental restorations. Thus to investigate one of the etiological factors as tooth brushing procedure is clinical relevant in order to select the best material combination that may prevent damage of resin dental restoration's abrasion. This study evaluated the influence of tooth brushing on mass loss and surface roughness of direct Venus (Vs) and indirect Signum (Sg) resin composites, with and without a surface sealant, Fortify (F). Twenty-four specimens were prepared with each resin composite, using their proprietary curing units, according to manufacturer's instructions. All the specimens were polished and ultrasonically cleaned in distilled water for 5 minutes. Half of the specimens of each resin (n = 12) were covered with F (Vs F and Sg F ), except for the control (C) specimens (Vs C and Sg C ), which were not sealed. Mass loss (ML) as well as surface roughness (Ra ) was measured for all the specimens. Then, the specimens were subjected to toothbrush-dentifrice abrasion, using a testing machine for 67.000 brushing strokes, in an abrasive slurry. After brushing simulation, the specimens were removed from the holder, rinsed thoroughly and blot dried with soft absorbent paper. The abrasion of the material was quantitatively determined with final measurements of ML and surface roughness, using the method described above. ML data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the analysis indicated that resin composites were not statistically different; however, the specimens sealed with F showed higher ML. Ra mean values of the groups Vs F and Sg F significantly increased. Tooth brushing affects mainly the roughness of the direct and indirect resin composites veneered with a sealant.

  1. In vivo antiplaque efficacy of combined antimicrobial dentifrice and rinse hygiene regimens.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Barker, Matthew L; Klukowska, Malgorzata

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate using digital plaque image analysis the antiplaque efficacy of oral care regimens including use of antimicrobial toothpaste in combination with antimicrobial mouthrinse. 16 subjects completed the study protocol including: (1) initial treatment phase, all subjects used a standard sodium fluoride dentifrice with 2x/day brushing, (2) second treatment phase, subjects were randomized to two treatment groups: stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice or sodium fluoride triclosan/copolymer dentifrice; (3) third treatment phase, the group using stannous fluoride dentifrice rinsed with alcohol-free cetylpyridinium chloride mouthrinse and the group using triclosan dentifrice rinsed with essential oil mouthrinse. During each phase, plaque levels were assessed in the morning before toothbrushing (AM), post-brushing in the morning (PB) and in the afternoon (PM). Stannous fluoride dentifrice was superior to triclosan dentifrice in plaque growth inhibition between toothbrushing. Both mouthrinses provided additional plaque prevention benefits when used with antimicrobial dentifrices. The cetylpyridinium chloride mouthrinse and stannous fluoride dentifrice regimen was particularly effective, building accretive efficacy over time. Average plaque reductions exceeded 50% vs. sodium fluoride dentifrice alone. Chemotherapeutic dentifrices and rinses increase plaque control used alone and particularly in combination. The stannous fluoride-cetylpyridinium chloride regimen showed the greatest benefits.

  2. Toothbrushing abrasion susceptibility of enamel and dentin bleached with calcium-supplemented hydrogen peroxide gel.

    PubMed

    Borges, A B; Santos, L F T F; Augusto, M G; Bonfiette, D; Hara, A T; Torres, C R G

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate enamel and dentin susceptibility to toothbrushing abrasion, after bleaching with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel supplemented or not with 0.5% calcium gluconate (Ca). Toothbrushing was performed immediately and 1h after bleaching, with two suspensions (high and low abrasivity). Bovine enamel and dentin specimens were divided into 12 groups (n=10) according to the bleaching gel (with and without Ca), slurry abrasivity (high or low) and elapsed time after bleaching (immediately and after 1h). As control, a group was not bleached, but abraded. The treatment cycle (7 d) consisted of bleaching (1h) and toothbrushing (135 strokes/day) immediatelly or after 1h of artificial saliva exposure. Surface roughness and surface loss (μm) were measured by profilometry and analysed by three-way ANOVA (5%). Surface roughness means were significantly influenced by slurry abrasivity (p<0.0001). For enamel loss, significant triple interaction was observed (p<0.0001). HP-bleached groups and immediately brushed with high-abrasive slurry exhibited increased loss (1.41±0.14) compared to other groups (μm). Control and HP+Ca-bleached groups brushed after 1h with low abrasive slurry presented the lowest loss (0.21±0.03/0.27±0.02). For dentin loss, significant interaction was observed for bleaching and interval factors (p<0.001). 7.5%HP-bleached groups and immediately brushed showed significantly higher loss (8.71±2.45) than the other groups. It was concluded that surface roughness increased when high abrasive was used, independently of bleaching. 7.5%HP increased enamel and dentin loss, mainly with high abrasive slurries. Calcium supplementation of bleaching gel reduced surface loss. Additionally, in order to minimize tooth wear susceptibility, it is recommended to delay brushing after bleaching. After bleaching gel application, postponing toothbrushing is recommended, as well as brushing with low abrasive dentifrices. Additionally

  3. Effect of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of commercial composites.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Guilherme Machado; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto; Burnett, Luiz Henrique

    2011-10-01

    Our study aimed to test the null hypothesis that whitening and non-whitening dentifrices affect similarly the surface roughness of commercial microhybrid composites, independent of the brushing time. One hundred and ninety-two disc-shaped specimens of Filtek Z250 (3 M/ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) and Rok (SDI, Australia) were built up and randomly assigned to 24 groups, based on the dentifrices used (two whitening dentifrices: Colgate Max White-Colgate-Palmolive, São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil and Close Up Extra Whitening-Unilever, Brasil Higiene Pessoal e Limpeza Ltda, Ipojuca, Pernambuco, Brazil; and one non-whitening dentifrice: Colgate Total 12 Clean Mint-Colgate-Palmolive), and on the simulated brushing times (24 hours, 6, 12 and 24 months). The specimens were submitted to the toothbrushing regimens after which the surface roughness (Ra) was measured. Data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). The composite's surface roughness was significantly affected by the composites (p=0.0007), the dentifrices (p=0.0001), and the simulated brushing time (p=0.0001). Higher roughness was observed when the whitening dentifrices were used and when the brushing time increased. Filtek Z250 was more affected than Rok, especially after 24 months of simulated brushing. Whitening dentifrices produced higher surface roughness in the composites tested. The degree of surface compromising increased with brushing time and depends on the composite's microstructure and composition. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fluoride availability in human saliva after dentifrice use: correlation with anticaries effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Afflitto, J; Schmid, R; Esposito, A; Toddywala, R; Gaffar, A

    1992-04-01

    Studies were conducted to determine fluoride availability in saliva after dentifrice use and to relate this parameter to cariostatic efficacy in rat caries experiments. Three dentifrices--two commercial formulations (Colgate Winterfresh Gel and Crest Dentifrice with Na-Sr-polyacrylate) and an Experimental dentifrice--were compared with respect to salivary fluoride availability. All of the dentifrices tested contained 1100 ppm F as sodium fluoride. It was observed that the Experimental dentifrice and Crest dentifrice with Sr-polyacrylate exhibited low salivary fluoride availability relative to the Colgate Winterfresh Gel. Salivary fluoride availability was assessed by means of two parameters: (a) the fluoride concentration in the dentifrice saliva slurry expectorated after brushing, and (b) the area under the curve of salivary F concentration vs. time for up to two hours after dentifrice use. In two rat caries experiments, it was observed that both the Experimental dentifrice and the Sr-polyacrylate dentifrice provided less cariostatic efficacy than the clinically validated Positive Control (Colgate Winterfesh Gel). Analysis of these data provides further evidence in support of the concept that fluoride availability in saliva following dentifrice use is an important parameter related to anticaries efficacy.

  5. Stain removal and whitening by baking soda dentifrice: A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2017-11-01

    Tooth discoloration may be caused by intrinsic or extrinsic stains or a combination of both. There are 2 major approaches to removing the stains, including the chemical mechanism using peroxides for tooth bleaching and the mechanical mechanism using abrasives in prophylactic pastes and dentifrices to remove stains, resulting in a whitening effect. Attempts have also been made to add a low concentration of peroxides to dentifrices to enhance their abrasive cleaning to remove tooth stains. This article provides a review of both in vitro and clinical studies on stain removal and whitening effect of dentifrices containing sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). In recent years, whitening dentifrices have become popular because of little additional effort for use, ease of availability, low cost, and accumulated evidence of clinical efficacy and safety in the literature. Advances in research and technology have led to innovative formulations of dentifrices using baking soda as the sole abrasive or a component of an abrasive system. Baking soda is biologically compatible with acid-buffering capacities, antibacterial at high concentrations, and has a relatively lower abrasivity. The evidence available in the literature indicates that baking soda-based dentifrices are effective and safe for tooth stain removal and consequently whitening. A number of clinical studies have also shown that baking soda-based dentifrices are more effective in stain removal and whitening than some non-baking soda-containing dentifrices with a higher abrasivity. So far, research efforts have mainly focused on stain removal and tooth-whitening efficacy and clinical safety of baking soda dentifrices used with manual toothbrushes, with only a few studies investigating their effects using powered toothbrushes, for which further research is encouraged. As part of a daily oral hygiene practice, baking soda-based dentifrice is a desirable, alternative or additional measure for tooth stain removal and whitening

  6. Effect of baking soda in dentifrices on plaque removal.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Srinivas R

    2017-11-01

    The prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases targets control of dental plaque biofilm. In this context, chemical agents could represent a valuable complement to mechanical plaque control by reducing and controlling biofilm formation. The literature on the effectiveness of different dentifrices has not, however, been carefully categorized. A lack of consensus exists among dental professionals on a recommendation for a universal dentifrice for plaque control. The authors reviewed the scientific data on the different properties of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)-containing dentifrices and their effectiveness in plaque removal. The results of the literature search show that baking soda-containing dentifrices are ideal candidates to be considered as a universal dentifrice because baking soda is inexpensive, abundant in supply, highly biocompatible, exhibits specific antibacterial properties to oral microorganisms, has low abrasivity, and is effective in plaque biofilm removal. Although some patients may benefit from desensitizing or high fluoride-containing dentifrices, those with routine needs may find using dentifrices containing baking soda and fluoride effective. Baking soda and fluoride dentifrices, therefore, may perhaps be considered as a criterion standard for patients with routine oral hygiene needs. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of whitening and regular dentifrices on orthodontic clear ligature color stability.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê S; Kaizer, Marina R; Salgado, Vinícius E; Soldati, Dener C; Silva, Roberta C; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of brushing orthodontic clear ligatures with a whitening dentifrice containing a blue pigment (Close Up White Now, Unilever, London, UK) on their color stability, when exposed to a staining agent. Ligatures from 3M Unitek (Monrovia, CA, USA) and Morelli (Sorocaba, SP, Brazil) were tested. Baseline color measurements were performed and nonstained groups (control) were stored in distilled water whereas test groups were exposed for 1 hour daily to red wine. Specimens were brushed daily using regular or whitening dentifrice. Color measurements were repeated after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days using a spectrophotometer based on the CIE L*a*b* system. Decreased luminosity (CIE L*), increased red discoloration (CIE a* axis), and increased yellow discoloration (CIE b* axis) were generally observed for ligatures exposed to the staining agent. Color variation was generally lower in specimens brushed with regular dentifrice, but ligatures brushed with whitening dentifrice were generally less red and less yellow than regular dentifrice. The whitening dentifrice led to blue discoloration trend, with visually detectable differences particularly apparent according to storage condition and ligature brand. The whitening dentifrice containing blue pigment did not improve the ligature color stability, but it decreased yellow discoloration and increased a blue coloration. The use of a whitening dentifrice containing blue pigment during orthodontic treatment might decrease the yellow discoloration of elastic ligatures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo.

    PubMed

    Creeth, Jonathan; Zero, Domenick; Mau, Melissa; Bosma, Mary Lynn; Butler, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  9. Clinical comparison of plaque inhibition effects of a novel stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice and a chlorhexidine digluconate dentifrice using digital plaque imaging.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, P G; Boulding, A; Farmer, S; Day, T N; Mussett, A J; Barker, M L

    2011-01-01

    To compare the plaque inhibition efficacy of a novel 0.454% stannous fluoride (SnF2) test dentifrice with sodium hexametaphosphate and stannous chloride to a chlorhexidine digluconate (0.05%), aluminium lactate (0.8%), and aluminium fluoride marketed control dentifrice (Lacalut Aktiv or AlF3/Chx). This was a randomized, two-treatment, two-period, double-blind crossover study that compared the SnF2 test dentifrice to the AlF3/Chx control dentifrice. Each of the two treatment periods lasted for 17 consecutive days of product use, during which subjects were required to brush twice per day with their assigned dentifrice using a standard manual toothbrush (Oral-B P35 Indicator). The two periods of the crossover were separated by a four-day washout period. Plaque levels on the facial anterior tooth surfaces were evaluated and averaged among three assessment days at the end of each treatment period using digital plaque imaging analysis (DPIA). The evening prior to assessments, subjects only brushed lingual surfaces. Assessment time points were carried out in the morning following no morning brushing (A.M. pre-brush), following 40 seconds of brushing with the assigned dentifrice (A.M. post-brush), and in the afternoon (P.M.). The DPIA captured images were used to calculate and analyze visible plaque coverage. Twenty-eight subjects were randomized and completed the study. At each assessment time point, the SnF2 test dentifrice demonstrated a statistically significant lower plaque level compared to the AlF3/Chx dentifrice: A.M. mean pre-brush 15.9% lower, p < 0.05; A.M. mean post-brush 22.2% lower, p < 0.05; P.M. mean 24.3% lower, p < 0.005. Compared to the AlF3/Chx control dentifrice, the novel SnF2 test dentifrice significantly inhibited plaque regrowth overnight and during the day. Immediately after brushing there was also significantly less plaque coverage with the SnF2 test dentifrice.

  10. Association Between Socioeconomic Factors and the Choice of Dentifrice and Fluoride Intake by Children

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carolina Castro; Oliveira, Maria José; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2011-01-01

    It is questionable whether socioeconomic factors influence the choice of marketed children’s dentifrices and whether these products are associated with greater fluoride (F) intake in children. The present cross-sectional study involving 197 children (mean age: 40.98 ± 6.62 months) was carried out in Montes Claros, Brazil. Parents completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic status and the tooth brushing habits of their children. The children brushed their teeth and saliva residues were collected for F analysis. F intake from dentifrice was determined with an ion-specific electrode. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to test whether the type of dentifrice (children’s or family) and F dose (<0.05 and ≥0.05 mg F/Kg of body weight/day) were associated with the independent variables (p < 0.05). No differences were found between children’s and family dentifrices regarding daily F intake (0.046 and 0.040 mg F/Kg/day, respectively; p = 0.513). The following were strong predictors for the use of a children’s dentifrice: studying at a private kindergarten (OR: 6.89; p < 0.001); age that the child begun to tooth brush <2 years (OR: 2.93; p = 0.041), and the interaction between the variables “use of the same dentifrice as parents” and “type of tooth brush used” (OR: 27.20; p < 0.001). “The amount of dentifrice used” and “frequency of tooth brushing” (p ≤ 0.004) had a statistically and synergistic effect over the daily F dose. The present study found a social influence over the choice of dentifrice: children with a high socioeconomic status tend to use a children’s dentifrice. The amount of dentifrice used can strongly increase the risk of exposure to higher doses of F, regardless of the type of dentifrice. PMID:22163207

  11. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits.

  12. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base

    PubMed Central

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Background The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. Aim To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. Methods This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Results ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. Conclusion CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:28713496

  13. Effect of toothbrushing duration and dentifrice quantity on enamel remineralisation: An in situ randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Creeth, J E; Kelly, S A; González-Cabezas, C; Karwal, R; Martinez-Mier, E A; Lynch, R J M; Bosma, M L; Zero, D T

    2016-12-01

    The influence of toothbrushing duration and dentifrice quantity on fluoride efficacy against dental caries is poorly understood. This study investigated effects of these two oral hygiene factors on enamel remineralisation (measured as surface microhardness recovery [SMHR]), enamel fluoride uptake (EFU), and net acid resistance (NAR) post-remineralisation in a randomized clinical study using an in situ caries model. Subjects (n=63) wore their partial dentures holding partially demineralised human enamel specimens and brushed twice-daily for two weeks, following each of five regimens: brushing for 120 or 45s with 1.5g of 1150ppm F (as NaF) dentifrice; for 120 or 45s with 0.5g of this dentifrice; and for 120s with 1.5g of 250ppm F (NaF) dentifrice. Comparing brushing for 120s against brushing for 45s, SMHR and EFU increased by 20.0% and 26.9% respectively when 1.5g dentifrice was used; and by 22.8% and 19.9% respectively when 0.5g dentifrice was used. Comparing brushing with 1.5g against brushing with 0.5g dentifrice, SMHR and EFU increased by 35.3% and 51.3% respectively when brushing for 120s, and by 38.4% and 43.0% respectively when brushing for 45s. Increasing brushing duration and dentifrice quantity also increased the NAR value. The effects of these two oral hygiene factors on SMHR, EFU, and NAR were statistically significant (p<0.05 in all cases). Brushing duration and dentifrice quantity have the potential to influence the anti-caries effectiveness of fluoride dentifrices. Study NCT01563172 on ClinicalTrials.gov. The effect of two key oral hygiene regimen factors - toothbrushing duration and dentifrice quantity - on fluoride's anticaries effectiveness is unclear. This 2-week home-use in situ remineralisation clinical study showed both these factors can influence fluoride bioactivity, and so can potentially affect fluoride's ability to protect against caries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness and mode of action of whitening dentifrices on enamel extrinsic stains.

    PubMed

    Alshara, Salem; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the mode of action and the whitening effect of whitening dentifrices. Two hundred fifty-six bovine enamel specimens (10 × 10 mm(2)) were prepared, partially stained, and assigned into eight groups (n = 32): six whitening dentifrices, one nonwhitening and deionized water (negative control), and further divided in two subgroups (n = 16), according to the test model: chemical (dentifrice slurry treatment only) or chemo-mechanical (slurry + toothbrushing). Specimens were treated with dentifrice slurries 2 ×/day for 1 min and toothbrushed or not, according to each model. In between dentifrice treatments, specimens were artificially stained for 5 h. This protocol was repeated for 5 days and enamel color changes (∆E) were measured after each day (days 1-5). The abrasive level of the dentifrices was determined following the ISO11609 guidelines. In the chemo-mechanical model, the whitening action of all dentifrices was observed after day 1, being higher than the negative control group (p < 0.05). In days 2-5, nonsignificant changes in color were observed for all groups (p > 0.05). Differences on ∆E among dentifrices were observed, and they seemed to correlate well with their abrasive level (r(2) = 0.80). In the chemical model, no significant differences were observed among groups (p > 0.05), with ∆E remaining constant throughout the study. Higher ∆E values were observed in the chemo-mechanical model compared to the chemical (p < 0.05). All tested dentifrices were effective in whitening stained enamel and their mode of action showed to be mainly mechanical (toothbrushing abrasion). The abrasive level of dentifrices seems to determine its whitening effectiveness.

  15. Effects of regular and whitening dentifrices on remineralization of bovine enamel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kielbassa, Andrej M; Tschoppe, Peter; Hellwig, Elmar; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas

    2009-02-01

    To compare in vitro the remineralizing effects of different regular dentifrices and whitening dentifrices (containing pyrophosphates) on predemineralized enamel. Specimens from 84 bovine incisors were embedded in epoxy resin, partly covered with nail varnish, and demineralized in a lactic acid solution (37 degrees C, pH 5.0, 8 days). Parts of the demineralized areas were covered with nail varnish, and specimens were randomly assigned to 6 groups. Subsequently, specimens were exposed to a remineralizing solution (37 degrees C, pH 7.0, 60 days) and brushed 3 times a day (1:3 slurry with remineralizing solution) with 1 of 3 regular dentifrices designed for anticaries (group 1, amine; group 2, sodium fluoride) or periodontal (group 3, amine/stannous fluoride) purposes or whitening dentifrice containing pyrophosphates (group 4, sodium fluoride). An experimental dentifrice (group 5, without pyrophosphates/fluorides) and a whitening dentifrice (group 6, monofluorophosphate) served as controls. Mineral loss and lesion depths were evaluated from contact microradiographs, and intergroup comparisons were performed using the closed-test procedure (alpha =.05). Compared to baseline, specimens brushed with the dentifrices containing stannous/amine fluorides revealed significant mineral gains and lesion depth reductions (P < .05). Concerning the reacquired mineral, the whitening dentifrice performed worse than the regular dentifrices (P > .05), while mineral gain, as well as lesion depth, reduction was negligible with the control groups. Dentifrices containing pyrophosphates perform worse than regular dentifrices but do not necessarily affect remineralization. Unless remineralizing efficacy is proven, whitening dentifrices should be recommended only after deliberate consideration in caries-prone patients.

  16. Evaluation of ex vivo effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Mockdeci, Hanny; Polonini, Hudson; Granato, Ana-Paula; Raposo, Nádia; Chaves, Maria-das Graças

    2017-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity is a short, severe pain with fast onset. Therapy aims to either prevent or decrease neural transmission or physically occlude the dentinal tubules. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial desensitizing dentifrice by means of an ex vivo method. Material and Methods Samples (n=8 lower human premolars for each group) were randomly allocated into: G1- brushing with Colgate®Sensitive Pro-Relief; G2- brushing with Sensodyne®Rapid Relief; G3- brushing with Sensodyne®Repair & Protect; and G4- brushing with Colgate®Maximum Cavity Protection. The test bodies were submitted to simulated toothbrushing and dentifrices were analyzed regarding their hydrodynamic size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential. Specimens were evaluated using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); spectroscopy energy dispersive X-ray (EDS); and profilometry. A qualitative analysis of the photomicrographs and topographies was performed. Results The dentifrices showed statistical similar physical and chemical characteristics. They also demonstrated obliteration of dentinal tubules when micrographs were observed. Regarding the chemical elements present in the dentin samples, there was a statistically significant difference between the control and experimental surfaces in the four groups. Conclusions Joint data analysis shows that the desensitizing dentifrice showed better results with regards to the obliteration of dentinal tubules compared to positive and negative controls. Key words:Dentin hypersensitivity, dentin desensitizing agents, toothpastes. PMID:28469813

  17. Effects of Dentifrice Containing Hydroxyapatite on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion and Aqueous Hexavalent Chromium Cations Sorption: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr6+) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution. PMID:23300511

  18. Effect of Whitening Toothpastes on Dentin Abrasion: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Gustavo Henrique Apolinario; Nogueira, Marcia Bessa; Gaio, Eduardo Jose; Rosing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Santiago, Sergio Lima; Rego, Rodrigo Otavio

    To compare the effect of toothbrushing abrasion with hydrated silica-based whitening and regular toothpastes on root dentin using contact profilometry. Ninety dentin specimens (4 x 4 x 2 mm) were randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 18) according to the toothpaste: three whitening (W1, W2 and W3) and two regular toothpastes (R1 and R2) produced by two different manufacturers. Using a brushing machine, each specimen was brushed with a constant load of 300 g for 2500 cycles (4.5 cycles/s). The toothpastes were diluted at a ratio of 1:3 w/w (dentifrice:distilled water). The brush diamond tip of the profilometer moved at a constant speed of 0.05 mm/s with a force of 0.7 mN. The average value of brushing abrasion in μm (mean ± SD) was obtained from five consecutive measurements of each specimen: W1 = 8.86 ± 1.58, W2 = 7.59 ± 1.04, W3 = 8.27 ± 2.39, R1 = 2.89 ± 1.05 and R2= 2.94 ± 1.29. There was a significant difference between groups (ANOVA, p<0.0001). Post-hoc Tukey's test for multiple comparisons showed differences between all the whitening and regular toothpastes, but not among the whitening nor among the regular toothpastes. The whitening toothpastes tested can cause more dentin abrasion than the regular ones.

  19. [Historical investigation of dentifrice in China].

    PubMed

    Kubo, M; Song, Q; Tang, F

    2001-01-01

    A herbal literature survey was carried out on data concerning historical pharmacognostical changes of "dentifrice" in China and how diseases of the teeth and gums had been treated there in ancient times. It had been considered to be a matter of utmost importance that to prevent teeth from decaying, only the brushing of teeth with a toothbrush was necessary. Over time, various tooth agents have been found to treat oral diseases the teeth and gums. Glycyrrhizae Radix, Ginseng Radix, Scutellariae Radix, Menthae Herbal, and salt were widely used materials. Investigations from all approaches are being carried out to develop remedies for oral diseases, including Kampo medicine and the pharmacological effects of numerous crude drugs. When tracing the pharmacognostical changes of dentifrice in ancient China, we felt wonder at and admiration for the abundance of clinical experiences described in the old herbal and medical literature we researched.

  20. Oral fluoride retention after use of fluoride dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, R M; Morgan, S N

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride is the only extensively clinically proven means of reducing dental caries. Despite a large body of epidemiological data on the effectiveness of fluoride, delivered in the form of dentifrices, mouthrinses, drinking water, etc., the precise mode of action of fluoride is not completely understood. The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of the link between oral fluoride levels and applied fluoride dose from dentifrices. Human salivary fluoride clearance studies and equilibrium baseline studies of fluoride in saliva and plaque have been carried out with dentifrices which contained 1,000, 1,500 and 2,500 micrograms fluoride per gram as sodium monofluorophosphate. After a single brushing with a fluoride dentifrice, salivary fluoride decreased in two distinct phases: an initial rapid phase which lasted for 40-80 min, depending on the individual, and a second slow phase lasting for several hours. The latter phase is believed to be due to fluoride released from an oral fluoride reservoir. During regular repeated use of the test dentifrices, the equilibrium baseline fluoride concentration, attained in both saliva and plaque between one application and the next, increased significantly compared with placebo values. Such elevated baseline fluoride concentrations also increased with increasing Na2FPO3 content of the dentifrices. The present work supports the concept that labile fluoride, stored in an oral fluoride reservoir at the time of treatment application, may maintain a prolonged protective effect against dental caries.

  1. Effects of a triclosan dentifrice on plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding in pregnant women: five-month clinical results.

    PubMed

    Kraivaphan, P; Amornchat, C; Triratana, T

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice on plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding in pregnant subjects. This double-blind clinical study was carried out in 180 women at 3 months of pregnancy. The subjects were stratified into two balanced groups according to their baseline plaque, gingivitis and bleeding scores. Subjects received a thorough dental prophylaxis and were assigned to brush with either a placebo or triclosan dentifrice for five months. They were instructed to brush their teeth as they normally would, twice a day for one minute per brushing. Follow-up examinations after five months of dentifrice use evaluated supragingival plaque, gingivitis and gingival bleeding. After five months, the triclosan dentifrice significantly reduced plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding by 40.5%, 22.5% and 35.3%, respectively, compared to the placebo group (p<0.05).

  2. Supragingival calculus in children with gastrostomy feeding: significant reduction with a caregiver-applied tartar-control dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laurie M; Casamassimo, Paul S; Griffen, Ann; Tatakis, Dimitris

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the anti-calculus benefit of Crest Dual Action Whitening Toothpaste in gastrostomy (GT) children compared to a control anti-caries dentifrice. A double-blind randomized crossover design was used to compare the two dentifrices. A convenience sample of 24 GT subjects, 3-12 years old, was given a consensus baseline Volpe-Manhold Index calculus score by 2 trained examiners, followed by a dental prophylaxis to remove all calculus. Each child was randomly assigned to either study or control dentifrice groups. Caregivers brushed subjects' teeth twice daily with the unlabelled dentifrice for at least 45 seconds. Calculus was scored at 8 weeks (+/- 1 week) by the same investigators. Subjects then had a prophylaxis and received the alternative dentifrice. Subjects returned 8 weeks (+/- 1 week) later for final calculus scoring. The study dentifrice significantly reduced supragingival calculus from baseline by 58% compared to control dentifrice (p<0.005 need exact p-value unless it is <.001; maybe it's reported in the paper). Calculus levels decreased by 68% over the study duration, irrespective of dentifrice. ANOVA found no significant differences in calculus scores based on gender, race, history of reflux, aspiration pneumonia, or oral intake of food. Calculus was significantly related to history of aspiration pneumonia (p<0.05 need exact p-value here). Crest Dual Action Whitening Toothpaste was effective and better than anti-caries control dentifrice in reducing calculus in GT children.

  3. Surface texture and composition of titanium brushed with toothpaste slurries of different pHs.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Awlad; Okawa, Seigo; Miyakawa, Osamu

    2007-02-01

    This in vitro study characterized the surface texture and composition of titanium brushed with toothpaste slurries of different pHs, and thereby elucidated mechanochemical interactions between the metal and abrasive material in dentifrice. Two fluoride-free toothpastes, which contained crystalline CaHPO(4).2H(2)O and amorphous SiO(2) particles as abrasive, were mixed with acidic buffers to provide slurries of pH 6.8 and 4.8. Specimens were cast from CP Ti, mirror-polished, and then toothbrushed at 120strokes/min for 350,400 strokes under a load of 2.45N. Specimen surfaces were characterized by means of SPM and EPMA. The obtained data were compared with the already reported results of water-diluted alkaline slurries. SPM data of each paste were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey test. Irrespective of toothpaste, neutral slurries, as with alkaline slurries, yielded a chemically altered surface with rough texture, whereas acidic slurries formed a chemically clean surface with relatively smooth texture. Mechanochemical polishing effect might be mainly responsible for the cleanness and smoothness. Acidic slurry-induced smooth surface may minimize plaque formation. However, the augmentation of released titanium ions may be adverse to the human body. For evaluation of toothpaste abrasion effects on titanium, paste slurry pH should be taken into account.

  4. A clinical investigation of the efficacy of two dentifrices for the reduction of supragingival calculus formation.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Thomas; Delgado, Evaristo; DeVizio, William; Proskin, Howard M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study, conducted in harmony with Volpe-Manhold design for studies of dental calculus, was to compare the efficacy of a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% polyvinylmethyl ether/maleic acid (PVM/MA) copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride in a 17% dual silica base (Colgate Total Advanced Toothpaste) to that of a commercially available dentifrice containing 0.243% sodium fluoride in a silica base (Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste) with respect to the reduction of supragingival calculus formation. Adult male and female subjects from the San Francisco area were entered into the eight-week pre-test phase of the study. Subjects received an evaluation of oral soft and hard tissues and were given a complete oral prophylaxis. They were provided with a non-tartar control placebo dentifrice and a soft-bristled adult toothbrush, and were instructed to brush their teeth twice daily (morning and evening) for one minute. After eight weeks of using the placebo dentifrice, subjects were examined for baseline supragingival calculus formation using the Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index. Qualifying subjects were randomized into two treatment groups which were balanced for gender and baseline calculus scores. All subjects entered into the twelve-week test phase were given a complete oral prophylaxis, and were provided with their assigned dentifrice and a soft-bristled adult toothbrush for home use. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for one minute twice daily (in the morning and evening). Prior to each study visit, subjects refrained from brushing their teeth and eating and drinking for four hours. Seventy-seven (77) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the study. At the twelve-week examination, the Test Dentifrice group presented a mean Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index score of 13.22 and the Control Dentifrice group presented a score of 20.29. After twelve weeks of product use, the Test Dentifrice group exhibited 34.8% less

  5. EFFECT OF A DENTIFRICE CONTAINING ALOE VERA ON PLAQUE AND GINGIVITIS CONTROL. A DOUBLE-BLIND CLINICAL STUDY IN HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Sílvia Morgana Araújo; Torres, Ticiana Carneiro; Pereira, Sérgio Luís da Silva; Mota, Olívia Morais de Lima; Carlos, Márlio Ximenes

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was evaluated in a randomized, parallel and double-blind clinical trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to the test group (n=15) – dentifrice containing Aloe vera - or the control group (n=15) – fluoridated dentifrice. Plaque index (PI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were assessed at days 0 and 30. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth with the control or test dentifrice, three times a day, during a 30-day period. There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in both groups, but no statistically significant difference was observed among them (p>0.01). The dentifrice containing Aloe vera did not show any additional effect on plaque and gingivitis control compared to the fluoridated dentifrice. PMID:19089263

  6. Effect of a dentifrice containing Aloe vera on plaque and gingivitis control. A double-blind clinical study in humans.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Sílvia Morgana Araújo; Torres, Ticiana Carneiro; Pereira, Sérgio Luís da Silva; Mota, Olívia Morais de Lima; Carlos, Márlio Ximenes

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was evaluated in a randomized, parallel and double-blind clinical trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to the test group (n=15) - dentifrice containing Aloe vera - or the control group (n=15) - fluoridated dentifrice. Plaque index (PI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were assessed at days 0 and 30. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth with the control or test dentifrice, three times a day, during a 30-day period. There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in both groups, but no statistically significant difference was observed among them (p>0.01). The dentifrice containing Aloe vera did not show any additional effect on plaque and gingivitis control compared to the fluoridated dentifrice.

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Two Novel Desensitising Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Ashley P.; He, Jane; Tian, Cindy; Jeffery, Peter; Mason, Stephen C.; Tai, Bao-Jun; Jiang, Han; Rees, Gareth D.; Du, Min Quan

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the desensitising efficacy of two commercially available dentifrices with different modes of action was conducted in a randomised, examiner-blind, two-arm, parallel group, 8-week, longitudinal clinical study. Dentifrice A, (Sensodyne Multi Action Iso-Active), contained 50000 ppm KNO3 and 1450 ppm fluoride as NaF. Dentifrice B, Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief, contained a combination of 80000 ppm arginine, bicarbonate, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluorine as NaMFP. Subjects (N = 110), stratified into two groups (N = 55), brushed twice-daily for 60 s, over an 8-week period. Sensitivity status, compliance, and safety were determined at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. A fixed-effects ANCOVA statistical model was applied to the Intent-To-Treat population using a two-sided 5% significance level. After 8 weeks, the treatment groups using Dentifrice A and Dentifrice B exhibited mean reductions from baseline of 49% and 45% in air sensitivity visual analogue scale (VAS) score, 61% (both) in examiner-based Schiff Sensitivity score, and clinically significant reductions in tactile pain threshold; all reductions were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Both treatment groups also exhibited significant reductions across all sensitivity measures at 1, 2, and 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.0059, Dentifrice A; P ≤ 0.0137, Dentifrice B). PMID:23304149

  8. A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of two novel desensitising dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Ashley P; He, Jane; Tian, Cindy; Jeffery, Peter; Mason, Stephen C; Tai, Bao-Jun; Jiang, Han; Rees, Gareth D; Du, Min Quan

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the desensitising efficacy of two commercially available dentifrices with different modes of action was conducted in a randomised, examiner-blind, two-arm, parallel group, 8-week, longitudinal clinical study. Dentifrice A, (Sensodyne Multi Action Iso-Active), contained 50000 ppm KNO(3) and 1450 ppm fluoride as NaF. Dentifrice B, Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief, contained a combination of 80000 ppm arginine, bicarbonate, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluorine as NaMFP. Subjects (N = 110), stratified into two groups (N = 55), brushed twice-daily for 60 s, over an 8-week period. Sensitivity status, compliance, and safety were determined at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. A fixed-effects ANCOVA statistical model was applied to the Intent-To-Treat population using a two-sided 5% significance level. After 8 weeks, the treatment groups using Dentifrice A and Dentifrice B exhibited mean reductions from baseline of 49% and 45% in air sensitivity visual analogue scale (VAS) score, 61% (both) in examiner-based Schiff Sensitivity score, and clinically significant reductions in tactile pain threshold; all reductions were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Both treatment groups also exhibited significant reductions across all sensitivity measures at 1, 2, and 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.0059, Dentifrice A; P ≤ 0.0137, Dentifrice B).

  9. Abrasion of acrylic veneers by simulated toothbrushing.

    PubMed

    Xu, H C; Söremark, R; Wiktorsson, G; Wang, T; Liu, W Y

    1984-12-01

    The abrasion responses were tested on four acrylic veneer materials, K + B Plus, K + B 75, Isosit, and Ivocron. The studies were performed in two independent research laboratories. Two different brushing machines were used with an abrasive slurry. The results were used for comparing the degree of abrasion for the resin materials. Three analytical methods of measuring the degree of abrasive wear were used: surface profile measurement, microscopic evaluation, and measurement of loss of volume. Isosit showed the best abrasion resistance of the four materials tested.

  10. A randomised clinical evaluation of a fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice in an in situ caries model.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Charles R; Hara, Anderson T; Nehme, Marc; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick T

    2018-03-01

    Fluoride mouthrinses provide advantages for fluoride delivery by maintaining elevated intra-oral fluoride concentrations following fluoride dentifrice use. This in situ caries study investigated potential anti-caries efficacy of a 220 ppm fluoride mouthrinse. This was an analyst-blinded, four-treatment, randomised, crossover study using partially demineralised, gauze-wrapped, human enamel samples mounted in a mandibular partial denture. Participants brushed twice daily for 14 days with either a 1150 ppm fluoride or a fluoride-free placebo dentifrice and either rinsed once daily with the 220 ppm fluoride mouthrinse or not. Following each treatment period, percent surface microhardness recovery (%SMHR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) were assessed. Fifty three participants completed the study. Compared with the placebo dentifrice/no rinse treatment, the fluoride-containing regimens demonstrated greater enamel remineralisation (%SMHR) and fluoridation (EFU): fluoride dentifrice/fluoride rinse (%SMHR difference: 21.55 [95% CI: 15.78,27.32]; EFU difference 8.35 [7.21,9.29]); fluoride dentifrice/no rinse: 19.48 [13.81,25.15]; 6.47 [5.35,7.60]; placebo dentifrice/fluoride rinse: 16.76 [11.06,22.45]; 5.87 [4.72,7.00] (all P < .0001). There were no significant differences in%SMHR between fluoride regimens. The fluoride dentifrice/fluoride rinse regimen was associated with higher EFU than the fluoride dentifrice/no rinse (1.88 [0.75,3.01], P = .0013) and placebo dentifrice/fluoride rinse regimens (2.48 [1.34,3.62], P < .0001). Treatments were generally well-tolerated. The in situ caries model demonstrated that the fluoride mouthrinse is effective in promoting enamel caries lesion remineralisation and fluoridation whether used following a fluoride or non-fluoride dentifrice. Additive (potential) anti-caries benefits of a fluoride rinse after a fluoride dentifrice were confined to enhancements in lesion fluoridation (EFU). In conjunction with a fluoride

  11. A comparison of dentifrices for clinical relief from dentin hypersensitivity using the Jay Sensitivity Sensor Probe.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shashikanth; Rao, B H Sripathi; Kakar, Ravish Chander; Kakar, Ashish

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical relief from dentin hypersensitivity among subjects provided with a dentifrice formulated with 8% arginine, calcium carbonate and 1,000 ppm fluoride [sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP)] in comparison to those issued a commercially available dentifrice containing 1,000 ppm fluoride [as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP)]. Clinical evaluations for hypersensitivity were performed with a novel tactile hypersensitivity measuring instrument--the Jay Sensitivity Sensor (Jay) Probe--in conjunction with evaporative triggers by air blast (Schiff scale) and Visual Analog Scores (VAS). Qualified adults from the Mangalore, India area who presented two teeth with dentin hypersensitivity were enrolled for this double-blind, randomized, parallel, controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinical setting. At baseline, dentin hypersensitivity was evaluated by the Jay Probe (tactile), air blast and VAS methods. Subjects were randomly issued a study dentifrice and instructed to brush their teeth for 1 minute twice daily with the provided dentifrice. Clinical evaluations for hypersensitivity were repeated after 2, 4 and 8 weeks of product use. 86 subjects (35 males and 51 females) complied with the study protocol and completed the entire study. At each recall visit, both treatment groups demonstrated significant reductions in dentin hypersensitivity from their corresponding baselines (P < 0.05). Subjects assigned the 8% arginine, calcium carbonate and 1,000 ppm fluoride dentifrice demonstrated statistically significant reductions in responses to tactile stimuli, air blast, and VAS responses in comparison to those using the dentifrice containing 1,000 ppm fluoride after 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively.

  12. Antimicrobial capacity of Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans strains in toothbrushes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Patrícia Fernanda Roesler; Biondi Filho, Oswaldo; Pomilio, Arnaldo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; Carvalho, Meghi Silva de

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the efficiency of Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice on reducing the contamination of toothbrush bristles by a standard strain of Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175; SM), after toothbrushing. Fifteen sterile toothbrushes were randomly divided into 5 toothbrushing groups: I (negative control): without dentifrice; II: with fluoridated dentifrice; III: with triclosan and gantrez dentifrice; IV (positive control): without dentifrice and irrigation with 10 mL of 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate; V: with Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice. In each group, 1 sterile bovine tooth was brushed for 1 min, where the toothbrush bristles were contaminated with 25 µL of SM. After toothbrushing, the bristles were stored in individual test tubes with 3 mL of BHI under anaerobiosis of 37°C for 48 h. Then, they were seeded with sterile swab in triplicate in the Mitis salivarius - Bacitracin culture medium. The samples were kept under anaerobiosis of 37°C for 48 h. Scores were used to count the number of colony forming units (cfu). The results were submitted to the Mann-Whitney statistical test at 5% significance level. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.05) for the reduction of bristle contamination comparing groups II, III, IV and V to group I. It may be stated that after toothbrushing, the Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice reduced the contamination of toothbrush bristles by SM, without differentiation from the other chemical agents used.

  13. Assessment of the effects of a stannous fluoride dentifrice on gingivitis in a two-month positive-controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Barker, Matthew L; Biesbock, A R; Sharma, N C; Qaqish, J; Goyal, C R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-gingivitis effectiveness of a 0.454% stannous fluoride test dentifrice relative to a marketed positive-control triclosan-containing dentifrice in adults with gingivitis. This was a two-month, randomized and controlled, double-blind, parallel group, single-center investigation involving 150 adults with existing mild to moderate gingivitis. Pre-treatment gingivitis levels were assessed at baseline using the Lobene Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and the Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI). Qualified subjects were randomly assigned to either a 0.454% stannous fluoride test dentifrice or a marketed, positive-control 0.30% triclosan/copolymer dentifrice. Subjects then brushed for two months unsupervised in the home setting with their assigned dentifrice per manufacturer's instructions. At Month 2, subjects were re-evaluated for gingivitis via MGI and GBI examinations. All 150 enrolled subjects completed the trial and were evaluable. Both the stannous fluoride test and triclosan/copolymer control dentifrices provided statistically significant reductions in average MGI, GBI, and number of bleeding sites relative to pre-treatment (p < 0.0001) at Month 2. The adjusted mean improvement from baseline at Month 2 for the stannous fluoride test dentifrice group was 65% greater for number of bleeding sites, 62% greater for GBI, and 45% greater for MGI compared to the triclosan/copolymer positive-control group, with groups differing significantly (p < 0.0001) via each of the three gingivitis measures. Both dentifrices were well-tolerated. An advanced stannous fluoride test dentifrice provided superior reductions in gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding compared to a commercially available triclosan/copolymer positive-control dentifrice after two months of tooth brushing.

  14. A clinical investigation of the efficacy of three commercially available dentifrices for controlling established gingivitis and supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surrendra; Chaknis, Patricia; DeVizio, William; Petrone, Margaret; Panagakos, Fotinos S; Proskin, Howard M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the efficacy ofa dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride for controlling established gingivitis and supragingival plaque relative to that of a dentifrice containing 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate, and a dentifrice containing 0.243% sodium fluoride as a negative control. Following a baseline examination for gingivitis and supragingival plaque, qualifying adult male and female subjects from the Piscataway, NJ, USA area were randomized into three dentifrice groups. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth twice daily (morning and evening) for one minute with their assigned dentifrice and a soft-bristled toothbrush. Examinations for gingivitis and supragingival plaque were repeated after six weeks of product use. One-hundred and seventy-one (171) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the study. Relative to the group using the dentifrice with 0.243% sodium fluoride alone, the 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride group exhibited statistically significant reductions in gingival index and supragingival plaque index scores of 25.3% and 33.0%, respectively, after six weeks of product use. Similarly, relative to the group using the 0.243% sodium fluoride dentifrice, the 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate dentifrice group exhibited statistically significant reductions in gingival index and plaque index scores of 8.1% and 14.1% after six weeks of product use. Further, relative to the 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate dentifrice group, the 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride dentifrice group exhibited statistically significant reductions in gingival index and plaque index scores of 18.7% and 22%, respectively. The overall results of this double-blind clinical study support the conclusion that a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0

  15. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... the doctor looks at the eye under a light that is filtered cobalt blue. The fluorescein causes the abrasion to glow bright green under the light. The doctor also might do a standard ophthalmic ...

  16. Surface Roughness of Composite Resins after Simulated Toothbrushing with Different Dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Bruna; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate, in vitro, the surface roughness of two composite resins submitted to simulated toothbrushing with three different dentifrices. Totally, 36 samples of Z350XT and 36 samples of Empress Direct were built and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12) according to the dentifrice used (Oral-B Pro-Health Whitening [OBW], Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief [CS], Colgate Total Clean Mint 12 [CT12]). The samples were submitted to 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing. After each simulated period, the surface roughness of the samples was measured using a roughness tester. According to three-way analysis of variance, dentifrice (P = 0.044) and brushing time (P = 0.000) were significant. The composite resin was not significant (P = 0.381) and the interaction among the factors was not significant (P > 0.05). The mean values of the surface roughness (µm) followed by the same letter represent no statistical difference by Tukey's post-hoc test (P <0.05): Dentifrice: CT12 = 0.269(a); CS Pro- Relief = 0.300(ab); OBW = 0.390(b). Brushing time: Baseline = 0,046ª; 5,000 cycles = 0.297(b); 10,000 cycles = 0.354(b); 20,000 cycles = 0.584(c). Z350 XT and Empress Direct presented similar surface roughness after all cycles of simulated toothbrushing. The higher the brushing time, the higher the surface roughness of composite resins. The dentifrice OBW caused a higher surface roughness in both composite resins.

  17. Surface Roughness of Composite Resins after Simulated Toothbrushing with Different Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Bruna; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate, in vitro, the surface roughness of two composite resins submitted to simulated toothbrushing with three different dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 samples of Z350XT and 36 samples of Empress Direct were built and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12) according to the dentifrice used (Oral-B Pro-Health Whitening [OBW], Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief [CS], Colgate Total Clean Mint 12 [CT12]). The samples were submitted to 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing. After each simulated period, the surface roughness of the samples was measured using a roughness tester. Results: According to three-way analysis of variance, dentifrice (P = 0.044) and brushing time (P = 0.000) were significant. The composite resin was not significant (P = 0.381) and the interaction among the factors was not significant (P > 0.05). The mean values of the surface roughness (µm) followed by the same letter represent no statistical difference by Tukey's post-hoc test (P <0.05): Dentifrice: CT12 = 0.269a; CS Pro- Relief = 0.300ab; OBW = 0.390b. Brushing time: Baseline = 0,046ª; 5,000 cycles = 0.297b; 10,000 cycles = 0.354b; 20,000 cycles = 0.584c. Conclusion: Z350 XT and Empress Direct presented similar surface roughness after all cycles of simulated toothbrushing. The higher the brushing time, the higher the surface roughness of composite resins. The dentifrice OBW caused a higher surface roughness in both composite resins. PMID:26229362

  18. Control of oral malodour by dentifrices measured by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Newby, Evelyn E; Hickling, Jenneth M; Hughes, Francis J; Proskin, Howard M; Bosma, Marylynn P

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of toothpaste treatments on levels of oral volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) measured by gas chromatography in two clinical studies. These were blinded, randomised, controlled, crossover studies with 16 (study A) or 20 (study B) healthy volunteers between the ages of 19-54. Study A: breath samples were collected at baseline, immediately and lhr after brushing. Four dentifrices (Zinc A, Zinc B, commercially available triclosan dentifrice and zinc free control) were evaluated. Study B: breath samples were collected at baseline, immediately, 1, 2, 3 and 7 hours after treatment. Subjects consumed a light breakfast then provided an additional breath sample between baseline assessment and treatment. Two dentifrices (gel-to-foam and a commercially available triclosan dentrifrice) were evaluated. Breath samples were collected in syringes and analysed for VSCs (hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan and Total VSCs) utilising gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Study A: immediately after treatment, a statistically significant reduction in VSCs from baseline was observed for Zinc A product only. A statistically significant reduction in VSCs from baseline was observed after 1 hour for all products. Both zinc products exhibited a significantly greater reduction from baseline VSCs than Colgate Total and Control at all time points. Study B: a statistically significant reduction in VSCs from baseline was observed at all time points for both products. The gel-to-foam product exhibited significantly greater reduction from baseline Total VSC concentration than Colgate Total at all time points from 1 hour post-treatment. Control of oral malodour by toothpaste treatment, evaluated as VSC levels using GC, has been demonstrated. Zinc is effective at reducing VSCs and the efficacy of zinc is formulation dependent. A gel-to-foam dentifrice was more effective at reducing VSCs than Colgate Total up to 7 hours.

  19. Effect of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Gabriela Migliorin; da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Menezes, Márcio; do Vale, Hugo Felipe; Regalado, Diego Ferreira; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study verified the influence of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two specimens were prepared with Filtek™ Z350 XT (3M/ESPE) and randomly divided into four groups (n = 08) that were subjected to brushing simulation equivalent to the period of 1 month. The groups assessed were a control group with distilled water (G1), Colgate Total 12 Professional Clean (G2), Sensodyne Extra Whitener Extra Fresh (G3), and Colgate Luminous White (G4). A sequence of 90 cycles was performed for all the samples. The initial roughness of each group was analyzed by the Surface Roughness Tester (TR 200-TIME Group Inc., CA, USA). After the brushing period, the final roughness was measured, and the results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis and Dunn tests for intergroup roughness comparison in the time factor. For intragroup and “Δ Final − Initial” comparisons, the Wilcoxon test and (one-way) ANOVA were, respectively, performed (α = 0.05). Results: The roughness mean values before and after brushing showed no statistically significant difference when the different dentifrices were used. None of the dentifrices analyzed increased significantly the nanohybrid composite resin surface roughness in a 1 month of tooth brushing simulation. Conclusions: These results suggest that no hazardous effect on the roughness of nanohybrid composite resin can be expected when whitening dentifrices are used for a short period. Similar studies should be conducted to analyze other esthetic composite materials. PMID:27095891

  20. Enhanced anticaries efficacy of a 0.243% sodium fluoride/10% xylitol/silica dentifrice: 3-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Sintes, J L; Escalante, C; Stewart, B; McCool, J J; Garcia, L; Volpe, A R; Triol, C

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a sodium fluoride (NaF)/silica/xylitol dentifrice compared with that of a positive control NaF/silica dentifrice on caries increments in school children over a 3-year period in an area without an optimal level of fluoride in the drinking water (mean level <0.1 ppm). A 3-year, double-blind clinical caries study was conducted in 2,630 children initially aged 8-10 years at 17 schools in the San Jose, Costa Rica metropolitan area. Clinical dental examinations were performed at participating schools utilizing portable dental equipment. Caries evaluations employed conventional tactile/visual methodology consisting of artificial light, dental mirrors and single-edge #23 explorers. Children accepted into the study were stratified by age and sex into two balanced groups within each school, and randomly assigned to use either a positive control dentifrice containing 0.243% NaF/silica or a test dentifrice containing 0.234% NaF/silica/10% xylitol. Children were instructed to brush with the assigned dentifrice twice daily. Caries evaluations were conducted at baseline, 2 years, and 3 years. After 3 years, subjects using the 0.234% NaF/silica/10% xylitol dentifrice had statistically significantly reduced decayed/filled surfaces (DFS; -12.3% reduction; P < or = 0.001) and decayed/filled buccal and lingual surfaces (DFS-BL; -10.5% reduction; P < or = 0/01).

  1. A randomized clinical study comparing the plaque inhibition effect of a SnF2/SHMP dentifrice (blend-a-med EXPERT GUMS PROTECTION) and a chlorhexidine digluconate dentifrice (Lacalut Aktiv).

    PubMed

    Bellamy, P G; Khera, N; Day, T N; Mussett, A J; Barker, M L

    2009-01-01

    To compare the plaque inhibition benefits of a control 0.454% stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate/sodium fluoride dentifrice (SnF2/SHMP with 1450 ppm F) to a chlorhexidine digluconate (0.05%), aluminum lactate (0.8%), and aluminum fluoride (AlF3/Chx with 1400 ppm F) dentifrice. Twenty-nine subjects were randomized to a two-period, two-treatment, double-blind crossover sequence using blend-a-med EXPERT GUMS PROTECTION toothpaste (SnF2/SHMP) and Lacalut Aktiv toothpaste (AlF3/Chx). Each treatment was used along with a standard manual toothbrush (Oral-B P35 Indicator) for 17 days. Digital plaque image analysis (DPIA) was used at the end of each period for three consecutive days to evaluate plaque levels; a) overnight (A.M. pre-brush); b) following 40 seconds of brushing with the test product (A.M. post-brush); and c) mid-afternoon (P.M.). Images were analyzed using an objective computer algorithm to calculate the total area of visible plaque. A four-day washout period was instituted for the crossover phase. Twenty-seven subjects completed the study. The SnF2/SHMP dentifrice provided a statistically significant lower level of plaque area coverage compared to the AlF3/Chx dentifrice at all time points. For the SnF2/SHMP dentifrice, plaque coverage was 19.4% lower (p = 0.0043) at the A.M. pre-brush, 25.6% lower (p = 0.0014) at the A.M. post-brush, and 19.8% lower (p = 0.0057) at the P.M. measure relative to the AlF3/Chx dentifrice. The blend-a-med EXPERT GUMS PROTECTION toothpaste inhibits plaque regrowth, both overnight and during the day, to a significantly greater degree than Lacalut Aktiv. Additionally, immediately after brushing with blend-a-med EXPERT GUMS PROTECTION, subjects had significantly less plaque than after brushing with Lacalut Aktiv.

  2. Evaluation of different fluoridated dentifrice formulations using an in situ erosion remineralization model.

    PubMed

    Barlow, A P; Sufi, F; Mason, S C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of these three clinical in situ studies was to investigate the relative performance of commercially available and experimental dentifrice formulations, having different fluoride sources and excipient ingredients, at remineralizing a bovine enamel surface previously softened by a dietary acid challenge. Each study utilized the same randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blind, crossover design. Subjects undertook single brushings of their natural teeth, with an in situ appliance in place, using different dentifrices in a randomly assigned order. Study A involved 58 subjects with the following dentifrices: Sensodyne Pronamel (1450 ppm F as NaF/5% KNO3); Blend-a-Med Classic (1450 ppm F as NaF); and a matched (Pronamel) placebo control (0 ppm F). Study B involved 56 subjects with the following dentifrices: Sensodyne Pronamel (1150 ppm F as NaF/5% KNO3); Crest Cavity Protection (1100 ppm F as NaF); Crest Pro-Health (0.454% SnF2 [1100 ppm F]/sodium hexametaphosphate); and a matched (Pronamel) placebo control (0 ppm F). Study C involved 56 subjects with the following dentifrices: Sensodyne Pronamel (1150 ppm F as NaF/5% KNO3); Sensodyne Pronamel Gentle Whitening (1150 ppm F as NaF/5% KNO3); Colgate Sensitive Multi Protection (1000 ppm F as NaMFP/5.53% potassium citrate/2% zinc citrate); and a matched (Pronamel) placebo control (0 ppm F). Subjects wore their palatal appliances holding eight bovine enamel blocks, previously exposed for 25 minutes to an in vitro erosive challenge with grapefruit juice, for the duration of the experiment. Five minutes after appliance insertion, subjects undertook a supervised, 90-second brush/rinse regimen with their assigned dentifrice. Surface microhardness (SMH) of the specimens was determined prior to the erosive challenge (baseline), after the in vitro erosive challenge, and were remeasured after four hours in situ remineralization following the tooth brushing event. Finally, SMH values were determined after a second in

  3. Effectiveness of a new dentifrice with baking soda and peroxide in removing extrinsic stain and whitening teeth.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, A; Hooper, W; Vorwerk, L; Domke, T; DeSciscio, P; Nathoo, S

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this randomized, controlled, six-week clinical trial was to determine the effectiveness and safety of a new whitening dentifrice in removing extrinsic tooth stain and whitening teeth. An additional two-week exploratory study was conducted to determine whether the whitening or stain-prevention activity of the dentifrice would persist following cessation of use. In the first study (Phase I), one-hundred and forty-six qualifying subjects were randomly assigned to either a sodium bicarbonate whitening dentifrice group (Arm & Hammer Advance White Extreme Whitening Baking Soda and Peroxide Toothpaste) or a silica-based negative control dentifrice group, and brushed twice daily with their assigned dentifrice for six weeks. Tooth shade on the labial surfaces of the eight incisors was assessed using a Vita Classic shade guide, and extrinsic tooth stain was scored using a Modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI) at baseline, week 4, and week 6. In Phase II (after the week 6 examination), volunteers from the Arm & Hammer whitening dentifrice group were randomly assigned to continue using the whitening dentifrice or to use the negative control dentifrice twice daily for two weeks. The six-week shade and stain index scores served as the baseline for this exploratory phase and were rescored after two weeks. The whitening dentifrice group had statistically significant (p < 0.0001) mean shade score reductions of 1.82 and 2.57 from baseline to weeks 4 and 6, respectively. For the same periods, the negative control dentifrice group was virtually unchanged from baseline. For tooth stain, the MLSI total mean scores for the whitening dentifrice group showed statistically significant (p < 0.0001) decreases from baseline of 1.42 (41.6%) and 2.11 (61.6%) at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In contrast, the negative control dentifrice group had a MLSI reduction of 0.07 at week 4 and a 0.06 increase at week 6. Between-group analyses using baseline-adjusted ANCOVA showed the

  4. Dentin abrasivity of various desensitizing toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Gröger, Ch; Bizhang, M; Naumova, E A

    2016-04-02

    The aim of this study was to compare the abrasivity of various commercially available toothpastes that claim to reduce dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin discs were prepared from 70 human extracted molars. The discs were etched with lemon juice for 5 min, and one half of the discs were covered with aluminum tape. Following this, they were brushed with 6 different toothpastes, simulating a total brushing time of 6 months. As a negative control, discs were brushed with tap water only. The toothpastes contained pro-arginine and calcium carbonate, strontium acetate, stannous fluoride, zinc carbonate and hydroxyapatite, new silica, or tetrapotassium pyrophosphate and hydroxyapatite. After brushing, the height differences between the control halves and the brushed halves were determined with a profilometer and statistically compared using a Mann-Whitney U test for independent variables. A significant difference (p < 0.001) in height difference between the controls and the toothpaste-treated samples was found in all cases, except for the stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste (p = 0.583). The highest abrasion was found in the toothpaste containing zinc carbonate and hydroxyapatite, and the lowest was found in the toothpaste containing pro-arginine and calcium carbonate. Desensitizing toothpastes with different desensitizing ingredients have different levels of abrasivity, which may have a negative effect on their desensitizing abilities over a long period of time.

  5. 3D-Image analysis of the impact of toothpaste abrasivity on the progression of simulated non-carious cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Sabrah, Alaa H; Turssi, Cecilia P; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Kelly, Adam B; Hara, Anderson T

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the effect of toothpaste abrasive level on the progression of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using 3D-image subtraction. Upper first premolars were allocated into seven groups (n = 16) of toothpaste/abrasive slurries: A-Zeodent113/5%, B-Zeodent124/10%, C-Zeodent103/15%, D-Sensodyne Pronamel, E-Crest Cavity-Protection, F-Crest Pro-Health-Whitening, and G-Deionized water (DIW). Teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks, and their root surfaces covered with acrylic resin, except for 2-mm near the cemento-enamel junction that was exposed to toothbrushing. Specimens were brushed with the slurries for 5000-, 15,000-, 35,000- and 65,000-strokes. Impressions were taken at baseline and after each brushing time, and then scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. Dentine volume loss was calculated by image subtraction software and subjected to mixed-model ANOVA and multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). No significant differences among slurries were observed at 5000 and 15,000. At 35,000, F showed higher loss than all other groups except C, which did not differ from the others. At 65,000, F (4.19 ± 3.29 mm 3 ) showed the highest loss, followed by C (2.33 ± 1.47 mm 3 ), which differed from all the other groups except B (1.85 ± 0.91 mm 3 ). Groups B, A (1.35 ± 0.65 mm 3 ), D (1.17 ± 0.48 mm 3 ), E (1.40 ± 0.68 mm 3 ) and G (1.12 ± 0.73 mm 3 ) did not differ from each other. Groups F and C showed significant increase of volume loss starting at 35,000, while B, A, D and E only at 65,000; no increase loss was observed for G. 3D-image subtraction was able to quantify and differentiate tooth loss, but only at advanced stages. The progression of NCCLs was more evident and faster for highly abrasive slurries. Upon root dentin exposure, brushing with lower abrasive dentifrices is advisable to reduce the risk for NCCLs development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In Situ Study to Confirm the Anticaries Potential of a Sodium Monofluorophosphate Dentifrice Containing Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, C R; Siddiqi, M; Mason, S; Lippert, F; Hara, A T; Zero, D T

    2017-06-01

    A randomized, investigator-blind, five-treatment, crossover, non-inferiority study was conducted to investigate the effect of the addition of calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS), an agent known to relieve dentin hypersensitivity, to a sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP)-containing dentifrice on the enamel remineralization potential of fluoride (F), as assessed by percentage surface microhardness recovery (%SMHR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) using a standard in situ caries model. Seventy-seven subjects wearing bilateral mandibular partial dentures holding partially demineralized bovine enamel specimens 24 hours/day brushed their teeth with their assigned randomized dentifrice containing either 1500 or 0 ppm F with 5% CSPS or 1500, 500, or 0 ppm F with 0% CSPS twice daily for 21 days. The success criterion was to observe a difference in % SMHR between dentifrices containing 1500 ppm F of six units or less in the upper bound of the two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI). Following 21 days of treatment, the upper bound CI of the %SMHR difference between the dentifrices containing 1500 ppm F was 1.66, thus within the non-inferiority limit. No statistically significant differences for %SMHR (p = 0.2601) and EFU (p = 0.2984) were noted between these two dentifrices. The present in situ caries study provides evidence demonstrating that the addition of the calcium-containing compound CSPS to a 1500 ppm F dentifrice does not interfere with the ability of fluoride to remineralize surface-softened enamel; i.e., CSPS neither impairs nor improves the potential cariostatic value of SMFP dentifrice.

  7. Flavoring agents present in a dentifrice can modify volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) formation in morning bad breath.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Daiane Cristina; Salvador, Sérgio Luis; Sallum, Antonio Wilson; Nogueira-Filho, Getúlio da Rocha

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a flavor-containing dentifrice on the formation of volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) in morning bad breath. A two-step, blinded, crossover, randomized study was carried out in 50 dental students with a healthy periodontium divided into two experimental groups: flavor-containing dentifrice (test) and non-flavor-containing dentifrice (control). The volunteers received the designated dentifrice and a new toothbrush for a 3 X/day brushing regimen for 2 periods of 30 days. A seven-day washout interval was used between the periods. The assessed parameters were: plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), organoleptic breath scores (ORG), VSC levels (as measured by a portable sulphide monitor) before (H1) and after (H2) cleaning of the tongue, tongue coating (TC) wet weight and BANA test from TC samples. The intra-group analysis showed a decrease in ORG, from 3 to 2, after 30 days for the test group (p < 0.05). The inter-group analysis showed lower values in ORG, H1 and H2 for the test group (p < 0.05). There was no difference between the amount of TC between groups and the presence of flavor also did not interfere in the BANA results between groups (p > 0.05). These findings suggest that a flavor-containing dentifrice seems to prevent VSCs formation in morning bad breath regardless of the amount of TC in periodontally healthy subjects.

  8. An evaluation of 6 dentifrice formulations for supragingival anticalculus and antiplaque activity.

    PubMed

    Disney, J A; Graves, R C; Cancro, L; Payonk, G; Stewart, P

    1989-09-01

    A 4 week, double blind clinical trial was conducted to assess the antiplaque/anticalculus activity of test dentifrices containing varying levels of zinc citrate. Subjects were divided into 6 groups, 4 experimental, 1 positive control and a placebo group. All subjects only brushed at home using the placebo control during study weeks 1 and 3. Plaque and calculus were collected at the end of study weeks 2 and 4 on mylar strips worn on lower incisor teeth. Dentifrice efficacy was assessed by comparing group dry and ash weight decrements. While there were no significant differences between the test and control groups, there was a demonstrable trend toward greater inhibition with higher zinc citrate levels, especially among subjects with high levels of plaque and calculus at baseline.

  9. In vitro assessments of experimental NaF dentifrices containing a prospective calcium phosphate technology.

    PubMed

    Karlinsey, Robert L; Mackey, Allen C; Stookey, George K; Pfarrer, Aaron M

    2009-06-01

    To determine the fluoride dose response of experimental NaF dentifrices containing a prospective calcium phosphate technology, along with the corresponding relative enamel and dentin abrasion values. 3 mm diameter bovine enamel specimens were mounted, ground and polished, and softened in a carbopol-lactic acid solution (pH = 5.0) for 36 hours at 37 degrees C. Specimens were then measured for baseline Vickers microhardness and stratified (N = 18, mean VHN = 33) into eight groups. These groups consisted of a placebo paste, four test dentifrices (A, B, C, D) with three of the four (A, B, C) containing a promising calcium phosphate ingredient, Crest Cavity Protection, MI Paste Plus, and PreviDent Booster 5000. The groups were cycled in a lesion reversal pH cycling model consisting of four 2-minute treatment periods (diluted 1:3 with DI water) and one 4-hour acid challenge (carbopol-lactic acid, pH = 5.0) per day. Between these events, specimens were immersed in artificial saliva (pH = 7.0). After 20 days of cycling, the specimens were microdrilled and analyzed for fluoride content, and also measured for Vickers surface microhardness after 10 and 20 days of cycling and after a 2-hour and 16-hour post-cycle acid challenge (carbopol-lactic acid, pH = 5.0). Separately, relative dentin and enamel abrasion (RDA and REA) were performed using the ADA recommended radiotracer method. A fluoride dose response was observed for the test dentifrices after 10 and 20 days of pH cycling, with test dentifrice C promoting the highest remineralization among the groups while both the MI Paste Plus and PreviDent systems provide the least remineralization (one-way ANOVA, SNK, P < 0.05). With respect to enamel fluoride uptake, the group facilitating the highest incorporation of fluoride into the enamel lesion was test dentifrice C, while the least effective NaF system was the MI Paste Plus (one-way ANOVA, SNK, P < 0.05). In terms of formulation abrasion, the REA scores were similar among the

  10. 'King George Island' Brushed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    This mosaic was made from frames acquired by the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 1,031 Martian day, or sol, on the red planet (Nov. 27, 2006). It shows a rock target called 'King George Island' after the target was brushed by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The mosaic covers approximately 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across and shows the granular nature of the rock exposure. The grains are typically about 1 millimeter (.04 inches) wide. Data from the rover's Moessbauer spectrometer provides evidence that they have an enhanced amount of the mineral hematite relative to surrounding soils.

  11. The antimicrobial efficacy of commercial dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Zambon, Joseph J; Sreenivasan, Prem K

    2010-01-01

    This investigation compared the effects of a fluoride dentifrice and toothpastes formulated with antimicrobial ingredients (stannous fluoride and triclosan/copolymer) on oral micro-organisms, including those found in samples taken from the human oral cavity. Microbiological techniques determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of each dentifrice necessary to inhibit the growth of bacterial strains from the healthy oral cavity, as well as those found in dental caries, periodontal disease, and halitosis. Ex vivo studies utilized oral rinse samples and supragingival plaque from adults to determine antimicrobial effects on the entire microbial diversity of these samples, including biofilm-derived micro-organisms. The triclosan/copolymer dentifrice demonstrated the lowest MICs and significantly inhibited Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including the periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum). In the ex vivo tests, the triclosan/copolymer dentifrice demonstrated substantial inhibition in the oral rinse samples over each treatment period (p > 0.0005) as compared to either the fluoride or stannous fluoride dentifrices. Similarly, the triclosan/copolymer dentifrice demonstrated the highest inhibition of micro-organisms in the supragingival plaque biofilm (p < 0.0005). No significant differences were observed between the fluoride and stannous fluoride dentifrices (p > 0.5).

  12. Do Abrasives Play a Role in Toothpaste Efficacy against Erosion/Abrasion?

    PubMed

    Ganss, Carolina; Möllers, Maike; Schlueter, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Abrasives may counteract the efficacy of anti-erosion toothpastes either due to physical effects or due to interaction with active agents. This study aimed to investigate whether the amount of abrasives is a determinant for the efficacy of Sn2+-containing toothpastes with or without chitosan additive. Enamel samples were eroded (0.50 wt% citric acid, pH 2.5; 6 × 2 min/day) on a shaking desk - 30/min in experiment 1 (E1) and 35/min in experiments 2 (E2) and 3 (E3) - and immersed in toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min). Half of the samples were additionally brushed (15 s, load 200 g) within the immersion time. The toothpastes contained 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20% silica. In E1 and E2 the active ingredients were F- (700 ppm as amine fluoride, 700 ppm as NaF) and Sn2+ (3,500 ppm as SnCl2); in E3 chitosan (0.5%) was additionally added. The placebo contained 20% silica. Tissue loss was determined profilometrically. In E1, slurries completely inhibited tissue loss; distinct surface deposits occurred. With brushing, tissue loss significantly increased up to an abrasive content of 10%, but decreased significantly with higher amounts; 20% silica revealed similar values as the abrasive-free formulation. In E2, all slurries inhibited tissue loss distinctly irrespective of the amounts of abrasives. With brushing, a similar trend as in E1 was observed but with much less efficacy. The chitosan-containing formulations in E3 were much more effective; similar results as in E1 were found. In conclusion, the amount of abrasives had no effect when toothpastes were applied as slurries, but played an important role with brushing. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A randomised clinical trial to evaluate the effect of a 67 % sodium bicarbonate-containing dentifrice on 0.2 % chlorhexidine digluconate mouthwash tooth staining.

    PubMed

    Akwagyiram, Ivy; Butler, Andrew; Maclure, Robert; Colgan, Patrick; Yan, Nicole; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2016-08-25

    Gingivitis can develop as a reaction to dental plaque. It can be limited by curtailing plaque build-up through actions including tooth brushing and the use of medicinal mouthwashes, such as those containing chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), that can reach parts of the mouth that may be missed when brushing. This study aimed to compare dental stain control of twice-daily brushing with a sodium fluoride (NaF) dentifrice containing 67 % sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or a commercially available NaF silica dentifrice without NaHCO3, while using a mouthwash containing 0.2 % CHX. This was a 6-week, randomised, two-site, examiner-blind, parallel-group study in healthy subjects with at least 'mild' stain levels on the facial surfaces of ≥4 teeth and ≥15 bleeding sites. Assessment was via modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI), the score being the mean of stain intensity multiplied by area (MLSI [IxA]). One hundred and fifty of 160 randomised subjects completed the study. There were no significant differences in Overall (facial and lingual) MLSI (IxA) scores between dentifrices. The Facial MLSI (IxA) was statistically significant at 6 weeks, favouring the 67 % NaHCO3 dentifrice (p = 0.0404). Post-hoc analysis, conducted due to a significant site interaction, found significant differences for all MLSI scores in favour of the 67 % NaHCO3 dentifrice at Site 1 (both weeks) but not Site 2. No overall significant differences were found between a 67 and 0 % NaHCO3 dentifrice in controlling CHX stain; a significant difference on facial surfaces suggests advantage of the former on more accessible surfaces. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01962493 ) on 10 October 2013 and was funded by GSK Consumer Healthcare.

  14. Proper Brushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... bristles along the gumline at a 45-degree angle. Bristles should contact both the tooth surface and the gumline. Gently ... A rolling motion is when the brush makes contact with the gumline and ... a 45-degree angle with bristles contacting the tooth surface and gumline. ...

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations of the Anticalculus Effect of a Novel Stabilized Stannous Fluoride Dentifrice.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Anastasia, Mary Kay; Zsiska, Marianne; Farmer, Teresa; Schneiderman, Eva; Milleman, Jeffery L

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of a novel stannous fluoride dentifrice with zinc citrate on calculus inhibition using both in vitro and clinical models. Each investigation tested a novel stabilized 0.454% stannous fluoride dentifrice with zinc citrate as an anticalculus agent (Crest® Pro-Health™ smooth formula) compared to a negative control fluoride dentifrice. The in vitro study used the modified Plaque Growth and Mineralization Model (mPGM). Plaque biofilms were prepared and mineralized by alternate immersion of glass rods in human saliva and artificial mineralization solution. Treatments of 25% w/w dentifrice/water slurries were carried out for 60 seconds daily for 6 days, between saliva and mineralization solution immersions. Plaque calcium levels were determined by digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Student's t-test (p < 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. The clinical study was a parallel group, double-blind, randomized, and controlled trial. Following a dental prophylaxis, subjects entered a two-month run-in phase. At the end, they received a Volpe-Manhold Index (V-MI) calculus examination. Eighty (80) qualified subjects who had formed at least 9 mm of calculus on the linguals of the mandibular anterior teeth were re-prophied and randomly assigned to either the stannous fluoride dentifrice or the negative control. Subjects brushed twice daily, unsupervised, during the three-month test period, returning at Weeks 6 and 12 for safety and V-MI examinations. Statistical analyses were via ANCOVA. In vitro mPGM: The stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice showed 20% less in vitro tartar formation, measured as calcium accumulation normalized by biofilm mass, versus the negative control (106.95 versus 133.04 µg Ca/mg biofilm, respectively, p < 0.05). Clinical Trial: Seventy-eight (78) subjects completed with fully evaluable data. The stannous fluoride dentifrice group had 15.1% less adjusted mean calculus at Week 6 compared to

  16. Preventive effect of toothpastes with MMP inhibitors on human dentine erosion and abrasion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hannas, Angelica Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Cardoso, Cristiane de Almeida Baldini; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Pereira, José Carlos; Tjäderhane, Leo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of gels and mouthrinses with MMP inhibitors (chlorhexidine, and green tea extract) was shown to prevent erosive wear. The aim of this study was to analyze the protective effect of toothpastes containing MMP inhibitors on dentine loss induced by erosion in vitro. Material and Methods Five groups each containing 12 specimens of human root dentine were prepared. The specimens were subjected to 1 min erosion by immersion in a cola drink, 4 times a day, for 5 d. Each day, after the first and last erosive challenges, the specimens were brushed for 15 s with a slurry of dentifrice and water (1:3) containing placebo, 1,100 ppm fluoride, 0.61% green tea extract, 0.12% chlorhexidine or 0.004% chlorhexidine (commercial toothpaste). Between the acid challenges, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva with remineralizing potential until the next treatment. Dentine loss was determined using profilometry. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA after log transform (p<0.05). Results The mean wear values (μm) were as follows: placebo 1.83±0.53; 0.61% green tea extract 1.00±0.21; fluoride 1.27±0.43; 0.12% chlorhexidine 1.19±0.30; and 0.004% chlorhexidine 1.22±0.46. There was a significant difference in wear between placebo and all the treatment toothpastes, which did not differ from each other. Conclusion The results suggest that toothpastes containing MMP inhibitors are as effective as those based on NaF in preventing dentine erosion and abrasion. PMID:27008258

  17. Preventive effect of toothpastes with MMP inhibitors on human dentine erosion and abrasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hannas, Angelica Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Cardoso, Cristiane de Almeida Baldini; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Pereira, José Carlos; Tjäderhane, Leo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    The use of gels and mouthrinses with MMP inhibitors (chlorhexidine, and green tea extract) was shown to prevent erosive wear. The aim of this study was to analyze the protective effect of toothpastes containing MMP inhibitors on dentine loss induced by erosion in vitro. Five groups each containing 12 specimens of human root dentine were prepared. The specimens were subjected to 1 min erosion by immersion in a cola drink, 4 times a day, for 5 d. Each day, after the first and last erosive challenges, the specimens were brushed for 15 s with a slurry of dentifrice and water (1:3) containing placebo, 1,100 ppm fluoride, 0.61% green tea extract, 0.12% chlorhexidine or 0.004% chlorhexidine (commercial toothpaste). Between the acid challenges, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva with remineralizing potential until the next treatment. Dentine loss was determined using profilometry. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA after log transform (p<0.05). The mean wear values (μm) were as follows: placebo 1.83±0.53; 0.61% green tea extract 1.00±0.21; fluoride 1.27±0.43; 0.12% chlorhexidine 1.19±0.30; and 0.004% chlorhexidine 1.22±0.46. There was a significant difference in wear between placebo and all the treatment toothpastes, which did not differ from each other. The results suggest that toothpastes containing MMP inhibitors are as effective as those based on NaF in preventing dentine erosion and abrasion.

  18. A 6-month study of the effects of 0.3% triclosan/copolymer dentifrice on dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem K; Vered, Yuval; Zini, Avi; Mann, Jonathan; Kolog, Hilla; Steinberg, Doron; Zambon, Joseph J; Haraszthy, Violet I; da Silva, Maike P; De Vizio, William

    2011-01-01

    Supportive therapy to maintain dental implants is increasingly important. This study examined the effect of a 0.3% triclosan/2% copolymer dentifrice on oral biofilms and gingival inflammation (GI) on dental implants and peri-implant tissues. One hundred and twenty adults with a dental implant and contra-lateral tooth were enrolled in this 6 month, double-blind, two-treatment, parallel group study. Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice test group and 60 subjects to a fluoride dentifrice control group and instructed to brush twice daily for 6 months. At baseline, 3, and 6 months, a calibrated dentist assessed dental plaque, GI and collected supragingival dental plaque for microbiological analysis. Subjects in the triclosan/copolymer group demonstrated significantly lower levels of dental plaque, gingivitis, and bleeding on probing at 3 and 6 months at both the implant and contra-lateral tooth compared with the fluoride group (p<0.05). There were significantly fewer Gram-negative anaerobes in the triclosan/copolymer group (p<0.05) including >90% reductions in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium saburreum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Solobacterium moorei, and Tannerella forsythia. Twice daily use of a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice may enhance dental implant maintenance by reducing dental plaque and GI. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - brush - urinary tract; Retrograde ureteral brush biopsy cytology; Cytology - ureteral retrograde brush biopsy ... should not be performed in people with a: Urinary tract infection Blockage at or below the biopsy site ...

  20. Anticaries Potential of a Sodium Monofluorophosphate Dentifrice Containing Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate: Exploratory in situ Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Charles R; Siddiqi, Muhammad; Mason, Stephen; Lippert, Frank; Hara, Anderson T; Zero, Domenick T

    2017-01-01

    Calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS) is a bioactive glass material that alleviates dentin hypersensitivity and is postulated to confer remineralization of caries lesions. This single-centre, randomized, single (investigator)-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, in situ study explored whether the addition of 5% CSPS to a nonaqueous fluoride (F) such as sodium monofluorophosphate (SMFP)-containing dentifrice affects its cariostatic ability. Seventy-seven subjects wore 4 gauze-covered enamel specimens with preformed lesions (2 surface-softened and 2 subsurface) placed buccally on their mandibular bilateral dentures for up to 4 weeks. Subjects brushed twice daily with 1 of the 5 study dentifrices: 927 ppm F/5% CSPS, 927 ppm F/0% CSPS, 250 ppm F/0% CSPS, 0 ppm F/5% CSPS, or 0 ppm F/0% CSPS. Specimens were retrieved after either 21 (surface-softened lesions; analyzed by Knoop surface microhardness [SMH]) or 28 days (subsurface lesions; analyzed by transverse microradiography). The enamel fluoride uptake was determined for all specimens using a microbiopsy technique. The concentrations of fluoride and calcium in gauze-retrieved plaque were also evaluated. Higher dentifrice fluoride concentrations led to greater remineralization and fluoridation of both lesion types and increased plaque fluoride concentrations. CSPS did not improve the cariostatic properties of SMFP; there were no statistically significant differences between 927 ppm F/5% CSPS and 927 ppm F/0% CSPS in percent SMH recovery (p = 0.6788), change in integrated mineral loss (p = 0.5908), or lesion depth (p = 0.6622). Likewise, 0 ppm F/5% CSPS did not provide any benefits in comparison to 0 ppm F/0% CSPS. In conclusion, CSPS does not negatively impact nor does it improve the ability of an SMFP dentifrice to affect remineralization of caries lesions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The scientific rationale and development of an optimized dentifrice for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tavss, Edward A; Fisher, Steven W; Campbell, Shannon; Bonta, Yolanda; Darcy-Siegel, Joann; Blackwell, Bernie L; Volpe, Anthony R; Miller, Steven E

    2004-02-01

    To describe the development of a new dentin hypersensitivity treatment, Colgate Sensitive Maximum Strength dentifrice, containing 5% potassium nitrate as the anti-hypersensitivity active agent. The objective was to develop a home-use hypersensitivity dentifrice that would be superior to the market leader, improving on what is available, which also contains 5% potassium nitrate as the anti-hypersensitivity active agent. In vivo (clinicals, taste evaluation and rat caries), in vitro (potassium flux) and analytical (rheology, dispensed volume, scanning electron microscopy, electron scanning chemical analysis and radioactive dentin abrasion) methods were performed. The objective was accomplished with the development of a new activated silica technology that resulted in enhanced potassium ion activity. In vitro documentation, supported by clinical studies, demonstrated that the resulting formula is more effective than the market leader for relief of hypersensitivity pain. Fast pain relief in less than 2 weeks and long-lasting protection against pain with regular use have also been clinically documented. Furthermore, FDA-required in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that this formula, which contains 0.45% stannous fluoride (1100 ppm fluoride) as the anti-caries active agent, is effective against caries. Good taste, acceptable rheology, acceptable abrasivity, and cosmetic and chemical stability have all been engineered into this unique dentin hypersensitivity treatment. In summary, a highly efficacious consumer friendly treatment for dentin hypersensitivity has been developed.

  2. Evaluation of ionic degradation and slot corrosion of metallic brackets by the action of different dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Gustavo Antônio Martins; Simas, Rafael Menezes; de Almeida, Leandro Moreira; da Silva, Juliana Melo; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim; Brandão, Ana Maria Martins

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro ionic degradation and slot base corrosion of metallic brackets subjected to brushing with dentifrices, through analysis of chemical composition by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and qualitative analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thirty eight brackets were selected and randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 7). Two groups (n = 5) worked as positive and negative controls. Simulated orthodontic braces were assembled using 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel wires and elastomeric rings. The groups were divided according to surface treatment: G1 (Máxima Proteção Anticáries®); G2 (Total 12®); G3 (Sensitive®); G4 (Branqueador®); Positive control (artificial saliva) and Negative control (no treatment). Twenty eight brushing cycles were performed and evaluations were made before (T0) and after (T1) experiment. The Wilcoxon test showed no difference in ionic concentrations of titanium (Ti), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) between groups. G2 presented significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the concentration of aluminium ion (Al). Groups G3 and G4 presented significant increase (p < 0.05) in the concentration of aluminium ion. The SEM analysis showed increased characteristics indicative of corrosion on groups G2, G3 and G4. The EDS analysis revealed that control groups and G1 did not suffer alterations on the chemical composition. G2 presented degradation in the amount of Al ion. G3 and G4 suffered increase in the concentration of Al. The immersion in artificial saliva and the dentifrice Máxima Proteção Anticáries® did not alter the surface polishing. The dentifrices Total 12®, Sensitive® and Branqueador® altered the surface polishing.

  3. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-21

    This image shows the round, metallic working end of the rock abrasion tool at the end of a metallic cylinder. The flat grinding face, attached brush, and much of the smooth, metallic exterior of cylinder are covered with a deep reddish-brown layer of dust

  4. Comparison of the clinical efficacy in reducing dentin hypersensitivity of a new dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1000 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate to a commercially available toothpaste containing 1000 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate: an eight-week clinical trial on adults in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kakar, A; Kakar, K; Sreenivasan, P K; DeVizio, W; Kohli, R

    2012-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated relief from dentin hypersensitivity among subjects who brushed their teeth with a new dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1000 ppm fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) to subjects who brushed with a commercially available dentifrice containing 1000 ppm MFP over an eight-week period. Adult subjects from the New Delhi, India area, with two teeth that exhibited dentin hypersensitivity, both to tactile stimulation using the Yeaple Probe and to stimulation using an air blast delivered by a standard dental unit syringe, were screened for study enrollment. Qualifying subjects were randomly assigned one of the study dentifrices and instructed to brush their teeth for one minute, twice daily (morning and evening) with the provided dentifrice. Follow-up examinations for dentin hypersensitivity were conducted after two, four, and eight weeks of product use. Subjects provided with the new dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1000 ppm MFP exhibited statistically significantly (p < 0.05) greater reductions in dentin hypersensitivity in response to tactile (81.9%, 90.5%, and 116.7%) and air blast (39.5%, 56.7%, and 76.7%) stimuli than subjects assigned the 1000 ppm MFP dentifrice after two, four, and eight weeks, respectively. The use of a new dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1000 ppm MFP provides superior efficacy in reducing dentin hypersensitivity (p < 0.05) than a control dentifrice containing 1000 ppm MFP alone after two, four, and eight weeks of use.

  5. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During recent soil-brushing experiments, the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became covered with dust, as shown here. An abundance of iron oxide minerals in the dust gave the device a reddish-brown veneer. Investigators were using the rock abrasion tool to uncover successive layers of soil in an attempt to reveal near-surface stratigraphy. Afterward, remnant dirt clods were visible on both the bit and the brush of the tool. Designers of the rock abrasion tool at Honeybee Robotics and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a plan to run the brush on the rock abrasion tool in reverse to dislodge the dirt and return the tool to normal operation. Subsequent communications with the rover revealed that the procedure is working and the rock abrasion tool remains healthy.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 893rd sol, or Martian day (July 8, 2006). The image combines exposures taken through three of the camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 430 nanometers.

  6. Effects of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), present in dentifrice, on volatile sulphur compound (VSC) formation in morning bad breath.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Daiane Cristina; Salvador, Sérgio Luis; Sallum, Antonio Wilson; da Nogueira-Filho, Getúlio Rocha

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), present in a commercial dentifrice, on the formation of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) and tongue coating in a panel of periodontally healthy subjects. A two-step blinded, crossover, randomized study was carried out in 25 dental students with healthy periodontium; these were divided into two experimental groups: SLS (dentifrice with SLS) and WSLS (dentifrice without SLS). The volunteers received the designated dentifrice and a new toothbrush for a 3x/day brushing regimen for 2 periods of 30 days. A seven-day washout interval was used between the periods. The assessed parameters were: plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), organoleptic breath (ORG), VSC levels by portable sulphide monitor before (H1) and after (H2) cleaning of the tongue, tongue coating wet weight (TC) and benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA) test from tongue coating samples. The intra-group analysis showed a decrease in the median of organoleptic scores from 3 to 2 after 30 days for the SLS group (p < 0.05). The inter-group analysis showed lower values in ORG and H1 for the SLS group (p < 0.05). There was no difference between the amount of TC in SLS and WSLS groups. In the BANA test, the presence of SLS did not affect the BANA number of +/- results (p > 0.05). These findings suggest that sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), present in dentifrice, appears to prevent VSC formation in morning bad breath regardless of the amount of tongue coating in periodontally healthy subjects.

  7. Polyelectrolyte brushes: a novel stable lubrication system in aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terada, Masami; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Surface-initiated controlled radical copolymerizations of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride) (MTAC), and 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMK) were carried out on a silicon wafer and glass ball to prepare polyelectrolyte brushes with excellent water wettability. The frictional coefficient of the polymer brushes was recorded on a ball-on-plate type tribometer by linear reciprocating motion of the brush specimen at a selected velocity of 1.5 x 10(-3) m s-1 under a normal load of 0.49 N applied to the stationary glass ball (d = 10 mm) at 298 K. The poly(DMAEMA-co-MPC) brush partially cross-linked by bis(2-iodoethoxy)ethane maintained a relatively low friction coefficient around 0.13 under humid air (RH > 75%) even after 200 friction cycles. The poly(SPMK) brush revealed an extremely low friction coefficient around 0.01 even after 450 friction cycles. We supposed that the abrasion of the brush was prevented owing to the good affinity of the poly(SPMK) brush for water forming a water lubrication layer, and electrostatic repulsive interactions among the brushes bearing sulfonic acid groups. Furthermore, the poly(SPMK-co-MTAC) brush with a chemically cross-linked structure showed a stable low friction coefficient in water even after 1400 friction cycles under a normal load of 139 MPa, indicating that the cross-linking structure improved the wear resistance of the brush layer.

  8. Effects of short-term immersion and brushing with different denture cleansers on the roughness, hardness, and color of two types of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Panariello, Beatriz Helena Dias; Izumida, Fernanda Emiko; Moffa, Eduardo Buozi; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the cumulative effects of brushing (B) or immersion (I), using different cleansing agents, on the surface roughness, hardness and color stability of a heat-polymerized denture resin, Lucitone 550 (L), and a hard chairside reline resin, Tokuyama Rebase Fast II (T). A total of 316 specimens (10 x 2 mm) were fabricated. The specimens (n = 9) were divided into brushing or immersion groups according to the following agents: dentifrice/distilled water (D), 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), Corega Tabs (Pb), 1% chlorhexidine gluconate (Chx), and 0.2% peracetic acid (Ac). Brushing and immersion were tested independently. Assays were performed after 1, 3, 21, 45 and 90 brushing cycles or immersion of 10 seconds each. Data were evaluated statistically by repeated measures ANOVA. Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) post-hoc test was used to determine differences between means (α = 0.05). For L there was no statistically significant difference in roughness, except a significant decrease in roughness by brushing with D. T showed a significant effect on the roughness after 90 immersions with Ac. Hardness values decreased for L when specimens were immersed or brushed in NaOCl and Pb. The hardness of T decreased with increases in the repetitions (immersion or brushing), regardless of the cleaning method. Values of color stability for L resin showed significant color change after brushing with and immersion in Ac and Pb. Brushing with D exhibited a higher incidence of color change. For T there were no significant differences between cleaning agents and repetitions in immersion. A color change was noted after three brushings with the Ac, Chx, and D. Brushing with dentifrice decreased roughness of L. Immersion in or brushing with NaOCl and Pb decreased the hardness of L. For T, hardness decreased with increases in immersions or brushing. Color changes after the immersion in or brushing with cleaning agents were clinically acceptable according to National

  9. Interproximal plaque mass and fluoride retention after brushing and flossing--a comparative study of powered toothbrushing, manual toothbrushing and flossing.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Karin; Lundberg, Ann-Britt; Birkhed, Dowen; Dudgeon, Douglas J; Johnson, Matthew R

    2004-01-01

    To determine differences in interproximal plaque mass and fluoride retention with different modes of toothbrushing and flossing. Forty-seven subjects in good health used four treatments in a four-period, randomized, crossover design: 1) manual brushing only; 2) manual brushing and daily flossing; 3) electric brushing using a rotational oscillation toothbrush; and 4) electric brushing using a sonic toothbrush. Subjects used a standard sodium fluoride dentifrice during the eight-day experimental periods and a fluoride-free dentifrice during the seven-day washout periods between treatments. Interproximal plaque samples were taken on Day 1 and on Day 8, weighed, and analyzed for fluoride content. The amount of interproximal plaque was lowest with sonic brushing, which left 43-65% less plaque than all other treatments. Manual brushing and flossing yielded less plaque than manual brushing alone and rotational oscillation brushing. Differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05) for treatment; there was no time effect on plaque mass. For fluoride retention, at Day 1 sonic brushing gave at least 54% more fluoride in the interproximal plaque than all other treatments, which was significant. All treatments demonstrated a significant increase in fluoride concentration with time except manual brushing and flossing, which showed a significant decrease. At Day 8, the fluoride concentration was significantly higher for sonic brushing than for manual brushing or rotational oscillation brushing by over 40%, and all treatments exhibited significantly greater fluoride than the manual brushing and flossing combination. The mode of toothbrushing may impact the amount of plaque retained interproximally and its fluoride concentration.

  10. Influence of different toothpaste abrasives on the bristle end-rounding quality of toothbrushes.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, G J P L; de Aveiro, J M; Pavone, C; Marcantonio, R A C

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of different toothpaste abrasives on the bristle wear and bristle tip morphology of toothbrushes with different degrees of hardness. Ninety samples of bovine incisor teeth were used in this study. The samples were randomly divided into three groups according to the bristle hardness of the toothbrush used: soft bristles (S); extra-soft bristles (ES); hard bristles (H). The toothbrushes of each group were randomly divided into six subgroups with five toothbrushes each, according to the abrasive of the toothpaste used in the simulation: Negative control (distilled water); toothpaste 1 (silica); toothpaste 2 (hydrated silica); toothpaste 3 (calcium carbonate, calcium bicarbonate and silica); toothpaste 4 (tetrapotassium pyrophosphate, silica and titanium dioxide); toothpaste 5 (calcium carbonate). The samples were placed in a toothbrushing simulating machine that simulating three months of brushing. The toothbrush bristles were evaluated by the bristle wear index, and the bristle tips morphology was evaluated by the bristle tip morphology index. The ES brush presented the highest bristle wear among the toothbrushes. Additionally, the S brushes showed better morphology of the bristles followed by ES and H brushes. The type of abrasive only influenced the bristle tip morphology of the ES brushes. The toothpaste 3 induced the worse bristle tip morphology than all the other toothpastes. Different abrasives have influence only on the bristle tip morphology of the ES brushes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The clinical anticalculus efficacy of a tartar control whitening dentifrice for the prevention of supragingival calculus in a three-month study.

    PubMed

    Sowinski, J; Petrone, D M; Battista, G; Petrone, M E; Crawford, R; Patel, S; DeVizio, W; Chaknis, P; Volpe, A R; Proskin, H M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study was to compare the effect of a new dentifrice (Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening Fluoride Toothpaste) for the prevention of supragingival calculus, with that of a commercially available calculus-inhibiting dentifrice (Crest Tartar Control Toothpaste). The study involved adult male and female subjects who had pre-qualified for participation by developing sufficient supragingival calculus (greater than 7.0 on the Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index) during an eight-week screening period. Subjects received a full oral prophylaxis, and were stratified into two treatment groups balanced for age, sex and qualifying calculus score. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth twice daily (morning and evening) for one minute with their assigned dentifrice using a soft-bristled toothbrush. Examinations for dental calculus were performed after twelve weeks' use of the study dentifrices, using the Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index, Fifty-eight (58) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the entire study. The Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening group exhibited a statistically significant (p < 0.001) 34.6% reduction in mean calculus score compared to the Crest Tartar Control group.

  12. A Randomized in situ Clinical Study of Fluoride Dentifrices on Enamel Remineralization and Resistance to Demineralization: Effects of Zinc.

    PubMed

    Creeth, Jonathan E; Karwal, Ritu; Hara, Anderson T; Zero, Domenick T

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of zinc ions and F concentration in a dentifrice on remineralization of early caries lesions in situ and on resistance to subsequent demineralization. This was a single-center, 6-period, 6-product, blinded (examiner, subject, analyst), randomized (n = 62), crossover study. Products (all NaF) were: 0, 250, 1,150 and 1,426 ppm F (dose-response controls), "Zn-A" (0.3% ZnCl2, 1,426 ppm F), and "Zn-B" (as Zn-A, with high-foaming surfactants) in a conventional silica base. Subjects wore palatal appliances holding partially demineralized bovine enamel specimens. They brushed their teeth with 1.5 g test dentifrice (25 s), then swished the slurry ensuring even exposure of specimens (95 s), expectorated, and rinsed (15 mL water, 10 s). After 4 h intraoral remineralization, specimens were removed and acid-challenged in vitro. Surface microhardness (SMH), measured pre-experimental, post-initial acid exposure, post-remineralization, and post-second acid exposure, was used to calculate recovery (SMHR), net acid resistance (NAR), and a new, specifically demineralization-focused calculation, "comparative acid resistance" (CAR). Enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) was also measured. For the F dose-response controls, all measures showed significant relationships with dentifrice F concentration (p < 0.0001). The presence of zinc counteracted the ability of F to promote remineralization in this model. Compared to the 1,426 ppm F control, the zinc formulations gave reduced SMHR, EFU, and NAR (all p < 0.0001); however, they showed evidence of increased CAR (Zn-A: p = 0.0040; Zn-B: p = 0.0846). Products were generally well tolerated. In this study, increasing dentifrice F concentration progressively increased in situ remineralization and demineralization resistance of early caries enamel lesions. Zinc ions reduced remineralization but could increase demineralization resistance. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A randomized clinical trial evaluating gingivitis and plaque reduction of an oscillating-rotating power brush with a new brush head with angled bristles versus a marketed sonic brush with self-adjusting technology.

    PubMed

    Klukowska, Malgorzata; Grender, Julie M; Conde, Erinn; Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Ram Goyal, C

    2014-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of an oscillating-rotating power toothbrush with a novel brush head incorporating angled CrissCross bristles (Oral-B Pro 7000 SmartSeries and Oral-B CrossAction brush head) versus a marketed sonic toothbrush (Colgate ProClinical A1500 with the Triple Clean brush head) in the reduction of gingivitis and plaque over a 6-week period. This was a single center, randomized, open label, examiner-blind, 2-treatment, parallel group study. Study participants who met the entrance criteria were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to one of the two toothbrush groups. Study participants brushed with their assigned toothbrush and a marketed fluoride dentifrice for 2 minutes twice daily at home for 6 weeks. Gingivitis and plaque were evaluated at baseline and Week 6. Gingivitis was assessed using the Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) and plaque was assessed using the Rustogi Modified Navy Plaque Index (RMNPI). Data was analyzed using the ANCOVA with baseline as the covariate. In total, 130 study participants were randomized to treatment resulting in 64 study participants per group completing the study. Both brushes produced statistically significant (P < 0.001) reductions in gingivitis and plaque measures relative to baseline. The oscillating-rotating,brush with the novel brush head demonstrated statistically significantly (P < 0.05) greater reductions in all gingivitis measures, as well as whole mouth and interproximal plaque measures, compared to the sonic toothbrush. The benefit for the oscillating- rotating brush over the sonic brush was 21.3% for gingivitis, 35.7% for gingival bleeding, 34.7% for number of bleeding sites, 17.4% for whole mouth plaque, and 21.2% for interproximal plaque. There were no adverse events reported or observed for either brush.

  14. Evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of Aloe vera and Meswak containing dentifrices with fluoridated dentifrice: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Bhati, Neha; Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of fluoridated and herbal dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Sixty students in the age group 6–12 years with DMF/def score 0 were selected from an orphanage center. The participants were divided into four groups. In group A, no dentifrice was used; in group B, fluoride containing dentifrice was used; group C subjects used Aloe vera containing dentifrice; and in group D, Meswak containing dentifrice was used. The salivary samples were collected at the washout period of 2 days, 15 days, and 30 days and cultured on Mitis Salivarius Agar for determining Streptococcus mutans count. Results obtained were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test. Results: There was an increase in bacterial count in group A where no dentifrices were used, while the bacterial count steadily decreased in groups B, C, and D by 83.7%, 80.94%, and 83.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Herbal dentifrices containing A. vera and Meswak can be safely recommended as an alternative to fluoridated dentifrices in terms of antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:26539392

  15. The importance of measuring toothpaste abrasivity in both a quantitative and qualitative way

    PubMed Central

    Tellefsen, Georg; Johannsen, Annsofi; Liljeborg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the relative abrasivity of different toothpastes and polishing pastes both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and methods. Acrylic plates were exposed to brushing in a brushing machine with a toothpaste/water slurry for 1 and 6 h. Twelve different toothpastes were used and also four different polishing pastes. The results were evaluated using a profilometer after 1 and 6 h of brushing (corresponding to 2000 and 12 000 double strokes, respectively). A surface roughness value (Ra-value) and also a volume loss value were calculated from the profilometer measurements. These values were then correlated to each other. An unpaired t-test for the difference in the abrasion values between the toothpastes and the abrasion values over time was used. Results. The polishing paste RDA® 170 yielded higher Ra-values than RDA 250®, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing (1.01 ± 0.22 and 8.99 ± 1.55 compared to 0.63 ± 0.26 and 7.83 ± 5.89, respectively) as well as volume loss values (3.71 ± 0.17 and 20.20 ± 2.41 compared to 2.15 ± 1.41 and 14.79 ± 11.76, respectively), thus poor correlations between the RDA and Ra and Volume loss values were shown. Among the toothpastes, Apotekets® showed the highest Ra value after 1 h of brushing and Pepsodent® whitening after 6 h of brushing. Pepsodent® whitening also showed the highest volume loss values, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing. Conclusion. This study emphasizes the importance of not only considering the RDA value, but also a roughness value, when describing the abrasivity of a toothpaste. Furthermore, it can be concluded that so called ‘whitening' toothpastes do not necessarily have a higher abrasive effect than other toothpastes. PMID:22746180

  16. The importance of measuring toothpaste abrasivity in both a quantitative and qualitative way.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Gunnar; Tellefsen, Georg; Johannsen, Annsofi; Liljeborg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relative abrasivity of different toothpastes and polishing pastes both qualitatively and quantitatively. Acrylic plates were exposed to brushing in a brushing machine with a toothpaste/water slurry for 1 and 6 h. Twelve different toothpastes were used and also four different polishing pastes. The results were evaluated using a profilometer after 1 and 6 h of brushing (corresponding to 2000 and 12 000 double strokes, respectively). A surface roughness value (Ra-value) and also a volume loss value were calculated from the profilometer measurements. These values were then correlated to each other. An unpaired t-test for the difference in the abrasion values between the toothpastes and the abrasion values over time was used. The polishing paste RDA® 170 yielded higher Ra-values than RDA 250®, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing (1.01 ± 0.22 and 8.99 ± 1.55 compared to 0.63 ± 0.26 and 7.83 ± 5.89, respectively) as well as volume loss values (3.71 ± 0.17 and 20.20 ± 2.41 compared to 2.15 ± 1.41 and 14.79 ± 11.76, respectively), thus poor correlations between the RDA and Ra and Volume loss values were shown. Among the toothpastes, Apotekets® showed the highest Ra value after 1 h of brushing and Pepsodent® whitening after 6 h of brushing. Pepsodent® whitening also showed the highest volume loss values, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing. This study emphasizes the importance of not only considering the RDA value, but also a roughness value, when describing the abrasivity of a toothpaste. Furthermore, it can be concluded that so called 'whitening' toothpastes do not necessarily have a higher abrasive effect than other toothpastes.

  17. Surface characterization of current composites after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Jin, Jian; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Hickel, Reinhard; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the surface roughness and the gloss of current composites before and after toothbrush abrasion. We assessed forty dimensionally standardized composite specimens (n=8/group) from five composites: two nanohybrids (i. e., IPS Empress Direct Enamel and IPS Empress Direct Dentin), two microhybrids (i. e., Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Z250) and one organically modified ceramics (Admira). All of the specimens were polished with 4000-grid silicon carbide papers. Surface roughness was measured with a profilometer and gloss was measured with a glossmeter before and after powered toothbrush abrasion with a 1:1 slurry (dentifrice/tap water) at 12,000 strokes in a toothbrush simulator. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness and a reduction in gloss after toothbrush abrasion in all of the composites except Clearfil AP-X (p<0.05). Simple regression analysis showed that there was not an association between the surface roughness and the gloss (R(2)=0.191, p<0.001).

  18. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carolina C; Oliveira, Maria J; Pordeus, Isabela A; Paiva, Saul M

    2011-09-03

    Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months) from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75). There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p < 0.001). When observed by the examiner, the frequencies of dentifrice dispersed on all bristles (35.9%), children who brushed their teeth alone (33.8%) and those who did not rinse their mouths during brushing (42.0%) were higher than those reported by the mothers (12.1%, 18.9% and 6.5%, respectively; p < 0.001). In general, there was low agreement between observed tooth brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits, indicative of reporting bias. Data

  19. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. Methods A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months) from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Results Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75). There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p < 0.001). When observed by the examiner, the frequencies of dentifrice dispersed on all bristles (35.9%), children who brushed their teeth alone (33.8%) and those who did not rinse their mouths during brushing (42.0%) were higher than those reported by the mothers (12.1%, 18.9% and 6.5%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions In general, there was low agreement between observed tooth brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits

  20. Complete denture biofilm after brushing with specific denture paste, neutral soap and artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Salles, Antônio Eduardo Sparça; Macedo, Leandro Dorigan de; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena da; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Watanabe, Evandro

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the levels of biofilm in maxillary and mandibular complete dentures and evaluated the number of colony-forming units (cfu) of yeasts, after using auxiliary brushing agents and artificial saliva. Twenty-three denture wearers with hyposalivation and xerostomia were instructed to brush the dentures 3 times a day during 3 weeks with the following products: Corega Brite denture dentifrice, neutral liquid soap, Corega Brite combined with Oral Balance (artificial saliva) or tap water. For biofilm quantification, the internal surfaces of the dentures were disclosed, photographed and measured using a software. For microbiological analysis, the biofilm was scrapped off, and the harvested material was diluted, sown in CHROMagar™ Candida and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Mandibular dentures presented a mean biofilm percentage (µ=26.90 ± 21.10) significantly greater than the maxillary ones (µ=18.0 ± 15.0) (p<0.05). Brushing using Corega Brite combined with Oral Balance (µ=15.87 ± 18.47) was more effective (p<0.05) than using the denture dentifrice (µ=19.47 ± 17.24), neutral soap (µ=23.90 ± 18.63) or tap water (control; µ=32.50 ± 20.68). For the microbiological analysis, the chi-square test did not indicate significant difference between the hygiene products for either type of denture. The more frequently isolated species of yeasts were C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. In conclusion, mandibular dentures had more biofilm formation than maxillary ones. Denture brushing with Corega Brite dentifrice combined with the use of Oral Balance was the most effective method for reduction of biofilm levels, but the use of products did not show difference in yeast cfu counts.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy study of the effect of the brushing time on the human tooth dentin after exposure to acidic softdrinks.

    PubMed

    Kwoni, Eri; Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Park, Ki-Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2012-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the abrasive and erosive potential of the brushing time on the dentin surface eroded by acidic soft drinks to suggest an optimized toothbrushing start time after the consumption of cola (pH 2.52) in children. Thirty-six non-carious primary central incisors were assigned to 12 experimental groups (n = 3) based on the erosive and abrasive treatment protocols. Cola exposure was used as the erosive treatment. Three brushing durations (5, 15, and 30 sec) and four brushing start times (immediately, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min) after an erosive pre-treatment were used for the abrasive treatment. Toothbrushing after exposure to acidic soft drinks led to an increase in the open-tubule fraction and microstructural changes. Toothbrushing immediately after the erosive pre-treatment showed the largest abrasive and erosive potential on the dentin whereas that 60 and 120 min after the pre-treatment showed the least abrasive and erosive potential on the dentin. Toothbrushing for both 60 and 120 min after the pre-treatment showed similar erosive and abrasive potentials on the dentin. The brushing duration showed no effect on the erosive and abrasive potential on the dentin. Therefore, to achieve the desired tooth surface cleaning and less surface lesion on the dentin surface, toothbrushing should be performed at least 1 hour after cola consumption. Three-minute brushing after cola consumption is sufficient to prevent dental lesions, and prolonged brushing can irritate the gingival tissues.

  2. Ceramic brush seals development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: ceramic brush seals, research and development, manufacturing, brazed assembly development, controlling braze flow, fiber selection, and braze results.

  3. A comparative clinical study evaluating stain removal efficacy of a new sensitivity whitening dentifrice compared to commercially available whitening dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nathan; Maggio, Brenda; Sufi, Farzana; Mason, Stephen; Kleber, Carl J

    2009-01-01

    To assess the extrinsic stain removal efficacy of a new sensitivity dentifrice containing sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) to marketed whitening toothpastes after six weeks of product use. This was a single-center, double-blind, stratified, six-week clinical study comparing the reduction in stain area and intensity of Sensodyne Extra Whitening to Crest Maximum Strength Sensitivity Protection Whitening plus Scope and Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening Mint dentifrice, as measured by MacPherson's Modification of the Lobene Stain Index (MMLSI) in a forced stain model. Two-hundred and ninety-five subjects completed the study. Tooth stain MMSLI scores showed significant differences between Sensodyne and Crest dentifrices in favor of Sensodyne for all surface sites (p = 0.014), and individually for facial (p = 0.023), lingual (p = 0.027), and interproximal (p = 0.014) surfaces. No significant statistical differences between Sensodyne and Colgate dentifrices were observed for any of the surfaces. Results from this stain removal clinical study demonstrate significant extrinsic stain removal efficacy for all dentifrices relative to baseline. Significant differences between the two marketed sensitivity whitening dentifrices were demonstrated in favor of the new Sensodyne Sensitivity Whitening dentifrice.

  4. Effect of nanofillers' size on surface properties after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Larissa M; Masouras, Konstantinos; Watts, David C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Silikas, Nick

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of filler-particle size of experimental and commercial resin composites, undergoing toothbrush abrasion, on three surface properties: surface roughness (SR), surface gloss (G) and color stability (CS). Four model (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and one commercial resin composite (Tokuyama) with varying filler-size from 100-1000 nm were examined. Six discs (10 mm x 2 mm) from each product were prepared and mechanically polished. The samples were then submitted to 20,000 brushing strokes in a toothbrush abrasion machine. SR parameters (Ra, Rt and RSm), G, and CS were measured before and after toothbrush abrasion. Changes in SR and G were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, with Bonferroni post hoc test. CS values were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Initial G values ranged between 73-87 gloss units (GU) and were reduced after toothbrush abrasion to a range of 8-64 GU. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in significant modifications in SR and G amongst the materials tested, attributed to filler sizes. There was statistically significant difference in color (delta E* ranged from 0.38-0.88). Filler size did not affect color stability. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in rougher and matte surfaces for all materials tested. Although the individual differences in surface roughness among filler sizes were not always significant, the correlation showed a trend that larger filler sizes resulted in higher surface roughness after abrasion for the SR parameters Ra and Rt (r = 0.95; r = 0.93, respectively). RSm showed an increase after toothbrush abrasion for all resin composites, however no significant correlation was detected (r = 0.21).There was a significant correlation between G and Ra ratios (r = - 0.95).

  5. A three-year clinical comparison of a sodium monofluorophosphate dentifrice with sodium fluoride dentifrices on dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Lu, K H; Ruhlman, C D; Chung, K L; Sturzenberger, O P; Lehnhoff, R W

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the anticaries effects of these three fluoride-containing dentifrices: 1100 ppm F as NaF (positive control); 2800 ppm F as SMFP; and 2800 ppm F as NaF. The group using the 2800 SMFP dentifrice showed no significant differences in DMFS or DMFT, compared to the positive control, at anytime during the study. This indicated that higher levels of sodium monofluorophosphate in a dentifrice offer no advantage in caries protection over the conventional level of sodium fluoride, 1100 ppm F.

  6. Clinical evaluation of seven anticalculus dentifrice formulations.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, R R; Stewart, P W; Samuels, M S; Stamm, J W

    1991-01-01

    One hundred ninety-two subjects completed a clinical trial to determine the effects of seven dentifrice formulations on calculus inhibition. The double-blind study involved a ten-day control phase and a ten-day experimental phase. For the control phase, subjects were evaluated for calculus present, received a prophylaxis and had pre-weighed mylar strips attached to the lingual surfaces of the mandibular incisors to harvest mineral deposits. Subjects were then assigned the placebo dentifrice for unsupervised twice-daily use and were required to report once a day for a supervised mouthrinse using a 1:3 dilution of the dentrifice. The experimental phase was identical except that subjects were allocated the experimental dentifices using a stratified random assignment based on age, gender and the initial presence of calculus. Simple linear regression analyses of the dry and ash log weights obtained from the strips were performed. The results showed no statistically significant differences among the test products; however, two formulations containing zinc citrate showed some calculus inhibition-potential suggesting that further research and development of such products may be warranted.

  7. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  8. Dentifrice Containing Extract of Rosmarinus officinalis Linn.: An Antimicrobial Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valones, Marcela Agne Alves; Higino, Jane Sheila; Souza, Paulo Roberto Eleutério; Crovella, Sérgio; Caldas, Arnaldo de França; Carvalho, Alessandra de Albuquerque Tavares

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of a dentifrice containing an alcoholic extract of rosemary on oral bacteria, compared to a commercially available herbal dentifrice. Standard strains of Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175), Streptococcus oralis (ATCC 9811) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) were used, as well as different toothpastes based on rosemary (TR), on propolis (TH), triclosan (positive control) (TPC) and non-fluoridated dentifrice (negative control) (TNC). Bacteria were seeded in Petri dishes and paper discs soaked with dilutions of dentifrice placed on the plates. The inhibition halos were analyzed. It was observed that TR did not show statistical difference in relation to the TH to inhibit S. mutans and S. oralis, while TH was more active against L. rhamnosus. The toothpaste containing rosemary extract had the ability to inhibit the growth of S. mutans, S. oralis and L. rhamnosus, revealing an antimicrobial activity similar to commercially available toothpastes for inhibition of S. mutans and S. oralis.

  9. APF and dentifrice effect on root dentin demineralization and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Vale, G C; Tabchoury, C P M; Del Bel Cury, A A; Tenuta, L M A; ten Cate, J M; Cury, J A

    2011-01-01

    Because dentin is more caries-susceptible than enamel, its demineralization may be more influenced by additional fluoride (F). We hypothesized that a combination of professional F, applied as acidulated phosphate F (APF), and use of 1100-ppm-F dentifrice would provide additional protection for dentin compared with 1100-ppm-F alone. Twelve adult volunteers wore palatal appliances containing root dentin slabs, which were subjected, during 4 experimental phases of 7 days each, to biofilm accumulation and sucrose exposure 8x/day. The volunteers were randomly assigned to the following treatments: placebo dentifrice (PD), 1100-ppm-F dentifrice (FD), APF + PD, and APF+FD. APF gel (1.23% F) was applied to the slabs once at the beginning of the experimental phase, and the dentifrices were used 3x/day. APF and FD increased F concentration in biofilm fluid and reduced root dentin demineralization, presenting an additive effect. Analysis of the data suggests that the combination of APF gel application and daily regular use of 1100-ppm-F dentifrice may provide additional protection against root caries compared with the dentifrice alone.

  10. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  11. Brushing Your Child's Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000769.htm Brushing Your Child's Teeth To use the sharing features on this page, ... age. Taking care of your child's gums and teeth every day helps prevent tooth decay and gum ...

  12. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug... tests: Enamel solubility reduction or fluoride enamel uptake. The testing procedures for these...

  13. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug... tests: Enamel solubility reduction or fluoride enamel uptake. The testing procedures for these...

  14. The effect of a fluoride dentifrice containing an anticalculus agent on dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Lu, K H; Yen, D J; Zacherl, W A; Ruhlman, C D; Sturzenberger, O P; Lehnhoff, R W

    1985-01-01

    In this double-blind caries study, 1160 Taiwanese children (ages 8-15) completed a program using a test dentifrice containing 1.243 percent sodium fluoride and soluble pyrophosphates, or a control dentifrice without these agents. The average reduction of new carious tooth surfaces was 39 percent with the sodium fluoride dentifrice.

  15. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Testing Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug...

  16. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Testing Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug...

  17. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTICARIES DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Testing Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug...

  18. Effect of a calcium glycerophosphate fluoride dentifrice formulation on enamel demineralization in situ.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio; Cury, Altair A Del Bel; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Tabchoury, Cínthia Pereira Machado; Moi, Gisele Pedroso; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate in situ the effect and mechanisms involved in the anticariogenic effect of a calcium glycerophosphate fluoride dentifrice. In a double-blind, crossover design, a non-F dentifrice (negative control), a F dentifrice and a F dentifrice containing 0.13% CaGP were compared regarding the inhibition of enamel demineralization. Both F dentifrices contained 1500 microg F/g (w/w) as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). Bovine enamel blocks were mounted in contact with a S. mutans test plaque, in palatal appliances worn by 10 volunteers. 30 minutes after treatment with the dentifrices, a sucrose rinse was performed and enamel demineralization was assessed after an additional 45 minutes. No significant difference was observed among groups in the calcium and inorganic phosphate concentrations in the fluid phase of the test plaque 30 minutes after the dentifrice use (P > 0.05), but F concentration was significantly higher for both F dentifrices (P < 0.05). Also, the dentifrices did not differ regarding the pH before or 5 minutes after the sugar challenge (P > 0.05). A higher mineral loss was observed for the non-F dentifrice group (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the F dentifrices containing CaGP or not (P > 0.05). Using this in situ model, the findings suggested that CaGP at the concentration tested did not enhance the inhibition of enamel demineralization promoted by F dentifrice.

  19. Desensitizing efficacy of nano-carbonate apatite dentifrice and Er,Cr:YSGG laser: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Young; Jung, Hoi-In; Jung, Bock-Young; Cho, Young-Sik; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the desensitizing effects of a dentifrice containing nano-carbonate apatite (n-CAP) and Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Most studies of hypersensitivity treatment have been conducted with different methods of professional treatment and self-care in each study. Moreover, clinical studies that compare self-care and professional treatment have not yet been published. Eighty-two patients with dentin hypersensitivity were divided randomly into three groups: (1) a control group with strontium chloride dentifrice (SC), (2) n-CAP dentifrice (n-CAP), and (3) an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (laser) group. The study was conducted for 4 weeks: a treatment period of 2 weeks and a maintenance period of 2 subsequent weeks. The SC and n-CAP groups were instructed to brush their teeth twice a day for 1 min. The laser group visited twice at 1 week intervals for irradiation of the sensitive teeth. The desensitizing effect was evaluated by assessing the tactile sensitivity using the visual analogue scale (VAS), and evaporative air sensitivity was determined using an air blast score (ABS). The n-CAP group and the laser group showed significantly different desensitizing effects in VAS after 4 weeks (69% and 63%, respectively) and a 33% (p<0.05) and 3% (p>0.05) desensitizing effect, respectively, in VAS during the maintenance period. The n-CAP and the laser were effective in reducing dentin hypersensitivity. The laser had a superior desensitizing effect at the initial stage, whereas the n-CAP maintained its effect for a relatively longer time in clinical situations.

  20. Cavitation during wire brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    In our daily life, brush is often used to scrub the surface of objects, for example, teeth, pots, shoes, pool, etc. And cleaning rust and stripping paint are accomplished using wire brush. Wire brushes also can be used to clean the teeth for large animals, such as horses, crocodiles. By observing brushing process in water, we capture the cavitation phenomenon on the track of moving brush wire. It shows that the cavitation also can affect the surface. In order to take clear and entire pictures of cavity, a simplified model of one stainless steel wire brushing a boss is adopted in our experiment. A transparent organic tank filled with deionized water is used as a view box. And a high speed video camera is used to record the sequences. In experiment, ambient pressure is atmospheric pressure and deionized water temperature is kept at home temperature. An obvious beautiful flabellate cavity zone appears behind the moving steel wire. The fluctuation of pressure near cavity is recorded by a hydrophone. More movies and pictures are used to show the behaviors of cavitation bubble following a restoring wire. Beautiful tracking cavitation bubble cluster is captured and recorded to show.

  1. Clinical effect of a triclosan containing dentifrice on gingivitis during pregnancy and post-partum.

    PubMed

    Kraivaphan, Petcharat; Amornchat, Cholticha; Triratana, Terdphong; Leethochawalit, Ungkana

    2006-07-01

    One hundred forty pregnant women 3 months gestation were enrolled in a 9 month, double-blind clinical study to evaluate the effect of 0.3% triclosan/copolymer dentifrice on gingivitis, compared to a placebo dentifrice. Women were stratified into two balanced groups according to their baseline gingivitis scores. They then received oral prophylaxis and were assigned to use either a placebo or the triclosan dentifrice for the next 9 months. The 3, 5 and 9 month results of this study showed that the triclosan dentifrice provided statistically significant reductions in gingivitis of 19.73, 27.91and 38.45%, respectively, compared to the placebo dentifrice.

  2. Abrasion resistant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to themore » metal matrix.« less

  3. Potential effects of tooth-brushing on human dentin wear following exposure to acidic soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Park, K-H; Cheong, Y; Moon, S W; Park, Y-G; Park, H-K

    2012-08-01

    This study used scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to examine the short-term potential effects of brushing time and the start-time of tooth-brushing after demineralization on primary dentin wear in vitro. Thirty-six noncarious primary central incisors were assigned to 12 experimental groups. Exposure to cola drinks was used to initiate the demineralization process. Three brushing times (5, 15 and 30 s) and four start-times of brushing (0, 30, 60 and 120 min) after an erosive attack were used for the abrasion process. Tooth-brushing the softened dentin surface led to increases in the open tubular fraction and microstructural changes on the dentin surface. Brushing immediately after exposure to cola resulted in the greatest irreversible dentin loss, whereas brushing 60 or 120 min after pretreatment resulted in the least irreversible dentin loss. However, brushing time had no effect on the irreversible loss of dentin wear. Based on these experimental results, tooth-brushing should be performed at least 60 min after consuming a cola drink to achieve the desired tooth cleaning and avoid the introduction of surface lesions on dentin. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health.

  4. Bidirectional Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Wilson, Jack; Wu, Tom; Flower, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    Presented is a study of the use of a set of I.D./O.D. bidirectional press seals to reduce the leakage losses in a wave rotor. Relative to the baseline configuration, data indicate the use of brush seals enhanced wave rotor efficiency from 36 to 45 percent at low leakages (small rotor endwall gap spacings) and from 15 to 33 percent at high leakages (larger endwall gap spacings). These brush seals are capable of sealing positive or negative pressure drops with respect to the axial direction. Surface tribology for these tests suggested little evidence of grooving although the bristles appeared polished.

  5. Fluoride and calcium concentrations in the biofilm fluid after use of fluoridated dentifrices supplemented with polyphosphate salts.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Mariana Emi; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Hall, Kevin Bruce; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Pessan, Juliano Pelim

    2017-04-01

    The present study evaluated fluoride (F) and calcium (Ca) concentrations in the biofilm fluid formed in situ under cariogenic challenge after using F dentifrices supplemented or not with sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) or calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP). Volunteers (n = 12) were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the toothpastes used: placebo (without F, CaGP or TMP), 1100 ppm F (1100F) and low-fluoride dentifrice (LFD, 550 ppm F) with no supplementation (550F) or supplemented with 1 % TMP (550F-TMP) or 0.25 % CaGP (550F-CaGP). In each phase, volunteers wore palatal appliances containing 4 bovine enamel blocks. Cariogenic challenge was performed with 30 % sucrose solution, 6 times/day. On the morning of the eigth day, biofilm samples were collected 12 h and 1 h after brushing and cariogenic challenge. F and Ca analyses in the biofilm fluid were performed with the inverted electrode after buffering with TISAB III and using the Arsenazo III method, respectively. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA (repeated measures) and Student-Newman-Keuls test (p < 0.05). A dose-response relationship was verified between F concentrations in the dentifrices and in the biofilm fluid. Significant differences were observed among placebo, 550F, and 1100F only 1 h after brushing, without statistical differences among 550F, 550F-TMP, and 550F-CaGP. No defined trend was observed among the groups regarding Ca concentrations, with the highest values seen for placebo and 550F-CaGP. The anticaries effect of LFDs supplemented with CaGP or TMP cannot be related to an increased availability of F and Ca in the biofilm fluid. The better performance of LFDs containing CaGP or TMP shown in previous studies should be attributed to their ability to interact with tooth enamel and with the biofilm, rather to their effect on the biofilm fluid.

  6. Protocol for measurement of enamel loss from brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste after an acidic episode.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Mojdeh; Vieira Ozorio, Jose Estevam; Chanin, Simon; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2017-01-01

    Tooth erosion from an acidic insult may be exacerbated by toothbrushing. The purposes of this study were to develop an in vitro methodology to measure enamel loss after brushing immediately following an acidic episode and to investigate the effect of brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste. The null hypotheses tested were that tooth erosion after brushing with the toothpaste would not be different from brushing with water and that a 1-hour delay before brushing would not reduce tooth erosion. Forty bovine enamel slabs were embedded, polished, and subjected to baseline profilometry. Specimens were bathed in hydrochloric acid for 10 minutes to simulate stomach acid exposure before post-acid profilometry. Toothbrushing was then simulated with a cross-brushing machine and followed by postbrushing profilometry. Group 1 was brushed with water; group 2 was brushed with a 50:50 toothpaste-water slurry; and groups 3 and 4 were immersed in artificial saliva for 1 hour before brushing with water or the toothpaste slurry, respectively. The depth of enamel loss was analyzed and compared using 1-way analysis of variance and post hoc testing (α = 0.05). Greater enamel loss was measured in groups brushed with toothpaste than in groups brushed with water. One-hour immersion in artificial saliva significantly reduced enamel loss when teeth were brushed with water (group 3; P < 0.05) but not with toothpaste (group 4). This study established a protocol for measuring enamel loss resulting from erosion followed by toothbrush abrasion. The results confirmed the abrasive action of toothpaste on acid-softened enamel.

  7. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOEpatents

    Finch, Hilvan A.

    1987-01-01

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics in each of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  8. Friction between Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A polymer brush consists of a surface with a fairly concentrated coating of polymer chains, each one of which has one of its ends tightly bound to the surface. They serve as extremely effective lubricant, producing friction coefficients as low as 0.001 or less! Polymer brushes are a promising way to reduce friction to extremely low values. They have the disadvantage, however, that they must be immersed in a liquid solvent in order to function as a lubricant. The presence of a solvent is believed to result in osmotic pressure which partially supports the load. The density profile of a polymer brush (i.e., the density of monomers as a function of distance from the surface to which the polymers are attached) is well established. What is not understood is how the interaction of polymer brush coated surfaces in contact with each other is able to account for the details of the observed low friction. For example, molecular dynamics studies generally do not predict static friction, whereas surface force apparatus measurements due to Tadmor, et. al., find that there is static friction. This is the topic of the present presentation.

  9. A Brush-Creeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Wong, Siu-ling

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we introduce a simple homemade toy called the brush-creeper, which can glide forward with no propellers, limbs, wheels, and seemingly no movement of any kind that can push forward against the ground. The toy arouses pupils' interest and their incentive to ask "Why?" in lessons related to friction.

  10. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOEpatents

    Finch, H.A.

    1985-06-21

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  11. Analysis of tooth brushing cycles.

    PubMed

    Tosaka, Yuki; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Murakami, Nozomi; Ishii, Rikako; Saitoh, Issei; Iwase, Yoko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Ohuchi, Akitsugu; Hayasaki, Haruaki

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of an analysis of tooth brushing cycles using a system that measures tooth brushing motion and brushing force with an accelerometer and strain tension gage attached to a toothbrush. Mechanical plaque removal with a manual toothbrush remains the primary method of maintaining good oral hygiene for the majority of the population. Because toothbrush motion has not been fully understood, it should be clarified by analysis of tooth brushing cycles. Twenty healthy female dental hygienists participated in this study. Their tooth brushing motions were measured and analyzed using an American Dental Association-approved manual toothbrush to which a three-dimensional (3-D) accelerometer and strain tension gage were attached. 3-D motion and brushing force on the labial surface of the mandibular right central incisor and the lingual surface of the mandibular left first molar were measured, analyzed, and compared. Multilevel linear model analysis was applied to estimate variables and compare motion and forces related to the two tooth surfaces. The analysis of tooth brushing cycles was feasible, and significant differences were detected for durations and 3-D ranges of toothbrush motion as well as brushing force between the two tooth surfaces. The analysis used in this study demonstrated an ability to detect characteristics of tooth brushing motion, showing tooth brushing motion to change depending on the brushed location. These results also suggest that more detailed instructions might be required according to patient's oral condition.

  12. Effect of a stannous fluoride dentifrice on the sulcular microbiota: a prospective cohort study in subjects with various levels of periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Benjasupattananan, Supranee; Lai, Caroline S Y; Persson, G Rutger; Pjetursson, Bjarni E; Lang, Niklaus P

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effects of an experimental 0.454% stannous fluoride (SnF2) dentifrice on the oral sulcular microbiota in patients with various stages of oral diseases using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. In the present one-month, single center, single product, prospective cohort trial, 37 adults (mean age 37.6) were assigned to one of four oral health condition cohorts with seven to 10 subjects each: 1. mild gingivitis, 2. marked generalized gingivitis to moderate periodontitis, 3. caries-prone and 4. treated moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis in supportive periodontal care. All four groups were asked to use the test dentifrice and a power toothbrush twice a day for one minute during a four-week test period. Before and after the trial period, Plaque Indices (PII, Silness and Löe, 1964) and Gingival Indices (GI, Löe and Silness, 1963) were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from all patients at Baseline, as well as after two and four weeks. These samples were analyzed for content of 40 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. As a result of the only one minute brushing with the stannous fluoride dentifrice, the mean PII at Baseline was significantly lower (p < 0.05) from the mean PII at four weeks. No statistically significant differences were found between premolar and molar mean values. Moreover, no statistically significant differences were found between the mean GI at Baseline and at four weeks. The microbiological analysis showed that at baseline subjects in groups 2 and 4 had significantly higher bacterial loads of bacteria than groups 1, and 3 (i.e. A. actinomyctemcomitans P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola. Over the study period, the total bacterial load did not change in groups 2, 3 and 4. In groups 1 and 3, however, an increase in the loads of Streptococci spp. were noticed (p < 0.05) including S. mitis, S. intermedius, and S. sanguis (p < 0.01) suggesting an increase in the presence of early

  13. Comparative evaluation of antibacterial property and substantivity of chlorhexidine containing dentifrices with sodium lauryl sulfate and Tween as surfactants: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Venu, V; Prabhakar, A R; Basappa, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the antibacterial property and substantivity of chlorhexidine containing dentifrices with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and Tween as surfactants. It is a double-blind cross over the study, a total of 20 children within their mixed dentition period (7-13 year) having Streptococci mutans count more than 10(6) were selected for the main study. Three types of chlorhexidine containing dentifrices were used with a washout period of 1 week. Out of the three toothpastes, one was without surfactant and other two toothpastes contained SLS and Tween as surfactants respectively. 20 volunteers brushed for 1 min during the study day with their assigned toothpaste. Saliva samples were collected before brushing, immediately after brushing and 1, 3, 5, and 7 hand sent for microbial analysis. The culture carried out by inoculating saliva sample onto Mitis salivarius agar for selective isolation of S. mutans followed by counting of colony forming unit. Group I and III (Chlorhexidine and CHX + Tween) had shown statistically significant reduction in bacterial count until 7 h when compared to their baseline values ( P < 0.001). Group II toothpaste (CHX + SLS) had shown significant reduction in bacterial count until 3 h only. On inter group comparison, Group III had shown good amount of percentage reduction in bacterial count when compared to other groups. CHX + Tween toothpaste had shown statistically significant reduction in antibacterial activity and substantivity than other groups. These findings show chlorhexidine containing toothpaste with non-ionic surfactant will be able to maintain the antibacterial property and substantivity of chlorhexidine.

  14. Evaluation of tartar control dentifrices in in vitro models of dentin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mason, S; Levan, A; Crawford, R; Fisher, S; Gaffar, A

    1991-01-01

    The effects of anticalculus dentifrices were compared with other commercially available dentifrices in in vitro models of dentin sensitivity. Changes in the hydraulic conductance of dentin discs were measured with and without a smear layer before and after treatment and also after a post-treatment acid etch. The capacity of dentifrices to occlude open dentinal tubules in vitro was also assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There was good correlation (R = 0.98) between our test and values reported in the literature. Tartar control dentifrices gave reductions in fluid flow rates through the dentin discs comparable to those obtained with Promise, Sensodyne, Thermodent and Denquel. Additionally, tartar control dentifrices did not remove microcrystalline debris (smear layers) from the surfaces of dentin in vitro. These results were confirmed by SEM. Thus, according to the hydrodynamic theory of dentin sensitivity, these in vitro results suggest that pyrophosphate-containing dentifrices should reduce dentinal sensitivity.

  15. Analysis of the antibacterial activity and plaque control benefit of colgate total dentifrice via clinical evaluation and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Deshmukh, Meenal; Barnes, Virginia Monsul; Trivedi, Harsh M; Du-Thumm, Laurence; Richter, Rose; Cummins, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This study analyzed, from a combined clinical and molecular biologic perspective, the antibacterial and antiplaque efficacy of Colgate Total dentifrice (CTD). A single-blind crossover study design utilized 11 healthy human subjects. After a one-week washout period, subjects donated dental plaque, received a dental prophylaxis, and subsequently brushed with a test product. Twenty-four hours postbrushing, dental plaque was collected and a clinical plaque score determined. Dental plaque was submitted for Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (Real-time PCR) analysis. The same procedure was repeated in accordance with a crossover design for the use of the second test product. Following a one-week washout, a plaque donation, prophylaxis, and brushing with the test product ensued for each subject. Twenty-four hours post-brushing, the subjects returned for a plaque score and plaque donation. Twenty-four hours after brushing, dental plaque coverage increased 17.88% +/- 8.27% with CTD, compared to 30.42% +/- 9.97% with Colgate Cavity Protection (CCP; p = 0.005). Real-time PCR found plaque collected 24 hours after brushing with CTD exhibited, on average, fewer representative periodontal pathogens (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythensis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis) and fewer early colonizers (Actinomyces naeslundii) than plaque collected before brushing, whereas CCP showed a moderate effect on oral bacteria. The study provides clinical and molecular biological evidence to substantiate the antibacterial and plaque control benefits of Colgate Total, and suggests the value of combining a molecular biological method with clinical research to corroborate clinical benefits.

  16. Brushed Target on Rock 'Champagne' in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this microscopic image of a target called 'Bubbles' on a rock called 'Champagne' after using its rock abrasion tool to brush away a coating of dust. The circular brushed area is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) across. This rock is different from rocks out on the plains of Gusev Crater but is similar to other rocks in this area of the 'Columbia Hills' in that it has higher levels of phosphorus. Plagioclase, a mineral commonly found in igneous rocks, is also present in these rocks, according to analysis with the minature thermal emission spectrometer. By using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to collect data over multiple martian days, or sols, scientists are also beginning to get measurements of trace elements in these rocks. Spirit took the images that are combined into this mosaic on sol 354 (Dec. 30, 2004).

  17. DNA decontamination of fingerprint brushes.

    PubMed

    Szkuta, Bianca; Oorschot, Roland A H van; Ballantyne, Kaye N

    2017-08-01

    Genetic profiling of DNA collected from fingerprints that have been exposed to various enhancement techniques is routine in many forensic laboratories. As a result of direct contact with fingermark residues during treatment, there is concern around the DNA contamination risk of dusting fingermarks with fingerprint brushes. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for cross-contamination between evidentiary items through various mechanisms, highlighting the risk of using the same fingerprint brush to powder multiple surfaces within and between crime-scenes. Experiments were performed to assess the contamination risk of reused fingerprint brushes through the transfer of dried saliva and skin deposits from and to glass surfaces with new unused squirrel hair and fiberglass brushes. Additional new unused brushes and brushes previously used in casework were also tested for their ability to contaminate samples. In addition, the ability to eradicate DNA from used squirrel hair and fiberglass fingerprint brushes was assessed using a 1% sodium hypochlorite solution and a 5% solution of a commercially available alternative, Virkon. DNA profiling results from surfaces contacted by treated and untreated brushes were compared to determine the effectiveness of the devised cleaning protocol. Brush durability was also assessed over multiple wash/rinse/dry cycles with both agents. Varying amounts of DNA-containing material were collected and transferred by squirrel hair and fiberglass brushes, with detectability on the secondary surface dependent on the biological nature of the material being transferred. The impact of DNA contamination from dirty fingerprint brushes was most apparent in simulations involving the transfer of dried saliva and brushes previously used in casework, while minimal transfer of touch DNA was observed. Alarmingly, large quantities of DNA were found to reside on new unused squirrel hair brushes, while no DNA was detected on new unused fiberglass

  18. Nanostructured polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Schmelmer, Ursula; Paul, Anne; Küller, Alexander; Steenackers, Marin; Ulman, Abraham; Grunze, Michael; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Jordan, Rainer

    2007-03-01

    Nanopatterned polymer brushes with sub-50-nm resolution were prepared by a combination of electron-beam chemical lithography (EBCL) of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and surface-initiated photopolymerization (SIPP). As a further development of our previous work, selective EBCL was performed with a highly focused electron beam and not via a mask, to region-selectively convert a SAM of 4'-nitro-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol to defined areas of crosslinked 4'-amino-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol. These "written" structures were then used to prepare surface-bonded, asymmetric, azo initiator sites of 4'-azomethylmalonodinitrile-1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol. In the presence of bulk styrene, SIPP amplified the primary structures of line widths from 500 to 10 nm to polystyrene structures of line widths 530 nm down to approximately 45 nm at a brush height of 10 or 7 nm, respectively, as measured by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relative position of individual structures was within a tolerance of a few nanometers, as verified by AFM. At line-to-line spacings down to 50-70 nm, individual polymer brush structures are still observable. Below this threshold, neighboring structures merge due to chain overlap.

  19. Polyelectrolyte brushes on dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antila, Hanne; Luijten, Erik

    When chains of charged polymers are grafted to a solid surface, a polyelectrolyte (PE) brush results. These types of PE assemblies have a wide range of applications ranging from fuel cells and switchable electrodes to drug delivery. Many of these applications stem from the ability of PE brushes to respond to external stimuli: the brush properties can be tuned, for example, by varying electric field, PE grafting density, pH, salt concentration or salt valency. Accordingly, deciphering the brush behavior under different conditions has been a subject of considerable experimental, theoretical, and computational research efforts. However, the effect of the dielectric properties of the substrate on the PE brush has received much less attention. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to show how varying the dielectric mismatch between the solvent and the substrate can significantly affect the brush. We demonstrate how tuning this mismatch can either diminish or enhance the effects of other control parameters, such as pH, on the brush properties. Furthermore, we investigate how dielectric properties of the substrate affect the brush, and the ion distribution and mobility within the brush, when the brush is exposed to an electric field.

  20. The role of erosion, abrasion and attrition in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Michele E; Rees, Gareth D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing clinical awareness of erosion of enamel and dentine by dietary acids and the consequent increased susceptibility to physical wear. Enamel erosion is characterized by acid-mediated surface softening that, if unchecked, will progress to irreversible loss of surface tissue, potentially exposing the underlying dentine. In comparison, dentine erosion is less well understood as the composition and microstructure are more heterogeneous. Factors which affect the erosive potential of a solution include pH, titratable acidity, common ion concentrations, and frequency and method of exposure. Abrasion and attrition are sources of physical wear and are commonly associated with tooth brushing and tooth-to-tooth contact, respectively. A combination of erosion and abrasion or attrition exacerbates wear; however, further research is required to understand the role of fluoride in protecting mineralized tissues from such processes. Abrasive wear may be seen in a wide range of patients, whereas attritive loss is usually seen in individuals with bruxism. Wear processes are implicated in the development of dentine hypersensitivity. Saliva confers the major protective function against wear due to its role in pellicle formation, buffering, acid clearance, and hard tissue remineralization. This review focuses on the physiochemical factors impacting tooth wear.

  1. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  2. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1994-07-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents test results of brush seals for cryogenic applications. Leakage for a single brush seal was two to three times less than for a 12-tooth labyrinth seal. The maximum temperature rise for a single brush seal was less than 50 R and occurred at 25 psid across the seal and 35,000 rpm. A static blowout test demonstrated sealing capability up to 550 psid. The seal limit was not obtained. The power loss for a single brush at 35,000 rpm and 175 psid was 2.45 hp. Two brushes far apart leak less than two brushes tight packed. Rotor wear was approximately 0.00075 mils and bristle wear was 1-3 mils after 4-1/2 hours.

  3. Comparative Efficacy of a Soft Toothbrush with Tapered-tip Bristles to an ADA Reference Toothbrush on Gingival Abrasion over a 12-Week Period.

    PubMed

    Gallob, John; Petrone, Dolores M; Mateo, Luis R; Chaknis, Patricia; Morrison, Boyce M; Panagakos, Foti; Williams, Malcolm

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of a soft toothbrush with tapered-tip (Test Toothbrush) bristles and an ADA reference toothbrush (ADA Toothbrush) on gingival abrasion over a 12-week period. This was a randomized, single-center, examiner-blind, two-cell, parallel clinical research study and used the Danser Gingival Abrasion Index to assess the level of gingival abrasion after a single brushing, as well as after six weeks and 12 weeks of twice-daily brushing. Adult male and female subjects from the Central New Jersey, USA area refrained from all oral hygiene procedures for 24 hours. They reported to the study site after refraining from eating, drinking, and smoking for four hours. Following a qualifying examination using plaque and gingivitis scores along with a baseline gingival abrasion examination, subjects were randomized into two balanced groups, each group using one of the two study toothbrushes. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for one minute, under supervision, with their assigned toothbrush and a commercially available fluoride toothpaste (Colgate© Cavity Protection Toothpaste), after which they were again evaluated for gingival abrasion. Subjects were dismissed from the study site with their assigned toothbrush and toothpaste, and instructed to brush twice daily at home for the next 12 weeks. The subjects were instructed to brush for one minute during each tooth brushing. The subjects reported to the study site after six weeks and 12 weeks of product use, at which time they were evaluated for gingival abrasion. Seventy-one (71) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the clinical study. The results of this study showed that the Test Toothbrush provided statistically significantly (p < 0.05) greater reductions in gingival abrasion scores as compared to the gingival abrasion scores of the ADA Toothbrush after a single tooth brushing, after six weeks, and after 12 weeks of product use (75.0%, 85.5%, 73.9%, respectively). The soft toothbrush

  4. Physics of loose abrasive microgrinding.

    PubMed

    Golini, D; Jacobs, S D

    1991-07-01

    This study examined the physics of loose abrasive microgrinding (grinding with micron and submicron sized abrasives). More specifically, it focused on the transition from brittle to ductile mode grinding which occurs in this region of abrasive sizes. Process dependency on slurry chemistry was the primary area of emphasis and was studied for diamond abrasives varying in size from 3.0 to 0.75 microm on both ULE and Zerodur, with emphasis on ULE. Ductile mode grinding was achieved with smaller abrasives, as expected, however two significant discoveries were made. The first observation was that by simply changing slurry chemistry, it was possible to induce the transition from brittle fracture to ductile mode grinding in ULE. This transition point could be intentionally moved about for diamonds 3.0-0.75 microm in diameter. For any given abrasive size within these limits, either brittle fracture or ductile removal may be achieved, depending on the slurry used to suspend the diamonds. Several slurries were studied, including water, a series of homologous n-alcohols, and other solvents chosen for properties varying from molecular size to dielectric constant and zeta potential. The study revealed that this slurry dependency is primarily a Rebinder effect. The second finding was that a tremendous amount of surface stress is introduced in loose abrasive ductile mode grinding. This stress was observed when the Twyman Effect in ULE plates increased by a factor of 4 in the transition from the brittle to the ductile mode. An assessment of the cause of this stress is discussed.

  5. Ordering nanoparticles with polymer brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Stevens, Mark J.; Grest, Gary S.

    Ordering nanoparticles into a desired super-structure is often crucial for their technological applications. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the assembly of nanoparticles in a polymer brush randomly grafted to a planar surface as the solvent evaporates. Initially, the nanoparticles are dispersed in a solvent that wets the polymer brush. After the solvent evaporates, the nanoparticles are either inside the brush or adsorbed at the surface of the brush, depending on the strength of the nanoparticle-polymer interaction. For strong nanoparticle-polymer interactions, a 2-dimensional ordered array is only formed when the brush density is finely tuned to accommodate a singlemore » layer of nanoparticles. When the brush density is higher or lower than this optimal value, the distribution of nanoparticles shows large fluctuations in space and the packing order diminishes. For weak nanoparticle-polymer interactions, the nanoparticles order into a hexagonal array on top of the polymer brush as long as the grafting density is high enough to yield a dense brush. As a result, an interesting healing effect is observed for a low-grafting-density polymer brush that can become more uniform in the presence of weakly adsorbed nanoparticles.« less

  6. Ordering nanoparticles with polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Stevens, Mark J.; Grest, Gary S.

    2017-12-01

    Ordering nanoparticles into a desired super-structure is often crucial for their technological applications. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the assembly of nanoparticles in a polymer brush randomly grafted to a planar surface as the solvent evaporates. Initially, the nanoparticles are dispersed in a solvent that wets the polymer brush. After the solvent evaporates, the nanoparticles are either inside the brush or adsorbed at the surface of the brush, depending on the strength of the nanoparticle-polymer interaction. For strong nanoparticle-polymer interactions, a 2-dimensional ordered array is only formed when the brush density is finely tuned to accommodate a single layer of nanoparticles. When the brush density is higher or lower than this optimal value, the distribution of nanoparticles shows large fluctuations in space and the packing order diminishes. For weak nanoparticle-polymer interactions, the nanoparticles order into a hexagonal array on top of the polymer brush as long as the grafting density is high enough to yield a dense brush. An interesting healing effect is observed for a low-grafting-density polymer brush that can become more uniform in the presence of weakly adsorbed nanoparticles.

  7. Ordering nanoparticles with polymer brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Stevens, Mark J.; Grest, Gary S.

    2017-12-08

    Ordering nanoparticles into a desired super-structure is often crucial for their technological applications. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the assembly of nanoparticles in a polymer brush randomly grafted to a planar surface as the solvent evaporates. Initially, the nanoparticles are dispersed in a solvent that wets the polymer brush. After the solvent evaporates, the nanoparticles are either inside the brush or adsorbed at the surface of the brush, depending on the strength of the nanoparticle-polymer interaction. For strong nanoparticle-polymer interactions, a 2-dimensional ordered array is only formed when the brush density is finely tuned to accommodate a singlemore » layer of nanoparticles. When the brush density is higher or lower than this optimal value, the distribution of nanoparticles shows large fluctuations in space and the packing order diminishes. For weak nanoparticle-polymer interactions, the nanoparticles order into a hexagonal array on top of the polymer brush as long as the grafting density is high enough to yield a dense brush. As a result, an interesting healing effect is observed for a low-grafting-density polymer brush that can become more uniform in the presence of weakly adsorbed nanoparticles.« less

  8. Remineralization effects of two pediatric dentifrices and one regular dentifrice on artificial carious lesion in primary teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Shweta; Sogi, Suma; Hugar, Shivayogi; Indushekar, K. R.; Kiran, K.; Hallikerimath, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the following study is to know the efficacy of remineralization of two pediatric dentifrices and one regular dentifrice on artificial carious lesions in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 21 teeth coated with nail varnish leaving a window of 1 mm were subjected to demineralization for 72 h. These 21 teeth were then sectioned into two equal parts with a diamond disc. The 42 sections obtained were then evaluated under the stereomicroscope and the demineralization values were noted. The 42 sections were divided into three groups: Group 1: Kidodent, Group 2: Cheeriogel, Group 3: Colgate Total and subjected to remineralization respectively for 7 days. The specimens were again evaluated under the stereomicroscope for the remineralisation values. Results: All the three dentifrices showed remineralization with artificial carious lesions. Colgate Total showed higher remineralization rates compared with the other two pediatric dentifrices. Kidodent showed a slightly higher remineralisation rate compared with Cheeriogel which was not significant. Conclusion/Hypothesis: The pediatric dentifrices also showed remineralization with artificial carious lesions. Hence, we conclude that, this amount of remineralization was more or less, when compared to the regular dentifrice which showed higher remineralization rates, which could lead to adverse effects, like fluorosis if not used judiciously. On basis of which we hypothetize: Pediatric dentifrices have an appropriate fluoride content, as required by the children, and also does not minimize the cariostatic effects. PMID:25254193

  9. Anticaries Potential of Low Fluoride Dentifrices Found in The Brazilian Market.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Adriana de Cássia; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Tabchoury, Cínthia Pereira Machado; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Low-fluoride (F) dentifrices (<600 µg F/g) are widely available worldwide, but evidence to recommend the use of such dentifrices, with either regular or improved formulations, is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anticaries potential of low-F dentifrices found in the Brazilian market, using a validated and tested pH-cycling model. Enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness (SH) and randomized into four treatment groups (n=12): non-F dentifrice (negative control), low-F dentifrice (500 μg F/g), low-F acidulated dentifrice (550 μg F/g) and 1,100 μg F/g dentifrice (positive control). The blocks were subjected to pH-cycling regimen for 8 days and were treated 2x/day with dentifrice slurries prepared in water (1:3, w/v). The pH of the slurries was checked, and only the acidulated one had low pH. After the pH cycling, SH was again determined and the percentage of surface hardness loss was calculated as indicator of demineralization. Loosely- and firmly-bound F concentrations in enamel were also determined. The 1,100 μg F/g dentifrice was more effective than the low-F ones to reduce enamel demineralization and was the only one that differed from the non-F (p<0.05). All F dentifrices formed higher concentration of loosely-bound F on enamel than the non-F (p<0.05), but the 1,100 μg F/g was the only one that differed from the non-F in the ability to form firmly-bound F. The findings suggest that the low-F dentifrices available in the Brazilian market, irrespective of their formulation, do not have anticaries potential.

  10. The Efficacy of Xylitol, Xylitol-Probiotic and Fluoride Dentifrices in Plaque Reduction and Gingival Inflammation in Children: A Randomised Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Arat Maden, Eda; Altun, Ceyhan; Açikel, Cengizhan

    The present prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was designed to evaluate the clinical effects of a commercially available dentifrice containing fluoride, xylitol or xylitol-probiotic on the decrease of plaque and gingival inflammation in children between 13 and 15 years of age. Forty-eight adolescents were randomly grouped into three groups of n = 16 each: study group A received xylitol (Xyliwhite) toothpaste; study group B received xylitol-probiotic (Periobiotic) toothpaste; and the control group C received fluoride (Colgate Max Fresh) toothpaste. The subjects were instructed to use the dentifrice determined and a modified Bass brushing technique twice a day for two minutes over a 6-week perioed. Clinical evaluation was performed using a gingival index and a plaque index at baseline and at the end of the 6-week period. From day 0 to 42, reductions in the plaque index were statistically significant in all groups, Colgate Max Fresh, PerioBiotic and Xyliwhite (p-values 0.001, 0.001 and 0.035, respectively), but reductions in the gingival index were statistically significant only in the Colgate Max Fresh and PerioBiotic groups (both with p = 0.001), not in the Xyliwhite group (p = 0.116). PerioBiotic toothpaste was found to be better than Xyliwhite and Colgate Max Fresh toothpastes at reducing plaque and gingival scores. However, statistically significant differences with PerioBiotic and Colgate Max Fresh toothpaste were not observed. It was concluded that PerioBiotic was an all-round dentifrice that produced a significant reduction in both gingivitis and plaque.

  11. Effect of tooth brushing on gloss retention and surface roughness of five bulk-fill resin composites.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Catherine; Kreplak, Laurent; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Labrie, Daniel; Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Price, Richard Bengt

    2018-01-01

    To determine the effects of tooth brushing on five bulk-fill resin based composites (RBCs). Ten samples of Filtek Supreme Enamel (control), Filtek One Bulk Fill, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill 2, SDR flow+, and Admira Fusion X-tra were light cured for 20 seconds using the Valo Grand curing light. After 24 hours storage in air at 37°C, specimens were brushed in a random order using Colgate OpticWhite dentifrice and a soft toothbrush. Surface gloss was measured prior to brushing, after 5,000, 10,000 and 15,000 back and forth brushing cycles. Surface roughness was measured after 15,000 brushing cycles using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and selected scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken. The data was examined using ANOVA and pair-wise comparisons using Scheffe's post-hoc multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). Surface gloss decreased and the surface roughness increased after brushing. Two-way ANOVA showed that both the RBC and the number of brushing cycles had a significant negative effect on the gloss. One-way ANOVA showed that the RBC had a significant effect on the roughness after 15,000 brushing cycles. For both gloss and roughness, brushing had the least effect on the nano-filled control and nano-filled bulk-fill RBC, and the greatest negative effect on Admira Fusion X-tra. The SEM images provided visual agreement. There was an excellent linear correlation (R 2  = 0.98) between the logarithm of the gloss and roughness. After brushing, the bulk-fill RBCs were all rougher than the control nano-filled RBC. The nano-filled bulk-fill RBC was the least affected by brushing. Bulk-fill RBCs lose their gloss faster and become rougher than the nanofilled conventional RBC, Filtek Supreme Ultra. The nanofilled bulk-fill RBC was the least affected by tooth brushing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. ``Smart'' Surfaces of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Meng, Dong

    2009-03-01

    ``Smart'' surfaces, also known as stimuli-responsive surfaces, can change their properties (e.g., wettability, adhesion, friction, elasticity, and biocompatibility) in response to external stimuli (e.g., temperature, pressure, light, solvent selectivity, ionic strength, type of salt, pH, applied electric field, etc.). In this work, we use numerical self-consistent field calculations to study in detail the structure and stimuli- responses of various polymer brushes, including (1) the thermo- response of PNIPAM brushes in water, (2) solvent-response of uncharged diblock copolymer brushes, and (3) the stimuli- response of charged two-component polymer brushes (including both the binary A/B brushes and diblock copolymer A-B brushes) to ionic strength, pH, and applied electric field. Among the many design parameters (e.g., chain lengths, grafting densities, A-B incompatibility, degree of ionization of charged polymers, etc.) we identify those that strongly affect the surface switchability. Such knowledge is useful to the experimental design of these smart polymer brushes for their applications.

  13. A 12-week clinical comparison of an oscillating-rotating power brush versus a marketed sonic brush with self-adjusting technology in reducing plaque and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Klukowska, Malgorzata; Grender, Julie M; Conde, Erinn; Goyal, C Ram

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the comparative gingivitis and plaque reduction efficacy of a leading oscillating-rotating power toothbrush and a recently introduced sonic toothbrush in adults with gingivitis. This was a 12-week, randomized and controlled, parallel group, examiner-blind, single-center clinical study of 130 adults with pre-existing gingivitis and plaque. At baseline, the Modified Gingival Index (MGI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), and total number of bleeding sites were assessed, along with plaque levels (whole mouth, gingival margin, and interproximal) via the Rustogi Modified Navy Plaque Index (RMNPI). Qualified subjects were randomly assigned to one of two power toothbrush test groups: the Oral-B Triumph with SmartGuide (marketed in the United States as the Oral-B Professional Care SmartSeries 5000 [D34]) oscillating-rotating brush, or the Colgate ProClinical A1500 (also marketed as elmex ProClinical) sonic brush. Subjects brushed at home for two minutes twice daily with their assigned power toothbrush and a marketed sodium fluoride dentifrice, and were reevaluated for gingivitis at Week 4 and Week 12 via the MGI, GBI, and total number of bleeding sites, and for plaque reduction via the RMNPI. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of the 130 enrolled subjects completed the trial and 62 and 65 subjects in the oscillating-rotating and sonic brush groups, respectively, had evaluable data for analysis. Statistically significant mean reductions in all three gingivitis parameters and plaque relative to baseline were seen at both Weeks 4 and 12 with unsupervised use of both test toothbrushes (p < 0.001). The oscillating-rotating power brush provided statistically significantly superior reductions compared to the sonic brush in mean adjusted MGI (31% and 29% at Weeks 4 and 12, respectively; p < 0.001), GBI (17% at Week 12; p = 0.047), and total number of bleeding sites (48% and 30% at Weeks 4 and 12, respectively; p = 0.002), and produced statistically

  14. Toothpastes and enamel erosion/abrasion - Impact of active ingredients and the particulate fraction.

    PubMed

    Ganss, C; Marten, J; Hara, A T; Schlueter, N

    2016-11-01

    To investigate in vitro a range of differently characterised toothpastes with respect to their efficacy in an erosion/abrasion setting with special emphasis on the role of the particulate ingredients. Human enamel samples were erosively demineralised with citric acid (2min, 6×/day; 0.5%, pH 2.5; 10 days) and immersed in slurries (2min, 2×/day) either without or with brushing (15s, load 200g). The toothpastes were eight NaF-toothpastes, three hydroxyapatite-toothpastes (one without and two with NaF), one fluoride-free chitosan-toothpaste and three Sn-toothpastes. Negative control was erosion only, positive control was SnF 2 gel. Tissue loss was quantified profilometrically. The SnF 2 gel was most effective (reduction of tissue loss of 79%). Most of the products reduced tissue loss significantly when applied as slurries (between 28 and 66%). Brushing increased tissue loss in almost all toothpastes, only 5 formulations (all Sn-toothpastes and 2 NaF-toothpastes) reduced tissue loss significantly when compared to negative control (between 33 and 59%). There was a non-linear association between abrasiveness and amount of particles in a formulation, the particle size had no impact. Toothpastes had a protecting effect when applied as slurries but to a much lesser degree when applied with brushing. The particulate fraction may be a determinant for toothpaste efficacy in erosion/abrasion settings. Toothpastes are important carriers of active agents against erosion, but physical impacts through brushing modifies efficacy distinctly. Understanding the role of the particulate fraction in toothpastes may offer perspectives for designing effective formulations for patients with erosive lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of Abrasion-Resistant Coating for Solar Reflective Films. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-247

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Matthew

    The purpose of this CRADA is to develop an abrasion-resistant coating, suitable for use on polymeric-based reflective films (e.g., the ReflecTech reflective film), that allows for improved scratch resistance and enables the use of aggressive cleaning techniques (e.g., direct contact methods like brushing) without damaging the specular reflectance properties of the reflective film.

  16. Toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents: efficacy in reducing extrinsic dental staining.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristina Neves Girao Salgado; Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho do; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents in reducing the extrinsic discoloration of dental enamel. Sixty slabs of dentin from human teeth were sealed so that only the enamel surface was exposed. The enamel surfaces were photographed for initial color assessment. Staining was performed by immersing the dental slabs in 0.2% chlorhexidine solution for 2 minutes and then in black tea for 60 minutes. This process was repeated 15 times. Photographs were taken at the end of the staining process, and the slabs were divided into 5 groups (n = 12), 3 to be brushed with toothpastes containing chemical whitening agents (2 containing phosphate salts and 1 containing phosphate salts plus hydrogen peroxide) and 2 to represent control groups (ordinary/nonwhitening toothpaste and distilled water). The dental slabs were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing with toothpaste slurry or distilled water, according to each group's specifications. After brushing, more photographs were taken for color analysis. The results showed a significant reduction in luminosity after the staining process in addition to an increase in the colors red and yellow (P < 0.001). After brushing, there was a significant increase in luminosity and a reduction in both red and yellow (P < 0.001). However, there was no observed difference between the changes in color values in dental enamel slabs brushed with whitening toothpastes and the changes found in slabs brushed with ordinary toothpaste. The whitening toothpastes did not outperform an ordinary toothpaste in the removal of extrinsic staining.

  17. An Eight-Week Clinical Evaluation of an Oscillating-Rotating Power Toothbrush with a Brush Head Utilizing Angled Bristles Compared with a Sonic Toothbrush in the Reduction of Gingivitis and Plaque.

    PubMed

    Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo A; Conde, Erinn; Grender, Julie M; Cunningham, Pamela; Qaqish, Jimmy; Goyal, C Ram

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficacy of an oscillating-rotating (O-R) power toothbrush with a brush head utilizing angled bristles to a marketed sonic toothbrush in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis over an eight-week period. This study used a randomized, examiner-blind, single-center, two-treatment, parallel group, eight-week design. Subjects with mild-to-moderate plaque and gingivitis were evaluated for baseline whole mouth, gingival margin, and approximal plaque, gingivitis, and gingival bleeding. Clinical assessments were performed using the Modified Gingival Index, Gingival Bleeding Index, and the Rustogi Modified Navy Plaque Index. Subjects received either the O-R brush (Oral-B Professional Care 1000 [D16u] with Oral-B CrossAction brush head [EB50]) or the sonic brush (Sonicare DiamondClean with the standard DiamondClean brush head). Subjects brushed twice daily for two minutes per brushing with the assigned brush and a standard fluoride dentifrice for eight weeks before returning for plaque and gingivitis evaluations using the same methods. Prior to baseline and Week 8 measurements, participants abstained from oral hygiene for 12 hours. One hundred and forty-eight subjects completed the study; 75 in the O-R group and 73 in the sonic group. Both brushes demonstrated statistically significant reductions in plaque and gingivitis over the eight-week study period (p < 0.00 1). The O-R brush was statistically significantly more effective in reducing plaque and gingivitis than the sonic brush. Whole mouth, gingival margin, and approximal plaque reductions were 27.7%, 46.8%, and 29.3% greater, respectively, compared with the sonic brush, while the reductions in gingivitis, gingival bleeding, and number of bleeding sites were 34.6%, 36.4%, and 36.1% greater, respectively, for the O-R brush than for the sonic brush (p < 0.001 for all six measures). No adverse events were observed for either brush. The plaque and gingivitis reductions for the O-R power brush

  18. Interaction between two polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Arun; Seidel, Christian

    2007-08-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations on completely charged polyelectrolyte brushes grafted to two parallel surfaces. The pressure Pi is evaluated as a function of separation D between the two grafting planes. For decreasing separation, Pi shows several regimes distinguished by their scaling with D which reflects the different physical nature of the various regimes. At weak compression the pressure obeys the 1D power law predicted by scaling theory of an ideal gas of counterions in the osmotic brush regime. In addition we find that the brushes shrink as they approach each other trying to avoid interpenetration. At higher compressions where excluded volume interactions become important, we obtain scaling exponents between -2 at small grafting density rho(a) and -3 at large rho(a). This behavior indicates a transition from a brush under good solvent condition to the melt regime with increasing grafting density.

  19. Dentifrices, mouthwashes, and remineralization/caries arrestment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zero, Domenick T

    2006-01-01

    While our knowledge of the dental caries process and its prevention has greatly advanced over the past fifty years, it is fair to state that the management of this disease at the level of the individual patient remains largely empirical. Recommendations for fluoride use by patients at different levels of caries risk are mainly based on the adage that more is better. There is a general understanding that the fluoride compound, concentration, frequency of use, duration of exposure, and method of delivery can influence fluoride efficacy. Two important factors are (1) the initial interaction of relatively high concentrations of fluoride with the tooth surface and plaque during application and (2) the retention of fluoride in oral fluids after application. Fluoride dentifrices remain the most widely used method of delivering topical fluoride. The efficacy of this approach in preventing dental caries is beyond dispute. However, the vast majority of currently marketed dentifrice products have not been clinically tested and have met only the minimal requirements of the FDA monograph using mainly laboratory testing and animal caries testing. Daily use of fluoride dental rinses as an adjunct to fluoride dentifrice has been shown to be clinically effective as has biweekly use of higher concentration fluoride rinses. The use of remineralizing agents (other than fluoride), directed at reversing or arresting non-cavitated lesions, remains a promising yet largely unproven strategy. High fluoride concentration compounds, e.g., AgF, Ag(NH3)2F, to arrest more advanced carious lesions with and without prior removal of carious tissue are being used in several countries as part of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. Most of the recent innovations in oral care products have been directed toward making cosmetic marketing claims. There continues to be a need for innovation and collaboration with other scientific disciplines to fully understand and prevent dental caries

  20. Chlorhexidine mouthwash and sodium lauryl sulphate dentifrice: do they mix effectively or interfere?

    PubMed

    Elkerbout, T A; Slot, D E; Bakker, E W P; Van der Weijden, G A

    2016-02-01

    What is the effectiveness of a chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthwash used in combination with a sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) dentifrice on the parameters of plaque and gingivitis? MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, EMBASE and other electronic databases were searched up to July 2014. The inclusion criteria were (randomized) controlled clinical trials, subjects ≥18 years of age with good general health. Papers evaluating the effect of CHX mouthwash used in combination with SLS dentifrice or a dentifrice slurry compared with CHX mouthwash as a single oral hygiene intervention or in combination with an SLS-free dentifrice were included. From the eligible studies, data were extracted, and a meta-analysis was performed when feasible. Independent screening of 83 unique papers resulted in four eligible publications, with nine comparisons. The meta-analysis showed that when an SLS dentifrice was used as a slurry rinse, the interference on the plaque-inhibiting effect of a CHX mouthwash was significantly decreased (MD 0.33; P ≤ 0.00001; 95% CI: <0.24; 0.42>). No significant difference was observed when SLS dentifrice was applied as a paste in combination with CHX mouthwash (MD 0.08; P = 0.42; 95% CI: <-0.26; 0.11>). Descriptive and subgroup analyses support these findings. Moreover, the observed effect for the dentifrice paste occurred regardless of the order of use. This review demonstrates that when CHX mouthwash is recommended, it can be used in combination with an SLS dentifrice without any interference regarding its inhibiting effect on dental plaque, regardless of the order of use. Consequently, the collective evidence indicates that the combined use of dentifrice and CHX mouthwash is not contraindicated. However, this recommendation has been graded as moderate taking into account a potential publication bias because three of the four included studies emerged from the same research group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Combination effect of fluoride dentifrices and varnish on deciduous enamel demineralization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Alessandra; Camargo, Lucila Basto; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticaries potential of 500 or 1100 ppm F dentifrices combined with fluoride varnish using a pH-cycling regimen. Seventy primary canines were covered with nail polish, leaving a 4×4 mm window on their buccal surface, and randomly assigned into 7 groups (n = 10): S: sound enamel not submitted to the pH-cycling regimen or treatment; N: negative control, submitted to the pH-cycling regimen without any treatment; D1 and D2: subjected to the pH-cycling regimen and treated twice daily with 1100 or 500 ppm F dentifrice, respectively; VF: fluoride varnish (subjected to F-varnish before and in the middle of the pH-cycling regimen); and VF+D1 and VF+D2. After 10 days, the teeth were sectioned, and enamel demineralization was assessed by cross-sectional hardness at different distances from the dental surface. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Dentifrice with 1100 ppm F and the combination of F-varnish with the dentifrices significantly reduced enamel demineralization compared with the negative control (p < 0.05), but the isolated effects of F-varnish and dentifrice with low concentration were not significant (p > 0.05). The effect of combining F-varnish with the dentifrices was not greater than the effect of the dentifrices alone (p < 0.05). The data suggest that the combination of F-varnish with dentifrices containing 500 and 1100 ppm F is not more effective in reducing demineralization in primary teeth than the isolated effect of dentifrice containing 1100 ppm F.

  2. Crossover clinical investigation of a whitening chewing gum for inhibiting dental stain formation in conjunction with tooth brushing.

    PubMed

    Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Kleber, Carl J; Proskin, Howard M; Dodds, Michael; Kelley, Michael; Ramirez, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a marketed whitening chewing gum compared to a no-gum control in preventing the formation of extrinsic stains on the teeth of stain-forming subjects when chewed over a 12-week period of regular unsupervised use in conjunction with daily tooth brushing. This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, 12-week crossover clinical trial. Stain-forming (after smoking or drinking coffee or tea) adults, starting with a stain-free baseline, either chewed the test gum (Orbit White) unsupervised four times per day, 15 minutes/chew, or used no gum along with daily brushing with a commercially available toothbrush and dentifrice for 12 weeks. At the crossover, all procedures were repeated with subjects assigned the opposite treatment. Extrinsic stain was measured at six and 12 weeks by both the Lobene Stain Index (LSI) and the Modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI) using separate experienced examiners. After 12 weeks, LSI stain scores showed a significant 25% reduction (p = 0.0008) in new stain formation for subjects using the test chewing gum along with tooth brushing versus tooth brushing alone (no-gum control). The corresponding MLSI stain scores demonstrated a 36% reduction (p < 0.0001) in the formation of extrinsic stain on the teeth. The overall findings of this clinical study demonstrated that regular use of Orbit White chewing gum, soon after smoking or drinking coffee or tea, will supplement daily tooth brushing in preventing unsightly stains from forming on the anterior teeth compared to brushing alone.

  3. Osmotic and Salted Brush Phase of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Christane A.; Ahrens, Heiko; Förster, Stephan

    2004-03-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a fluid hydrophobic Poly(ethyletylene) (PEE), and a Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) part form monolayers at the air/water interface. With x-ray reflectivity it is shown that the hydrophobic blocks of PEE_114PSS_83 and PEE_144PSS_136 constitute a nm-thick melt, while the polyelectrolyte forms an osmotically swollen brush with counterion incorporation. A slight thickness increase on monolayer compression is found which can be explained by the strong stretching of the brushes. Only at high salt conditions (above 0.1 M), the brush shrinks and the thickness scales with the molecular area (exponent -1/3), and with the salt concentration (exponent ca. -1/5). With Grazing Incidence Diffraction, the lateral order of the polyelectrolyte chains can be detected.

  4. Impact of toothpaste on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel: An in vitro white light interferometer study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maria; Kitasako, Yuichi; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of brushing using toothpastes marketed under different categories on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel in vitro at nanometer scale using a white light interferometer (WLI). Enamel surface of resin-embedded bovine incisors were fine polished with diamond slurry and divided into testing area (approximately 2 mm x 4 mm) and reference area using a nail varnish. The enamel specimens were randomly assigned to 10 groups (n = 10 each); six of which were subjected to erosive challenge. The testing area in these eroded groups was exposed to 10 ml of Coca-Cola for 90 seconds and then rinsed for 10 seconds in deionized water (DW). Enamel specimens, except for those in one eroded group, were brushed by an automatic brushing machine with 120 linear motion strokes in 60 seconds under load of 250 g with/without toothpaste slurry. After the toothbrushing abrasion, each specimen was rinsed for 10 seconds with DW followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 2 hours. Toothpaste slurries were prepared containing one of the four toothpastes used and DW in a ratio of 1:2. The erosion-abrasion cycle was repeated three times. Then, the nail varnish was removed and enamel surface loss (SL) was measured by the WLI. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's correction at significance level of 0.05. For eroded specimens, the mean SL values of groups not brushed and brushed with no toothpaste were not significantly different, but were significantly lower than those of whitening, anti-erosion and anti-caries toothpaste groups (P < 0.001). The whitening toothpaste group showed significantly higher SL than all other groups (P < 0.001). For sound enamel specimens, SL was not measured except for the whitening toothpaste group.

  5. ENHANCING REMINERALIZATION OF PRIMARY ENAMEL LESIONS WITH FLUORIDE DENTIFRICE CONTAINING TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Waidee, Sumana

    2017-03-01

    Fluoride dentifrice is effective in preventive dental caries but may cause fluorosis, especially in young children. Reducing the concentration of fluoride from the regular concentration of 1,000 parts per million (ppm) to 500 ppm can reduce the risk for fluorosis but increases the risk of caries. Adding tricalcium phosphate (TCP) to the dentifrices may improve the efficacy of remineralization possibly allowing for a lower concentration of fluoride to reduce the risk of fluorosis. We studied this to inform future caries prevention efforts in children. We immersed 40 sound primary incisors into demineralizing solution (pH=4.4) for 96 hours at 37°C to create demineralized lesions. The 40 teeth were then divided into 4 groups of 10 teeth each. Group A: control (treated with deionized water only); Group B: treated with fluoride dentifrice at a concentration of 1,000 ppm; Group C: treated with fluoride dentifrice at a concentration of 500 ppm and 500 ppm TCP, and Group D: treated with fluoride dentifrice at a concentration of 1,000 ppm and 500 ppm TCP. The teeth were each subjected to 7 days of pH-cycling and the studied dentifrice was applied for one minute, 3 times daily during the 7 day period. After the 7 day period the teeth were each sectioned and examined with polarized light microscopy. The depths of demineralized areas were measured using Image-Pro plus software. A pair t-test was used to compare lesion depths before and after dentifrice treatment. Differences in mean lesion depths within each group were analyzed using the One-way ANOVA and LSD tests; a 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The mean lesion depths in all the groups before dentifrice treatment were not significantly different (p=0.143). The mean demineralized lesion depths after dentifrice treatment were significantly different by group (p=0.00). The mean demineralized lesion depth in Group A significantly deeper than the other groups (p=0.00). Group D had the shallowest depth, significantly

  6. [Self-perception of fluorosis due to fluoride exposure to drinking water and dentifrice].

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Léa Maria Bezerra; de Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2002-12-01

    The impact of dental fluorosis in children exposed to fluoride in drinking water and dentifrice was evaluated. Dental fluorosis was found in 72% of the children, but the children's well-being was not affected. It was concluded that although dental fluorosis due to the intake of optimally fluoridated drinking water and dentifrice did not affect the dental aesthetics of this studied population sample, there is a need of further studies on the subject.

  7. Fingernail may not be a reliable biomarker of fluoride body burden from dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco Oliveira; Martins, Carolina Castro; Rocha, Lília Alves; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2010-01-01

    Fingernail has been suggested as a biomarker of fluoride (F) body burden, but there is no consensus if it would be a reliable indicator of F exposure from dentifrice. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate if fingernails would have sensitivity to detect F exposure from dentifrice in young children. Twenty-three 1-3-year-old children living in the city of Piracicaba (0.72 ppm F in water), Brazil, were enrolled in two phases of different F exposure: in phase A (1st to 11th week), they were exposed to the combination of F from diet (solids and liquids) and dentifrice (1,500 microg F/g as MFP), and in phase B (12th to 29th week), only to F from diet (the use of F dentifrice was interrupted). Fingernails were weekly clipped during 35 weeks for F determination. F intake from diet and dentifrice in each phase was also determined. Both analyses were made with ion-specific electrode. F intake (Mean +/- SD) was significantly higher (p<0.01) when the children were exposed to F from diet+dentifrice than only to F from diet (0.086 +/- 0.032 and 0.040 +/- 0.009 mg F/day/kg body weight, respectively). However, F concentrations in nails collected during the whole experimental period of 35 weeks presented great variation with no trend of decreasing after F dentifrice intake interruption. The findings suggest that fingernail may not be a reliable F biomarker of body burden from dentifrice.

  8. Sustained antibacterial actions of a new stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice containing sodium hexametaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Nivedita; Baig, Arif; He, Tao; Lawless, Michelle A; Saletta, Lisa; Suszcynsky-Meister, Elaine; Coggan, John

    2005-09-01

    Stannous fluoride has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent for years to improve oral health. The benefits of stannous fluoride in controlling caries, plaque, and gingivitis are directly associated with its antimicrobial actions. Recently, a novel dentifrice was developed that combines stannous fluoride with an anticalculus agent, sodium hexa. metaphosphate. A series of independent evaluations were conducted to assess the long-lasting antimicrobial activity of stannous fluoride in the new stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice: an in vitro Live/Dead assay; an in vivo Plaque Glycolysis and Regrowth Model study; a rapid in vitro salivary bacteria metabolic activity study; and a 12-hour in vivo tin-retention study. In the Live/Dead study, the new stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice killed approximately 90% to 99% of the salivary microbes 16 hours after a single exposure. Similarly, the stannous fluoride dentifrice produced statistically significant reductions in plaque acid production and plaque regrowth activity compared to plaque treated with a standard fluoride dentifrice at all time intervals measured after product exposure (15 and 45 minutes). Results from the final two studies collectively demonstrated the presence of total soluble tin, which serves as a marker for the active stannous fluoride, at levels above the minimum concentration for inhibition of salivary bacteria metabolic activity 12 hours posttreatment. These findings confirm the long-lasting antibacterial action of the new stannous fluoride dentifrice, which serves as a basis for its therapeutic benefits.

  9. Evaluating the bonding of two adhesive systems to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Toseto, Roberta Mariano; de Arruda, Alex Mendes; Tolentino, Patricia Ramos; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by micro-shear bond strength test, the bond strength of composite resin restoration to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices. Forty bovine teeth were embedded in polystyrene resin and polished. The specimens were randomly divided into eight groups (n=5), according to the dentifrice (carbamide peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and conventional dentifrice) and the adhesive system (Prime & Bond 2.1 and Adper Single Bond 2). Dentifrice was applied for 15 minutes a day, for 21 days. Thirty minutes after the last exposure to dentifrice, the samples were submitted to a bonding procedure with the respective adhesive system. After that, four buttons of resin were bonded in each sample using transparent cylindrical molds. After 24 hours, the teeth were submitted to the micro-shear bond strength test and subsequent analysis of the fracture mode. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test (alpha = 0.05). The micro-shear bond strength showed no difference between adhesives systems but a significant reduction was found between the control and carbamide groups (p = 0.0145) and the control and hydrogen groups (p = 0.0370). The evaluation of the failures modes showed that adhesive failures were predominant. Cohesive failures were predominant in group IV The use of dentifrice with peroxides can decrease bonding strength in enamel.

  10. Aloe vera herbal dentifrices for plaque and gingivitis control: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of aloe vera containing herbal dentifrices in improving plaque control and gingival health. A manual and electronic literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) search was performed up to July 2012, for randomized controlled trials presenting clinical, microbiological, immunological, and patient-centered data for the efficacy of aloe vera herbal dentifrices for controlling plaque and gingival inflammation in patients with gingivitis. From 79 titles and abstracts, eight full-text articles were screened and finally two randomized controlled trials were selected. These randomized controlled trials reported that aloe vera dentifrices were similar in efficacy to control dentifrices in effectively reducing plaque and gingival inflammation in gingivitis patients based on the assessment of clinical, microbiological, and patient-centered treatment outcomes. However, many important details (composition and characteristics of aloe vera and control dentifrices along with appropriate randomization, blinding, and outcomes assessed) were lacking in these trials, and therefore, the quality of reporting and methods was generally flawed with high risk of bias. Even though there are some promising results, the clinical effectiveness of aloe vera herbal dentifrices is not sufficiently defined at present and warrants further investigations based on reporting guidelines of herbal CONSORT statement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Friction and wear characteristics of wire-brush skids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The testing technique consisted of towing the skids with a ground test vehicle over asphalt and concrete surfaces at ground speeds up to 80 km/hr (50 mph) and bearing pressures up to 689 kPa (100 psi) over sliding distances up to 1585 m (5200 ft). Results indicate that the friction coefficient developed by wire brush skids is essentially independent of ground speed, is slightly increased with increasing bearing pressure, is noticeably affected by surface texture, and is not degraded by surface wetness. Skid wear is shown to increase with increasing bearing pressure and with increasing ground speed and is dependent on the nature of the surface. Runway surface damage caused by the skids was in the form of an abrasive scrubbing action rather than physical damage.

  12. Abrasive wear of resin composites as related to finishing and polishing procedures.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Ferracane, Jack L; Serra, Mônica C

    2005-07-01

    Finishing and polishing procedures may cause topographical changes and introduce subsurface microcracks in dental composite restoratives. Since both of these effects may contribute toward the kinetics of wear, the purpose of this study was to assess and correlate the wear and surface roughness of minifilled and nanofilled composites finished and polished by different methods. Specimens (n=10) made of a minifilled and a nanofilled composite were finished and polished with one of the four sequences: (1) tungsten carbide burs plus Al(2)O(3)-impregnated brush (CbBr) or (2) tungsten carbide burs plus diamond-impregnated cup (CbCp), (3) diamond burs plus brush (DmBr) or (4) diamond burs plus cup (DmCp). As a control, abrasive papers were used. After surface roughness had been quantified, three-body abrasion was simulated using the OHSU wear machine. The wear facets were then scanned to measure wear depth and post-testing roughness. All sets of data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (alpha=0.05). Pearson's correlation test was applied to check for the existence of a relationship between pre-testing roughness and wear. Significantly smoother surfaces were attained with the sequences CbBr and CbCp, whereas DmCp yielded the roughest surface. Regardless of the finishing/polishing technique, the nanofilled composite exhibited the lowest pre-testing roughness and wear. There was no correlation between the surface roughness achieved after finishing/polishing procedures and wear (p=0.3899). Nano-sized materials may have improved abrasive wear resistance over minifilled composites. The absence of correlation between wear and surface roughness produced by different finishing/polishing methods suggests that the latter negligibly influences material loss due to three-body abrasion.

  13. Toothbrush abrasion, simulated tongue friction and attrition of eroded bovine enamel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Overweg, E; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2006-05-01

    Enamel erosion results in the formation of a softened layer that is susceptible to disruption by mechanical factors such as brushing abrasion, tongue friction and attrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the individual contribution of those mechanical insults to the enamel loss caused by dental erosion. Forty two bovine enamel samples were randomly divided into seven groups (n=6 per group) that were submitted to 3cycles of one of the following regimes: erosion and remineralization (er/remin); toothbrush abrasion and remineralization (abr/remin); erosion, toothbrush abrasion and remineralization (er/abr/remin); attrition and remineralization (at/remin); erosion, attrition and remineralization (er/at/remin); simulated tongue friction and remineralization (tg/remin); erosion, simulated tongue friction and remineralization (er/tg/remin). Erosion took place in a demineralization solution (50mM citric acid, pH 3) for 10min under agitation. Brushing abrasion, tongue friction and attrition were simulated for 1min using a home-made wear device. Remineralization was carried out in artificial saliva for 2h. Enamel loss was quantified using optical profilometry. One-way ANOVA indicated a significant difference between the amounts of enamel lost due to the different wear regimes (p

  14. Teach children to brush (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child's overall good health. Without proper dental care tooth decay and gum disease can lead to serious problems such as cavities and gingivitis, swollen and bleeding gums. Regular visits to the dentist, brushing twice each day, and flossing, are ways to ...

  15. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  16. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  17. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  18. Effect of a triclosan/PVM/MA copolymer/fluoride dentifrice on volatile sulfur compounds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pilch, S; Williams, M I; Cummins, D

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to document the in vitro efficacy of a triclosan/PVM/MA copolymer/fluoride (TCF) dentifrice against the formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) as well as the growth of H2S-producing bacteria. Clinical studies using organoleptic judges, gas chromatography, or a portable sulfide monitor have generally been employed in the assessment of treatments for the control of oral malodor. However, these studies are not appropriate for screening purposes because of the expense and time required. An in vitro method was developed for the purpose of screening new compounds, agents or formulations for their ability to control VSC formation and for determining bio-equivalence of efficacy when implementing changes in existing formulations. The method combines basic microbiological methods, dynamic flow cell techniques and head space analysis. The in vitro VSC method was validated by comparing the efficacy of two dentifrices containing TCF with a control fluoride dentifrice as the TCF products have been clinically proven to control oral malodor. In the validation studies, the TCF-containing dentifrices were significantly better (P < 0.05) than the control dentifrice in inhibiting VSC formation and reducing H(2)S-producing bacteria. For example, when compared with baseline, the TCF dentifrices reduced VSC formation between 42 and 49% compared with the control dentifrice which reduced VSC formation 3%. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the two TCF dentifrice formulations. Using an in vitro breath VSC model, it has been demonstrated that two variants of a dentifrice containing triclosan, PVM/MA copolymer and fluoride have efficacy that is significantly better than a control fluoridated dentifrice and that there is no significant difference between the triclosan/PVM/MA copolymer/fluoride dentifrice variants.

  19. Effect of low-fluoride dentifrices supplemented with calcium glycerophosphate on enamel demineralization in situ.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Jackeline Gallo; Sassaki, Kikue Takebayashi; Martinhon, Cleide Cristina Rodrigues; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate whether a low-fluoride dentifrice with calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) reduced the demineralization process in situ. A cross-over design with four treatment phases of 7 days each was used. Ten volunteers wore palatal devices containing four blocks of bovine dental enamel. The enamel was treated (ex-vivo) with a placebo, 500 microg-F/g (500), 500 microg-F/g with 0.25%CaGP (500 CaGP), and 1,100 microg-F/g (1,100) dentifrices (twice a day/1 minute) under cariogenic challenge from sucrose solution. To evaluate mineral loss, surface and cross-sectional hardness were performed. The fluoride, calcium, and phosphorus ion concentrations from enamel and dental plaque were determined. The insoluble extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) concentrations were also analyzed. The data were submitted to ANOVA (1-way) followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test (P < 0.05). The mineral loss and EPS concentration were lowest in the 500 CaGP and 1,100 dentifrice groups. The use of the 500 CaGP and 1,100 dentifrices resulted in similar fluoride, calcium, and phosphorus concentrations in the enamel and in dental plaque (P > 0.05). The ionic activities of calcium phosphate phases for the 500 CaGP and 1,100 dentifrices were similar (P > or = 0.492). The low-fluoride dentifrice with 0.25%CaGP demonstrated efficacy similar to that of the positive control (1,100 dentifrice) with respect to in situ demineralization.

  20. Turbine-Driven Pipe-Cleaning Brush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Rowell, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Simple pipe-cleaning device includes small turbine wheel axially connected, by standoff, to circular brush. Turbine wheel turns on hub bearing attached to end of upstream cable. Turbine-and-brush assembly inserted in pipe with cable trailing upstream and brush facing downstream. Water or cleaning solution pumped through pipe. Cable held at upstream end, so it holds turbine and brush in pipe at location to be cleaned. Flow in pipe turns turbine, which turns wheel, producing desired cleaning action. In addition to brushing action, device provides even mixing of cleaning solution in pipe.

  1. An in situ/ex vivo comparison of the ability of regular and light colas to induce enamel wear when erosion is combined with abrasion.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniela; Santos, Flávia Cardoso Zaidan; Honório, Heitor Marques; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wang, Linda; de Andrade Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate whether the type of cola drink (regular or diet) could influence the wear of enamel subjected to erosion followed by brushing abrasion. Ten volunteers wore intraoral devices that each had eight bovine enamel blocks divided into four groups: ER, erosion with regular cola; EAR, erosion with regular cola plus abrasion; EL, erosion with light cola; and EAL, erosion with light cola plus abrasion. Each day for 1 week, half of each device was immersed in regular cola for 5 minutes. Then, two blocks were brushed using a fluoridated toothpaste and electric toothbrush for 30 seconds four times daily. Immediately after, the other half of the device was subjected to the same procedure using a light cola. The pH, calcium, phosphorus, and fluoride concentrations of the colas were analyzed using standard procedures. Enamel alterations were measured by profilometry. Data were tested using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test (P<.05). Regarding chemical characteristics, light cola presented pH 3.0, 13.7 mg Ca/L, 15.5 mg P/L, and 0.31 mg F/L, while regular cola had pH 2.6, 32.1 mg Ca/L, 18.1 mg P/L, and 0.26 mg F/L. The light cola promoted less enamel loss (EL, 0.36 Μm; EAL, 0.39 Μm) than its regular counterpart (ER, 0.72 Μm; EAR, 0.95 Μm) for both conditions. There was not a significant difference (P>.05) between erosion and erosion plus abrasion for light cola. However, for regular cola, erosion plus abrasion resulted in higher enamel loss than erosion alone. The data suggest that light cola promoted less enamel wear even when erosion was followed by brushing abrasion.

  2. The effect of brushing with nano calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate toothpaste on the surface roughness of nano-ionomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisja, D. H.; Indrani, D. J.; Herda, E.

    2017-08-01

    Nanotechnology developments in dentistry have resulted in the development of nano-ionomer, a new restorative material. The surface roughness of restorative materials can increase bacteria adhesion and lead to poor oral hygiene. Abrasive agents in toothpaste can alter tooth and restorative material surfaces. The aim of this study is to identify the effect of brushing with nano calcium carbonate, and calcium carbonate toothpaste on surface roughness of nano-ionomer. Eighteen nano-ionomer specimens were brushed with Aquabidest (doubledistilled water), nano calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate toothpaste. Brushing lasted 30 minutes, and the roughness value (Ra) was measured after each 10 minute segment using a surface roughness tester. The data was analyzed using repeated ANOVA and one-way ANOVA test. The value of nano-ionomer surface roughness increased significantly (p<0.05) after 20 minutes of brushing with the nano calcium carbonate toothpaste. Brushing with calcium carbonate toothpaste leaves nano-ionomer surfaces more rugged than brushing with nano calcium carbonate toothpaste.

  3. Brush Seals for Improved Steam Turbine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Ray; Baily, Fred; Burnett, Mark; Rivas, Flor; Bowsher, Aaron; Crudgington, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GE Energy has retrofitted brush seals into more than 19 operating steam turbines. Brush seals offer superior leakage control compared to labyrinth seals, owing to their compliant nature and ability to maintain very tight clearances to the rotating shaft. Seal designs have been established for steam turbines ranging in size from 12 MW to over 1200 MW, including fossil, nuclear, combined-cycle and industrial applications. Steam turbines present unique design challenges that must be addressed to ensure that the potential performance benefits of brush seals are realized. Brush seals can have important effects on the overall turbine system that must be taken into account to assure reliable operation. Subscale rig tests are instrumental to understanding seal behavior under simulated steam-turbine operating conditions, prior to installing brush seals in the field. This presentation discusses the technical challenges of designing brush seals for steam turbines; subscale testing; performance benefits of brush seals; overall system effects; and field applications.

  4. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbonemore » deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.« less

  5. Loss on drying, calcium concentration and pH of fluoride dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Arella Cristina Muniz; Dantas, Lívia Rocha; De Brito, André Luiz Fiquene; Muniz, Ana Cristina Silva; Ramos, Ianny Alves; Cardoso, Andreia Medeiros Rodrigues; Xavier, Alidianne Fábia Cabral; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate have advantages such as control of dental plaque and progression of dental caries, also contributing to oral hygiene, represent most dentifrices marketed in Brazil. Aim: To evaluate the physicochemical properties of seven fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate in relation to hydrogen potential (pH), loss on drying and calcium concentration. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed using the potentiometric method for pH ranges, gravimetric analysis for loss on drying and atomic absorption spectrometry for the concentration of calcium ions. All tests were performed in triplicate and the analysis was performed entirely at random according to one-way analysis of variance at 5% significance level. Results: The pH values were alkaline and ranged from 8.67 (Oral-B 123®) to 10.03 (Colgate Máxima Proteção Anticáries®). The results of loss on drying ranged from 33.81% (Oral-B 123®) to 61.13% (Close Up®), with significant differences between brands tested. In relation to the calcium content, the highest and lowest concentrations were found in dentifrices Even® (155.55 g/kg) and Colgate Ultra Branco® (129 g/kg), respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Fluoride dentifrices analyzed showed alkaline pH and high levels of loss on drying and calcium concentration. However, these physicochemical characteristics differed according to the different brands tested. PMID:25821380

  6. Clinical study to monitor dentinal hypersensitivity with episodic use of a desensitising dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Stephen; Kingston, Rose; Shneyer, Lucy; Harding, Máiréad

    2017-01-01

    Objectives/Aims: To evaluate continuous and episodic twice-daily usage regimens of a desensitising dentifrice containing 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS). Materials and Methods: In this exploratory, single-centre, randomised, examiner-blind study, subjects with dentinal hypersensitivity were randomised to continuous (24 weeks) use of a 5% CSPS-containing dentifrice or episodic use of the dentifrice comprising two 8-week treatment periods separated by 8 weeks′ use of a standard fluoride dentifrice. Sensitivity was assessed by tactile threshold (Yeaple probe) and evaporative (air) sensitivity (Schiff sensitivity score). Other measures included labelled magnitude scales to assess subjects′ responses to the evaporative stimulus, the Dentine Hypersensitivity Experience Questionnaire and a tooth sensitivity question. Results: Seventy-six subjects were randomised to continuous (n=38) or episodic (n=38) use. Small but statistically significant improvements from baseline in Schiff sensitivity scores were observed at weeks 8, 16 and 24 with both regimens (all P<0.05). Increases from baseline in tactile threshold were not statistically significant. No significant between-regimen difference was observed for any endpoint. No treatment-related adverse events were reported. Discussion: Dentifrice containing 5% CSPS improved dentinal hypersensitivity with both episodic and continuous twice-daily usage regimens over 24 weeks and was well tolerated. Conclusion: No performance differences were observed between the two usage regimens. PMID:29789771

  7. Nanotribology of charged polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jacob

    Polymers at surfaces, whose modern understanding may be traced back to early work by Sam Edwards1, have become a paradigm for modification of surface properties, both as steric stabilizers and as remarkable boundary lubricants2. Charged polymer brushes are of particular interest, with both technological implications and especially biological relevance where most macromolecules are charged. In the context of biolubrication, relevant in areas from dry eye syndrome to osteoarthritis, charged polymer surface phases and their complexes with other macromolecules may play a central role. The hydration lubrication paradigm, where tenaciously-held yet fluid hydration shells surrounding ions or zwitterions serve as highly-efficient friction-reducing elements, has been invoked to understand the excellent lubrication provided both by ionized3 and by zwitterionic4 brushes. In this talk we describe recent advances in our understanding of the nanotribology of such charged brush systems. We consider interactions between charged end-grafted polymers, and how one may disentangle the steric from the electrostatic surface forces5. We examine the limits of lubrication by ionized brushes, both synthetic and of biological origins, and how highly-hydrated zwitterionic chains may provide extremely effective boundary lubrication6. Finally we describe how the lubrication of articular cartilage in the major joints, a tribosystem presenting some of the greatest challenges and opportunities, may be understood in terms of a supramolecular synergy between charged surface-attached polymers and zwitterionic groups7. Work supported by European Research Council (HydrationLube), Israel Science Foundation (ISF), Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, ISF-NSF China Joint Program.

  8. Polymer Brushes: Synthesis, Characterization, Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advincula, Rigoberto C.; Brittain, William J.; Caster, Kenneth C.; Rühe, Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    Materials scientists, polymer chemists, surface physicists and materials engineers will find this book a complete and detailed treatise on the field of polymer brushes, their synthesis, characterization and manifold applications. In a first section, the various synthetic pathways and different surface materials are introduced and explained, followed by a second section covering important aspects of characterization and analysis in both flat surfaces and particles. These specific surface initiated polymerization (SIP) systems such as linear polymers, homopolymers, block copolymers, and hyperbranched polymers are unique compared to previously reported systems by chemisorption or physisorption. They have found their way in both large-scale and miniature applications of polymer brushes, which is covered in the last section. Such 'hairy' surfaces offer fascinating opportunities for addressing numerous problems of both academic and, in particular, industrial interest: high-quality, functional or protective coatings, composite materials, surface engineered particles, metal-organic interfaces, biological applications, micro-patterning, colloids, nanoparticles, functional devices, and many more. It is the desire of the authors that this book will be of benefit to readers who want to "brush-up on polymers".

  9. Structure zone diagram and particle incorporation of nickel brush plated composite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Isern, L.; Impey, S.; Almond, H.; Clouser, S. J.; Endrino, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the deposition of aluminium-incorporated nickel coatings by brush electroplating, focusing on the electroplating setup and processing parameters. The setup was optimised in order to increase the volume of particle incorporation. The optimised design focused on increasing the plating solution flow to avoid sedimentation, and as a result the particle transport experienced a three-fold increase when compared with the traditional setup. The influence of bath load, current density and the brush material used was investigated. Both current density and brush material have a significant impact on the morphology and composition of the coatings. Higher current densities and non-abrasive brushes produce rough, particle-rich samples. Different combinations of these two parameters influence the surface characteristics differently, as illustrated in a Structure Zone Diagram. Finally, surfaces featuring crevices and peaks incorporate between 3.5 and 20 times more particles than smoother coatings. The presence of such features has been quantified using average surface roughness Ra and Abbott-Firestone curves. The combination of optimised setup and rough surface increased the particle content of the composite to 28 at.%. PMID:28300159

  10. Structure zone diagram and particle incorporation of nickel brush plated composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, L.; Impey, S.; Almond, H.; Clouser, S. J.; Endrino, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    This work studies the deposition of aluminium-incorporated nickel coatings by brush electroplating, focusing on the electroplating setup and processing parameters. The setup was optimised in order to increase the volume of particle incorporation. The optimised design focused on increasing the plating solution flow to avoid sedimentation, and as a result the particle transport experienced a three-fold increase when compared with the traditional setup. The influence of bath load, current density and the brush material used was investigated. Both current density and brush material have a significant impact on the morphology and composition of the coatings. Higher current densities and non-abrasive brushes produce rough, particle-rich samples. Different combinations of these two parameters influence the surface characteristics differently, as illustrated in a Structure Zone Diagram. Finally, surfaces featuring crevices and peaks incorporate between 3.5 and 20 times more particles than smoother coatings. The presence of such features has been quantified using average surface roughness Ra and Abbott-Firestone curves. The combination of optimised setup and rough surface increased the particle content of the composite to 28 at.%.

  11. Structure zone diagram and particle incorporation of nickel brush plated composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Isern, L; Impey, S; Almond, H; Clouser, S J; Endrino, J L

    2017-03-16

    This work studies the deposition of aluminium-incorporated nickel coatings by brush electroplating, focusing on the electroplating setup and processing parameters. The setup was optimised in order to increase the volume of particle incorporation. The optimised design focused on increasing the plating solution flow to avoid sedimentation, and as a result the particle transport experienced a three-fold increase when compared with the traditional setup. The influence of bath load, current density and the brush material used was investigated. Both current density and brush material have a significant impact on the morphology and composition of the coatings. Higher current densities and non-abrasive brushes produce rough, particle-rich samples. Different combinations of these two parameters influence the surface characteristics differently, as illustrated in a Structure Zone Diagram. Finally, surfaces featuring crevices and peaks incorporate between 3.5 and 20 times more particles than smoother coatings. The presence of such features has been quantified using average surface roughness Ra and Abbott-Firestone curves. The combination of optimised setup and rough surface increased the particle content of the composite to 28 at.%.

  12. Baking soda dentifrice and periodontal health: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical disruption of dental biofilm is critical to maintain periodontal health. Baking soda-containing dentifrices have shown to be potential aids for improving gingival health and maintaining dental biofilm control. Evidence from classic and contemporary literature is reviewed and summarized in this review. In vitro and in vivo (animal and human, respectively) studies and clinical trials have been analyzed. Some clinical studies demonstrated the benefits of baking soda dentifrices in plaque and gingivitis reduction. Clinical trials with longer follow-up would be useful to confirm the impact of baking soda on gingival health. Regular dental biofilm control and adjunctive use of baking soda dentifrices in an otherwise healthy and compliant patient may provide success in maintenance of gingival health. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  14. [The application of air abrasion in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Mandinić, Zoran; Vulićević, Zoran R; Beloica, Milos; Radović, Ivana; Mandić, Jelena; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip's size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist.

  15. Abfraction, abrasion, biocorrosion, and the enigma of noncarious cervical lesions: a 20-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Grippo, John O; Simring, Marvin; Coleman, Thomas A

    2012-02-01

    Hitherto, noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) of teeth have been generally ascribed to either toothbrush-dentifrice abrasion or acid "erosion." The last two decades have provided a plethora of new studies concerning such lesions. The most significant studies are reviewed and integrated into a practical approach to the understanding and designation of these lesions. A paradigm shift is suggested regarding use of the term "biocorrosion" to supplant "erosion" as it continues to be misused in the United States and many other countries of the world. Biocorrosion embraces the chemical, biochemical, and electrochemical degradation of tooth substance caused by endogenous and exogenous acids, proteolytic agents, as well as the piezoelectric effects only on dentin. Abfraction, representing the microstructural loss of tooth substance in areas of stress concentration, should not be used to designate all NCCLs because these lesions are commonly multifactorial in origin. Appropriate designation of a particular NCCL depends upon the interplay of the specific combination of three major mechanisms: stress, friction, and biocorrosion, unique to that individual case. Modifying factors, such as saliva, tongue action, and tooth form, composition, microstructure, mobility, and positional prominence are elucidated. By performing a comprehensive medical and dental history, using precise terms and concepts, and utilizing the Revised Schema of Pathodynamic Mechanisms, the dentist may successfully identify and treat the etiology of root surface lesions. Preventive measures may be instituted if the causative factors are detected and their modifying factors are considered. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effect of magnesium hydroxide-containing dentifrice using an extrinsic and intrinsic erosion cycling model.

    PubMed

    Passos, Vanara Florêncio; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Santiago, Sérgio Lima

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the effect of Mg(OH) 2 dentifrice, and the influence of the number of experimental days, on the extrinsic (citric acid -CA) and intrinsic (hydrochloric acid -HCl) enamel erosion models. Human enamel slabs were selected according to surface hardness and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=9) as follows: non-fluoridated (negative control), NaF (1450ppm F- positive control) and Mg(OH) 2 (2%) dentifrices. The slabs were daily submitted to a 2-h period of pellicle formation and, over a period of 5days, submitted to cycles (3×/day) of erosive challenge (CA 0.05M, pH=3.75 or HCl 0.01M, pH=2 for 30s), treatment (1min -1:3w/w of dentifrice/distilled water) and remineralization (artificial saliva/120min). Enamel changes were determined by surface hardness loss (SHL) for each day and mechanical profilometry analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test to % SHL and one-way ANOVA to profilometry (p<0.05). The number of experimental days influenced the erosion process for the two types of erosion models (p<0.001). Mg(OH) 2 -containing dentifrices were effective in reducing enamel extrinsic acid erosion as determined by % SHL (p<0.001) when compared to the control group, being better than positive control (p<0.001); however, the dentifrices were not effective for the intrinsic model (p=0.295). With regards to surface wear, no statistically significant differences were found among the groups for CA (p=0.225) and HCl (p=0.526). The findings suggest that Mg(OH) 2 dentifrices might protect enamel against slight erosion, but protection was not effective for stronger acid erosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase behavior of ternary polymer brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Simocko, Chester K.; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Huber, Dale L.

    2016-01-07

    Ternary polymer brushes consisting of polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(4-vinylpyridine) have been synthesized. These brushes laterally phase separate into several distinct phases and can be tailored by altering the relative polymer composition. Self-consistent field theory has been used to predict the phase diagram and model both the horizontal and vertical phase behavior of the polymer brushes. As a result, all phase behaviors observed experimentally correlate well with the theoretical model.

  18. Design and Testing of High Performance Brushes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    specific types, namely metal fiber brushes and met- al foil brushes, have been constructed and tested, and a theory has been developed which accounts for...combining electric- al measurements with mechanical investigations and optical observations. Since we now have reason to rely confidently on the theory of...reasonable requirements. packing densities between a few % and up to 20%, have been made of various materi- Brushes with gold, platinum, niobium als by the

  19. Effects of baking-soda-containing dentifrices on oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D M

    1997-01-01

    Oral malodor, also known as bad breath or halitosis, is an extremely common problem. Bad breath can arise from many sources in the body, but most frequently is produced in the mouth by the action of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria on sulfur-containing proteinaceous substrates in the saliva, such as debris and plaque. The primary molecules responsible for oral malodor are volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), such as hydrogen sulfide and methylmercaptan. Increased malodor production is related to greater bacterial numbers, reducing conditions, availability of protein substrates, and a pH above neutral. Bad breath is more common in the elderly, as well as those with unhygienic mouths, gingivitis, and periodontitis, but bad breath can also be found in some individuals who are periodontally healthy. The major source of oral malodor is the tongue. Approaches to controlling malodor have included masking, oral hygiene, antibacterial agents, conversion of VSC to nonodorous forms, oxidizing agents, and traditional approaches, including the use of backing soda. Results of controlled double-blind crossover studies, using both organoleptic (sensory) and gas chromatographic analysis of mouth air VSC, indicate that two dentifrices with high baking-soda concentrations, Arm & Hammer Dental Care and Arm & Hammer PeroxiCare, reduce oral malodor.

  20. Remineralization Potential of Three Different Dentifrices using Raman Spectroscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope.

    PubMed

    Job, Tisson V; Narayana, Girish T; Venkappa, Kishan K; Nathan, K Binu; Ahsan, Shameem; Harikaran, Jayakkodi

    2018-04-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the remineralization potential of three different dentifrices using Raman spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Materials and methods: Totally, 30 extracted intact impacted third molar teeth were selected and the crown of each tooth in a group was separated from the root and longitudinally sectioned into four parts with each section under a subgroup, of which one section was an untreated section, the second and the third sections were demineralized in a demineralizing solution, and the third section was remineralized after demineralization. The teeth in the three groups were demineralized for 4 days and then treated with 0.21% sodium fluoride dentifrice with trical-cium phosphate, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), and NovaMin for 14 days, following which the teeth surfaces were studied using Raman spec-troscopy and CLSM to assess the remineralization potential of the three dentifrices. The data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results: Raman spectroscopic analysis revealed better remin-eralization with CPP-ACP, which was statistically significant from the groups treated with the NovaMin dentifrice and the fluoride-containing dentifrice.Confocal laser scanning microscopic examination also revealed significant differences between the three groups with the NovaMin-containing dentifrice demonstrating a greater remineralization of the surface when compared with the CPP-ACP dentifrice. The teeth samples treated with fluoride-containing dentifrice demonstrated the least reminer-alization among the three groups. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the demineralized samples of teeth treated with CPP-ACP showed the highest concentration of phosphate ions when analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, and the microscopic examination using confocal laser revealed a better surface remineralization of the demin-eralized samples when treated with the NovaMin technology. Clinical

  1. Nanopatterned polymer brushes: conformation, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Ista, Linnea K; Gu, Renpeng; Zauscher, Stefan; López, Gabriel P

    2016-01-14

    Surfaces with end-grafted, nanopatterned polymer brushes that exhibit well-defined feature dimensions and controlled chemical and physical properties provide versatile platforms not only for investigation of nanoscale phenomena at biointerfaces, but also for the development of advanced devices relevant to biotechnology and electronics applications. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of scaling behavior of nanopatterned polymer brushes and then summarize recent progress in fabrication and application of nanopatterned polymer brushes. Specifically, we highlight applications of nanopatterned stimuli-responsive polymer brushes in the areas of biomedicine and biotechnology.

  2. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  3. Nanopatterned polymer brushes: conformation, fabrication and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qian; Ista, Linnea K.; Gu, Renpeng; Zauscher, Stefan; López, Gabriel P.

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces with end-grafted, nanopatterned polymer brushes that exhibit well-defined feature dimensions and controlled chemical and physical properties provide versatile platforms not only for investigation of nanoscale phenomena at biointerfaces, but also for the development of advanced devices relevant to biotechnology and electronics applications. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of scaling behavior of nanopatterned polymer brushes and then summarize recent progress in fabrication and application of nanopatterned polymer brushes. Specifically, we highlight applications of nanopatterned stimuli-responsive polymer brushes in the areas of biomedicine and biotechnology.

  4. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  5. Development of a Brush Seals Program Leading to Ceramic Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Flower, Ralph; Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    Some events of a U.S. Army/NASA Lewis Research Center brush seals program are reviewed, and the development of ceramic brush seals is described. Some preliminary room-temperature flow data are given, and the results of testing metallic brushes in cryogenic nitrogen are discussed.

  6. A randomised clinical study to measure the anti-erosion benefits of a stannous-containing sodium fluoride dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    West, Nicola; Seong, Joon; Macdonald, Emma; He, Tao; Barker, Matthew; Hooper, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the enamel protection efficacy of stannous-containing sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP)/triclosan dentifrices marketed in India in an in situ erosion model with acidic challenge. Materials and Methods: This randomised and controlled, in situ, supervised, double-blind clinical trial employed a two-treatment, four-period crossover design, wherein subjects wore an appliance fitted with human enamel samples 6 h/day during each 10 day treatment period and swished twice daily with their assigned dentifrice slurry: Oral-B® Pro-Health (maximum 1,000 ppm F as sodium fluoride with stannous chloride) or Colgate® Strong Teeth with Cavity Protection (maximum 1,000 F as sodium MFP and triclosan). Subjects swished with 250 ml of orange juice over a 10 min period after each treatment and twice daily for the acidic erosive challenge. Enamel samples were measured for tooth surface loss using contact profilometry at baseline and day 10. Results: A total of 34 subjects were randomised to treatment; 32 subjects completed the final visit. Baseline profilometry measurements of the specimen surfaces were near zero within ± 0.3 μm, and no statistically significant difference (P > 0.48) on average was observed between the two test dentifrices. At day 10, the stannous-containing dentifrice demonstrated 88% less erosion (P < 0.0001) relative to the MFP/triclosan dentifrice. Estimated medians (95% confidence intervals) were 0.21 μm (0.17, 0.25) for the stannous-containing dentifrice versus 1.66 μm (1.39, 1.99) for the MFP/triclosan dentifrice. Both dentifrices were well-tolerated. Conclusions: Compared with MFP/triclosan toothpaste, a stabilised stannous-containing sodium fluoride dentifrice gave statistically significantly greater protection against tooth enamel surface loss in situ following repeated acid erosive challenge. PMID:26015669

  7. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  8. A Brush Seals Program Modeling and Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Flower, Ralph; Howe, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Some events of a U.S. Army/NASA Lewis Research Center brush seals program are reviewed, and the development of ceramic brush seals is described. Some preliminary room-temperature flow data are modeled and compare favorably to the results of Ergun.

  9. Dual wound dc brush motor gearhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Barrie W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements, the design, development tests and problems, the qualification and life test and the findings of the strip examination of a dual wound DC brushed motor gearhead are described. It is the only space qualified dual wound dc brushed motor gearhead in Europe.

  10. Antimicrobial effects of a new therapeutic liquid dentifrice formulation on oral bacteria including odorigenic species.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, P K; Furgang, D; Zhang, Y; DeVizio, W; Fine, D H

    2005-03-01

    The control of oral malodor is well-recognized in efforts to improve oral health. Antimicrobial formulations can mitigate oral malodor, however, procedures to assess effects on oral bacteria including those implicated in halitosis are unavailable. This investigation examined the antimicrobial effects of a new liquid triclosan/copolymer dentifrice (test) formulation that demonstrated significant inhibition of oral malodor in previous organoleptic clinical studies. Procedures compared antimicrobial effects of the test and control formulations on a range of oral micro-organisms including members implicated in halitosis, substantive antimicrobial effects of formulations with hydroxyapatite as a surrogate for human teeth and ex vivo effects on oral bacteria from human volunteers. With Actinomyces viscosus, as a model system, the test formulation demonstrated a dose-dependent effect. At these concentrations the test formulation provided significant antimicrobial effects on 13 strains of oral bacteria including those implicated in bad breath at selected posttreatment time points. Treatment of hydroxyapatite by the test dentifrice resulted in a significant and substantive antimicrobial effect vs. controls. Oral bacteria from subjects treated ex vivo with the test dentifrice resulted in significant reductions in cultivable oral bacteria and odorigenic bacteria producing hydrogen sulfide. In summary, microbiological methods adapted to study odorigenic bacteria demonstrate the significant antimicrobial effects of the test (triclosan/copolymer) dentifrice with laboratory and clinical strains of oral bacteria implicated in bad breath.

  11. Clinical efficacy of a herbal dentifrice on dentinal hypersensitivity: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M; Naik, S B; Rao, N S; Martande, S S; Pradeep, A R

    2013-12-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a common problem and there is a growing interest in herbal based formulations for the treatment of oral diseases. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of a commercially available novel herbal dentifrice in reduction of dentinal hypersensitivity. A total of 73 subjects (38 males and 35 females; aged 25-60 years) were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 - a placebo dentifrice (The Himalaya Drug Company Research and Development, Makali, Bangalore) and Group 2 - (test group), a commercially available herbal dentifrice (Hi Ora K, The Himalaya Drug Company Research and Development, Makali, Bangalore). Sensitivity scores for controlled air stimulus and cold water were recorded at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. The test group was found to be significantly better compared to the placebo group at the end of 6 and 12 weeks in reduction of dentinal hypersensitivity. The novel herbal dentifrice can be recommended for treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Nanostructured bio-functional polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Padeste, Celestino; Farquet, Patrick; Potzner, Christian; Solak, Harun H

    2006-01-01

    Structured poly(glycidyl methracrylate) (poly-GMA) brushes have been grafted onto flexible fluoro-polymer films using a radiation grafting process. The reactive epoxide of poly-GMA provides the basis for a versatile biofunctionalization of the grafted brushes. Structure definition by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) exposure allowed nanometer-scale resolution of periodic patterns. By variation of the exposure dose the height of the grafted structures can be adapted in a wide range. Derivatization of the grafted brushes included reaction with various amines with different side chains, hydrolysis of the epoxide to diols to increase protein resistance and introduction of ionic groups to yield poly-electrolytes. As an example for biofunctionalization, biotin was linked to the grafted brush and biofunctionality was demonstrated in a competitive biotin-streptavidin assay. In this article we also present a brief review of other approaches to obtain structured biofunctional polymer brushes.

  13. Influence of the Relative Enamel Abrasivity (REA) of Toothpastes on the Uptake of KOH-soluble and Structurally Bound Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Elmazi, Valbona; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Imfeld, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of the relative enamel abrasivity (REA) of fluoridated toothpaste on the uptake of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride into enamel. Bovine enamel samples were randomly allocated to 6 groups (n=36 per group). Groups A to C were treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) toothpastes and groups D to F with amine fluoride (AmF) toothpastes (1500 ppm F each). The REA in groups A and D was 2, in groups B and E it was 6 and in groups C and F it was 9. Twice a day, 18 samples of each group were immersed for 2 min in a slurry (toothpaste:artificial saliva=1:3), while the remaining samples were brushed with the respective slurry (2.5 N force; 60 strokes/min; 2 min). All samples were stored at 37°C and 100% humidity. After five days, the amount of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride was determined and statistically compared by Scheffe's post-hoc tests. REA value and mode of application (immersion or brushing) had no significant influence on the amount of either kind of fluoride from NaF toothpastes. Only for the NaF toothpaste with REA 6 was the amount of KOH-soluble fluoride significantly higher after brushing. With AmF toothpastes, KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride concentrations were significantly higher when the samples were brushed. Furthermore, in the REA-2 group, the amounts of KOH-soluble fluoride (brushed or immersed) and structurally bound fluoride (brushed) were significantly higher than in the other groups. The REA dependency of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride was found only for the AmF toothpastes. Using AmF toothpaste, the mode of application influenced the uptake of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride into enamel.

  14. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  15. The effect of microstructure on abrasive wear of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kešner, A.; Chotëborský, R.; Linda, M.

    2017-09-01

    Abrasive wear of agricultural tools is one of the biggest problems in currently being. The amount of abrasive wear, depending on the microstructure, has been investigated in this work. Steels 25CrMo4 and 51CrV4 were used in this work to determine the effect of the microstructure on the abrasive wear. These steels are commonly used for components that have to withstand abrasive wear.SEM analysis was used to detect the microstructure. The standardized ASTM G65 method was used to compare the abrasive wear of steels. The results show that the abrasive wear depends on the microstructure of steels.

  16. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  17. Mars Pathfinder: The Wheel Abrasion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE) will measure the amount of wear on wheel surfaces of the Mars Pathfinder rover. WAE uses thin films of Al, Ni, and Pt (ranging in thickness from 200 to 1000 angstroms) deposited on black, anodized Al strips attached to the rover wheel. As the wheel moves across the martian surface, changes in film reflectivity will be monitored by reflected sunlight. These changes, measured as output from a special photodetector mounted on the rover chassis, will be due to abrasion of the metal films by martian surface sand, dust, and clay.

  18. The effects of a new therapeutic triclosan/copolymer/sodium-fluoride dentifrice on oral bacteria, including odorigenic species.

    PubMed

    Furgang, David; Sreenivasan, Prem K; Zhang, Yun Po; Fine, Daniel H; Cummins, Diane

    2003-09-01

    This investigation examined the in vitro and ex vivo antimicrobial effects of a new dentifrice, Colgate Total Advanced Fresh, formulated with triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride, on oral bacteria, including those odorigenic bacteria implicated in bad breath. The effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh were compared to commercially available fluoride dentifrices that served as controls. Three experimental approaches were undertaken for these studies. In the first approach, the dentifrice formulations were tested in vitro against 13 species of oral bacteria implicated in bad breath. The second approach examined the antimicrobial activity derived from dentifrice that was adsorbed to and released from hydroxyapatite disks. In this approach, dentifrice-treated hydroxyapatite disks were immersed in a suspension of bacteria, and reduction in bacterial viability from the release of bioactive agents from hydroxyapatite was determined. The third approach examined the effect of treating bacteria immediately after their removal from the oral cavity of 11 adult human volunteers. This ex vivo study examined the viability of cultivable oral bacteria after dentifrice treatment for 2 minutes. Antimicrobial effects were determined by plating Colgate Total Advanced Fresh and control-dentifrice-treated samples on enriched media (for all cultivable oral bacteria) and indicator media (for hydrogen-sulfide-producing organisms), respectively. Results indicated that the antimicrobial effects of Colgate Total Advanced Fresh were significantly greater than either of the other dentifrices for all 13 oral odorigenic bacterial strains tested in vitro (P < or = 0.05). In the second approach, Colgate Total Advanced Fresh-treated hydroxyapatite disks were significantly more active in reducing bacterial growth than the other dentifrices tested (P < or = 0.05). Finally, ex vivo treatment of oral bacteria with Colgate Total Advanced Fresh demonstrated a 90.9% reduction of all oral cultivable bacteria

  19. Efficacy and mechanisms of non-antibacterial, chemical plaque control by dentifrices--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; White, Don J; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van der Mei, Henny C

    2007-04-01

    The provision of antiplaque benefits to dentifrices assists patients in improving hygiene and reducing susceptibility to gingivitis and caries. Chemical plaque control involves different mechanisms and is mostly associated with antibacterial effects, but also includes effects on pellicle surface chemistry to improve cleansing or discourage renewed plaque formation. It is the aim of this paper to analyze in vitro detachment of co-aggregating oral actinomyces and streptococci from pellicle surfaces by dentifrice supernates and to study subsequent de novo streptococcal deposition. Detachment by dentifrices of a co-adhering bacterial pair was studied in the parallel plate flow chamber on a 16 h pellicle coated surface. After detachment by perfusing the chamber with a dentifrice, re-deposition was initiated by flowing with a fresh streptococcal suspension. The dentifrices included both a regular, SLS-fluoride based formulation as well a pyrophosphate, anticalculus and antimicrobial formulations. All dentifrice supernates containing SLS were effective in detaching co-adhering bacteria from pellicles surfaces, except in combination with SnF(2). When hexametaphosphate was added immediate detachment was relatively low, but continued even during re-deposition. The re-deposition of streptococci after detachment by other, NaF containing dentifrices involved relatively few large aggregates, presumably because fluoride was able to block bi-dentate calcium binding sites on the bacterial cell surfaces, mediating co-adhesion. When pyrophosphate was present in addition to NaF, re-deposition involved significantly more large aggregates, likely because pyrophosphate served as a bi-dentate bridge between calcium bound on the bacterial cell surfaces. Commercially available dentifrice formulations differ in their ability to stimulate bacterial detachment from pellicles and dependent on their composition yield the formation of large co-adhering aggregates of actinomyces and streptococci

  20. Binary Polymer Brushes of Strongly Immiscible Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chu, Elza; Babar, Tashnia; Bruist, Michael F; Sidorenko, Alexander

    2015-06-17

    The phenomenon of microphase separation is an example of self-assembly in soft matter and has been observed in block copolymers (BCPs) and similar materials (i.e., supramolecular assemblies (SMAs) and homo/block copolymer blends (HBCs)). In this study, we use microphase separation to construct responsive polymer brushes that collapse to generate periodic surfaces. This is achieved by a chemical reaction between the minor block (10%, poly(4-vinylpyridine)) of the block copolymer and a substrate. The major block of polystyrene (PS) forms mosaic-like arrays of grafted patches that are 10-20 nm in size. Depending on the nature of the assembly (SMA, HBC, or neat BCP) and annealing method (exposure to vapors of different solvents or heating above the glass transition temperature), a range of "mosaic" brushes with different parameters can be obtained. Successive grafting of a secondary polymer (polyacrylamide, PAAm) results in the fabrication of binary polymer brushes (BPBs). Upon being exposed to specific selective solvents, BPBs may adopt different conformations. The surface tension and adhesion of the binary brush are governed by the polymer occupying the top stratum. The "mosaic" brush approach allows for a combination of strongly immiscible polymers in one brush. This facilitates substantial contrast in the surface properties upon switching, previously only possible for substrates composed of predetermined nanostructures. We also demonstrate a possible application of such PS/PAAm brushes in a tunable bioadhesion-bioadhesive (PS on top) or nonbioadhesive (PAAm on top) surface as revealed by Escherichia coli bacterial seeding.

  1. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  11. Long-term effect of the combined use of powered toothbrush and triclosan dentifrice in periodontal maintenance patients.

    PubMed

    Bogren, Anna; Teles, Ricardo P; Torresyap, Gay; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Jönsson, Kerstin; Wennström, Jan L

    2008-02-01

    To test the hypothesis of a superior clinical and microbiological effect of the combined use of powered toothbrush+triclosan-containing dentifrice compared with manual toothbrush+regular fluoride-containing dentifrice in periodontal maintenance patients. A total of 128 periodontitis subjects involved in recall programmes were randomized to use either powered toothbrush with triclosan-dentifrice (test) or manual toothbrush and standard dentifrice (control). Supportive periodontal treatment was provided at baseline and every 6 months. Plaque, bleeding on probing (BoP), probing pocket depth (PPD) and relative attachment level (RAL) were scored at baseline, 1, 2 and 3 years. Subgingival plaque samples were taken and analysed for their content of 40 bacterial species at each examination interval. All analyses were performed by "intention-to-treat" protocol. Both groups showed significant reduction in BoP, PPD and in mean total counts of the 40 bacterial species between baseline and 3 years, while plaque score and RAL remained almost unchanged. No significant differences between the two prevention programmes were found for any of the clinical outcome variables or in mean counts of the various bacterial species. The study failed to demonstrate superior clinical and microbiological effects of powered toothbrush+triclosan dentifrice compared with manual toothbrush+standard fluoride-dentifrice in periodontitis-susceptible patients on regular maintenance therapy.

  12. The stability of water- and fat-soluble vitamin in dentifrices according to pH level and storage type.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Eun; Choi, Yong-Jun; Park, Yong-Duk; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vitamin stabilities in dentifrices by analyzing various vitamins according to the level and storage temperature. The stabilities of water- and fat-soluble vitamins were investigated in buffer solution at different pH values (4, 7, 8, 10 and 11) for 14 days and in dentifrices at different pH (7 and 10) for 5 months at two temperature conditions (room and refrigeration temperature) by analyzing the remaining amounts using HPLC methods. In the buffer solution, the stability of vitamins B1 , B6 and C was increased as the pH values increased. Vitamins E and K showed poor stability at pH 4, and vitamin B3 showed poor stability at pH 11. In dentifrices, the storage temperature highly influenced vitamin stability, especially vitamins C and E, but the stabilities of vitamins B1 and C according to pH values did not correspond to the buffer solution tests. Vitamin B group was relatively stable in dentifrices, but vitamin C completely disappeared after 5 months. Vitamin K showed the least initial preservation rates. Vitamins were not detected in commercial dentifrices for adults and detected amounts were less than the advertised contents in dentifrices for children. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The effectiveness of a dentifrice without sodium lauryl sulphate on dental plaque and gingivitis - a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sälzer, S; Rosema, Nam; Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N L; Slot, D E; Timmer, C; Dörfer, C E; Van der Weijden, G A

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect on dental plaque and gingivitis of a dentifrice without sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) compared to two SLS-containing dentifrices. For this double-blind, parallel study, 90 volunteers having moderate gingival inflammation (≥40%) were randomly divided among three groups: one group using non-SLS dentifrice containing enzymes, colostrum and low concentrations of zinc and two control groups each using different SLS-containing dentifrices. Dental plaque scores (Turesky modification of Quigley & Hein) and gingivitis scores (Bleeding On Marginal Probing) were assessed at baseline, after 2 and 4 weeks. Eighty-nine participants provided evaluable data. A slight decrease in gingivitis scores was observed for all groups over 4 weeks, which was statistically significant for the non-SLS group. Mean values for dental plaque scores did not show major differences over 4 weeks. For both parameters, no significant differences between groups could be observed at any time point. Patient appreciation was in favour of the SLS groups especially regarding the foaming effect. No significant differences could be observed with respect to the effect on plaque and gingivitis between SLS-containing and SLS-free dentifrice containing enzymes, colostrum and low concentration zinc. Patients enjoyed the duration of taste and the 'foaming effect' of SLS-containing dentifrices better. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ambient, rapid and facile deposition of polymer brushes for immobilization of plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Hatice; Pekdemir, Sami; Ipekci, Hasan H.; Kiremitler, N. Burak; Hancer, Mehmet; Onses, M. Serdar

    2016-11-01

    The immobilization of nanoparticles (NPs) is of great interest to many technological applications and scientific fields. Methods to immobilize NPs either lack the uniformity, robustness and controllability or require complex and impractical preparation techniques. This paper aims in closing this gap by presenting practical routes in preparation of poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) brush grafted silicon oxide terminated substrates for immobilization of NPs. Here, we demonstrate that hydroxyl-terminated P2VP can be deposited using different coating techniques and grafted in air at processing times as short as a few minutes. The grafted P2VP brushes can immobilize spherical Au nanoparticles that are 20 nm in diameter, on the surface of substrates with densities as high as ∼600 particles/μm2. The density of the immobilized NPs can be further tuned with the grafting conditions and duration of the particle treatment. More than 80% of the grafted brushes and Au NPs remain on the substrate following abrasion tests proving mechanical robustness of the coatings. The immobilized Au NPs can impart surface enhanced Raman scattering effects in sensing of molecules, illustrating a representative use of the presented platform.

  15. Robotic edge machining using elastic abrasive tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, A. V.; Semyonov, E. N.; Belomestnykh, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes a robotic center designed for automation of finishing operations, and analyzes technological aspects of an elastic abrasive tool applied for edge machining. Based on the experimental studies, practical recommendations on the application of the robotic center for finishing operations were developed.

  16. A Mueller matrix model of Haidinger's brushes.

    PubMed

    Misson, Gary P

    2003-09-01

    Stokes vectors and Mueller matrices are used to model the polarisation properties (birefringence, dichroism and depolarisation) of any optical system, in particular the human eye. An explanation of the form and behaviour of the entoptic phenomenon of Haidinger's brushes is derived that complements and expands upon a previous study. The relationship between the appearance of Haidinger's brushes and intrinsic ocular retardation is quantified and the model allows prediction of the effect of any retarder of any orientation placed between a source of polarised light and the eye. The simple relationship of minimum contrast of Haidinger's brushes to the cosine of total retardation is derived.

  17. AFM-based force spectroscopy on polystyrene brushes: effect of brush thickness on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Carsten; Wagner, Hendrik; Smiatek, Jens; Heuer, Andreas; Fuchs, Harald; Zhang, Xi; Studer, Armido; Chi, Lifeng

    2013-02-12

    Herein we present a study on nonspecific binding of proteins at highly dense packed hydrophobic polystyrene brushes. In this context, an atomic force microscopy tip was functionalized with concanavalin A to perform single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements on polystyrene brushes with thicknesses of 10 and 60 nm, respectively. Polystyrene brushes with thickness of 10 nm show an almost two times stronger protein adsorption than brushes with a thickness of 60 nm: 72 pN for the thinner and 38 pN for the thicker layer, which is in qualitative agreement with protein adsorption studies conducted macroscopically by fluorescence microscopy.

  18. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... endometrium (the mucosal lining of the uterus) by brushing its surface. This device is used to study... perforation, or a recent cesarean section, and (3) Design and testing: (i) The sampling component is covered...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... endometrium (the mucosal lining of the uterus) by brushing its surface. This device is used to study... perforation, or a recent cesarean section, and (3) Design and testing: (i) The sampling component is covered...

  20. Comparative evaluation of cemental abrasion caused by soft and medium bristle hardness toothbrushes at three predetermined toothbrushing forces: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep; Patil, Agraja Ganpat; Karde, Prerna Ashok; Mahale, Swapna Arunkumar; Dani, Nitin Hemchandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plaque control has been shown to have a pivotal role in maintaining optimal periodontal health. Toothbrushing as a mechanical plaque control tool is the most popular and effective option for self-performed oral health maintenance. However, the detrimental effects of bristle hardness and force exerted by toothbrushes on the tooth surface are the areas of concern. Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the abrasive effect of two different manual toothbrushes exerting predetermined forces on cemental surfaces of the teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted first molars were selected. Totally six experimental groups were formed based on the three predetermined forces 1.5, 3, and 4.5 Newton (N) and two types of manual toothbrushes, i.e., soft and medium bristle hardness. Buccal and lingual surfaces were independently brushed for 5000 cycles using specially designed toothbrushing machine. Throughout the experiment, type and quantity of toothpaste were kept constant. Post 5000 cycles of toothbrushing, change in surface roughness was measured using profilometer in microns and change in weight indicating loss of substance was measured in milligrams. Results: Abrasion of cementum is force dependent. Data revealed that both soft and medium bristle hardness toothbrushes cause significant cemental abrasion at 3 and 4.5 N forces. Conclusions: Higher is the force, more is the cemental surface abrasion. Soft bristled toothbrush causes more cemental abrasion than medium bristled toothbrush at 3 and 4.5 N forces. PMID:29386794

  1. Design and Testing of High Performance Brushes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    brushes. Foil brushes were first develop- by P. Haney in his M.S. thesis research. David, before leaving for a position in industry as a research...inclusions [1, 31. However, well hclos the statlic yield stress. Even though neither the process wh Iich leads% to tlse nucleation of the Stres...Phenomenologicall) it has been cstalished [1.2] tic, deformattion, failurc ~cctur-; after some 10’ cycles. that. as a first step prior to fatigue crack nucleation

  2. Water driven turbine/brush pipe cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Assemblies are disclosed for cleaning the inside walls of pipes and tubes. A first embodiment includes a small turbine with angled blades axially mounted on one end of a standoff support. An O-ring for stabilizing the assembly within the pipe is mounted in a groove within the outer ring. A replaceable circular brush is fixedly mounted on the opposite end of the standoff support and can be used for cleaning tubes and pipes of various diameters, lengths and configurations. The turbine, standoff support, and brush spin in unison relative to a hub bearing that is fixedly attached to a wire upstream of the assembly. The nonrotating wire is for retaining the assembly in tension and enabling return of the assembly to the pipe entrance. The assembly is initially placed in the pipe or tube to be cleaned. A pressurized water or solution source is provided at a required flow-rate to propel the assembly through the pipe or tube. The upstream water pressure propels and spins the turbine, standoff support and brush. The rotating brush combined with the solution cleans the inside of the pipe. The solution flows out of the other end of the pipe with the brush rotation controlled by the flow-rate. A second embodiment is similar to the first embodiment but instead includes a circular shaped brush with ring backing mounted in the groove of the exterior ring of the turbine, and also reduces the size of the standoff support or eliminates the standoff support.

  3. Assessment of the influence of vegetarian diet on the occurrence of erosive and abrasive cavities in hard tooth tissues.

    PubMed

    Herman, Katarzyna; Czajczyńska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Dobrzyński, Maciej

    2011-11-25

    The aim of the study was to determine the potential relation between vegetarian diet and tooth erosion and abrasion. The examination included 46 vegetarians and the same number in the control group. Clinical research was carried out in order to detect the presence of abrasive and erosive changes and the level of hygiene in oral cavities. The questionnaire survey concerned dietary and hygienic habits. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted with Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test. The relations between following a vegetarian diet and the occurrence of non-carious cavities was tested with models of logistic regression. Tooth erosion was present among 39.1% of vegetarians and 23.9% of controls, while abrasion appeared among 26.1% and 10.9%, respectively, and the differences were statistically insignificant. The distribution of the changes was similar in both groups. Among vegetarians, significantly more frequent consumption of sour products (predominantly raw vegetables and fruit and tomatoes) was observed. The level of oral hygiene and hygienic habits were similar in both groups. The analysis of statistical regression did not reveal any relations between following a vegetarian diet and the occurrence of tooth erosion and abrasion. The results did not reveal any direct influence of vegetarian diet on the occurrence of erosive and abrasive changes. However, in the vegetarian group, more frequent consumption of some sour products and more commonly used horizontal brushing method were observed, with a slightly higher occurrence of non-carious cavities. Further research is required to obtain unambiguous conclusions.

  4. Plaque fluoride concentrations in a community without water fluoridation: effects of calcium and use of a fluoride or placebo dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Whitford, G M; Buzalaf, M A R; Bijella, M F B; Waller, J L

    2005-01-01

    The results of a recent study by Whitford et al. [Caries Res 2002;36:256-265] with subjects whose drinking water was fluoridated led to two major conclusions: (1) Compared to the use of a placebo dentifrice, plaque fluoride concentrations ([F]) throughout much of the day are not significantly increased by the use of an F dentifrice but (2) they are positively related to plaque [Ca] (p = 0.0001). The present double-blind, double-crossover study with 16 subjects used the same protocol and was done to: (1) determine the effects of the use of an F dentifrice on salivary and plaque [F] in a community without water fluoridation and (2) further examine the relationship between plaque [Ca] and [F]. Following the use of an F dentifrice or placebo for one week, whole saliva and plaque were collected 1.0 and 12 h after the last use of the products. The study was repeated to include rinsing with a 20 mmol/l CaCl(2) solution immediately before the use of the dentifrices. The CaCl(2) rinse had only minor effects on salivary [Ca] and [F] and none on the plaque concentrations. Unlike the results found in the fluoridated community, all salivary and plaque [F] associated with the use of the F dentifrice were significantly higher than those associated with the use of the placebo. The results suggest that the cariostatic effectiveness of an F dentifrice should be greater in areas without water fluoridation. As noted previously, plaque [F] were positively related to plaque [Ca] (p = 0.0001). Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Effect of an essential oil-containing dentifrice on dental plaque microbial composition.

    PubMed

    Charles, C H; Vincent, J W; Borycheski, L; Amatnieks, Y; Sarina, M; Qaqish, J; Proskin, H M

    2000-09-01

    To determine the effect of 6 months use of an essential oil-containing (EO) antiplaque/antigingivitis fluoride dentifrice on the balance of the oral microbial flora and on the emergence of resistant microbial forms by analysis of dental plaque and saliva. The dentifrice essential oils consisted of a fixed combination of thymol, menthol, methyl salicylate, and eucalyptol. An identical fluoride-containing dentifrice without the essential oils served as the control. A subgroup of 66 subjects from a clinical trial population of 321 was randomly selected for characterization of their dental plaque microflora. Saliva was also cultured to monitor for the emergence of opportunistic pathogens. Supragingival plaque and saliva were harvested at baseline, after which subjects received a dental prophylaxis. Subjects were sampled again after 3 and 6 months of product use prior to clinical examination. Plaque was characterized for microbial content by phase contrast microscopy for recognizable cellular morphotypes and by cultivation on nonselective and selective culture media. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the test agent against selected Actinomyces and Veillonella isolated bacterial species was conducted at all time points to monitor for the potential development of bacterial resistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the microbial flora obtained from subjects using the essential oil-containing dentifrice and the vehicle control for all parameters and time periods except for the percentage of spirochetes at 6 months and for percentage of "other" microorganisms at 3 months. The EO group exhibited a lower adjusted mean for both parameters. Additionally, there was no evidence of the development of bacterial resistance to the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils or the emergence of opportunistic pathogens.

  6. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate Extrinsic Stain Removal of a Whitening Dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Terézhalmy, Géza; He, Tao; Anastasia, Mary Kay; Eusebio, Rachelle

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the extrinsic stain removal efficacy of a new whitening dentifrice containing sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) over a two-week period. This study used a controlled and randomized, examiner-blind, single-center, two-treatment, parallel group design. Subjects with visible extrinsic dental stain on facial surfaces of their anterior teeth, and meeting all study criteria, were entered into the trial. The test group received the whitening dentifrice with sodium fluoride and SHMP and an ADA reference soft manual toothbrush. Subjects in the control group received a dental prophylaxis after the initial examination at Baseline and were instructed to use their usual oral hygiene products at home. Subjects returned at Day 3 and Week 2 for re-evaluation of extrinsic dental stain. Extrinsic stain was measured using the Interproximal Modified Lobene (IML) Stain Index; safety was assessed based on clinical examination. Fifty subjects (mean age 32.0 years) completed the study, with 25 in each group. Statistically significant reductions in composite stain for whole tooth, as well as interproximal, gingival, and body surfaces were observed for both groups at Day 3 and Week 2 (p < 0.0001) with no significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.3). At Day 3, median percent reductions in composite IML stain from Baseline were 98% for the prophylaxis group and 100% for the test dentifrice group. At Week 2, median percent reductions in composite IML stain were 100% compared to Baseline for both groups. No adverse events were reported for either group. The whitening dentifrice demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in IML stain after three days and two weeks of use relative to baseline. Stain reduction with the toothpaste was comparable to a dental prophylaxis.

  7. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  8. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  9. Explosibility and Ignitability of Plastic Abrasive Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Polyplus Is an alpha cellulose filled urea formaldehyde with a hardness or 3.5. Type III is a urea melamine formaldehyde with a hardness of 4. A fourth...is a thermoplastic acrylic media and the Kopper’s media are thermoset formaldehydes . o The greatest potential for dust explosions is in the baghouss...type or plastio media trom E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company was also tested. This Type L Solidstrip plastic stripping abrasive is an acrylic resin

  10. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation.

  11. Structure of Weakly Charged Polyelectrolyte Brushes: Monomer Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, O. V.; Zhulina, E. B.

    1997-03-01

    The internal structure (the monomer density profiles) of weakly charged polyelectrolyte brushes of different morphologies has been analyzed on the basis of the self-consistent-field approach. In contrast to previous studies based on the local electroneutrality approximation valid for sufficiently strongly charged or densely grafted (“osmotic") brushes we consider the opposite limit of sparse brushes which are unable to retain the counterions inside the brush. We have shown that an exact analytical solution of the SCF-equations is available in the case of a planar brush. In contrast to Gaussian monomer density profile known for “osmotic" polyelectrolyte brushes we have found that weakly charged brushes are characterized by constant monomer density. At the same time free ends of grafted polyions are distributed throughout the brush. Thus, the structural cross-over between polyelectrolyte “mushrooms" and dense brush regimes is established.

  12. Bidirectional Brush Seals: Post-Test Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Wilson, Jack; Wu, Tom Y.; Flower, Ralph; Mullen, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    A post-test analysis of a set of inside-diameter/outside-diameter (ID/OD) bidirectional brush seals used in three-port wave rotor tests was undertaken to determine brush bristle and configuration wear, pullout, and rotor coating wear. The results suggest that sharp changes in the pressure profiles were not well reflected in bristle tip configuration patterns or wear. Also, positive-to-negative changes in axial pressure gradients appeared to have little effect on the backing plates. Although the brushes had similar porosities, they had very different unpacked arrays. This difference could explain the departure of experimental data from computational fluid dynamics flow predictions for well-packed arrays at higher pressure drops. The rotor wear led to "car-track" scars (upper and lower wear bands) with a whipped surface between the bands. Those bands may have resulted from bristle stiffening at the fence and gap plates during alternate portions of the rotor cycle. Within the bristle response range the wear surface reflected the pressure distribution effect on bristle motion. No sacrificial metallurgical data were taken. The bristles did wear, with correspondingly more wear on the ID brush configurations than on the OD configurations; the complexity in constructing the ID brush was a factor.

  13. Self-Assembling Brush Polymers Bearing Multisaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongchan; Kim, Jin Chul; Lee, Hoyeol; Song, Sungjin; Kim, Heesoo; Ree, Moonhor

    2017-06-01

    Three different series of brush polymers bearing glucosyl, maltosyl, or maltotriosyl moiety at the bristle end are successfully prepared by using cationic ring-opening polymerization and two sequential postmodification reactions. All brush polymers, except for the polymer containing 100 mol% maltotriosyl moiety, demonstrate the formation of multibilayer structure in films, always providing saccharide-enriched surface. These self-assembling features are remarkable, regarding the bulkiness of saccharide moieties and the kink in the bristle due to the triazole linker. The saccharide-enriched film surfaces reveal exceptionally high specific binding affinity to concanavalin A but suppress nonspecific binding of plasma proteins severely. Overall, the brush polymers bearing saccharide moieties of various kinds in this study are highly suitable materials for biomedical applications including biosensors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Proteomic analysis of the enterocyte brush border

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Russell E.; Benesh, Andrew E.; Mao, Suli; Tabb, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The brush border domain at the apex of intestinal epithelial cells is the primary site of nutrient absorption in the intestinal tract and the primary surface of interaction with microbes that reside in the lumen. Because the brush border is positioned at such a critical physiological interface, we set out to create a comprehensive list of the proteins that reside in this domain using shotgun mass spectrometry. The resulting proteome contains 646 proteins with diverse functions. In addition to the expected collection of nutrient processing and transport components, we also identified molecules expected to function in the regulation of actin dynamics, membrane bending, and extracellular adhesion. These results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at defining the molecular mechanisms underpinning brush border assembly and function. PMID:21330445

  15. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  16. Abrasion-Resistant Coating for Flexible Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mui, D.; Headding, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic coating increases durability and heat resistance of flexible high-temperature insulation. Coating compatible with quartz-fabric insulation allowing it to remain flexible during and after repeated exposures to temperatures of 1,800 degree F (982 degree C). Prevents fabric from becoming brittle while increasing resistance to aerodynamic abrasion and loading. Coating consists of penetrating precoat and topcoat. Major ingredients high-purity colloidal silica binder and ground silica filler, which ensure stability and compatibility with fabric at high temperatures. Both precoat and topcoat cured at room temperature.

  17. Associations between fluorosis of permanent incisors and fluoride intake from infant formula, other dietary sources and dentifrice during early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Steven M.; Broffitt, Barbara; Marshall, Teresa A.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Warren, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The authors describe associations between dental fluorosis and fluoride intakes, with an emphasis on intake from fluoride in infant formula. Methods The authors administered periodic questionnaires to parents to assess early fluoride intake sources from beverages, selected foods, dentifrice and supplements. They assessed relationships between fluorosis of the permanent maxillary incisors and fluoride intake from beverages and other sources, both for individual time points and cumulatively using area-under-the-curve (AUC) estimates. The authors determined effects associated with fluoride in reconstituted powdered infant formulas, along with risks associated with intake of fluoride from dentifrice and other sources. Results Considering only fluoride intake from age 3 to 9 months, the authors found that participants with fluorosis (97 percent of which was mild) had significantly greater cumulative fluoride intake (AUC) from reconstituted powdered infant formula, other beverages with added water or a combination of these than did those without fluorosis. For participants aged 16 to 36 months, participants with fluorosis had significantly higher fluoride intake from water by itself, dentifrice or a combination of these than did those without fluorosis. In a model combining both the 3- to 9-month and 16- to 36-months age groups, the significant variables were fluoride intake from reconstituted powder concentrate formula (by participants aged 3–9 months), other beverages with added water (also by participants aged 3–9 months) and dentifrice (by participants aged 16–36 months). Conclusions Greater fluoride intakes from reconstituted powdered formulas (when participants were aged 3–9 months) and other water-added beverages (when participants were aged 3–9 months) increased fluorosis risk as did higher dentifrice intake by participants when aged 16 to 36 months. Clinical Implications Results suggest that prevalence of mild dental fluorosis could be

  18. Characterization of Small DC Brushed and Brushless Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    8 Figure 6. Torque vs. RPM for a SS7 -1.7-1 brushed motor...9 Figure 7. Efficiency vs. motor power output for SS7 -1.7-1 brushed motor...10 Figure 8. Efficiency vs. RPM for SS7 -1.7-1 brushed motor. ........................................................10 Figure 9

  19. 75 FR 21347 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Brushes From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of a full five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on natural bristle paint brushes from China. SUMMARY... antidumping duty order on natural bristle paint brushes from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  20. Increasing operational life of brush-contact device in the turbine generator due to using lubricating molybdenum disulphide brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, A. I.; Fominykh, A. A.; Nikulin, S. V.; Prokoshev, D. K.; Legoti, A. B.; Timina, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    A way of reducing irregular current distribution in multi-brush systems of sliding current transfer with its wear reduction due to installing lubricating molybdenum disulphide brushes on slip rings to ensure a greasing nano-sized cover on the slip ring surface is proposed. The authors give the results of industrial tests estimated on the performance effectiveness of lubricating brushes on slip rings of the TBB-320-2UZ-type turbine generator. The results showed that the lubricating brushes reduce a) the wear of 6110 OM+M and EG2AF+M brushes by 1.2 and 2.1 times respectively, b) current distribution irregularity in parallel operating brushes due to stabilizing the contact arc, and c) the temperature of the electrical brush-contact device due to the friction reduction in brushes.

  1. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Indication: Only to evaluate the endometrium, and (ii) Contraindications: Pregnancy, history of uterine...

  2. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Indication: Only to evaluate the endometrium, and (ii) Contraindications: Pregnancy, history of uterine...

  3. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...) Indication: Only to evaluate the endometrium, and (ii) Contraindications: Pregnancy, history of uterine...

  4. Attraction between Opposing Planar Dipolar Polymer Brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Mahalik, J. P.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we use a field theory approach to study the effects of permanent dipoles on interpenetration and free energy changes as a function of distance between two identical planar polymer brushes. Melts (i.e., solvent-free) and solvated brushes made up of polymers grafted on nonadsorbing substrates are studied. In particular, the weak coupling limit of the dipolar interactions is considered, which leads to concentration-dependent pairwise interactions, and the effects of orientational order are neglected. It is predicted that a gradual increase in the dipole moment of the polymer segments can lead to attractive interactions between the brushes at intermediatemore » separation distances. Finally, because classical theory of polymer brushes based on the strong stretching limit (SSL) and the standard self-consistent field theory (SCFT) simulations using the Flory’s χ parameter always predicts repulsive interactions at all separations, our work highlights the importance of dipolar interactions in tailoring and accurately predicting forces between polar polymeric interfaces in contact with each other.« less

  5. Soil slippage increased by brush conversion

    Treesearch

    Edward S. Corbett; Raymond M. Rice

    1966-01-01

    After 8 fire burned the San Dimas Experimental Forest, near Glendora Calif., in 1960, about 350 acres of brushland were converted to grass. Six years later, the frequency and extent of soil slips - a form of gravitational mass movement - on this acreage was compared with those on comparable sites where brush cover was recovering naturally after the fire. Both the area...

  6. Chinese Brush Calligraphy Character Retrieval and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Yueting; Zhang, Xiafen; Lu, Weiming; Wu, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Chinese brush calligraphy is a valuable civilization legacy and a high art of scholarship. It is still popular in Chinese banners, newspaper mastheads, university names, and celebration gifts. There are Web sites that try to help people enjoy and learn Chinese calligraphy. However, there lacks advanced services such as content-based retrieval or…

  7. 21 CFR 886.1090 - Haidinger brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haidinger brush. 886.1090 Section 886.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... viewed by the patient through a Nicol prism and intended to evaluate visual function. It may include a...

  8. Effect of power toothbrushing on simulated wear of dental cement margins.

    PubMed

    Black, Marsha A; Bayne, Stephen C; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2007-01-01

    Power toothbrushes (PTBs), in combination with abrasive dentifrices, may encourage wear of dental cements at crown margins. The objective of this in vitro simulation was to control the clinical variables associated with PTB use and measure the potential side effects of PTBs with mild and abrasive dentifrices. Four PTBs ( Braun-Oral-B-Professional Care at 150 g brushing force, Sonicare-Elite at 90 g, Colgate-Actibrush at 200 g and Crest-Spinbrush-Pro at 250 g) and 2 dentifrices mixed 1:1 with tap water (Mild= Colgate-Total, Colgate-Palmolive; Abrasive= Close-up, Chesebrough-Ponds) versus tap water alone (control) were used to abrade 2 cements (Fleck's Mizzy Zinc Phosphate [ZP]; 3M-ESPE Unicem universal cement [UC]) using cement-filled slots (160 m wide) cut into wear-resistant ceramic blocks. A custom fixture controlled PTB/block alignment, PTB loads, and other testing variables. Wear was measured (3 profilometer traces/slot, 5 slots/block/group, baseline to 5-year differences) and analyzed (3-way ANOVA, p < or = 0.05, Bonferroni). Wear for ZP was much greater than UC (p<0.05) for all 4 PTBs and both dentifrices. Brushing with water showed no effects (p<0.05). Cement-PTB-dentifrice interactions did occur. Only minor differences occurred among PTBs. Pooled 5y-wear levels for ZP for both dentifrices approximately 21 microm /5y) were similar to values for current-day posterior composite materials. Combinations of PTBs with mild and abrasive dentifrices produced significant wear with ZP but not UC; thus, resin-composite cements seem to represent a better choice for wear resistance.

  9. A double blind randomised controlled clinical trial comparing a novel anti-stain and calculus reducing dentifrice with a standard fluoride dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Adrian K; Marlow, Ian; Rawlinson, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    This clinical trial tested the anti-stain efficacy at 3 and 6 months of a novel, sodium polyaspartate-containing, anti-stain dentifrice. In addition, the efficacy of the new dentifrice in controlling gingival inflammation and inhibition of calculus deposition was tested. Participants were recruited to this double blind randomised control clinical trial, and allocated to either test or control groups. The presence of stain and calculus were entry criteria. Measurements of stain, calculus and gingival inflammation were recorded using the Shaw and Murray Stain score, Volpe-Manhold Calculus score and the Modified Gingival Index respectively. Measurements were made at baseline, prior to the removal of stain and calculus, and after 3 and 6 months. Missing data were imputed by and the outcomes were analysed using univariate analysis. At three months, toothpaste containing sodium polyaspartate was better (difference of mean 1.13 with SEM 0.57) than control for the control of dental stain (p<0.05). Stain scores also showed a trend in favour of the test product (difference of mean 1.03 with SEM 0.78) at six months (p>0.05). There was no difference between toothpastes with respect to calculus deposition or gingival inflammation. Toothpaste containing sodium polyaspartate was more effective than a control toothpaste at preventing deposition of dental stain for 3 months after professional tooth cleaning but showed no significant effect at 6 months. Sodium polyaspartate toothpaste was more effective than a control toothpaste at preventing dental stain formation and maybe helpful in controlling staining between episodes of scaling and polishing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomized clinical study of alterations in the color and surface roughness of dental enamel brushed with whitening toothpaste.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Rego Roselino, Lourenço; Tirapelli, Camila; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2018-03-30

    This clinical study evaluated the influence of whitening toothpaste on color and surface roughness of dental enamel. Initially, the abrasiveness of the toothpastes used (Sorriso Dentes Brancos [SDB]; Colgate Luminous White and Close up White Now) was tested on 30 (n = 10) plexiglass acrylic plates that were submitted to mechanical tooth brushing totalizing 29,200 cycles. Subsequently, 30 participants were selected, and received a toothbrush and nonwhitening toothpaste (SDB). The participants used these products for 7 days and initial color readouts (Spectrophotometer) and surface roughness of one maxillary central incisors was performed after this period of time. For surface roughness readouts, one replica of the maxillary central incisor was obtained by a polyvinyl siloxane impression material (Express) and polyurethane resin. After baseline measurements, participants were separated into three groups (n = 10), according to the toothpaste used. The participants returned after 7, 30, and 90 days when new color readouts and surface roughness were recorded. The measured values were statistically analyzed (2-way-ANOVA, repeated measures, Tukey, P < .05). Whitening toothpastes did not promote significant (P > .05) color alteration and nor increased the surface roughness of the dental enamel in brushing time of the study. The abrasiveness of whitening toothpaste and the brushing trial period did not affect the surface roughness of dental enamel. However, color changes observed on enamel were above the perceptibility and acceptability thresholds reported in the literature. The over-the-counter toothpastes tested had an effect on dental enamel color above the perceptibility and acceptability thresholds but did not change the surface roughness of the teeth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Experimental Rock-on-Rock Abrasive Wear Under Aqueous Conditions: its Role in Subglacial Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, E. H.; Lee, A. G.

    2003-12-01

    We have determined experimentally the rate of abrasive wear of rock on rock for a range of rock types as a function of normal stress and shear displacement. Unlike abrasive wear in fault zones, where wear products accumulate as a thickening gouge zone, in our experiments wear particles were removed by flowing water. The experiments are thus directly pertinent to one of the most important processes in subglacial erosion, and to some extent in river incision. Wear was produced between rotating discs machined from rock samples and measured from the progressive approach of the disc axes towards each other under various levels of normal load. Shear displacements of several km were produced. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the worn rock surfaces, and particle size distributions in wear products were characterized using a laser particle size analyzer. Rock types studied were sandstones of various porosities and cement characteristics, schists and a granite. In all cases abrasion rate decreased logarithmically with displacement by up to 2 orders of magnitude until a steady state was approached, but only after at least 1 km displacement. The more porous, less-well cemented rocks wore fastest. Amount of abrasion could be characterized quantitatively using an exponentially decaying plus a steady-state term. Wear rate increased non-linearly with normal contact stress, apparently to an asymptote defined by the unconfined compressive strength. Microstructural study showed that the well-cemented and/or lowest porosity rocks wore by progressive abrasion of grains without plucking, whereas whole grains were plucked out of weakly-cemented and/or more porous rocks. This difference in behavior was reflected in wear-product particle size distributions. Where whole-grain plucking was possible, wear products were dominated by particles of the original grain size rather than finer rock flour. Comparison of our results to glacier basal abrasive wear estimated

  12. Nonlinearity in the rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmayer, Mark; Dultz, Wolfgang; Frins, Erna; Zhan, Qiwen; Tierney, Dennis; Schmitzer, Heidrun

    2007-10-01

    Haidinger's brushes are an entoptic effect of the human visual system that enables us to detect polarized light. However, individual perceptions of Haidinger's brushes can vary significantly. We find that the birefringence of the cornea influences the rotational motion and the contrast of Haidinger's brushes and may offer an explanation for individual differences. We have devised an experimental setup to simulate various phase shifts of the cornea and found a switching effect in the rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes. In addition, age related macular degeneration reduces the polarization effect of the macula and thus also leads to changes in the brush pattern.

  13. Study on brush of moving electrode type electrostatic precipitator (MEEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haibao; He, Yuzhong; Yao, Yuping

    2018-02-01

    MEEP was an efficient particle removal technology for coal plant and sintering machine. As the stability of brush in MEEP was relatively poor, the experiments was designed for the brush which was made by 0Cr18Ni9 stainless steel wire to find the failure mode and cause. Combining the results of the experiments, the failure models of brushes were different under different conditions and the brushes were suitable for being used in the condition of small diameter particles. And the life span of brushes can be more than 6 years.

  14. Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain

    DOEpatents

    Plovnick, Ross; Celikkaya, Ahmet; Blake, Rodger D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.

  15. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  18. Evaluation of abrasion resistance of pipe and pipe lining materials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-09-01

    This project summarizes an evaluation of pipe material resistance to abrasion over a 5-year period (2001-2006) at a site known to be abrasive. : The key focus of the project was to gather more information to compare against existing guidance to desig...

  19. Application of tooth brushing behavior to active rest.

    PubMed

    Sadachi, Hidetoshi; Murakami, Yoshinori; Tonomura, Manabu; Yada, Yukihiro; Simoyama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of tooth brushing with toothpaste as active rest using the flicker value as a physiological parameter and a subjective questionnaire as a psychological parameter. Seventeen healthy, right-handed subjects (12 males and 5 females) aged 22.5 +/- 1.5 yr (mean +/- standard deviation) were randomly divided into tooth brushing with toothpaste (N=9) and non-tooth brushing groups (N=8). The subjects performed a serial calculation task for 20 min using personal computers. Subsequently, the tooth brushing group brushed their teeth, and the flicker value and mood were compared before and after the tooth brushing. The flicker value significantly increased in the tooth brushing group compared with the non-tooth brushing group (p<0.05). Concerning the mood, in the tooth brushing group, the incidence of a "feeling of being refreshed" significantly increased (p<0.05), that of "concentration power" or a "feeling of clear-headedness" tended to increase (p<0.1), and that of "lassitude" or "sleepiness" significantly decreased (p<0.01). Somatosensory stimulation and intraoral tactile stimulation during tooth brushing activated cerebral activity, producing refreshing effects. These results suggest the applicability of tooth brushing to active rest.

  20. Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Christine M; Hendricks, Kate; Bower, William A; Shadomy, Sean V; Hupert, Nathaniel

    2017-05-01

    During the First World War, anthrax cases in the United States and England increased greatly and seemed to be associated with use of new shaving brushes. Further investigation revealed that the source material and origin of shaving brushes had changed during the war. Cheap brushes of imported horsehair were being made to look like the preferred badger-hair brushes. Unfortunately, some of these brushes were not effectively disinfected and brought with them a nasty stowaway: Bacillus anthracis. A review of outbreak summaries, surveillance data, and case reports indicated that these cases originated from the use of ineffectively disinfected animal-hair shaving brushes. This historical information is relevant to current public health practice because renewed interest in vintage and animal-hair shaving brushes has been seen in popular culture. This information should help healthcare providers and public health officials answer questions on this topic.

  1. Lateral Structure Formation in Polyelectrolyte Brushes Induced by Multivalent Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brettmann, Blair; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2017-01-13

    We provide a theoretical model for the collapse of polyelectrolyte brushes in the presence of multivalent ions, focusing on the formation of lateral inhomogeneties in the collapsed state. Polyelectrolyte brushes are important in a variety of applications, including stabilizing colloidal particles and lubricating surfaces. Many uses rely on the extension of the densely grafted polymer chains from the surface in the extended brush morphology. In the presence Extended Brush of multivalent ions, brushes are significantly shorter than in monovalent ionic solutions, which greatly affects their properties. We base our theoretical analysis on an analogous collapse of polyelectrolyte brushes in amore » poor solvent, providing an energy balance representation for pinned micelles and cylindrical bundles. The equilibrium brush heights predicted for these structures are of a similar magnitude to those measured experimentally. The formation of lateral structures can open new avenues for stimuli-responsive applications that rely on nanoscale pattern formation on surfaces.« less

  2. Tooth wear: attrition, erosion, and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Andreana, Sebastiano; Bush, Peter J; Cohen, Robert E

    2003-06-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification acts through a distinct process that is associated with unique clinical characteristics. Accurate prevalence data for each classification are not available since indices do not necessarily measure one specific etiology, or the study populations may be too diverse in age and characteristics. The treatment of teeth in each classification will depend on identifying the factors associated with each etiology. Some cases may require specific restorative procedures, while others will not require treatment. A review of the literature points to the interaction of the three entities in the initiation and progression of lesions that may act synchronously or sequentially, synergistically or additively, or in conjunction with other entities to mask the true nature of tooth wear, which appears to be multifactorial.

  3. Casing window milling with abrasive fluid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Vestavik, O.M.; Fidtje, T.H.; Faure, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for through tubing re-entry drilling of multilateral wells has a large potential for increasing hydrocarbon production and total recovery. One of the bottle-necks of this technology is initiation of the side-track by milling a window in the casing downhole. A new approach to this problem has been investigated in a joint industry project. An experimental set-up has been built for milling a 4 inch window in a 7 inch steel casing at surface in the laboratory. A specially designed bit developed at RIF using abrasive jet cutting technology has been used for the window milling. The bit has anmore » abrasive jet beam which is always directed in the desired side-track direction, even if the bit is rotating uniformly. The bit performs the milling with a combined mechanical and hydraulic jet action. The method has been successfully demonstrated. The experiments has shown that the window milling can be performed with very low WOB and torque, and that only small side forces are required to perform the operation. Casing milling has been performed without a whipstock, a cement plug has been the only support for the tool. The tests indicate that milling operations can be performed more efficiently with less time and costs than what is required with conventional techniques. However, the method still needs some development of the downhole motor for coiled tubing applications. The method can be used both for milling and drilling giving the advantage of improved rate of penetration, improved bit life and increased horizontal reach. The method is planned to be demonstrated downhole in the near future.« less

  4. The influence of a dentifrice containing a zinc salt and a nonionic antimicrobial agent on the maintenance of gingival health.

    PubMed

    Svatun, B; Saxton, C A; van der Ouderaa, F; Rölla, G

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to test the concept that a dentifrice containing zinc citrate and Triclosan could maintain gingival health. The gingival health of 101 young predominately female student nurses in Oslo was brought to a high level by professional cleaning supported by oral hygiene instruction. The criterion of gingival health was less than or equal to 5 elicited bleeding sites from a full mouth assessment. The mean bleeding value attained for the whole group was 3.5. 2 balanced groups were formed, based on the initial number of elicited bleeding sites and plaque values. One group used the test dentifrice and the other group the placebo for 6 months, with an intermediate assessment after 3 months. The placebo group failed to maintain the standard of oral hygiene and gingival health that had been achieved by professional care. In contrast, the group using the test dentifrice for 6 months exhibited similar levels of plaque and gingival health to that observed at baseline following oral hygiene instruction. After 6 months, less than 7% of the subjects in the placebo group possessed healthy gingivae in contrast to 60% of the test group. Thus a dentifrice containing a zinc salt and nonionic germicide had successfully maintained gingival health in a group of young adults.

  5. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  6. Clinical and microbiologic effects of commercially available dentifrice containing aloe vera: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Agarwal, Esha; Naik, Savitha B

    2012-06-01

    Certain plants used in folk medicine serve as a source of therapeutic agents that have antimicrobial and other multipotential effects. This prospective, randomized, placebo, and positively controlled clinical trial was designed to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of a commercially available dentifrice containing aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation in patients with gingivitis. Ninety patients diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided into three groups: group 1, placebo toothpaste; group 2, toothpaste containing aloe vera; and group 3, toothpaste with polymer and fluoride containing triclosan. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using a gingival index, plaque was assessed using a modification of the Quigley-Hein index, and microbiologic counts were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. A subjective evaluation was also undertaken by questionnaire. Toothpaste containing aloe vera showed significant improvement in gingival and plaque index scores as well as microbiologic counts compared with placebo dentifrice. These improvements were comparable to those achieved with toothpaste containing triclosan. Toothpaste containing aloe vera may be a useful herbal formulation for chemical plaque control agents and improvement in plaque and gingival status.

  7. Uses of the Westrup brush machine

    Treesearch

    Jill Barbour

    2002-01-01

    The Westrup brush machine can be used as the first step in the conditioning process of seeds. Even though there are various sizes of the machine, only the laboratory model (LA-H) is described. The machine is designed to separate seed from pods or flowers, dewing tree seed, remove appendages or hairs from seed, split twin seed, de-lint cotton seed, scarify hard coated...

  8. Characterization of fine abrasive particles for optical fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkenbusch, Paul D.; Zhou, Y. Y.; Takahashi, Toshio; Quesnel, David J.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    1995-08-01

    Material removal during fine grinding operations is accomplished primarily by the action of individual abrasive particles on the glass surface. The mechanical properties of the abrasive are therefore important. Unfortunately it is difficult to directly measure the mechanical response of abrasives once they reach the scale of approximately 10 microns. As a result mechanical properties of fine abrasives are sometimes characterized in terms of an empirical `friability', based on the response of the abrasive to crushing by a metal ball in a vial. In this paper we report on modeling/experiments designed to more precisely quantify the mechanical properties of fine abrasives and ultimately to relate them to the conditions experienced by bound particles during grinding. Experiments have been performed on various types and sizes of diamond abrasives. The response of the particles is a strong function of the loading conditions and can be tracked by changing the testing parameters. Diamond size is also found to play a critical role, with finer diamonds less susceptible to fracture. A micromechanical model from the literature is employed estimate the forces likely to be seen during testing. We are also developing dynamic models to better predict the forces experienced during `friability' testing as a function of the testing parameters.

  9. Structure of Polyelectrolyte Brushes in the Presence of Multivalent Counterions

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Jing; Mao, Jun; Yuan, Guangcui; ...

    2016-07-20

    Polyelectrolyte brushes are of great importance to a wide range of fields, ranging from colloidal stabilization to responsive and tunable materials to lubrication. Here, we synthesized high-density polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) brushes using surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and performed neutron reflectivity (NR) and surface force measurements using a surface forces apparatus (SFA) to investigate the effect of monovalent Na +, divalent Ca 2+, Mg 2+, and Ba 2+, and trivalent Y 3+ counterions on the structure of the PSS brushes. NR and SFA results demonstrate that in monovalent salt solution the behavior of the PSS brushes agrees with scaling theorymore » well, exhibiting two distinct regimes: the osmotic and salted brush regimes. Introducing trivalent Y 3+ cations causes an abrupt shrinkage of the PSS brush due to the uptake of Y 3+ counterions. The uptake of Y 3+ counterions and shrinkage of the brush are reversible upon increasing the concentration of monovalent salt. Divalent cations, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and Ba 2+, while all significantly affecting the structure of PSS brushes, show strong ion specific effects that are related to the specific interactions between the divalent cations and the sulfonate groups. Our results demonstrate that the presence of multivalent counterions, even at relatively low concentrations, can strongly affect the structure of polyelectrolyte brushes. Finally, the results also highlight the importance of ion specificity to the structure of polyelectrolyte brushes in solution.« less

  10. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  11. Effect of a variety of Chinese herbs and an herb-containing dentifrice on volatile sulfur compounds associated with halitosis: An in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Yu; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhu-Ting

    2010-04-01

    The principal components of halitosis are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethylsulfide or compounds such as butyric acid, propionic acid, putrescine, and cadaverine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Chinese herbs on VSCs in vitro. Saliva samples from volunteers were used as the source for the evaluation of bacterial activity and VSC inhibition. Extracted substances from Chinese herbs were identified by VSC inhibition tests with a Halimeter and microbial sensitivity testing. The effectiveness on halitosis was compared between a dentifrice containing one of the effective Chinese herbs (ie, chrysanthemum flower [Chrysanthemum morifolium flos]), 4 commercially available antihalitosis dentifrices, and a positive control that received no treatment. Ten volunteers provided saliva samples for VSC testing. Of the 40 herbs tested, 14 extracts had percent inhibition rates of VSCs >50%. Ten herbs showed greatest effect against all culturable microorganisms with bacterial inhibition >70%. There was a weak positive correlation between bacteriostasis and the anti-VSC activity of the herbs with a correlation coefficient of 0.2579 (Pearson). The mean (SD) values of the VSC testing were as follows: dentifrice containing chrysanthemum flower, 55.91 (8.16) ppb; Crest Tea Refreshing Dentifrice®, 48.39 (7.48) ppb (P = NS); Cortex Phellodendri Dentifrice®, 139.90 (14.70) ppb (P < 0.01); Colgate Total Plus Whitening®, 120.94 (15.58) ppb (P < 0.01); Zhong Hua Chinese Herbs Dentifrice®, 136.96 (13.06) ppb (P < 0.01); and positive control, 312.38 (28.58) ppb (P < 0.01). Of 40 herbs tested, 14 Chinese herbs were found to be effective for VSC inhibition. A dentifrice containing chrysanthemum flower reduced the formation of VSC in vitro, showing a significantly greater effect than the control group and 3 of 4 dentifrices already on the market.

  12. Effect of a variety of Chinese herbs and an herb-containing dentifrice on volatile sulfur compounds associated with halitosis: An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-yu; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhu-ting

    2010-01-01

    Background: The principal components of halitosis are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethylsulfide or compounds such as butyric acid, propionic acid, putrescine, and cadaverine. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Chinese herbs on VSCs in vitro. Methods: Saliva samples from volunteers were used as the source for the evaluation of bacterial activity and VSC inhibition. Extracted substances from Chinese herbs were identified by VSC inhibition tests with a Halimeter and microbial sensitivity testing. The effectiveness on halitosis was compared between a dentifrice containing one of the effective Chinese herbs (ie, chrysanthemum flower [Chrysanthemum morifolium flos]), 4 commercially available antihalitosis dentifrices, and a positive control that received no treatment. Results: Ten volunteers provided saliva samples for VSC testing. Of the 40 herbs tested, 14 extracts had percent inhibition rates of VSCs >50%. Ten herbs showed greatest effect against all culturable microorganisms with bacterial inhibition >70%. There was a weak positive correlation between bacteriostasis and the anti-VSC activity of the herbs with a correlation coefficient of 0.2579 (Pearson). The mean (SD) values of the VSC testing were as follows: dentifrice containing chrysanthemum flower, 55.91 (8.16) ppb; Crest Tea Refreshing Dentifrice®, 48.39 (7.48) ppb (P = NS); Cortex Phellodendri Dentifrice®, 139.90 (14.70) ppb (P < 0.01); Colgate Total Plus Whitening®, 120.94 (15.58) ppb (P < 0.01); Zhong Hua Chinese Herbs Dentifrice®, 136.96 (13.06) ppb (P < 0.01); and positive control, 312.38 (28.58) ppb (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Of 40 herbs tested, 14 Chinese herbs were found to be effective for VSC inhibition. A dentifrice containing chrysanthemum flower reduced the formation of VSC in vitro, showing a significantly greater effect than the control group and 3 of 4 dentifrices already on the market. PMID:24683259

  13. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  14. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  15. [Clinical relevance of tooth brushing in relation to dental caries].

    PubMed

    Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Pombo-Sánchez, Antonio; Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan; Novio-Mallón, Silvia; Rivas-Mundiña, Berta; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia

    2010-07-01

    To determine the impact and clinical relevance of tooth brushing on oral health. Prevalence study. Fontiñas Health Centre. (Santiago de Compostela, Spain). Prevalence study (n=281 children aged 5-14 years. Odontological examination according to WHO methodology, to determine the frequency of tooth brushing, frequency of sweet consumption and their impact on the prevalence of caries. Logistic regression and estimation of the relative prevalence difference (RPD) and the Number Needed to Treat in order to prevent one additional bad outcome (NNT). The children who never brush their teeth have a 40% (95% CI: 24.3%-57.8%) of early caries, while those who brush their teeth several times a day have 15.3% (95% CI: 9.4%-23.7%). An association between not brushing the teeth and caries in primary teeth (OR=2.3; 95% CI:1.05-5.3) was observed after adjusting for age, sweet consumption and visits to the dentist. The same occurred with final teeth (OR=3.9; 95% CI:1.4-10.3). The RPD was 62%(95% CI: 30%-79%), meaning that prevalence of caries is 62% lower in children who brush their teeth several times a day as compared to those who never brush their teeth. The NNT is 4 (95% CI: 2.4-14), so for every 4 children who brush their teeth several times a day, there is one less case of caries, compared to those who never brush their teeth. There is a dose-response relationship between prevalence of caries and brushing frequency. The same effect was observed with definitive caries: RPD=55% (95% CI:16%-76%), NNT=5 (95% CI:2.8-53.3). Tooth brushing is related to oral health, with a major clinical impact. The positive effect of tooth brushing was superior to that of a correct diet. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Interaction between attrition,abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Shellis, R P

    2006-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence seems insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear through formation of pellicle and by remineralisation but cannot prevent it.

  18. A Review on Parametric Analysis of Magnetic Abrasive Machining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattri, Krishna; Choudhary, Gulshan; Bhuyan, B. K.; Selokar, Ashish

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic abrasive machining (MAM) process is a highly developed unconventional machining process. It is frequently used in manufacturing industries for nanometer range surface finishing of workpiece with the help of Magnetic abrasive particles (MAPs) and magnetic force applied in the machining zone. It is precise and faster than conventional methods and able to produce defect free finished components. This paper provides a comprehensive review on the recent advancement of MAM process carried out by different researcher till date. The effect of different input parameters such as rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage, magnetic flux density, abrasive particles size and working gap on the performances of Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) have been discussed. On the basis of review, it is observed that the rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage and mesh size of abrasive particles have significant impact on MAM process.

  19. Method of protecting surfaces from abrasion and abrasion resistant articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-06-09

    Surfaces of fabricated structures are protected from damage by impacting particulates by a coating of hard material formed as a mass of thin flexible filaments having root ends secured to the surface and free portions which can flex and overlap to form a resilient cushioning mat which resembles hair or fur. The filamentary coating covers the underlying surface with hard abrasion resistance material while also being compliant and capable of local accommodation to particle impacts. The coating can also function as thermal and/or acoustical insulation and has a friction reducing effect. 11 figs.

  20. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-05-01

    A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals. Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 surveyed participants to examine whether the perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration could be predicted from the ranking of each person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 2 tested whether manipulating the rank position of the tooth-brushing duration influenced participant-perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 used a longitudinal intervention method to examine whether messages relating to the rank positions of tooth-brushing durations causally influenced the self-report tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 demonstrates that perceptions of the health benefits from tooth-brushing duration are predicted by the perceptions of how that behaviour ranks in comparison to other people's behaviour. Study 2 demonstrates that the perceptions of the health benefits of tooth-brushing duration can be manipulated experimentally by changing the ranked position of a person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 experimentally demonstrates the possibility of increasing the length of time for which individuals clean their teeth by focusing on how they rank among their peers in terms of tooth-brushing duration. The effectiveness of interventions using social-ranking methods relative to those that emphasize comparisons made against group averages or normative guidelines are discussed. What is already known on this subject? Individual make judgements based on social rank information. Social rank information has been shown to influence positive health behaviours such as exercise

  1. Surface Abrasive Torsion for Improved Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ji Hyun; Baek, Seung Mi; Lee, Seok Gyu; Yoon, Jae Ik; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-05-01

    A novel process of discrete surface abrasion during simple torsion (ST), named "surface abrasive torsion (SAT)," is proposed to overcome the limitation of ST, i.e., insufficient strain for severe plastic deformation (SPD) due to cracks initiated on the surface, by removing the roughened surface region. The effect of SAT on delayed crack initiation was explained using finite element simulations. Larger shear deformation applicable to the specimen in SAT than ST was demonstrated experimentally.

  2. Antifouling Properties of Fluoropolymer Brushes toward Organic Polymers: The Influence of Composition, Thickness, Brush Architecture, and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhua; Zuilhof, Han

    2016-07-05

    Fluoropolymer brushes are widely used to prevent nonspecific adsorption of commercial polymeric or biological materials due to their strongly hydrophobic character. Herein, a series of fluoropolymer brushes with different compositions, thicknesses and molecular architectures was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Subsequently, the antifouling properties of these fluoropolymer brushes against organic polymers were studied in detail using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements and polystyrene as a representative fouling polymer. Among all of the molecular architectures studied, homopolymerized methacrylate-based fluoropolymer brushes (PMAF17) show the best antifouling properties. Annealing the fluoropolymer brushes improves the antifouling property dramatically due to the reregulated surface composition. These fluoropolymer brushes can be combined with, e.g., micro- and nanostructuring and other advanced materials properties to yield even better long-term antifouling behavior under harsh environments.

  3. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag.

    PubMed

    Kura, Bhaskar; Kambham, Kalpalatha; Sangameswaran, Sivaramakrishnan; Potana, Sandhya

    2006-08-01

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions.

  4. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast processmore » conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.« less

  5. Polymer absorption in dense polymer brushes vs. polymer adsorption on the brush-solvent interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of a dense brush of flexible polymers (of type A) interacting with a long flexible macromolecule (of type B) are presented, considering the case of an attractive AB interaction, while effective interactions between AA and BB pairs of monomers are repulsive. Varying the strength \\varepsilon_{AB} of the attraction between unlike monomers, an adsorption transition at some critical value \\varepsilon^c_{AB} is found, where the B-chain is bound to the brush-solvent interface, similar to the adsorption on a planar solid substrate. However, when \\varepsilon_{AB} is much higher than \\varepsilon^c_{AB} , the long macromolecule is gradually “sucked in” the brush, developing many pieces that are locally stretched in the z-direction perpendicular to the substrate, in order to fit between the brush chains. The resulting hairpin-like structures of the absorbed chain shows up via oscillatory decay of the bond vector autocorrelation function. Chain relaxation is only possible via reptation.

  6. Brush head composition, wear profile, and cleaning efficacy: an assessment of three electric brush heads using in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Eva; Meyners, Michael; Markgraf, Dirk; Stoerkel, Ulrich; von Koppenfels, Roxana; Adam, Ralf; Soukup, Martin; Wehrbein, Heinrich; Erbe, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate a current store brand (SB) brush head for composition/physical characteristics, Wear Index (WI), and cleaning efficacy versus the previous SB brush head refill design (SB control) and the Oral-B Precision Clean brush head (positive control, PC). This research consisted of three parts: 1) Analytical analysis using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry to evaluate the chemical composition of the current SB brush head bristles relative to the SB control. In addition, physical parameters such as bristle count and diameter were determined. 2) Wear Index (WI) investigation to determine the Wear Index scores of in vitro-aged brush heads at four weeks (one month) and 13 weeks (three months) by a trained investigator. To "age" the brush heads, a robot system was used as a new alternative in vitro method to simulate aging by consumer use. 3) Robot testing to determine the cleaning performance of in vitro-aged brush heads, comparing one month-aged current SB brush heads with the SB control (one and three months-aged) and the PC brush heads (three months-aged) in a standardized fashion. 1) FT-IR analysis revealed that the chemical composition of the current and control SB refill brush heads is identical. In terms of physical parameters, the current SB brush head has 12% more bristles and a slightly oval brush head compared to the round brush head of the SB control. 2) Wear Index analysis showed there was no difference in the one month-aged current SB brush head versus the one month-aged SB control (1.67 vs. 1.50, p = 0.65) or versus the three months-aged PC brush head (1.67 vs. 1.50, p = 0.65). The one month-aged current SB brush head demonstrated statistically significantly less wear than the three months-aged SB control (1.67 vs. 2.67, p = 0.01). 3) Analysis of cleaning efficacy shows that the one month-aged current SB brush head had improved cleaning performance over the one month-aged SB control brush head (p < 0

  7. Frequency of Fluoride Dentifrice Use and Caries Lesions Inhibition and Repair.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Diego Figueiredo; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    The clinical relevance of the frequency of fluoride dentifrice (FD) use on enamel caries is based on evidence. However, the relative effect of FD on reduction of demineralization or enhancement of remineralization is unknown and the effect of frequency on root dentine caries has not been explored. The aim of this double-blind, crossover, in situ study, which was conducted in 4 phases of 14 days each, was to evaluate the relationship between the frequency of FD use and enamel and root dentine de- and remineralization. Eighteen volunteers wore palatal appliances containing enamel and root dentine slabs, either sound or carious. Biofilm accumulation on the slab surface was allowed, and 20% sucrose solution was dripped 3 or 8 times per day on the carious and sound slabs, respectively. Volunteers used FD (1,100 μg F/g) in the frequencies 0 (fluoride-placebo dentifrice), 1, 2 and 3 times per day. The demineralization and remineralization that occurred in sound or carious slabs was estimated by the percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) or recovery (%SHR). Loosely (CaF2) and firmly (FAp) bound fluoride concentrations were also determined. The relationship between the variables was analyzed by linear regression. The %SHL, CaF2 and FAp concentrations were a function of the frequency of FD use for enamel and dentine, but the %SHR was a function of the frequency of FD use only for enamel (p < 0.05). The results suggest that demineralization in enamel and root dentine is reduced in proportion to the frequency of FD use, but for remineralization the effect of the frequency of FD use was relevant only to enamel. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Voltage-induced swelling and deswelling of weak polybase brushes.

    PubMed

    Weir, Michael P; Heriot, Sasha Y; Martin, Simon J; Parnell, Andrew J; Holt, Stephen A; Webster, John R P; Jones, Richard A L

    2011-09-06

    We have investigated a novel method of remotely switching the conformation of a weak polybase brush using an applied voltage. Surface-grafted polyelectrolyte brushes exhibit rich responsive behavior and show great promise as "smart surfaces", but existing switching methods involve physically or chemically changing the solution in contact with the brush. In this study, high grafting density poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes were grown from silicon surfaces using atom transfer radical polymerization. Optical ellipsometry and neutron reflectivity were used to measure changes in the profiles of the brushes in response to DC voltages applied between the brush substrate and a parallel electrode some distance away in the surrounding liquid (water or D(2)O). Positive voltages were shown to cause swelling, while negative voltages in some cases caused deswelling. Neutron reflectometry experiments were carried out on the INTER reflectometer (ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) allowing time-resolved measurements of polymer brush structure. The PDMAEMA brushes were shown to have a polymer volume fraction profile described by a Gaussian-terminated parabola both in the equilibrium and in the partially swollen states. At very high positive voltages (in this study, positive bias means positive voltage to the brush-bearing substrate), the brush chains were shown to be stretched to an extent comparable to their contour length, before being physically removed from the interface. Voltage-induced swelling was shown to exhibit a wider range of brush swelling states in comparison to pH switching, with the additional advantages that the stimulus is remotely controlled and may be fully automated. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Effect of Frequency of Brushing Teeth on Plaque and Calculus Accumulation, and Gingivitis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Colin; Serfilippi, Laurie; Barnvos, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of brushing the teeth of beagle dogs in a randomized, controlled, blinded study design using a clearly-defined brushing technique was evaluated for 4 brushing frequencies: brushing daily, brushing every other day, brushing weekly and brushing every other week, compared with no brushing in a control group of dogs. All dogs were fed a standard dry kibble diet during the study. Standard plaque, calculus, and gingivitis indices were used to score the teeth. A 'clean tooth' model was used. No gingival or non-gingival lacerations or other signs of injury to oral tissues were found at the end of the 28 day trial period. Brushing more frequently had greater effectiveness in retarding accumulation of plaque and calculus, and reducing the severity of pre-existing gingivitis. Brushing daily or every other day produced statistically significant improved results compared with brushing weekly or every other week. Based on the results of this study, daily brushing is recommended.

  10. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  11. Titanium surface topography after brushing with fluoride and fluoride-free toothpaste simulating 10 years of use.

    PubMed

    Fais, Laiza M G; Fernandes-Filho, Romeu B; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Vaz, Luis G; Adabo, Gelson L

    2012-04-01

    ) does not affect titanium per se; their use during brushing affects titanium topography and roughness. The associated effects of toothpaste abrasives and fluorides seem to increase roughness on titanium brushed surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tribological properties of hydrophilic polymer brushes under wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Takahara, Atsushi

    2010-08-01

    This article demonstrates a water-lubrication system using high-density hydrophilic polymer brushes consisting of 2,3-dehydroxypropyl methacrylate (DHMA), vinyl alcohol, oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTAC), 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMK), and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) prepared by surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization. Macroscopic frictional properties of brush surfaces were characterized by sliding a glass ball probe in water using a ball-on-plate type tribotester under the load of 0.1-0.49 N at the sliding velocity of 10(-5)-10(-1) m s(-1) at 298 K. A poly(DHMA) brush showed a relatively larger friction coefficient in water, whereas the polyelectrolyte brushes, such as poly(SPMK) and poly(MPC), revealed significantly low friction coefficients below 0.02 in water and in humid air conditions. A drastic reduction in the friction coefficient of polyelectrolyte brushes in aqueous solution was observed at around 10(-3)-10(-2) m s(-1) owing to the hydrodynamic lubrication effect, however, an increase in salt concentration in the aqueous solution led to the increase in the friction coefficients of poly(MTAC) and poly(SPMK) brushes. The poly(SPMK) brush showed a stable and low friction coefficient in water even after sliding over 450 friction cycles, indicating a good wear resistance of the brush film. Copyright 2010 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Using goats to control brush regrowth on fuelbreaks

    Treesearch

    Lisle R. Green; Leonard A. Newell

    1982-01-01

    On fuelbreaks, herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling brush regrowth. Vegetation of low volume and low growth is maintained on these wide strips as an aid to firefighting safety. Goats are a promising alternative to herbicides, and may be the best tool available for controlling brush regrowth on fuelbreaks. They eat a wider variety of plants, and more...

  14. The Effects of a Brushing Procedure on Stereotypical Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tonya N.; Durand, Shannon; Chan, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of a brushing protocol on stereotyped behavior of a young boy with autism. First, a functional analysis was conducted which showed that the participant's stereotypy was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Next, the Wilbarger Protocol, a brushing intervention, was implemented. An ABA design was implemented…

  15. Surface friction of hydrogels with well-defined polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Ohsedo, Yutaka; Takashina, Rikiya; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    2004-08-03

    Hydrogels of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) with well-defined polyelectrolyte brushes of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PNaSS) of various molecular weights were synthesized, keeping the distance between the polymer brushes constant at ca. 20 nm. The effect of polyelectrolyte brush length on the sliding friction against a glass plate, an electrorepulsive solid substrate, was investigated in water in a velocity range of 7.5 x 10(-5) to 7.5 x 10(-2) m/s. It is found that the presence of polymer brush can dramatically reduce the friction when the polymer brushes are short. With an increase in the length of the polymer brush, this drag reduction effect only works at a low sliding velocity, and the gel with long polymer brushes even shows a higher friction than that of a normal network gel at a high sliding velocity. The strong polymer length and sliding velocity dependence indicate a dynamic mechanism of the polymer brush effect.

  16. Improved Steam Turbine Leakage Control with a Brush Seal Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Raymond E.; Pastrana, Ryan; Wolfe, Chris; Burnett, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents an improved steam turbine leakage control system with a brush seal design. The contents include: 1) Typical Design Characteristics; 2) Typical Brush Seal Locations; 3) Reduced Leakage Rates; 4) Performance Benefits; 5) System Considerations; 6) Rotor Dynamics; 7) Laboratory Tests and 8) Field Experience.

  17. Wildlife responses to brush management: a contemporary evaluation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brush management has been widely practiced with the general intent of curtailing or reversing the proliferation of shrubs and trees in grasslands and savannas. The traditional aim of brush management has been to increase livestock forage or to improve water yield. Its potential role for restoring h...

  18. Physical characteristics of some northern California brush fuels

    Treesearch

    Clive M. Countryman

    1982-01-01

    Brush species make up much of the fuel load in forested wildlands. Basic physical and chemical characteristics of these species influence ease of ignition, rate of fire spread, burning time, and fire intensity. Quantitative knowledge of the variations in brush characteristics is essential to progress in fire control and effective use of fire in wildland management....

  19. A Critique of the Brushing for Life Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Martin C.; Drugan, Caroline S.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2006-01-01

    Background and objective: Brushing for Life is intended to promote regular brushing of children's teeth with fluoride toothpaste. The programme is delivered by health visitors who provide toothbrushes, toothpaste and dental health education material at children's 8, 18 and 36 month development checks. The purpose of the present paper was to…

  20. Cytologic detection of amyloid in duodenal and ureteral brushings.

    PubMed

    Korat, O; Yachnis, A T; Ernst, C S

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of amyloidosis diagnosed on cytology brush specimens are described. Gastrointestinal involvement in a patient with primary amyloidosis and renal involvement in a patient with multiple myeloma were diagnosed on duodenal and ureteral brush specimens, respectively. Familiarity with the staining characteristics of amyloid should increase it as a consideration in the differential diagnosis of certain specimen types.

  1. 75 FR 39706 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-244 (Third Review)] Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the... natural bristle paint brushes from China (75 FR 21347, April 23, 2010). On April 23, 2010, the domestic...

  2. Buckling Instabilities in Polymer Brush Surfaces via Postpolymerization Modification

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Reese, Cassandra M.; Xiong, Li; ...

    2017-10-30

    We report a simple route to engineer ultrathin polymer brush surfaces with wrinkled morphologies using postpolymerization modification (PPM), where the length scale of the buckled features can be tuned using PPM reaction time. Here, we show that partial crosslinking of the outer layer of the polymer brush under poor solvent conditions is critical to obtain wrinkled morphologies upon swelling.

  3. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  4. Tandem catalysis for the preparation of cylindrical polypeptide brushes.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Allison J; Deming, Timothy J

    2012-11-28

    Here, we report a method for synthesis of cylindrical copolypeptide brushes via N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) polymerization utilizing a new tandem catalysis approach that allows preparation of brushes with controlled segment lengths in a straightforward, one-pot procedure requiring no intermediate isolation or purification steps. To obtain high-density brush copolypeptides, we used a "grafting from" approach where alloc-α-aminoamide groups were installed onto the side chains of NCAs to serve as masked initiators. These groups were inert during cobalt-initiated NCA polymerization and gave allyloxycarbonyl-α-aminoamide-substituted polypeptide main chains. The alloc-α-aminoamide groups were then activated in situ using nickel to generate initiators for growth of side-chain brush segments. This use of stepwise tandem cobalt and nickel catalysis was found to be an efficient method for preparation of high-chain-density, cylindrical copolypeptide brushes, where both the main chains and side chains can be prepared with controlled segment lengths.

  5. Method for making a high current fiber brush collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuro, S. J.

    1986-05-01

    An axial-type homopolar motor having high density, high current fiber brush collectors affording efficient, low contact resistance and low operating temperatures is discussed. The collectors include a ring of concentric row of brushes in equally spaced beveled holes soldered in place using a fixture for heating the ring to just below the solder melting point at a soldering iron for the local application of additional heat at each brush. Prior to soldering, an oxide film is formed on the surfaces of the brushes and ring, and the bevels are burnished to form a wetting surface. Flux applied with the solder at each bevel removes to an effective soldering depth the oxide film on the brushes and the holes.

  6. Importance of filament diameter when using bass brushing technique.

    PubMed

    Vowles, A D; Wade, A B

    1977-08-01

    A comparative study using a crossover experimental construction was made of the effectiveness of brushes containing 6/10 nylon filaments of 0.132 mm mean diameter using a Bass technique with those containing filaments of the same type of nylon but 0.280 mm diameter. Each type of brush was used for a 2-week period. Even though the finer filament brushes contained more than three times as many filaments, they were inferior in cleaning achievement to the brushes with the broader filaments. The difference was particularly marked on the facial aspect, but was largely nullified lingually. The effectiveness of the Bass technique in the gingival zone demonstrated in a previous investigation when brushes containing filaments of 0.18 and 0.20 mm were used, was not found in this investigation. It is concluded that filament diameter is critical in achieving effective cleaning using the Bass technique.

  7. Computer Simulations of Bottle Brushes: From Melts to Soft Networks

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Zhen; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Sheiko, Sergei S.; ...

    2015-07-13

    We use a combination of Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical calculations, and study dens bottle-brush systems in a melt and network State. Analysis of our simulation results shows that bottle-brush macromolecules in melt behave as ideal chains with effective Kuhn length b K. Simulations show that the bottle-brush-induced bending rigidity is due to an entropy decrease caused by redistribution of the side chains upon backbone bending. The Kuhn length of the bottle:brushes increases with increasing the side-chain degree of polymerization n sc as b K proportional to n sc 0.46. Moreover, this model of bottle brush macromolecules is extended tomore » describe mechanical properties of bottle brush networks in linear and nonlinear deformation regimes. In the linear deformation regime, the network shear modulus scales with the degree of polymerization of the side chains as G 0 proportional to (n sc + 1) -1 as long as the ratio of the Kuhn length, b K, to the size of the fully extended bottle-brush backbone between cross-links, R-max, is smaller than unity, b K/R max << 1. Bottle-brush networks With b K/R max proportional to 1 demonstrate behavior similar to that of networks Of semiflexible chains with G 0 proportional to n sc -0.5. Finally, in the nonlinear network deformation regime, the deformation-dependent shear modulus is a universal function of the first strain invariant I 1 and bottle-brush backbone deformation ratio beta describing stretching ability of the bottle-brush backbone between cross-links.« less

  8. Tooth-brushing behaviour in 6-12 year olds.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Anna; Cressey, Janet; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2011-01-01

    A common clinical finding is that many schoolchildren display a nonacceptable oral hygiene. To evaluate the tooth-brushing behaviour in children aged 6-12 years. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Children aged 6, 8, 10, and 12 years in an elementary school in a middle class area in Umeå, a city in northern Sweden, were invited and 82 (82%) consented. Visible plaque on buccal surfaces of incisors and canines was recorded from photographs of the participant's teeth before and after brushing using the scores of the Green and Vermillion Oral Hygiene Index. Brushing technique was recorded with a video camera. A questionnaire was used to collect data about oral hygiene habits at home. The ratio between the sum of plaque scores after and before brushing was statistically significantly higher in the 6-year-old group compared with the 10-year olds, (P < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between time spent for brushing and the ratio between the sum of plaque scores after and before brushing (r = -0.31, P < 0.01). The lowest correlation was displayed in the youngest age group (r = 0.07, P > 0.05). Six-year olds spent statistically significantly less time for brushing than older children (P < 0.05). Plaque removal from buccal surfaces from brushing was poor and averaged 19% for 6-year olds and 30% for older children. The results of brushing for children aged 8-12 years could benefit from increasing tooth-brushing time. Children could be given an increasing responsibility from 7 to 8 year of age but parental help is motivated up to 10 years of age. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2010 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Effect of 5,000 ppm Fluoride Dentifrice or 1,100 ppm Fluoride Dentifrice Combined with Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride on Caries Lesion Inhibition and Repair.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Constanza E; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Nóbrega, Diego Figueiredo; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2017-01-01

    High fluoride dentifrice (FD; 5,000 ppm F) has been recommended to arrest root dentine lesions and to control enamel caries in high-risk patients. Also, standard FD (1,100 ppm F) in combination with professional fluoride application has been recommended to control dentine caries, but the effect of this combination on enamel has been considered modest. Considering the lack of evaluation comparing the use of 5,000 ppm FD (5,000-FD) versus acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application combined with 1,100 ppm FD (1,100-FD) on the inhibition and repair of caries lesions in both enamel and dentine, we conducted this in situ, double-blind, crossover study of 3 phases of 14 days. In each phase, 18 volunteers wore palatal appliances containing enamel and root dentine specimens, either sound or carious, to evaluate the effect of the treatments on the inhibition or repair of caries lesions, respectively. The treatments were non-FD (negative control), 5,000-FD, or 1 APF gel application on dental specimens combined with 1,100-FD used twice per day (APF + 1,100-FD). The reduction of demineralization and enhancement of remineralization were assessed by surface and cross-sectional hardness. Fluoride concentration was determined on dental specimens and on the formed biofilm. For enamel, APF + 1,100-FD and 5,000-FD did not differ regarding the inhibition of demineralization and repair of caries lesions. However, for dentine the difference between these treatments was inconclusive because while APF + 1,100-FD was more effective than 5,000-FD in caries lesion reduction and repair, 5,000-FD was more effective than APF + 1,100-FD in the reduction of surface demineralization. Therefore, the findings show that the combination of APF + 1,100-FD is as effective as 5,000-FD in enamel inhibition of demineralization and enhancement of remineralization. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Dentifrice Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  11. Sterilization effects of atmospheric cold plasma brush

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Q.S.; Huang, C.; Hsieh, F.-H.

    2006-01-02

    This study investigated the sterilization effects of a brush-shaped plasma created at one atmospheric pressure. A population of 1.0x10{sup 4}-1.0x10{sup 5} Escherichia coli or Micrococcus luteus bacteria was seeded in filter paper media and then subjected to Ar and/or Ar+O{sub 2} plasmas. A complete kill of the Micrococcus luteus required about 3 min argon plasma exposures. With oxygen addition into the argon plasma gas streams, a complete kill of the bacteria needed only less than 1 min plasma exposure for Micrococcus luteus and about 2 min exposure for Escherichia coli. The plasma treatment effects on the different bacteria cell structuresmore » were examined using scanning electron microscopy.« less

  12. Sterilization effects of atmospheric cold plasma brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q. S.; Huang, C.; Hsieh, F.-H.; Huff, H.; Duan, Yixiang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the sterilization effects of a brush-shaped plasma created at one atmospheric pressure. A population of 1.0×104-1.0×105 Escherichia coli or Micrococcus luteus bacteria was seeded in filter paper media and then subjected to Ar and/or Ar +O2 plasmas. A complete kill of the Micrococcus luteus required about 3 min argon plasma exposures. With oxygen addition into the argon plasma gas streams, a complete kill of the bacteria needed only less than 1 min plasma exposure for Micrococcus luteus and about 2 min exposure for Escherichia coli. The plasma treatment effects on the different bacteria cell structures were examined using scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Prevention of dentine erosion by brushing with anti-erosive toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Aykut-Yetkiner, Arzu; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2014-07-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the preventive effect of brushing with anti-erosive toothpastes compared to a conventional fluoride toothpaste on dentine erosion. Bovine dentine specimens (n=12 per subgroup) were eroded in an artificial mouth (6 days, 6×30 s/day) using either citric acid (pH:2.5) or a hydrochloric acid/pepsin solution (pH:1.6), simulating extrinsic or intrinsic erosive conditions, respectively. In between, the specimens were rinsed with artificial saliva. Twice daily, the specimens were brushed for 15 s in an automatic brushing machine at 2.5 N with a conventional fluoride toothpaste slurry (elmex, AmF) or toothpaste slurries with anti-erosive formulations: Apacare (NaF/1% nHAP), Biorepair (ZnCO3-HAP), Chitodent (Chitosan), elmex Erosionsschutz (NaF/AmF/SnCl2/Chitosan), mirasensitive hap (NaF/30% HAP), Sensodyne Proschmelz (NaF/KNO3). Unbrushed specimens served as control. Dentine loss was measured profilometrically and statistically analysed using two-way and one-way ANOVA followed by Scheffe's post hoc tests. RDA-values of all toothpastes were determined, and linear mixed models were applied to analyse the influence of toothpaste abrasivity on dentine wear (p<0.05). Dentine erosion of unbrushed specimens amounted to 5.1±1.0 μm (extrinsic conditions) and 12.9±1.4 μm (intrinsic conditions). All toothpastes significantly reduced dentine erosion by 24-67% (extrinsic conditions) and 21-40% (intrinsic conditions). Biorepair was least effective, while all other toothpastes were not significantly different from each other. Linear mixed models did not show a significant effect of the RDA-value of the respective toothpaste on dentine loss. Toothpastes with anti-erosive formulations reduced dentine erosion, especially under simulated extrinsic erosive conditions, but were not superior to a conventional fluoride toothpaste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prepolishing on a CNC platform with bound abrasive contour tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffler, Adrienne E.; Gregg, Leslie L.; Schoen, John M.; Fess, Edward M.; Hakiel, Michael; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Deterministic microgrinding (DMG) of optical glasses and ceramics is the commercial manufacturing process of choice to shape glass surfaces prior to final finishing. This process employs rigid bound matrix diamond tooling resulting in surface roughness values of 3-5μm peak to valley and 100-400nm rms, as well as mid-spatial frequency tool marks that require subsequent removal in secondary finishing steps. The ability to pre-polish optical surfaces within the grinding platform would reduce final finishing process times. Bound abrasive contour wheels containing cerium oxide, alumina or zirconia abrasives were constructed with an epoxy matrix. The effects of abrasive type, composition, and erosion promoters were examined for tool hardness (Shore D), and tested with commercial optical glasses in an Optipro CNC grinding platform. Metrology protocols were developed to examine tool wear and subsequent surface roughness. Work is directed to demonstrating effective material removal, improved surface roughness and cutter mark removal.

  15. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  16. Feasibility Study on Cutting HTPB Propellants with Abrasive Water Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dayong; Bai, Yun

    2018-01-01

    Abrasive water jet is used to carry out the experiment research on cutting HTPB propellants with three components, which will provide technical support for the engineering treatment of waste rocket motor. Based on the reliability theory and related scientific research results, the safety and efficiency of cutting sensitive HTPB propellants by abrasive water jet were experimentally studied. The results show that the safety reliability is not less than 99.52% at 90% confidence level, so the safety is adequately ensured. The cooling and anti-friction effect of high-speed water jet is the decisive factor to suppress the detonation of HTPB propellant. Compared with pure water jet, cutting efficiency was increased by 5% - 87%. The study shows that abrasive water jets meet the practical use for cutting HTPB propellants.

  17. Aeolian abrasion on Venus: Preliminary results from the Venus simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, D. W.; Pollack, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    The role of atmospheric pressure on aeolian abrasion was examined in the Venus Simulator with a constant temperature of 737 K. Both the rock target and the impactor were fine-grained basalt. The impactor was a 3 mm diameter angular particle chosen to represent a size of material that is entrainable by the dense Venusian atmosphere and potentially abrasive by virtue of its mass. It was projected at the target 10 to the 5 power times at a velocity of 0.7 m/s. The impactor showed a weight loss of approximately 1.2 x 10 to the -9 power gm per impact with the attrition occurring only at the edges. Results from scanning electron microscope analysis, profilometry, and weight measurement are summarized. It is concluded that particles can incur abrasion at Venusian temperatures even with low impact velocities expected for Venus.

  18. Study of Dominant Factors Affecting Cerchar Abrasivity Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Jamal; Ghasemi, Amireza; Alavi Gharahbagh, Ehsan; Dogruoz, Cihan; Dahl, Filip

    2014-09-01

    The Cerchar abrasion index is commonly used to represent rock abrasion for estimation of bit life and wear in various mining and tunneling applications. Although the test is simple and fast, there are some discrepancies in the test results related to the equipment used, condition of the rock surface, operator skills, and procedures used in conducting and measuring the wear surface. This paper focuses on the background of the test and examines the influence of various parameters on Cerchar testing including pin hardness, surface condition of specimens, petrographical and geomechanical properties, test speed, applied load, and method of measuring wear surface. Results of Cerchar tests on a set of rock specimens performed at different laboratories are presented to examine repeatability of the tests. In addition, the preliminary results of testing with a new device as a potential alternative testing system for rock abrasivity measurement are discussed.

  19. Pleurectomy versus pleural abrasion for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in children.

    PubMed

    Joharifard, Shahrzad; Coakley, Brian A; Butterworth, Sonia A

    2017-05-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) represents a common indication for urgent surgical intervention in children. First episodes are often managed with thoracostomy tube, whereas recurrent episodes typically prompt surgery involving apical bleb resection and pleurodesis, either via pleurectomy or pleural abrasion. The purpose of this study was to assess whether pleurectomy or pleural abrasion was associated with lower postoperative recurrence. The records of patients undergoing surgery for PSP between February 2005 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Recurrence was defined as an ipsilateral pneumothorax requiring surgical intervention. Bivariate logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with recurrence. Fifty-two patients underwent 64 index operations for PSP (12 patients had surgery for contralateral pneumothorax, and each instance was analyzed separately). The mean age was 15.7±1.2years, and 79.7% (n=51) of patients were male. In addition to apical wedge resection, 53.1% (n=34) of patients underwent pleurectomy, 39.1% (n=25) underwent pleural abrasion, and 7.8% (n=5) had no pleural treatment. The overall recurrence rate was 23.4% (n=15). Recurrence was significantly lower in patients who underwent pleurectomy rather than pleural abrasion (8.8% vs. 40%, p<0.01). In patients who underwent pleural abrasion without pleurectomy, the relative risk of recurrence was 2.36 [1.41-3.92, p<0.01]. Recurrence of PSP is significantly reduced in patients undergoing pleurectomy compared to pleural abrasion. Level III, retrospective comparative therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparing solvophobic and multivalent induced collapse in polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Brettmann, Blair K.; Vishwanath, Venkatram; ...

    2017-02-03

    Here, coarse-grained molecular dynamics enhanced by free-energy sampling methods is used to examine the roles of solvophobicity and multivalent salts on polyelectrolyte brush collapse. Specifically, we demonstrate that while ostensibly similar, solvophobic collapsed brushes and multivalent-ion collapsed brushes exhibit distinct mechanistic and structural features. Notably, multivalent-induced heterogeneous brush collapse is observed under good solvent polymer backbone conditions, demonstrating that the mechanism of multivalent collapse is not contingent upon a solvophobic backbone. Umbrella sampling of the potential of mean-force (PMF) between two individual brush strands confirms this analysis, revealing starkly different PMFs under solvophobic and multivalent conditions, suggesting the role ofmore » multivalent “bridging” as the discriminating feature in trivalent collapse. Structurally, multivalent ions show a propensity for nucleating order within collapsed brushes, whereas poor-solvent collapsed brushes are more disordered; this difference is traced to the existence of a metastable PMF minimum for poor solvent conditions, and a global PMF minimum for trivalent systems, under experimentally relevant conditions.« less

  1. Comparing solvophobic and multivalent induced collapse in polyelectrolyte brushes

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Brettmann, Blair K.; Vishwanath, Venkatram

    Here, coarse-grained molecular dynamics enhanced by free-energy sampling methods is used to examine the roles of solvophobicity and multivalent salts on polyelectrolyte brush collapse. Specifically, we demonstrate that while ostensibly similar, solvophobic collapsed brushes and multivalent-ion collapsed brushes exhibit distinct mechanistic and structural features. Notably, multivalent-induced heterogeneous brush collapse is observed under good solvent polymer backbone conditions, demonstrating that the mechanism of multivalent collapse is not contingent upon a solvophobic backbone. Umbrella sampling of the potential of mean-force (PMF) between two individual brush strands confirms this analysis, revealing starkly different PMFs under solvophobic and multivalent conditions, suggesting the role ofmore » multivalent “bridging” as the discriminating feature in trivalent collapse. Structurally, multivalent ions show a propensity for nucleating order within collapsed brushes, whereas poor-solvent collapsed brushes are more disordered; this difference is traced to the existence of a metastable PMF minimum for poor solvent conditions, and a global PMF minimum for trivalent systems, under experimentally relevant conditions.« less

  2. Clinical Effects of Stabilized Stannous Fluoride Dentifrice in Reducing Plaque Microbial Virulence I: Microbiological and Receptor Cell Findings.

    PubMed

    Klukowska, Malgorzata; Haught, John Christian; Xie, Sancai; Circello, Ben; Tansky, Cheryl S; Khambe, Deepa; Huggins, Tom; White, Donald J

    2017-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and lipoteichoic acids (LTAs), or bacterial endotoxins, bind with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that are expressed on host cells of the periodontium, thereby contributing to the periodontal pathogenicity of oral bacteria. Stannous fluoride (SnF2), an antibacterial fluoride that treats and controls gingivitis, has been shown to react with lipophilic domains/anionic charges in LPS and LTA. The effects of bacterial species and dental plaque on toll receptors can be studied using genetically engineered cell lines containing linked toll receptors on their surfaces. This randomized, examiner-blinded study examined the clinical effects of stabilized SnF2 dentifrice intervention on gingivitis and dental plaque virulence in populations exhibiting high and low levels of clinical gingivitis. Recruited populations were evaluated for gingival inflammation (MGI) and gingival bleeding (GBI) at baseline and assigned into two cohorts of 20 each, those with high (GBI > 20 sites) and low (GBI < 3 sites) levels of observed bleeding/gingivitis. Participants were sampled at baseline for both supra- and subgingival dental plaque at both healthy (no bleeding, PD = 2 mm), as well as clinically diseased sites (bleeding, PD = 3-4 mm), and then provided with an intervention hygiene product including a stabilized SnF2 dentifrice and a new soft bristle manual toothbrush. Following two and four weeks of assigned dentifrice use, participants returned for a re-evaluation of gingival inflammation and bleeding and repeat samplings of dental plaque. Plaque samples were analyzed by anaerobic culturing of gram negative anaerobes (GNA), as well as by incubation of subgingival sampled plaques with TLR4 transfected HEK293 cells, where gene expression was assessed by measurement of a SEAP alkaline phosphatase reporter as a marker of toll receptor activation. Clinical assessments showed statistically significant reductions in MGI (24-26%) and GBI (42-53%) gingivitis in both diseased

  3. Field evidence of two-phase abrasion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Szabo, T.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.

    2013-12-01

    The rounded shape of river rocks is clear evidence that abrasion due to bed load transport is a significant agent for mass loss. Its contribution to downstream fining, however, is typically assumed to be negligible - as diminution trends may be explained solely by size-selective transport. A recent theory has predicted that pebble abrasion occurs in two well separated phases: in Phase 1, an intially-polyhedral pebble rounds to the shape of an inscribed ellipsoid without any change in axis dimensions; in Phase II, axis dimensions are slowly reduced. Importantly, Phase I abrasion means that an initially-blocky pebble may lose up to half its mass without any apparent change in 'size', which is only measured as the length of a single pebble axis by most field researchers. We hypothesize that field studies have significantly underestimated the importance of abrasion because they do not quantify pebble shape, and we set out to demonstrate that two-phase abrasion occurs in a natural stream. Our study examines downstream trends in pebble size and shape along a 10-km stretch of the Rio Mameyes within the Luquillo Critical Zone observatory, where volcaniclastic cobbles and boulders are transported by bed load at slopes up to 10%. The upper reaches of the stream consist of alluviated bedrock valleys that preclude sediment storage and thus minimize size-selective transport, which allows us to isolate the effects of abrasion. The lower 5 km is an alluvial river in which size-selective transport becomes operative. We quantified the shape and size of thousands of pebbles along the profile using hand and image-based techniques. The data provide the first field validation of two-phase abrasion; in the bedrock reaches, pebbles clearly evolve toward ellipsoids without any significant change in axis dimensions (rounding), while in the lower reaches pebbles slowly reduce their axis dimensions with little or no change in roundness. Results also show that shape metrics determined from

  4. Effect of dielectric discontinuity on a spherical polyelectrolyte brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tergolina, Vinicius B.; dos Santos, Alexandre P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we perform molecular dynamics simulations of a spherical polyelectrolyte brush and counterions in a salt-free medium. The dielectric discontinuity on the grafted nanoparticle surface is taken into account by the method of image charges. Properties of the polyelectrolyte brush are obtained for different parameters, including valency of the counterions, radius of the nanoparticle, and the brush total charge. The monovalent counterions density profiles are obtained and compared with a simple mean-field theoretical approach. The theory allows us to obtain osmotic properties of the system.

  5. Exposure to crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations where silica and non-silica abrasives are used.

    PubMed

    Radnoff, Diane L; Kutz, Michelle K

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to respirable crystalline silica is a hazard common to many industries in Alberta but particularly so in abrasive blasting. Alberta occupational health and safety legislation requires the consideration of silica substitutes when conducting abrasive blasting, where reasonably practicable. In this study, exposure to crystalline silica during abrasive blasting was evaluated when both silica and non-silica products were used. The crystalline silica content of non-silica abrasives was also measured. The facilities evaluated were preparing metal products for the application of coatings, so the substrate should not have had a significant contribution to worker exposure to crystalline silica. The occupational sampling results indicate that two-thirds of the workers assessed were potentially over-exposed to respirable crystalline silica. About one-third of the measurements over the exposure limit were at the work sites using silica substitutes at the time of the assessment. The use of the silica substitute, by itself, did not appear to have a large effect on the mean airborne exposure levels. There are a number of factors that may contribute to over-exposures, including the isolation of the blasting area, housekeeping, and inappropriate use of respiratory protective equipment. However, the non-silica abrasives themselves also contain silica. Bulk analysis results for non-silica abrasives commercially available in Alberta indicate that many contain crystalline silica above the legislated disclosure limit of 0.1% weight of silica per weight of product (w/w) and this information may not be accurately disclosed on the material safety data sheet for the product. The employer may still have to evaluate the potential for exposure to crystalline silica at their work site, even when silica substitutes are used. Limited tests on recycled non-silica abrasive indicated that the silica content had increased. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of product recycling

  6. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  9. Propelled abrasive grit for weed control in organic silage corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed management in organic farming requires many strategies to accomplish acceptable control and maintain crop yields. This two-year field study used air propelled abrasive grit for in-row weed control in a silage corn system. Corncob grit was applied as a single application at corn vegetative growt...

  10. Review of Artificial Abrasion Test Methods for PV Module Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Muller, Matt T.; Simpson, Lin J.

    This review is intended to identify the method or methods--and the basic details of those methods--that might be used to develop an artificial abrasion test. Methods used in the PV literature were compared with their closest implementation in existing standards. Also, meetings of the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force Task Group 12-3 (TG12-3, which is concerned with coated glass) were used to identify established test methods. Feedback from the group, which included many of the authors from the PV literature, included insights not explored within the literature itself. The combined experience and examples from the literature are intended tomore » provide an assessment of the present industry practices and an informed path forward. Recommendations toward artificial abrasion test methods are then identified based on the experiences in the literature and feedback from the PV community. The review here is strictly focused on abrasion. Assessment methods, including optical performance (e.g., transmittance or reflectance), surface energy, and verification of chemical composition were not examined. Methods of artificially soiling PV modules or other specimens were not examined. The weathering of artificial or naturally soiled specimens (which may ultimately include combined temperature and humidity, thermal cycling and ultraviolet light) were also not examined. A sense of the purpose or application of an abrasion test method within the PV industry should, however, be evident from the literature.« less

  11. Effect of air abrasion and polishing on primary molar fissures.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T L; Menezes, L B R; Soares, F Z M; Rocha, R O

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of air abrasion and polishing on primary molar fissures under light microscopy. 15 exfoliated primary second molars were longitudinally sectioned and photographed under a stereomicroscope (40×; baseline evaluation). Sections were then randomly allocated into one of the two groups (n = 15) and treated by either air abrasion (aluminium oxide jet) or air polishing (sodium bicarbonate jet) for 30 s. After treatment, sections were washed with an air/water spray, dried with absorbent paper, and photographed as previously described (final evaluation). Baseline and final morphology were compared by two blinded examiners who evaluated changes in the width and depth of fissures. The percentage of changed fissures was analysed, and the two treatments were compared using the Mann-Whitney test (α = 0.01). Both air systems resulted in fissure changes in most (93.3 %) of the sections. No significant differences in fissure width changes were found between treatments, but when changes in fissure depth were evaluated, air polishing was found to be less damaging than air abrasion (p < 0.01). Air abrasion and polishing cause changes to the anatomical configuration of occlusal fissures of primary molars.

  12. Assessment of Rail Seat Abrasion Patterns and Environment

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-05-01

    Rail seat abrasion (RSA) of concrete ties is manifested by the loss of material under the rail seat area and, in extreme cases, results in loss of rail clip holding power, reverse rail cant, and gauge widening. RSA was measured in several curves on t...

  13. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. 311.14 Section 311.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND...

  14. Keep Kids' Mouths Healthy: Brush 2min2X

    MedlinePlus

    ... your kids brush for 2 minutes, twice a day. En Español facebook twitter instagram Kids’ Healthy Mouths ... about dental visits Floss Every Day Floss Every Day As soon as two teeth touch each other ( ...

  15. Brush Testing for the TLRV Power Collection System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-04-01

    This report describes work which as been completed to demonstrate the use of laboratory tests in simulationg and measuring brush wear for application in the power collection system of the U.S. Department of Transportation's tracked levitated research...

  16. Oral Health: Brush Up on Dental Care Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff Your smile depends on simple dental care habits, such as brushing and flossing. But ... your oral health. Oral health begins with clean teeth. Keeping the area where your teeth meet your ...

  17. Polymer Brushes as Functional, Patterned Surfaces for Nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Welch, M Elizabeth; Xu, Youyong; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah; Tague, Michele E; Abruña, Héctor D; Baird, Barbara; Ober, Christopher K

    2013-01-01

    Polymer brushes have many desirable characteristics such as the ability to tether molecules to a substrate or change the properties of a surface. Patterning of polymer films has been an area of great interest due to the broad range of applications including bio-related and medicinal research. Consequently, we have investigated patterning techniques for polymer brushes which allow for two different functionalities on the same surface. This method has been applied to a biosensor device which requires both polymer brushes and a photosensitizer to be polymerized on a patterned gold substrate. Additionally, the nature of patterned polymer brushes as removable thin films was explored. An etching process has enabled us to lift off very thin membranes for further characterization with the potential of using them as Janus membranes for biological applications.

  18. Unique Tuft Test Facility Dramatically Reduces Brush Seal Development Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Brush seals have been incorporated in the latest turbine engines to reduce leakage and improve efficiency. However, the life of these seals is limited by wear. Studies have shown that optimal sealing characteristics for a brush seal occur before the interference fit between the brush and shaft is excessively worn. Research to develop improved tribopairs (brush and coating) with reduced wear and lower friction has been hindered by the lack of an accurate, low-cost, efficient test methodology. Estimated costs for evaluating a new material combination in an engine company seal test program are on the order of $100,000. To address this need, the NASA Lewis Research Center designed, built, and validated a unique, innovative brush seal tuft tester that slides a single tuft of brush seal wire against a rotating shaft under controlled loads, speeds, and temperatures comparable to those in turbine engines. As an initial screening tool, the brush seal tuft tester can tribologicaly evaluate candidate seal materials for 1/10th the cost of full-scale seal tests. Previous to the development of the brush seal tuft tester facility, most relevant tribological data had been obtained from full-scale seal tests conducted primarily to determine seal leakage characteristics. However, from a tribological point of view, these tests included the confounding effects of varying contact pressures, bristle flaring, high-temperature oxidation, and varying bristle contact angles. These confounding effects are overcome in tuft testing. The interface contact pressures can be either constant or varying depending on the tuft mounting device, and bristle wear can be measured optically with inscribed witness marks. In a recent cooperative program with a U.S. turbine engine manufacturer, five metallic wire candidates were tested against a plasma-sprayed Nichrome-bonded chrome carbide. The wire materials used during this collaboration were either nickel-chrome- or cobaltchrome-based superalloys. These

  19. Tension Amplification in Molecular Brushes in Solutions and on Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Panyukov, Sergey; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Randall, Greg C.; Brock, James; Rubinstein, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Molecular bottle-brushes are highly branched macromolecules with side chains densely grafted to a long polymer backbone. The brush-like architecture allows focusing of the side-chain tension to the backbone and its amplification from the picoNewton to nanoNewton range. The backbone tension depends on the overall molecular conformation and the surrounding environment. Here we study the relation between the tension and conformation of the molecular brushes in solutions, melts, and on substrates. In solutions, we find that the backbone tension in dense brushes with side chains attached to every backbone monomer is on the order of f0N3/8 in athermal solvents, f0N1/3 in θ-solvents, and f0 in poor solvents and melts, where N is the degree of polymerization of side chains, f0≃ kBT/b is the maximum tension in side chains, b is the Kuhn length, kB is Boltzmann constant, and T is absolute temperature. Depending on the side chain length and solvent quality, molecular brushes in solutions develop tension on the order of 10–100 picoNewtons, which is sufficient to break hydrogen bonds. Significant amplification of tension occurs upon adsorption of brushes onto a substrate. On a strongly attractive substrate, maximum tension in the brush backbone is ~ f0N, reaching values on the order of several nanoNewtons which exceed the strength of a typical covalent bond. At low grafting density and high spreading parameter the cross-sectional profile of adsorbed molecular brush is approximately rectangular with thicknes ~bA/S, where A is the Hamaker constant and S is the spreading parameter. At a very high spreading parameter (S > A), the brush thickness saturates at monolayer ~ b. At a low spreading parameter, the cross-sectional profile of adsorbed molecular brush has triangular tent-like shape. In the cross-over between these two opposite cases, covering a wide range of parameter space, the adsorbed molecular brush consists of two layers. Side chains in the lower layer gain surface

  20. Determination of glycerophosphate and other anions in dentifrices by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongxin; Ye, Mingli; Cui, Hairong; Wu, Feiyan; Zhu, Yan; Fritz, James S

    2006-06-16

    Simple, reliable and sensitive analytical methods to determine the anions, such as fluoride, monofluorophaosphate, glycerophosphate related to anticaries are necessary for basic investigations of anticaries and quality control of dentifrices. A method for the simultaneous determination of organic acids, organic anions and inorganic anions in the sample of commercial toothpaste is proposed. Nine anions (fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, monofluorophaosphate, glycerophosphate and oxalic acid) were analyzed by means of ion chromatography using a gradient elution with KOH as mobile phase, IonPac AS18 as the separation column and suppressed conductivity detection. Optimized analytical conditions were further validated in terms of accuracy, precision and total uncertainty and the results showed the reliability of the IC method. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of the retention time and peak area of all species were less than 0.170 and 1.800%, respectively. The correlation coefficients for target analytes ranged from 0.9985 to 0.9996. The detection limit (signal to noise ratio of 3:1) of this method was at low ppb level (<15 ppb). The spiked recoveries for the anions were 96-103%. The method was applied to toothpaste without interferences.

  1. Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ASETS Defense ‘12 1 Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application Zhimin Zhong & Sid Clouser Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...6 Surface morphology Visual appearance, scanning electron and optical microscope images. Smooth, fine grained, micro- cracked surface morphology

  2. Study on design of light-weight super-abrasive wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohara, K.; Yanagihara, K.; Ogawa, M.

    2018-01-01

    Fixed-abrasive tool, also called a grinding wheel, is produced by furnacing abrasive compound which contains abrasive grains and binding powder such as vitrified materials or resins. Fixed-abrasive tool is installed on spindle of grinding machine. And it is given 1,800-2,000 min-1 of spindle rotation for the usage. The centrifugal fracture of the compound of fixed- abrasive tool is one of the careful respects in designing. In recent years, however, super-abrasive wheel as a fixed-abrasive tool has been developed and applied widely. One of the most characteristic respects is that metal is applied for the body of grinding-wheel. The strength to hold abrasive grain and the rigidity of wheel become stronger than those of general grinding wheel, also the lifespan of fixed-abrasive tool becomes longer. The weight of fixed-abrasive tool, however, becomes heavier. Therefore, when the super-abrasive wheel is used, the power consumption of spindle motor becomes larger. It also becomes difficult for the grinding-wheel to respond to sudden acceleration or deceleration. Thus, in order to reduce power consumption in grinding and to obtain quicker frequency response of super-abrasive wheel, the new wheel design is proposed. The design accomplishes 46% weight reduction. Acceleration that is one second quicker than that of conventional grinding wheel is obtained.

  3. Polyelectrolyte brushes in mixed ionic medium studied via intermolecular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Robert; Laugel, Nicolas; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    The vast uses and applications of polyelectrolyte brushes make them an attractive field of research especially with the growing interest in responsive materials. Polymers which respond via changes in temperature, pH, and ionic strength are increasingly being used for applications in drug delivery, chemical gating, etc. When polyelectrolyte brushes are found in either nature (e.g., surfaces of cartilage and mammalian lung interiors) or commercially (e.g., skin care products, shampoo, and surfaces of medical devices) they are always surrounded by mixed ionic medium. This makes the study of these brushes in varying ionic environments extremely relevant for both current and future potential applications. The polyelectrolyte brushes in this work are diblock co-polymers of poly-styrene sulfonate (N=420) and poly-t-butyl styrene (N=20) which tethers to a hydrophobic surface allowing for a purely thermodynamic study of the polyelectrolyte chains. Intermolecular forces between two brushes are measured using the SFA. As multi-valent concentrations are increased, the brushes collapse internally and form strong adhesion between one another after contact (properties not seen in a purely mono-valent environment).

  4. Stereoregular polyacrylamide and its copolymer brushes: Preparation and surface characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoshu; Lu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yun

    2008-12-01

    Two kinds of polymer brushes, the single one with stereospecific polyacrylamide (PAAM) chains and the dual-component one with random poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) segments grafting from stereospecific PAAM chains, were prepared on silicon wafer for the first time by combining the immobilization of initiator and the stereospecific living radical in situ polymerization. With the addition of the Lewis acid AlCl 3 into the polymerization system, the PAAM brushes obtained exhibited an increased stereospecificity as well as a decreased hydrophilicity, which might attribute to the reduced thickness of PAAM brushes on the silicon wafer and the handicap of the free rotation of the stereospecific molecular chain. The smoother surface morphology of the stereospecific PAAM brushes shown in AFM images was in good agreement with the experimental data of water contact angle. Also, block amphiphilic copolymer brushes were prepared with the stereospecific PAAM formed first on silicon wafer as the anchored-initiator and revealed a novel surface self-assembly behavior after being treated with different solvent such as toluene or water. The stereospecificity of PAAM chains in the polymer brushes could be modulated by adjusting reaction conditions according to the requirement of applications for surface hydrophilicity.

  5. Tension amplification in tethered layers of bottle-brush polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Leuty, Gary M.; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-02-26

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead–spring model have been used to study the effects of molecular crowding on the accumulation of tension in the backbone of bottle-brush polymers tethered to a flat substrate. The number of bottle-brushes per unit surface area, Σ, as well as the lengths of the bottle-brush backbones N bb (50 ≤ N bb ≤ 200) and side chains N sc (50 ≤ N sc ≤ 200) were varied to determine how the dimensions and degree of crowding of bottle-brushes give rise to bond tension amplification along the backbone, especially near the substrate.more » From these simulations, we have identified three separate regimes of tension. For low Σ, the tension is due solely to intramolecular interactions and is dominated by the side chain repulsion that governs the lateral brush dimensions. With increasing Σ, the interactions between bottle-brush polymers induce compression of the side chains, transmitting increasing tension to the backbone. For large Σ, intermolecular side chain repulsion increases, forcing side chain extension and reorientation in the direction normal to the surface and transmitting considerable tension to the backbone.« less

  6. Macroion induced dehydration of weak polyelectrolyte brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhongli; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2014-03-01

    The interaction of macroions, including polyelectrolytes, DNAs, and proteins, with polymer and cellular surfaces is critically related to many biomolecular activities, such as protein adsorption and DNA hybridization at probe surfaces. In an experimental approach to examine the macroion electrostatic interaction with a polymer surface while minimizing the long-debated hydrophobic interaction, we study the interaction of molybdenum-based inorganic polyoxometalate (POM) nanoclusters carrying 42 negative charges as model hydrophilic macroions with surface-tethered poly-2-vinylpyridine (P2VP) brushes immersed in aqueous solutions. By AFM, QCM, and contact goniometer, we have observed the collapse of P2VP chains by adding POM macroions at a constant pH. Surprisingly, added POM macroions can cause the shift of swollen-to-collapse transition pH to a lower value, in contrast to the shift to high pH value by adding simple monovalent salts. At sufficiently high POM concentration, a stable POM-P2VP composite layer, showing little dependence on solution pH and additional salts, can be formed, suggesting a simple route to construct meso-porous polymer membranes.

  7. In situ clinical effects of new dentifrices containing 1.5% arginine and fluoride on enamel de- and remineralization and plaque metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cantore, R; Petrou, I; Lavender, S; Santarpia, P; Liu, Z; Gittins, E; Vandeven, M; Cummins, D; Sullivan, R; Utgikar, N

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of the three studies reported in this paper was to evaluate the effects of new dentifrices containing 1.5% arginine, an insoluble calcium compound, and fluoride for their ability to promote remineralization of demineralized enamel, and to prevent mineral loss from sound enamel specimens. A secondary objective was to determine the effects on plaque metabolism with respect to the conversion of arginine to ammonia and sucrose to lactic acid. In Study 1, an intraoral remineralization/demineralization clinical model was used to assess the ability to promote remineralization of enamel of two dentifrices containing 1.5% arginine and 1450 ppm fluoride, as sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP), relative to a positive control with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (Dical) and 1450 ppm fluoride, and a negative control with Dical and 250 ppm fluoride. One of the arginine-containing dentifrices contained Dical, and the other contained calcium carbonate as the source of insoluble calcium. Microradiography and image analysis were used to measure mineral changes. The study used a double-blind crossover design with a two-week treatment period. Each treatment period was preceded by a one-week washout period. Each product was used twice a day for two weeks. In the two other studies, the ability of dentifrices containing 1.5% arginine and fluoride to prevent demineralization of sound enamel blocks was assessed using an intraoral demineralization/remineralization clinical model and a double-blind crossover design with a five-day treatment period. A one-week minimum washout period preceded each treatment phase. Microhardness was used to assess mineral changes. Cariogenic challenges were administered by dipping each intraoral retainer into a 10% sucrose solution four times per day. Each product was used twice per day during the treatment period. Plaque was harvested from the specimens to measure the ability of the plaque to convert arginine to ammonia (Studies 2 and 3) and

  8. In vitro assessment of 3 dentifrices containing fluoride in preventing demineralization of overdenture abutments and root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goettsche, Zachary S; Ettinger, Ronald L; Wefel, James S; Hogan, Mary M; Harless, Jeffery D; Qian, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Caries development under overdentures has been a continuing problem and requires the daily use of fluoride to prevent demineralization. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effectiveness of dentifrices containing tricalcium phosphate or calcium phosphosilicate in combination with fluoride to prevent the demineralization of overdenture abutments and root surfaces. A total of 56 caries-free extracted teeth were prepared as overdenture abutments. The teeth were painted with acid-resistant varnish, leaving one 1×4-mm window on occlusal and root surfaces. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups: a control group treated with distilled/deionized water only, a group treated with ClinPro 5000, a group treated with ReNew, and a group treated with Prevident 5000 gel. Each tooth was subjected to a demineralizing/remineralizing cycling protocol for 12 days with the appropriate treatment products. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally through both windows. Photomicrographs were made of 3 representative sections from each tooth. A representative section was defined as one that included both windows and was cut from the part of the tooth that had the flattest surface to reduce the edge effect. The depths of the lesions were measured on representative sections from each group. A 1-way MANOVA and a 1-way ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey-Kramer test were used to evaluate the treatment effects on the criterion variables (α=.05). The total lesion depths of the control teeth on the occlusal surface were not statistically significantly deeper than for the 3 dentifrices (P=.7705). However, all 3 dentifrices had narrower cavitation depths than the control (mean cavitation band depth, 43.59 [ReNew] versus 37.99 [Prevident 5000 gel] versus 36.70 [ClinPro 5000] versus 246.86 [control]) (P<.001). The mean remineralization band depth for ClinPro 5000 was significantly greater than for the other 2 treatment groups (118.03 [ClinPro 5000] versus 107.80 [Re

  9. Impact of Sn/F Pre-Treatments on the Durability of Protective Coatings against Dentine Erosion/Abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Naguib Attia, Nader; Schlueter, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    For preventing erosive wear in dentine, coating with adhesives has been suggested as an alternative to fluoridation. However, clinical studies have revealed limited efficacy. As there is first evidence that Sn2+ increases bond strength of the adhesive Clearfil SE (Kuraray), the aim of the present study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with different Sn2+/F− solutions improves the durability of Clearfil SE coatings. Dentine samples (eight groups, n=16/group) were freed of smear layer (0.5% citric acid, 10 s), treated (15 s) either with no solution (control), aminefluoride (AmF, 500 ppm F−, pH 4.5), SnCl2 (800/1600 ppm Sn2+; pH 1.5), SnCl2/AmF (500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 1.5/3.0/4.5), or Elmex Erosion Protection Rinse (EP, 500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 4.5; GABA International), then rinsed with water (15 s) and individually covered with Clearfil SE. Subsequently the specimens were subjected to an erosion/abrasion protocol consisting of 1320 cycles of immersion in 0.5% citric acid (5°C/55°C; 2 min) and automated brushing (15 s, 200 g, NaF-toothpaste, RDA 80). As the coatings proved stable up to 1320 cycles, 60 modified cycles (brushing time 30 min/cycle) were added. Wear was measured profilometrically. After SnCl2/AmF, pH 4.5 or EP pre-treatment all except one coating survived. In the other groups, almost all coatings were lost and there was no significant difference to the control group. Pre-treatment with a Sn2+/F− solution at pH 4.5 seems able to improve the durability of adhesive coatings, rendering these an attractive option in preventing erosive wear in dentine. PMID:26075906

  10. Quantifying the brush structure and assembly of mixed brush nanoparticles in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Jason; Frischknecht, Amalie

    The arrangement of nanoparticles in a polymer melt or solution is critical to the resulting material properties. A common strategy to control the distribution of nanoparticles is to graft polymer chains onto the surface of the nanoparticles. An emerging strategy to further control the arrangement of nanoparticles is to graft polymer chains of different types and/or different lengths onto the surface of the nanoparticle, though this considerably increases the parameter space needed to describe the system. Theoretical models that are capable of predicting the assembly of nanoparticles in a melt or solution are thus desirable to guide experiments. In this talk, I will describe a recently developed non-equilibrium method that is appealing in its ability to tractably account for fluctuations and that can directly relate to experiments. To showcase the utility of this method, I apply it to mixed brush grafted nanoparticles in solution where fluctuations are prominent. Specifically, I investigate the role of experimentally relevant parameters on the structure of the brush and the corresponding effects on the assembly of the nanoparticles in solution. These results can be directly linked to experiments to help narrow the relevant parameter space for optimizing these materials.

  11. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 5; Abrasion: Plowing and Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5 discusses abrasion, a common wear phenomenon of great economic importance. It has been estimated that 50% of the wear encountered in industry is due to abrasion. Also, it is the mechanism involved in the finishing of many surfaces. Experiments are described to help in understanding the complex abrasion process and in predicting friction and wear behavior in plowing and/or cutting. These experimental modelings and measurements used a single spherical pin (asperity) and a single wedge pin (asperity). Other two-body and three-body abrasion studies used hard abrasive particles.

  12. Research on operation mode of abrasive grain during grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, T. N.; Dement’ev, V. B.; Nikitina, O. V.

    2018-03-01

    The processing of materials by cutting with an abrasive tool is carried out by means of thousands of grains bonded together as a single whole. The quality of the abrasive tool is defined by cutting properties of abrasive grains and depends on features of spreading the temperature field in time and in the abrasive grain volume. Grains are exposed to heating and cooling during work. It leads to undesired effects such as a decrease of durability of grain retention in the binder, hardness, intensification of diffusion and oxidation processes between the binder and the grain, the occurrence of considerable temperature stresses in the grain itself. The obtained equation which allows calculation of temperature field of grain for one rotation of grinding wheel shows that the temperature of the wheel depends on grinding modes and thermophysical properties of abrasive material. Thus, as the time of contact of grain with processed material increases, the temperature in the cutting area rises. As thermophysical properties increase, the temperature in cutting area decreases. Thermal working conditions are determined to be different from each other depending on contact time of the grain and the material. For example, in case of creep-feed grinding, the peak value of temperature is higher than during multistep grinding; the depth of expansion is greater. While the speed of the thermal process in creep-feed grinding is 2-3 times lower than in multistep grinding, the gradient reduces 3-4 times. The analysis of machining methods shows that creep-feed grinding ensures greater depth of grain heating, a smaller heating rate and a reduced velocity gradient. It causes a decrease of probable allotropic modifications and prevents from occurring of heat strokes - cracking of grains due to high temperature falls. Consequently, it is necessary to employ creep-feed grinding to increase the efficiency of abrasive tool employing. Three operation modes of grinding wheel including blunting, full

  13. Alcohol versus brush PRK: visual outcomes and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sia, Rose K; Ryan, Denise S; Stutzman, Richard D; Psolka, Maximilian; Mines, Michael J; Wagner, Melvin E; Weber, Eric D; Wroblewski, Keith J; Bower, Kraig S

    2012-08-01

    A smooth corneal surface prior to laser ablation is important in order to achieve a favorable refractive outcome. In this study, we compare PRK outcomes following two commonly used methods of epithelial debridement: Amoils epithelial scrubber (brush) versus 20% ethanol (alcohol). We reviewed records of patients who underwent wavefront-optimized PRK for myopia or myopic astigmatism between January 2008 and June 2010. Two treatment groups (brush vs. alcohol) were compared in terms of uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and complications at postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12. One thousand five hundred ninety-three eyes of 804 patients underwent PRK during the study period: 828 brush-treated eyes and 765 alcohol-treated eyes. At 6 months postoperatively UDVA was ≥20/20 in 94.7% of brush-treated eyes versus 94.4% of alcohol-treated eyes (P = 0.907). At 1 month a higher percentage of brush-treated eyes maintained or gained one or more lines CDVA compared to alcohol-treated eyes (P = 0.007), but there were no other differences in UDVA, MRSE, or CDVA at any point postoperatively. At 1 month 75.4% of brush-treated eyes versus 70.4% of alcohol-treated eyes were free of complications (P = 0.032), and there were fewer brush-treated eyes with corneal haze (4.0% vs. 6.9%, P = 0.012) and dry eye (8.9% vs. 14.4%, P = 0.001). Although corneal haze was slightly more frequent in the alcohol group, most was trace and not significant. Although alcohol-assisted PRK had more minor complications in the early postoperative period, including corneal haze and dry eye, results for both groups beyond 1 month were comparable. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Self inflicted corneal abrasions due to delusional parasitosis

    PubMed Central

    Meraj, Adeel; Din, Amad U; Larsen, Lynn; Liskow, Barry I

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of self inflicted bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage due to ophthalmic and cutaneous delusional parasitosis. A male in his 50s presented with a 10 year history of believing that parasites were colonizing his skin and biting into his skin and eyes. The patient had received extensive medical evaluations that found no evidence that symptoms were due to a medical cause. He was persistent in his belief and had induced bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage by using heat lamps and hair dryers in an attempt to disinfect his body. The patient was treated with olanzapine along with treatment for his skin and eyes. His delusional belief system persisted but no further damage to his eyes and skin was noted on initial follow-up. PMID:22689836

  15. The worn dentition--pathognomonic patterns of abrasion and erosion.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the dental literature has revealed various causes of tooth wear, yet it has failed to provide a conclusive method of differentiation and diagnosis of the condition. The categories of tooth wear encountered most commonly in dental practice are abrasion and erosion. The major causes of wear from abrasion are bruxism and toothpaste abuse, and the major causes of wear from erosion are regurgitation, coke-swishing and fruit-mulling. Through in-depth clinical study of these causes, this paper provides a diagnostic system that will enable dental professionals to determine and differentiate the exact aetiology of the worn dentition simply by the recognition of the pathognomonic wear patterns on diagnostic casts, which are based upon the position and quantity of the non-carious loss of tooth structure.

  16. Design of a new abrasive slurry jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Shi, L. L.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    With the advantages of a low system working pressure, good jet convergence and high cutting quality, abrasive slurry jet (ASJ) has broad application prospects in material cutting and equipment cleaning. Considering that the generator plays a crucial role in ASJ system, the paper designed a new type ASJ generator using an electric oil pump, a separate plunger cylinder, and a spring energized seal. According to the determining of structure shape, size and seal type, a new ASJ generator has been manufactured out and tested by a series of experiments. The new generator separates the abrasive slurry from the dynamic hydraulic oil, which can improve the service life of the ASJ system. And the new ASJ system can reach 40 MPa and has good performance in jet convergence, which deserves to popularization and application in materials machining.

  17. Abrasion resistance of muscovite in aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Calvin J.; Struble, Alexander; Whitmore, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Complementary aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments showed a trend in muscovite abrasion that may be useful for identifying ancient sandstones as aeolian or subaqueous in origin. We found that our experimental aeolian processes pulverized the micas quickly, while our subaqueous processes did not. In a pair of abrasion resistance experiments conducted with micaceous quartz sand, it was found that large muscovite grains were (1) reduced by aeolian processes to less than 500 μm in just 4 days, and (2) preserved by subaqueous processes to 610 ± 90 μm even after 356 days. At 20 days of aeolian transport no loose micas could be found even under the microscope, but after a year of subaqueous transport loose muscovite grains could still be seen with the naked eye. Thus, the occurrence and character of micas in a sandstone, particularly muscovite, may be helpful in determining the ancient depositional process.

  18. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Metals Selection for Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Hoffman, Richard; Hill, Maria M.; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of metals was examined for suitability for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment, one of ten microrover experiments of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. The seven candidate metals were: Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Ni, Pt, and W. Thin films of candidate metals from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer thick were deposited on black anodized aluminum coupons by e-beam and resistive evaporation and chemical vapor deposition. Optical, corrosion, abrasion, and adhesion criteria were used to select Al, Ni, and Pt. A description is given of the deposition and testing of thin films, followed by a presentation of experimental data and a brief discussion of follow-on testing and flight qualification.

  19. Comparison of anti-plaque efficacy between a low and high cost dentifrice: A short term randomized double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Ganavadiya, Rahul; Shekar, B. R. Chandra; Goel, Pankaj; Hongal, Sudheer G.; Jain, Manish; Gupta, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the anti-plaque efficacy of a low and high cost commercially available tooth paste among 13-20 years old adolescents in a Residential Home, Bhopal, India. Materials and Methods: The study was randomized double-blind parallel clinical trial conducted in a Residential Home, Bhopal, India. A total of 65 patients with established dental plaque and gingivitis were randomly assigned to either low cost or high cost dentifrice group for 4 weeks. The plaque and gingival scores at baseline and post-intervention were assessed and compared. Statistical analysis was performed using paired t-test and the independent sample t-test. The statistical significance was fixed at 0.05. Results: Results indicated a significant reduction in plaque and gingival scores in both groups post-intervention compared with the baseline. Difference between the groups was not significant. No adverse events were reported and both the dentifrices were well-tolerated. Conclusion: Low cost dentifrice is equally effective to the high cost dentifrice in reducing plaque and gingival inflammation. PMID:25202220

  20. Enamel remineralization effect of a dentifrice containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate: an optical coherence tomography observation.

    PubMed

    Matsuyoshi, Saki; Murayama, Ryosuke; Akiba, Shunsuke; Yabuki, Chiaki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a dentifrice containing 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSP) on the remineralization of the enamel using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Bovine incisors were sliced and shaped in a rectangular form. One group of five specimens was treated with undersaturated 0.1 M lactic acid buffer solution (pH 4.75) for 10 min and then placed in artificial saliva (pH 7.0) (De group). Other specimens were stored in solutions of toothpaste containing CSP for 10 min, followed by 10-min immersion in the lactic acid buffer solution twice a day before storage in artificial saliva (CSP group). An additional group was stored in only artificial saliva (control group). OCT imaging on the selected location of the enamel surface was performed. The peak intensity and width at 1/e 2 were recorded in each of the six areas on the sample and averaged, and the sample size of each group was six. The integrated value in units (dB × μm) was calculated in the area of peak intensity. The data for each group was subjected to one-way repeated-measures ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The changes in integrated values of each group were different. A slight but significant increase in the integrated value was observed in the control group, whereas a slight but significant decrease in the value was observed the De group. Integrated values increased in the CSP group. Remineralization occurred upon immersion in the toothpaste containing CSP.

  1. Investigation of wear resistance of polyurethanes in abrasive soil mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiórkowski, Jerzy; Ligier, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of polyurethane wear in different abrasive soil masses. Two types of polyurethanes of various chemical compositions and untreated 38GSA steel were tested, the latter being used as a reference standard. The study was conducted in natural soil mass at a "rotating bowl" stand. Relative wear resistance was determined from measurements of mass wear for the materials under study. The condition of the surface of the materials under wear test was analysed.

  2. Supporting awareness through collaborative brushing and linking of tabular data.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Amir Hossein; Tory, Melanie; Leung, Rock

    2013-12-01

    Maintaining an awareness of collaborators' actions is critical during collaborative work, including during collaborative visualization activities. Particularly when collaborators are located at a distance, it is important to know what everyone is working on in order to avoid duplication of effort, share relevant results in a timely manner and build upon each other's results. Can a person's brushing actions provide an indication of their queries and interests in a data set? Can these actions be revealed to a collaborator without substantially disrupting their own independent work? We designed a study to answer these questions in the context of distributed collaborative visualization of tabular data. Participants in our study worked independently to answer questions about a tabular data set, while simultaneously viewing brushing actions of a fictitious collaborator, shown directly within a shared workspace. We compared three methods of presenting the collaborator's actions: brushing & linking (i.e. highlighting exactly what the collaborator would see), selection (i.e. showing only a selected item), and persistent selection (i.e. showing only selected items but having them persist for some time). Our results demonstrated that persistent selection enabled some awareness of the collaborator's activities while causing minimal interference with independent work. Other techniques were less effective at providing awareness, and brushing & linking caused substantial interference. These findings suggest promise for the idea of exploiting natural brushing actions to provide awareness in collaborative work.

  3. What information can frictional properties of polymer brushes tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Moxey, Mark; Morse, Andrew; Armes, Steven; Lewis, Andrew; Geoghegan, Mark; Leggett, Graham

    2013-03-01

    We have used friction force microscopy (FFM) to quantitatively examine surface grown zwitterionic polymer brushes: poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC), and to establish the correlation between its frictional behaviour to other intrinsic properties. In a good solvent, it was found that the coefficient of friction (μ) decreased with increasing film thickness. We conclude that the amount of bound solvent increases as the brush length increases, causing the osmotic pressure to increase and yielding a reduced tendency for the brush layer to deform under applied load. When measured in a series of alcohol/water mixtures, a significant increase in μ was observed for ethanol/water mixtures at a volume fraction of 90%. This is attributed to brush collapse due to co-nonsolvency, leading to loss of hydration of the brush chains and hence substantially reduced lubrication. We show that single asperity contact mechanics is strongly dependent on solvent quality. Friction-load relationship was found linear in methanol (good solvent), but sub-linear in water and ethanol (moderate solvent).

  4. Monitoring the degrafting of polyelectrolyte brushes by using surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeongun; Genzer, Jan

    Polymer brushes comprise densely grafted polymer chains on surfaces, which possess high stability and high concentration of reactive centers per unit area compared to physisorbed polymer film. Polymer brushes are employed in many applications, including anti-fouling surfaces, cell adhesive surfaces, responsive surfaces, low-friction surfaces, etc. Recently, researchers reported that charged (or chargeable) polymer brushes can be degrafted from substrate while incubated in buffer solutions. Based on previous experiments conducted in our group and by others, we assume that chain degrafting results from the hydrolysis of Si-O groups in head-group of the initiator and/or the ester groups in main body of the initiator. The kinetic of hydrolysis is affected by mechanical forces acting on the initiator. Those forces depend on the molecular weight and the grafting density of the brush, and the concentration and distribution of charges along the macromolecule (tuned by pH - for weak electrolytes - and concentration of external salt). In this work, we study the stability of poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes in two solvents (ethanol and water) at various pH values in water and under different levels of external salt concentration. National Science Foundation.

  5. From Comb-like Polymers to Bottle-Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Heyi; Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey; Sheiko, Sergei

    We use a combination of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis to study conformations of bottle-brushes and comb-like polymers in a melt. Our analysis show that bottle-brushes and comb-like polymers can be in four different conformation regimes depending on the number of monomers between grafted side chains and side chain degree of polymerization. In loosely-grafted comb regime (LC) the degree of polymerization between side chains is longer than side chain degree of polymerization, such that the side chains belonging to the same macromolecule do not overlap. Crossover to a new densely-grafted comb regime (DC) takes place when side chains begin to overlap reducing interpenetration of side chains belonging to different macromolecules. In these two regimes both side-chains and backbone behave as unperturbed linear chains with the effective Kuhn length of the backbone being close to that of linear chain. Further decrease spacer degree of polymerization results in crossover to loosely-grafted bottle-brush regime (LB). In this regime, the bottle-brush backbone is stretched while the side-chains still maintain ideal chain conformation. Finally, for even shorter spacer between grafted side chains, which corresponds to densely-grafted bottle-brush regime (DB), the backbone adopts a fully extended chain conformation, and side-chains begin to stretch to maintain a constant monomer density. NSF DMR-1409710, DMR-1407645, DMR-1624569, DMR-1436201.

  6. Evaluation of Internal Brushing on Pinch Weld Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P

    2005-12-01

    Post machining operations such as borescope inspection can cause linear indications down the length of the bore of fill stems. Often these indications are removed or obscured using rotary wire brushing. This study evaluated the effect this mechanical operation may have on pinch weld quality when relatively cold welds were made. A total of four stems with two levels of brushing of both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two each of the Type 304L stems were Nitradd cleaned and the other two were aqueously cleaned; all four 21-6-9 stems were aqueously cleaned. All of themore » brushed stem areas exhibited more surface anomalies based on borescope evaluation. On average, the bond rating was a higher value (worse) for the brushed areas than the unadulterated areas for both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stems. The test method used may have biased the results towards a lesser quality bond for the brushed areas so additional testing is recommended.« less

  7. Effective teaching of tooth-brushing to preschool children.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Almut; Reschke, Konrad; Rupf, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare artificial tooth-brushing models (TBM) and individual modeling regarding their efficacy in teaching the correct brushing movements to younger preschool children. A total of 141 30- to 50-month-old preschool children who had not been previously instructed on tooth-brushing were enrolled in the present trial. Four different model types/groups were compared: (1) giant TBM; (2) animal TBM puppet; (3) child him/herself in front of the mirror; (4) another person with the child in the mirror. Parameters of imitational learning were investigated by means of single-person monitoring on the basis of a standardized observational method. The subjects were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups, which were comparable regarding gender and age. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. This study demonstrated that behavioral modeling types 3 and 4 were more suitable as a methodological basis than TBM. Correct tooth-brushing position and movement were correlated with the attractiveness of the model and its similarity to the child. It was shown that human models achieved greatest learning success. It is important to find a "helper" and an attractive model person assisting in guiding the brush with a feedback in a mirror.

  8. Adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms in ion implanted metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-03-01

    The distinction between adhesive and abrasive wear processes was introduced originally by Burwell during the nineteen-fifties, though some authors prefer to classify wear according to whether it is mild or severe. It is argued here that, on the basis of the performance of a variety of ion implanted metal surfaces, exposed to different modes of wear, the Burwell distinction is a valid one which, moreover, enables us to predict under which circumstances a given treatment will perform well. It is shown that, because wear rates under abrasive conditions are very sensitive to the ratio of the hardness of the surface to that of the abrasive particles, large increases in working life are attainable as a result of ion implantation. Under adhesive wear conditions, the wear rate appears to fall inversely as the hardness increases, and it is advantageous to implant species which will create and retain a hard surface oxide or other continuous film in order to reduce metal-metal contact. By the appropriate combination of physico-chemical changes in an implanted layer it has been possible to reduce wear rates by up to three orders of magnitude. Such rates compensate for the shallow depths achievable by ion implantation.

  9. Development of underwater cutting system by abrasive water-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi

    1993-09-01

    The technology to cut objects in the ocean's depths with abrasive water jets was examined for possible application in view of the greater water depths and sophistication involved in work on the ocean floor today. A test model was developed to study this technology's safety and practicability. The test model was designed for use at great water depths and has functions and a configuration that are unlike equipment used on land. A continuous, stable supply of abrasive is a distinctive design feature. In land applications, there had been problems with plugged tubes and an uneven supply. For this reason, the abrasive was converted to slurry form, and a continuous pressurized tube pump system was adopted for supply to the nozzle head. Also, a hydraulic motor that does not employ oil or electric power was used to provide an underwater drive that is environment-friendly. The report outlines the technology's general design concept including its distinctive functions and its configuration for use at great depths, and the report provides great detail on the equipment.

  10. pH-cycling models for in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of fluoridated dentifrices for caries control: strengths and limitations

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélica Reis; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; RIOS, Daniela; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; DELBEM, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2010-01-01

    Despite a plethora of in situ studies and clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of fluoridated dentifrices on caries control, in vitro pH cycling models are still broadly used because they mimic the dynamics of mineral loss and gain involved in caries formation. This paper critically reviews the current literature on existing pH-cycling models for the in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of fluoridated dentifrices for caries control, focusing on their strengths and limitations. A search was undertaken in the MEDLINE electronic journal database using the keywords "pH-cycling", "demineralization", "remineralization", "in vitro", "fluoride", "dentifrice". The primary outcome was the decrease of demineralization or the increase of remineralization as measured by different methods (e.g.: transverse microradiography) or tooth fluoride uptake. Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. One hundred and sixteen studies were included, of which 42 addressed specifically the comparison of dentifrices using different pH-cycling models. The other studies included meta-analysis or reviews, data about the effect of different fluoride sources on de-remineralization, different methods for analysis de-remineralization and chemical variables and characteristics of dental hard tissues that might have influence on de-remineralization processes. Generally, the studies presented ability to detect known results established by clinical trials, to demonstrate dose-related responses in the fluoride content of the dentifrices, and to provide repeatability and reproducibility between tests. In order to accomplish these features satisfactorily, it is mandatory to take into account the type of substrate and baseline artificial lesion, as well as the adequate response variables and statistical approaches to be used. This

  11. A randomised study to compare salivary pH, calcium, phosphate and calculus formation after using anticavity dentifrices containing Recaldent(®) and functionalized tri-calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ena; Vishwanathamurthy, Ramesh Alampalli; Nadella, Manjari; Savitha, A N; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Hussain, M Ahad

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the pH of saliva, concentration of calcium and inorganic phosphate, and calculus formation before and after usage of Recaldent(®) (GC Tooth Mousse Plus™), Functionalized Tricalcium Phosphate (3M ESPE ClinPro™ Tooth Crème) and standard dentifrice (Colgate dental cream). Randomized double-blind study. A total of 50 subjects were recruited, the subjects were assessed at their first visit, on the 21(st) day and on the 42(nd) day. At the first visit, scaling was carried out and oral hygiene instructions were given. After 21 days, the subjects were given coded dentifrices where the operator and the subjects both were unaware of the type of dentifrice. Clinical parameters assessed were Plaque index, Gingival index, and Calculus index. Salivary samples were obtained to measure calcium, phosphate levels, and pH at 21(st) day and 42(nd) day. ANOVA test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean salivary calcium level and mean salivary phosphate level were higher in Group III (functionalized tricalcium phosphate (3M ESPE ClinPro™ Tooth Creme) as compared to Group II (Recaldent(®) GC Tooth Mousse Plus™) and Group I (Colgate dental cream) on the 42(nd) day after using dentifrices, which was statistically significant. This showed that the usage of remineralizing dentifrices led to an increase in the salivary calcium, phosphate, and pH but it did not reach the level of super saturation of the ions caused by elevated pH which could lead to calculus formation. Thought here was a statistically significant increase in salivary calcium and phosphate level in all three groups from baseline to 42(nd) day, there was no calculus formation.

  12. Controls on wind abrasion patterns through a fractured bedrock landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, J. P.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wind abrasion is an important geomorphic process for understanding arid landscape evolution on Earth and interpreting the post-fluvial history of Mars. Both the presence and orientation of wind-abraded landforms provide potentially important constraints on paleo-climatic conditions; however, such interpretations can be complicated by lithologic and structural heterogeneity. To explore the influence of pre-existing structure on wind abrasion, we exploit a natural experiment along the 10.2 Ma Lower Rio San Pedro ignimbrite in northern Chile. Here, a 3.2 Ma andesite flow erupted from Cerro de las Cuevas and deposited atop the ignimbrite, supplying wind-transportable sediment and initiating a phase of downwind abrasion. Additionally, the lava flow provides a continually varying degree of upwind topographic shielding along the ignimbrite that is reflected in a range of surface morphologies. Where fully shielded the ignimbrite surface is partially blanketed by sediment. However, as relief decreases the surface morphology shifts from large polygonal structures that emerge due to the concentration of wind abrasion along pre-existing fracture sets, to polygons that are bisected by wind-parallel grooves that cross-cut fracture sets, to linear sets of yardangs. We reconstruct the ignimbrite surface using a high-resolution digital elevation model, and calculate erosion rates ranging from 0.002 to 0.45 mm/kyr that vary strongly with degree of topographic shielding (R2 = 0.97). We use measured abrasion rates together with nearby weather station data to estimate the nondimensional Rouse number and Inertial Parameter for a range of particle sizes. From these calculations, we hypothesize that the change from fracture-controlled to flow-controlled morphology reflects increases in the grain size and inertia of particles in the suspension cloud. Where the ignimbrite experiences persistent high winds, large particles may travel in suspension and are largely insensitive to topographic

  13. The abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded enamel.

    PubMed

    Mosquim, Victor; Martines Souza, Beatriz; Foratori Junior, Gerson Aparecido; Wang, Linda; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the in vitro abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded bovine enamel samples in respect to erosive tooth wear. 72 bovine crowns were embedded, polished and subjected to the baseline profile analysis. The samples were then protected in 2/3 of the enamel surface and were randomly assigned to six groups (n= 12/group): G1: Oral-B 3D White, G2: Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White, G3: Sorriso Xtreme White 4D, G4: Colgate Luminous White, G5: Crest (conventional toothpaste), G6:erosion only (control). All samples were submitted to an erosive pH cycling (4 x 90 seconds in 0.1% citric acid, pH 2.5, per day) and abrasive challenges (2 x 15 seconds, per day) for 7 days. After the first and the last daily cycles, the samples were subjected to abrasive challenges, using a toothbrushing machine, soft toothbrushes and slurry of the tested toothpastes (1.5 N). Between the challenges, the samples were immersed in artificial saliva. The final profile was obtained and overlaid to the baseline profile for the calculation of the erosive tooth wear (μm). The data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (P< 0.05). G1 promoted the highest enamel wear (3.68±1.06 μm), similarly to G3 (3.17± 0.80 μm) and G4 (3.44± 1.29 μm). G3 and G4 performed similarly between them and compared with G5 (2.35± 1.44 μm). G2 (1.51± 0.95 μm) and G6 (0.85± 0.36 μm) showed the lowest enamel wear, which did not differ between them and from G5. Oral-B 3D White showed the highest abrasive potential while Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White showed the lowest abrasive potential on eroded enamel in vitro. This study showed that some commercial whitening toothpastes, especially those containing pyrophosphate associated with hydrated silica, enhanced enamel erosive wear.

  14. Surface Modification of Nonwoven fabrics by Atmospheric Brush Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksuz, Lutfi; Uygun, Emre; Bozduman, Ferhat; Yurdabak Karaca, Gozde; Asan, Orkun Nuri; Uygun Oksuz, Aysegul

    2017-10-01

    Polypropylene nonwoven fabrics (PPNF) are used in disposable absorbent articles, such as diapers, feminine care products, wipes. PPNF need to be wettable by water or aqueous-based liquid. Plasma surface treatment/modification has turned out to be a well-accepted method since it offers superior surface property enhancement than other chemical methods. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical application. The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of two different nonwoven surfaces.

  15. Surface changes of enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertiwi, U. I.; Eriwati, Y. K.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the surface roughness changes of tooth enamel after brushing with charcoal toothpaste. Thirty specimens were brushed using distilled water (the first group), Strong® Formula toothpaste (the second group), and Charcoal® Formula toothpaste for four minutes and 40 seconds (equivalent to one month) and for 14 minutes (equivalent to three months) using a soft fleece toothbrush with a mass of 150 gr. The roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester, and the results were tested with repeated ANOVA test and one-way ANOVA. The value of the surface roughness of tooth enamel was significantly different (p<0.05) after brushing for an equivalent of one month and an equivalent of three months. Using toothpaste containing charcoal can increase the surface roughness of tooth enamel.

  16. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  17. Polyacrylic acid polymer brushes as substrates for the incorporation of anthraquinone derivatives. Unprecedented application of decorated polymer brushes on organocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Muelle, Ana Belén; Contreras-Cáceres, Rafael; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Rodríguez-Dieguez, Antonio; López-Romero, Juan Manuel; Fernández, Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis of amino-terminated anthraquinone derivatives and their incorporation onto polymer brushes for the fabrication of silicon-based nanometric functional coatings are described for the first time. The general process involves the covalent grafting of anthraquinone 1 onto two different polymer-brushes by amidation reactions. They are composed by amino- and carboxy-terminated poly(acrylic acid) chains (PAA-NH2- and PAA-COOH, respectively) tethered by one end to an underlying silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate in a polymer brush configuration. A third substrate is fabricated by UV induced hydrosilylation reaction using undecenoic acid as adsorbate on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces. One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), FT-IR, MS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize anthraquinone 1. Ellipsometric and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrated the presence of the polymer brushes on the silicon wafers, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study its surface morphology. The covalent linkage between anthraquinone and polymer brushes was proven by XPS and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The resulting surfaces were assayed in the heterogenous organocatalytic transformation of (1H)-indole into 3-benzyl indole with moderate yields but with high recyclability.

  18. The protective effect of SnF2 containing toothpastes and solution on enamel surfaces subjected to erosion and abrasion in situ.

    PubMed

    Hove, L H; Stenhagen, K R; Holme, B; Tveit, A B

    2014-08-01

    Stannous fluoride solutions have shown promising protective effect against erosion/abrasion, but the effect of SnF2 toothpastes is uncertain. The aim of the study was to test the inhibiting effect of two SnF2 toothpastes and a SnF2 solution against erosive/abrasive wear in a single-blind, randomised in situ study, using a white light interferometer. Sixteen human molars were each divided into four specimens, mounted on mouth appliances and worn by 8 volunteers for 9 days. Specimens were brushed with toothpaste twice each day for 30 s either with fluoride-free toothpaste or toothpastes including SnF2. Toothpaste was left on the surface for 90 additional seconds. Group 1, fluoride-free toothpaste; Group 2, toothpaste A (0.4% SnF2, Solidox); Group 3, toothpaste B (0.454 % SnF2, Oral-B(®)); Group 4, brushed with fluoride-free toothpaste (30 s) and treated for 2 min with a 0.4 % SnF2 solution (1,000 ppm F). To mimic gastric reflux/vomit, specimens were etched for 2 min twice a day (0.01 M HCl). Procedures were performed extra-orally. The mean enamel wear (in μm) for the control specimens was: -29.2 ± SD 10.5; for group 2 -14.5 SD ± 9.3; for group 3 -33.3 SD ± 7.4, and for group 4 +0.4 SD ± 1.3. The specimens treated with SnF2 solution and toothpaste A showed significantly lower enamel wear than the control group. Toothpaste B gave no significant reduction in enamel wear. The SnF2 solution fully protected the enamel surface against erosive and abrasive challenges. The SnF2 toothpaste A (Solidox) showed less, but significant protection of the enamel, while no statistically significant protection was demonstrated by SnF2 toothpaste B (Oral-B(®) Pro-Expert).

  19. Effect of a chitosan additive to a Sn2+-containing toothpaste on its anti-erosive/anti-abrasive efficacy--a controlled randomised in situ trial.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, N; Klimek, J; Ganss, C

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that Sn(2+) is a notable anti-erosive agent. There are indications that biopolymers such as chitosan can enhance the effect of Sn(2+), at least in vitro. However, little information exists about their anti-erosive/anti-abrasive in situ effects. In the present in situ study, the efficacy of Sn(2+)-containing toothpastes in the presence or absence of chitosan was tested. Ten subjects participated in the randomised crossover study, wearing mandibular appliances with human enamel specimens. Specimens were extraorally demineralised (7 days, 0.5% citric acid, pH 2.6; 6 × 2 min/day) and intraorally exposed to toothpaste suspensions (2 × 2 min/day). Within the suspension immersion time, one half of the specimens were additionally brushed intraorally with a powered toothbrush (5 s, 2.5 N). Tested preparations were a placebo toothpaste (negative control), two experimental toothpastes (F/Sn = 1,400 ppm F(-), 3,500 ppm Sn(2+); F/Sn/chitosan = 1,400 ppm F(-), 3,500 ppm Sn(2+), 0.5 % chitosan) and an SnF2-containing gel (positive control, GelKam = 3,000 ppm Sn(2+), 1,000 ppm F(-)). Substance loss was quantified profilometrically (μm). In the placebo group, tissue loss was 11.2 ± 4.6 (immersion in suspension) and 17.7 ± 4.7 (immersion in suspension + brushing). Immersion in each Sn(2+)-containing suspension significantly reduced tissue loss (p ≤ 0.01); after immersion in suspension + brushing, only the treatments with GelKam (5.4 ± 5.5) and with F/Sn/chitosan (9.6 ± 5.6) significantly reduced loss [both p ≤ 0.05 compared to placebo; F/Sn 12.8 ± 6.4 (not significant)] Chitosan enhanced the efficacy of the Sn(2+)-containing toothpaste as an anti-erosive/anti-abrasive agent. The use of Sn(2+)- and chitosan-containing toothpaste is a good option for symptomatic therapy in patients with regular acid impacts.

  20. Gingival condition and tooth-brushing behavior after alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S; Ekuni, D; Tomofuji, T; Yamane, M; Azuma, T; Iwasaki, Y; Morita, M

    2015-08-01

    Various studies have reported the relationship between alcohol consumption and gingival condition. However, they focus on the direct effects of alcohol consumption or alcohol sensitivity on gingival condition, and it is unclear how oral health behaviors relate these relationships. The aims of this study were to assess the inter-relationships between gingival condition, tooth-brushing behavior after drinking alcohol and alcohol sensitivity in university students who drink more than once per week on average. A total of 808 students (541 males, 267 females) that habitually consume alcohol were analyzed. The disease activity of gingival condition was assessed as the percentage of bleeding on probing (%BOP). Additional information regarding alcohol sensitivity and oral health behaviors, including tooth-brushing behavior after drinking, were also collected. Thirteen percent of the current participants reported neglecting tooth-brushing after drinking, and their alcohol consumption was higher than those who did not neglect tooth-brushing. Logistic regression analysis showed that high %BOP (%BOP ≥ 20) was associated with male (OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.33), neglect of tooth-brushing after drinking (OR = 2.60; 95% CI, 1.20-5.61) and debris index (OR = 8.38; 95% CI, 4.24-16.60) in participants with low alcohol sensitivity. In participants with high alcohol sensitivity, high %BOP was associated with debris index (OR = 7.60; 95% CI, 3.12-18.51), but not with any oral health behaviors. The study revealed that alcohol consumption was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the neglect of tooth-brushing after drinking alcohol in university students with low alcohol sensitivity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Charged Polymer Brushes: Counterion Incorporation and Scaling Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Heiko; Förster, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.

    1998-11-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a fluid hydrophobic and a polyelectrolyte part form monolayers at the air/water interface. With x-ray reflectivity it is shown that the hydrophobic block is a nm-thick melt, while the polyelectrolyte forms an osmotically swollen brush of constant thickness, independent of grafting density and with stochiometric counter ion incorporation. Only at high salt conditions (above 0.1 M), the brush shrinks and the thickness scales with the molecular area and the salt concentration (corrected for excluded volume interactions) with an exponent -1/3.

  2. Ordered quasi-two-dimensional structure of nanoparticles in semiflexible ring polymer brushes under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yunfeng; Deng, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Linxi

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring model of ring polymer brushes under compression are presented. Flexible polymer brushes are always disordered during compression, whereas semiflexible polymer brushes tend to be ordered under sufficiently strong compression. Further, the polymer monomer density of the semiflexible polymer brush is very high near the brush surface, inducing a peak value of the free energy near the surface. Therefore, when nanoparticles are compressed in semiflexible ring polymer brushes, they tend to exhibit a closely packed single-layer structure between the brush surface and the impenetrable wall, and a quasi-two-dimensional ordered structure near the brush surface is formed under strong compression. These findings provide a new approach to designing responsive applications.

  3. Efficient Energy Conversion by Grafting Nanochannels with End-charged Stimuli-responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2017-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes have aroused increasing attention in applications in energy conversion and chemical sensing due to the environmentally-responsive and designable nature. PE brushes are charged polymer chains densely grafted on solid-liquid interfaces. By designing copolymeric systems, one can localize the ionizable sites at the brush tip in order to get end-charged PE brushes. Such brushes demonstrate anomalous shrinking/swelling behaviors with tunable environmental parameters such as pH and salt concentration. In this study, we probe the conformation and electrostatics of such PE brush systems with various size, grafting density and charge distribution, and exploit the electrochemomechanical energy conversion capabilities of nanochannels grafted with such PE brush systems. Our results indicate that the presence of the end-charged PE brush layer can massively enhance the streaming potential mediated energy conversion efficiency, and the improvement is more significant in strongly ionic solution.

  4. Control technology for crystalline silica exposures in construction: wet abrasive blasting.

    PubMed

    Golla, Vijay; Heitbrink, William

    2004-03-01

    This study was designed to document the effect that wet abrasive blasting has on reducing worker exposure to crystalline silica, which has been associated with silicosis and premature death. In this study, worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica was monitored during wet abrasive blasting on the exterior walls of a parking garage to remove surface concrete and expose the underlying aggregate. In this process a wet sand mix comprised of 80% dry sand and 20% water was used. Sampling and analysis revealed that the geometric mean respirable quartz concentration was 0.2 mg/m(3) for workers conducting abrasive blasting and 0.06 mg/m(3) for helpers. When abrasive blasting was conducted in areas that apparently had reduced natural ventilation, dust exposures appeared to increase. When compared with other published data, this case study suggests that wet abrasive blasting causes less exposure to crystalline silica than dry abrasive blasting.

  5. Study of Effect of Impacting Direction on Abrasive Nanometric Cutting Process with Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junye; Meng, Wenqing; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Xinming; Zhao, Weihong

    2018-01-01

    Abrasive flow polishing plays an important part in modern ultra-precision machining. Ultrafine particles suspended in the medium of abrasive flow removes the material in nanoscale. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effect of impacting direction on abrasive cutting process during abrasive flow polishing. The molecular dynamics simulation software Lammps was used to simulate the cutting of single crystal copper with SiC abrasive grains at different cutting angles (0o-45o). At a constant friction coefficient, we found a direct relation between cutting angle and cutting force, which ultimately increases the number of dislocation during abrasive flow machining. Our theoretical study reveal that a small cutting angle is beneficial for improving surface quality and reducing internal defects in the workpiece. However, there is no obvious relationship between cutting angle and friction coefficient.

  6. Study of Effect of Impacting Direction on Abrasive Nanometric Cutting Process with Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Junye; Meng, Wenqing; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Xinming; Zhao, Weihong

    2018-01-11

    Abrasive flow polishing plays an important part in modern ultra-precision machining. Ultrafine particles suspended in the medium of abrasive flow removes the material in nanoscale. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effect of impacting direction on abrasive cutting process during abrasive flow polishing. The molecular dynamics simulation software Lammps was used to simulate the cutting of single crystal copper with SiC abrasive grains at different cutting angles (0 o -45 o ). At a constant friction coefficient, we found a direct relation between cutting angle and cutting force, which ultimately increases the number of dislocation during abrasive flow machining. Our theoretical study reveal that a small cutting angle is beneficial for improving surface quality and reducing internal defects in the workpiece. However, there is no obvious relationship between cutting angle and friction coefficient.

  7. The efficiency of child formula dentifrices containing different calcium and phosphate compounds on artificial enamel caries.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Khumsub, Ploychompoo

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride toothpaste has been extensively used to prevent dental caries. However, the risk of fluorosis is concerning, especially in young children. Calcium phosphate has been an effective remineralizing agent and is present in commercial dental products, with no risk of fluorosis to users. This in vitro study aimed to compare the effects of different calcium phosphate compounds and fluoride-containing dentifrices on artificial caries in primary teeth. Fifty sound primary incisors were coated with nail varnish, leaving two 1 mm 2 windows on the labial surface before immersion in demineralizing solution for 96 hours to produce artificial enamel lesions. Subsequently, one window from each tooth was coated with nail varnish, and all 50 teeth were divided into five groups ( n = 10); group A - deionized water; group B - casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (Tooth Mousse); group C - 500 ppm F (Colgate Spiderman ® ); group D - nonfluoridated toothpaste with triple calcium phosphate (Pureen ® ); and group E - tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Polarized light microscopy and Image-Pro ® Plus software were used to evaluate lesions. After a 7-day pH-cycle, mean lesion depths in groups A, B, C, D, and E had increased by 57.52 ± 10.66%, 33.28 ± 10.16%, 17.04 ± 4.76%, 32.51 ± 8.99%, and 21.76 ± 8.15%, respectively. All data were processed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 16.0) software package. Comparison of percentage changes using one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least squares difference tests at a 95% level of confidence demonstrated that group A was significantly different from the other groups ( P < 0.001). Lesions in groups B and D had a significant lesion progression when compared with groups C and E. All toothpastes in this study had the potential to delay the demineralization progression of artificial enamel caries in primary teeth. The fluoride 500 ppm and TCP toothpastes were equal in the deceleration of

  8. The efficiency of child formula dentifrices containing different calcium and phosphate compounds on artificial enamel caries

    PubMed Central

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Khumsub, Ploychompoo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride toothpaste has been extensively used to prevent dental caries. However, the risk of fluorosis is concerning, especially in young children. Calcium phosphate has been an effective remineralizing agent and is present in commercial dental products, with no risk of fluorosis to users. This in vitro study aimed to compare the effects of different calcium phosphate compounds and fluoride-containing dentifrices on artificial caries in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Fifty sound primary incisors were coated with nail varnish, leaving two 1 mm2 windows on the labial surface before immersion in demineralizing solution for 96 hours to produce artificial enamel lesions. Subsequently, one window from each tooth was coated with nail varnish, and all 50 teeth were divided into five groups (n = 10); group A – deionized water; group B – casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP–ACP) paste (Tooth Mousse); group C – 500 ppm F (Colgate Spiderman®); group D – nonfluoridated toothpaste with triple calcium phosphate (Pureen®); and group E – tricalcium phosphate (TCP). Polarized light microscopy and Image-Pro® Plus software were used to evaluate lesions. Results: After a 7-day pH-cycle, mean lesion depths in groups A, B, C, D, and E had increased by 57.52 ± 10.66%, 33.28 ± 10.16%, 17.04 ± 4.76%, 32.51 ± 8.99%, and 21.76 ± 8.15%, respectively. All data were processed by the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 16.0) software package. Comparison of percentage changes using one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least squares difference tests at a 95% level of confidence demonstrated that group A was significantly different from the other groups (P < 0.001). Lesions in groups B and D had a significant lesion progression when compared with groups C and E. Conclusions: All toothpastes in this study had the potential to delay the demineralization progression of artificial enamel caries in primary teeth. The

  9. Resistance to abrasion of extrinsic porcelain esthetic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Chi, Woo J; Browning, William; Looney, Stephen; Mackert, J Rodway; Windhorn, Richard J; Rueggeberg, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    A novel esthetic porcelain characterization technique involves mixing an appropriate amount of ceramic colorants with clear, low-fusing porcelain (LFP), applying the mixture on the external surfaces, and firing the combined components onto the surface of restorations in a porcelain oven. This method may provide better esthetic qualities and toothbrush abrasion resistance compared to the conventional techniques of applying color-corrective porcelain colorants alone, or applying a clear glaze layer over the colorants. However, there is no scientific literature to support this claim. This research evaluated toothbrush abrasion resistance of a novel porcelain esthetic characterization technique by subjecting specimens to various durations of simulated toothbrush abrasion. The results were compared to those obtained using the conventional characterization techniques of colorant application only or colorant followed by placement of a clear over-glaze. Four experimental groups, all of which were a leucite reinforced ceramic of E TC1 (Vita A1) shade, were prepared and fired in a porcelain oven according to the manufacturer's instructions. Group S (stain only) was characterized by application of surface colorants to provide a definitive shade of Vita A3.5. Group GS (glaze over stain) was characterized by application of a layer of glaze over the existing colorant layer as used for Group S. Group SL (stain+LFP) was characterized by application of a mixture of colorants and clear low-fusing add-on porcelain to provide a definitive shade of Vita A3.5. Group C (Control) was used as a control without any surface characterization. The 4 groups were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing using a 1:1 water-to-toothpaste solution for a simulated duration of 32 years of clinical use. The amount of wear was measured at time intervals simulating every 4 years of toothbrushing. These parameters were evaluated longitudinally for all groups as well as compared at similar time points among

  10. Some metallographic results for brush bristles and brush segments of a shroud ring brush seal tested in a T-700 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Griffin, Thomas A.; Bobula, George A.; Bill, Robert C.; Hull, David R.; Csavina, Kristine R.

    1994-01-01

    Post-test investigation of a T-700 engine brush seal found regions void of bristles ('yanked out'), regions of bent-over bristles near the inlet, some 'snapped' bristles near the fence, and a more uniform smeared bristle interface between the first and last axial rows of bristles. Several bristles and four brush segments were cut from the brush seal, wax mounted, polished, and analyzed. Metallographic analysis of the bristle near the rub tip showed tungsten-rich phases uniformly distributed throughout the bristle, no apparent change within 1 mu m of the interface, and possibly a small amount of titanium, which would represent a transfer from the rotor. Analysis of the bristle wear face showed nonuniform tungsten, which is indicative of material resolidification. The cut end contained oxides and internal fractures; the worn end was covered with oxide scale. Material losses due to wear and elastoplastic deformation within the shear zone and third-body lubrication effects in the contact zone are discussed.

  11. Shoe heel abrasion and its possible biomechanical cause: a transversal study with infantry recruits.

    PubMed

    Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando C; Macedo, Benjamim; Silva, Thiago Alexandre Alves; Baumfeld, Tiago; Favato, Danilo Fabrino; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Nery, Caio

    2015-11-19

    Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available about this feature and its possible causes. The purpose of this study was to relate this phenomenon with biomechanical factors that could predispose to shoe heel abrasion. Ninety-seven recruits (median age 25) were enrolled in this study. Shoe abrasion was assessed manually with a metric plastic tape on the posterior part of the heel that comes in contact with the ground. The number of sprains, foot alignment, and calf muscle shortening (Silfverskiold test) was also assessed in order to relate it with shoe heel abrasion. After using our exclusion criteria, 86 recruits and 172 were considered for this study. The most common abrasion site was the lateral portion of the heel surface (50 %). Forty-four percent of the participants had neutral hind-foot alignment and 39 % had valgus alignment. Twenty-six (30 %) patients have had previous ankle or foot sprains. Neutral foot was related with less calf muscle shortening. On the other hand, valgus hind-foot alignment was more associated with Achilles shortening (p < 0.05). Patients with neutral alignment were associated with more uniform shoe heel abrasion and varus feet were associated with more central and lateral abrasion (p < 0.05). The pattern of shoe heel abrasion was not statistically related with calf muscle shortening nor with number of sprains. This study was able to correlate shoe heel abrasion with biomechanical causes (neutral alignment-uniform abrasion/varus alignment-central and lateral abrasion). More effort has to be done to continue evaluating outsole abrasion with its possible biomechanical cause in order to predict and treat possible associated injuries.

  12. The change in retentive force of magnetic attachment by abrasion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanjin; Tawada, Yasuyuki; Hata, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Fumihiko

    2008-07-01

    Magnets are frequently applied to removable dentures as retentive attachments. A magnet-retained removable overdenture might be slightly shifted from side to side by eccentric movement in the mouth, and the surface of magnetic attachment may be worn as a result. However, the relationship between the retentive force of magnetic attachment and its surface abrasion has not been reported. The purpose of this research is to investigate this relationship. Ten Mgfit DX 400 magnetic attachments for natural tooth roots were used for this experiment. The magnetic attachments were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, and ten pairs of specimens were fabricated. A 5-mm repeated gliding motion was applied on each pair of specimens until 30 000, 50 000, or 90 000 cycles had been achieved. The abrasion machine was under 5 kg loading, and the slide speed was 60 times/min. The retentive force of magnetic attachment was measured with a tension gauge at (1) before gliding; (2) after 30 000 gliding cycles; (3)after 50 000 gliding cycles; or (4) after 90 000 gliding cycles. The average change of retentive force of ten magnetic attachments after 30 000, 50 000, and 90 000 gliding cycles was 0.016 N, 0.003 N, and -0.008 N, respectively. The change was statistically analyzed using a paired-sample t test, which showed that the number of gliding cycles did not affect the retentive force of magnetic attachment significantly. The surface of magnetic attachment after gliding was observed by a microscope, and the abrasion of this attachment surface is clearly seen.

  13. Comparison of Three types of Tooth Brushes on Plaque and Gingival Indices: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Moeintaghavi, Amir; Sargolzaie, Naser; Rostampour, Mehrnoosh; Sarvari, Sara; Kargozar, Sanaz; Gharaei, Shideh

    2017-01-01

    To compare clinical results of three types of manual tooth brushes on plaque removal efficacy and gingivitis. This study is a single blind randomized trial with crossover design which involved 30 periodontaly healthy individuals. Professional plaque removal and oral hygiene instruction were performed for all the participants in the first step of our study followed by asking them to avoid brushing for 2 days. Thereafter plaque and gingivitis scores were measured using plaque and gingival indices (PI and GI). Then subjects were instructed to use Pulsar tooth brush for a two-week period and then, GI and PI indices were assessed again. After passing one-week period for wash out, subjects didn't brush for 2 days and indices were recorded again. The same procedure was done for CrossAction, and Butler 411 tooth brushes respectively and at the end of the study these variables were analyzed using SPSS software ver.16. Repeated measurement ANOVA test was used to compare the scores between different brushes. Finding of this study reveals that using all three types of tooth brushes resulted in significant plaque and gingivitis reduction compared to baseline levels. Pulsar tooth brush was significantly more effective in diminishing PI and GI than Butler tooth brush (p=0.044 and 0.031 respectively). According to our findings all 3 types of tooth brushes are effective in reduction of plaque and gingivitis and this reduction is significantly greater for Pulsar tooth brush compared to Butler and CrossAction tooth brushes.

  14. 46 CFR 108.187 - Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified... Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified spaces. Ventilation for brush type electric motors in... Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Locations”, except audible and visual alarms may be used if shutting down...

  15. Chemical control of brush in ponderosa pine forests of central Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Walter G. Dahms

    1961-01-01

    The many acres of forest land that are occupied by brush in central Oregon represent a large-scale waste of timber-growing capacity and a major economic loss to the area. Although large brushfields devoid of tree growth present the most spectacular examples of loss, less obvious but equally important brush problems are common in established timber stands. Brush...

  16. Tooth brushing habits in uninstructed adults--frequency, technique, duration and force.

    PubMed

    Ganss, C; Schlueter, N; Preiss, S; Klimek, J

    2009-06-01

    Professional recommendations for individual oral hygiene mostly include tooth brushing at least twice daily for 2-3 min with gentle force using the Bass technique or modifications of it. This study evaluated whether habitual tooth brushing actually meets these standards. Uninstructed adults (n = 103; mean age 31 +/- 6 years; 61 female, 42 male) with habitual manual tooth brushing were given a self-administered questionnaire about the frequency of brushing and a computer system recorded their brushing technique, duration and force. The majority (79.6%) of participants brushed twice daily. The mean brushing duration was 96.6 +/- 36.0 s, the mean brushing force was 2.3 +/- 0.7 N (max. 4.1 N), and no significant differences were found for quadrants. Most subjects (73.8%) brushed with circling, 8.7% with horizontal/scrubbing, 13.6% with horizontal/circling and 3.9% with vertical/sweeping movements. Modified Bass technique was not observed. When appropriate brushing habits were defined as brushing at least twice daily for 120 s with a brushing force of less than 3 N and with circling or vertical sweeping movements, only 25.2% of the participants fulfilled all criteria, emphasising the ongoing need for oral hygiene education.

  17. 46 CFR 108.187 - Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified... Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified spaces. Ventilation for brush type electric motors in classified locations must meet N.F.P.A. 496-1974 “Standard for Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for...

  18. Chemical brush control on central Oregon ponderosa pine lands.

    Treesearch

    Walter G. Dahms

    1955-01-01

    Practical brush control appears to be within sight for some of the problem areas in central Oregon as a result of experiments conducted on the Pringle Falls Experimental Forest and Deschutes National Forest. Small-plot trials to determine which chemicals will kill manzanita (Arctostaphylos parryana var. pinetorum (Rollins)...

  19. AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO VALUING WATER FROM BRUSH CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical methodology utilizing models from three disciplines is developed to assess the viability of brush control for wate yield in the Frio River Basin, TX. Ecological, hydrologic, and economic models are used to portray changes in forage production and water supply result...

  20. Polymer Brush-Functionalized Chitosan Hydrogels as Antifouling Implant Coatings.

    PubMed

    Buzzacchera, Irene; Vorobii, Mariia; Kostina, Nina Yu; de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Riedel, Tomáš; Bruns, Michael; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Möller, Martin; Wilson, Christopher J; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar

    2017-06-12

    Implantable sensor devices require coatings that efficiently interface with the tissue environment to mediate biochemical analysis. In this regard, bioinspired polymer hydrogels offer an attractive and abundant source of coating materials. However, upon implantation these materials generally elicit inflammation and the foreign body reaction as a consequence of protein fouling on their surface and concomitant poor hemocompatibility. In this report we investigate a strategy to endow chitosan hydrogel coatings with antifouling properties by the grafting of polymer brushes in a "grafting-from" approach. Chitosan coatings were functionalized with polymer brushes of oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate using photoinduced single electron transfer living radical polymerization and the surfaces were thoroughly characterized by XPS, AFM, water contact angle goniometry, and in situ ellipsometry. The antifouling properties of these new bioinspired hydrogel-brush coatings were investigated by surface plasmon resonance. The influence of the modifications to the chitosan on hemocompatibility was assessed by contacting the surfaces with platelets and leukocytes. The coatings were hydrophilic and reached a thickness of up to 180 nm within 30 min of polymerization. The functionalization of the surface with polymer brushes significantly reduced the protein fouling and eliminated platelet activation and leukocyte adhesion. This methodology offers a facile route to functionalizing implantable sensor systems with antifouling coatings that improve hemocompatibility and pave the way for enhanced device integration in tissue.

  1. Salt dependence of compression normal forces of quenched polyelectrolyte brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Zapata, Ernesto; Tamashiro, Mario N.; Pincus, Philip A.

    2001-03-01

    We obtained mean-field expressions for the compression normal forces between two identical opposing quenched polyelectrolyte brushes in the presence of monovalent salt. The brush elasticity is modeled using the entropy of ideal Gaussian chains, while the entropy of the microions and the electrostatic contribution to the grand potential is obtained by solving the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the system in contact with a salt reservoir. For the polyelectrolyte brush we considered both a uniformly charged slab as well as an inhomogeneous charge profile obtained using a self-consistent field theory. Using the Derjaguin approximation, we related the planar-geometry results to the realistic two-crossed cylinders experimental set up. Theoretical predictions are compared to experimental measurements(Marc Balastre's abstract, APS March 2001 Meeting.) of the salt dependence of the compression normal forces between two quenched polyelectrolyte brushes formed by the adsorption of diblock copolymers poly(tert-butyl styrene)-sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) [PtBs/NaPSS] onto an octadecyltriethoxysilane (OTE) hydrophobically modified mica, as well as onto bare mica.

  2. Dendritic brushes under theta and poor solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergidis, Leonidas N.; Kalogirou, Andreas; Charalambopoulos, Antonios; Vlahos, Costas

    2013-07-01

    The effects of solvent quality on the internal stratification of polymer brushes formed by dendron polymers up to third generation were studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations with Langevin thermostat. The distributions of polymer units, of the free ends, the radii of gyration, and the back folding probabilities of the dendritic spacers were studied at the macroscopic states of theta and poor solvent. For high grafting densities we observed a small decrease in the height of the brush as the solvent quality decreases. The internal stratification in theta solvent was similar to the one we found in good solvent, with two and in some cases three kinds of populations containing short dendrons with weakly extended spacers, intermediate-height dendrons, and tall dendrons with highly stretched spacers. The differences increase as the grafting density decreases and single dendron populations were evident in theta and poor solvent. In poor solvent at low grafting densities, solvent micelles, polymeric pinned lamellae, spherical and single chain collapsed micelles were observed. The scaling dependence of the height of the dendritic brush at high density brushes for both solvents was found to be in agreement with existing analytical results.

  3. The Conformation of Thermoresponsive Polymer Brushes Probed by Optical Reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Varma, Siddhartha; Bureau, Lionel; Débarre, Delphine

    2016-04-05

    We describe a microscope-based optical setup that allows us to perform space- and time-resolved measurements of the spectral reflectance of transparent substrates coated with ultrathin films. This technique is applied to investigate the behavior in water of thermosensitive polymer brushes made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted on glass. We show that spectral reflectance measurements yield quantitative information about the conformation and axial structure of the brushes as a function of temperature. We study how parameters such as grafting density and chain length affect the hydration state of a brush, and provide one of the few experimental evidences for the occurrence of vertical phase separation in the vicinity of the lower critical solution temperature of the polymer. The origin of the hysteretic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes upon cycling the temperature is also clarified. We thus demonstrate that our optical technique allows for in-depth characterization of stimuli-responsive polymer layers, which is crucial for the rational design of smart polymer coatings in actuation, gating, or sensing applications.

  4. Disposal of logging slash, thinnings, and brush by burying

    Treesearch

    Harry E Schimke; Ronald H. Dougherty

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted on the Stanislaus National Forest to find out if logging slash, thinnings, and brush could be disposed of by burying. This method of slash disposal shows promise and has some distinct advantages over disposal by chipping and burning.

  5. 75 FR 18237 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-244 (Third Review)] Natural Bristle Paint... determination to conduct a full five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on natural bristle paint... revocation of the antidumping duty order on natural bristle paint brushes from China would be likely to lead...

  6. Optimization of Profile and Material of Abrasive Water Jet Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand Bala Selwin, K. P.; Ramachandran, S.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this work is to study the behaviour of the abrasive water jet nozzle with different profiles and materials. Taguchi-Grey relational analysis optimization technique is used to optimize the value with different material and different profiles. Initially the 3D models of the nozzle are modelled with different profiles by changing the tapered inlet angle of the nozzle. The different profile models are analysed with different materials and the results are optimized. The optimized results would give the better result taking wear and machining behaviour of the nozzle.

  7. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  8. Brushing-Induced Surface Roughness of Two Nickel Based Alloys and a Titanium Based Alloy: A Comparative Study - In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, B L Guruprasanna; Nadiger, Ramesh; Shetty, Bharathraj; Gururaj, G; Kumar, K Naveen; Darshan, D D

    2014-01-01

    be given to the selection of the toothbrushes and toothpastes with the medium abrasives in patients with these restorations. How to cite the article: Acharya BL, Nadiger R, Shetty B, Gururaj G, Kumar KN, Darshan DD. Brushing induced surface roughness of two nickel based alloys and a titanium based alloy: A comparative study - In vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):36-49. PMID:25083031

  9. Baking soda as an abrasive in toothpastes: Mechanism of action and safety and effectiveness considerations.

    PubMed

    Hara, Anderson T; Turssi, Cecilia P

    2017-11-01

    Toothpastes can be formulated with different abrasive systems, depending on their intended clinical application. This formulation potentially affects their effectiveness and safety and, therefore, requires proper understanding. In this article, the authors focused on abrasive aspects of toothpastes containing sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), which have gained considerable attention because of their low abrasivity and good compatibility, while providing clinical effectiveness (further detailed in the other articles of this special issue). The authors first appraised the role of toothpaste abrasivity on tooth wear, exploring some underlying processes and the existing methods to determine toothpaste abrasivity. The authors reviewed the available data on the abrasivity of toothpastes containing baking soda and reported a summary of findings highlighting the clinical implications. On the basis of the collected evidence, baking soda has an intrinsic low-abrasive nature because of its comparatively lower hardness in relation to enamel and dentin. Baking soda toothpastes also may contain other ingredients, which can increase their stain removal effectiveness and, consequently, abrasivity. Even those formulations have abrasivity well within the safety limit regulatory agencies have established and, therefore, can be considered safe. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrologic Effects of Brush Management in Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, J. R.; Slattery, R.

    2011-12-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into traditional savanna grassland ecosystems in central Texas has largely been attributed to land use practices of settlers, most notably overgrazing and fire suppression. Implementing brush management practices (removing the woody vegetation and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area), could potentially change the hydrology in a watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several local, State, and Federal cooperators, studied the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. Two adjacent watersheds of 104 and 159 hectares were used in a paired study. Rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration (Bowen ratio method), and water quality data were collected in both watersheds. Using a hydrologic mass balance approach, rainfall was allocated to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but estimated as the residual of the hydrologic mass balance. After hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for 3 years, approximately 80 percent of the woody vegetation (ashe juniper) was selectively removed from the 159 hectare watershed (treatment watershed). Brush management was not implemented in the other (reference) watershed. Hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for six years after brush management implementation. The resulting data were examined for differences in the hydrologic budget between the reference and treatment watersheds as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods to assess effects of the treatment. Preliminary results indicate there are differences in the hydrologic budget as well as water quality between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods.

  11. Protective Effect of Adhesive Systems associated with Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Laser on Enamel Erosive/Abrasive Wear.

    PubMed

    Crastechini, Erica; Borges, Alessandra B; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas; Torres, Carlos Rg

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of self-etching adhesive systems associated or not associated with the neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on the protection against enamel erosive/abrasive wear. Bovine enamel specimens were demineralized with 0.3% citric acid (5 minutes). The samples were randomly assigned to eight groups (n = 20): SB - Single Bond Universal (3M/ESPE); SB+L - Single Bond Universal + laser (80 mJ/10 Hz); FB - Futurabond U (Voco); FB+L -Futurabond U + laser; GEN - G-aenial bond (GC); GEN+L -G-aenial bond + laser; L - laser irradiation; and C - no treatment. The laser was applied before light curing. The samples were subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges (0.3% citric acid - 2 minutes and tooth brushing four times daily for 5 days). Enamel surface loss was recovered profilometrically by comparison of baseline and final profiles. The adhesive layer thickness, retention percentage of the protective layer, and microhardness of cured adhesive were measured. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). There were significant differences for all parameters (p = 0.0001). Mean values ± SD and results of the Tukey's test were: Surface wear: GEN - 4.88 (±1.09)a, L - 5.04 ± 0.99)a, FB - 5.32 (±0.93)ab, GEN + L - 5.46 (±1.27)abc, SB + L - 5.78 (±1.12)abc, FB + L - 6.23 (±1.25)bc, SB - 6.35 (±1.11)c, and C - 6.46 (±0.61)c; layer thickness: GEN - 15.2 (±8.63)c, FB - 5.06 (±1.96)a, GEN + L - 13.96 (±7.07)bc, SB + L - 4.24 (±2.68)a, FB + L - 9.03 (±13.02)abc, and SB - 7.49 (±2.80)ab; retention: GEN - 68.89 (±20.62)c, FB - 54.53 (±24.80)abc, GEN + L - 59.90 (±19.79)abc, SB + L - 63.37 (±19.30)bc, FB + L - 42.23 (±17.68) a, and SB - 47.78 (±18.29)ab; microhardness: GEN - 9.27 (±1.75)c; FB - 6.99 (±0.89)b; GEN + L - 6.22 (±0.87)ab; SB + L - 15.48 (±2.51)d; FB + L - 10.67 (±1.58)c; SB - 5.00 (±1.60)a. The application of Futurabond U and G-aenial bond on enamel surface, as well as the Nd

  12. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  13. Sliding-gate valve for use with abrasive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Jr., William J.; Carter, Charles R.; Griffith, Richard A.; Loomis, Richard B.; Notestein, John E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a flow and pressure-sealing valve for use with abrasive solids. The valve embodies special features which provide for long, reliable operating lifetimes in solids-handling service. The valve includes upper and lower transversely slidable gates, contained in separate chambers. The upper gate provides a solids-flow control function, whereas the lower gate provides a pressure-sealing function. The lower gate is supported by means for (a) lifting that gate into sealing engagement with its seat when the gate is in its open and closed positions and (b) lowering the gate out of contact with its seat to permit abrasion-free transit of the gate between its open and closed positions. When closed, the upper gate isolates the lower gate from the solids. Because of this shielding action, the sealing surface of the lower gate is not exposed to solids during transit or when it is being lifted or lowered. The chamber containing the lower gate normally is pressurized slightly, and a sweep gas is directed inwardly across the lower-gate sealing surface during the vertical translation of the gate.

  14. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  15. Air abrasion experiments in U-Pb dating of zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldich, S.S.; Fischer, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    Air abrasion of zircon grains can remove metamict material that has lost radiogenic Pb and zircon overgrowths that were added during younger events and thereby improve the precision of the age measurements and permit closer estimates of the original age. Age discordance that resulted from a single disturbance of the U-Pb isotopic decay systems, as had been demonstrated by T.E. Krogh, can be considerably reduced, and, under favorable conditions, the ages brought into concordancy. Two or more events complicate the U-Pb systematics, but a series of abrasion experiments can be helpful in deciphering the geologic history and in arriving at a useful interpretation of the probable times of origin and disturbances. In east-central Minnesota, U.S.A., Penokean tonalite gneiss is dated at 1869 ?? 5 Ma, and sheared granite gneiss is shown to have been a high-level granite intrusion at 1982 ?? 5 Ma in the McGrath Gneiss precursor. Tonalite gneiss and a mafic granodiorite in the Rainy Lake area, Ontario, Canada, are dated at 2736 ?? 16 and 2682 ?? 4 Ma, respectively. The tonalitic phase of the Morton Gneiss, southwestern Minnesota, is dated at 3662 ?? 42 Ma. ?? 1986.

  16. Abrasion and Fragmentation Processes in Marly Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, C.; Naaim, F.; Mathys, N.; Lave, J.; Kaitna, R.

    2009-04-01

    In the highly erosive marly catchments of Draix (Southern Alps, France), downstream fining of sediments has been observed and can not be explained by selective sorting. Moreover, high concentrations of suspended fine sediment (up to 800 g/L) are measured during flood events in these basins. These observations lead to the hypothesis that abrasion and fragmentation of marly sediments during transport play an important role in the production of fine sediments. Several experiments are conducted in order to quantify these processes: material from the river bed is introduced into the water flow in a circular flume as well as in a large scale rotating drum. Abrasion rates range from 5 to 15%/km, depending on the lithology: marls from the upper basin are more erosive than those from the lower basin. Modifications of grain size distribution in the rough fraction are also observed. Field measurements are also conducted. Downstream of the main marly sediment sources, the river bed is composed of marls and limestone pebbles. We have sampled the river bed for analysis of grain size distribution and lithology. First results show a decrease of the proportion of marls along the river bed. This is in accordance with the high erosion rates observed in our laboratory experiments. Further investigations are planned in order to study more precisely marl grain size distribution, especially in the finer fraction.

  17. Abrasive-assisted Nickel Electroforming Process with Moving Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REN, Jianhua; ZHU, Zengwei; XIA, Chunqiu; QU, Ningsong; ZHU, Di

    2017-03-01

    In traditional electroforming process for revolving parts with complex profiles, the drawbacks on surface of deposits, such as pinholes and nodules, will lead to varying physical and mechanical properties on different parts of electroformed components. To solve the problem, compositely moving cathode is employed in abrasive-assisted electroforming of revolving parts with complicated profiles. The cathode translates and rotates simultaneously to achieve uniform friction effect on deposits without drawbacks. The influences of current density and translation speed on the microstructure and properties of the electroformed nickel layers are investigated. It is found that abrasive-assisted electroforming with compound cathode motion can effectively remove the pinholes and nodules, positively affect the crystal nucleation, and refine the grains of layer. The increase of current density will lead to coarse microstructure and lower micro hardness, from 325 HV down to 189 HV. While, faster translational linear speed produces better surface quality and higher micro hardness, from 236 HV up to 283 HV. The weld-ability of the electroformed layers are also studied through the metallurgical analysis of welded joints between nickel layer and 304 stainless steel. The electrodeposited nickel layer shows fine performance in welding. The novel compound motion of cathode promotes the mechanical properties and refines the microstructure of deposited layer.

  18. Design optimization of a brush turbine with a cleaner/water based solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a turbine-brush was analyzed based on the energy conservation and the force momentum equation with an empirical relationship of the drag coefficient. An equation was derived to predict the rotational speed of the turbine-brush in terms of the blade angle, number of blades, rest of geometries of the turbine-brush and the incoming velocity. Using the observed flow conditions, drag coefficients were determined. Based on the experimental values as boundary conditions, the turbine-brush flows were numerically simulated to understand first the nature of the flows, and to extend the observed drag coefficient to a flow without holding the turbine-brush.

  19. Abrasion Plus Local Fibrin Sealant Instillation Produces Pleurodesis Similar to Pleurectomy in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Evaldo; de Carvalho, Marcus V H; Ventureli, Tiago R; Fruchi, Andre J; Lazaro, Ariane; do Carmo, Deborah C; Barreto, Thayssa Y A S; Dias, Bruno V B; Acencio, Milena M P; Teixeira, Lisete R; Light, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Pleurodesis performed either by pleurectomy or pleural abrasion is recommended in the approach to primary spontaneous pneumothorax to avoid recurrence. However, the efficacy of parietal pleural abrasion in producing pleurodesis is questioned. This study aims to determine the efficacy of apical abrasion alone, abrasion plus fibrin sealant application, and pleurectomy in producing pleurodesis in rabbits. Rabbits were subjected to video-assisted thoracic surgery alone (control) or to video-assisted thoracic surgery with apical gauze abrasion, abrasion plus fibrin sealant instillation, or apical pleurectomy. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and 48 h and 28 days postoperatively to measure total leukocytes (white blood cell count), neutrophil counts, and serum interleukin (IL)-8 levels. After 28 days the animals were sacrificed for macroscopic evaluation of the degree of apical pleurodesis and microscopic evaluation of local pleural fibrosis and collagen deposition. White blood cell and neutrophil counts were similar in all groups, whereas the serum IL-8 level peaked at 48 h in all groups and decreased after 28 days, except in the pleurectomy group. After 28 days the abrasion plus fibrin sealant and pleurectomy groups had significantly more pleural adhesions, pleural fibrosis, and collagen deposition than the abrasion alone group, mainly due to thick mature fibers. Abrasion with local fibrin sealant instillation is as effective as pleurectomy in producing pleurodesis in rabbits. Apical pleurectomy elicits a more persistent elevation of serum IL-8 levels than apical abrasion alone or abrasion plus fibrin adhesive instillation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Salt Concentration on the pH Responses of Strong and Weak Polyelectrolyte Brushes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Kou, Ran; Liu, Guangming

    2017-07-11

    Strong polyelectrolyte brushes (SPB) and weak polyelectrolyte brushes (WPB) have different origins with response to pH, which makes their pH-responsive properties sensitive to salt concentration in different ways. Herein, we have employed poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium chloride] (PMETAC) and poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) brushes as model systems for SPB and WPB, respectively, to investigate the effect of salt concentration on the pH responses of SPB and WPB using several surface-sensitive techniques. The pH-responsive properties of the PMETAC brushes are governed by the reorganization of the interchain hydrogen bonds between the grafted chains, whereas the pH response of the PDMAEMA brushes is controlled by the charge of the grafted chains. The response of the properties of the PMETAC brushes including hydration, conformation, and surface wettability becomes weaker with increasing salt concentration induced by the competitive adsorption of counterions to the brushes between OH - and Cl - . The weakening of the pH response of the PMETAC brushes is more remarkable at the relatively high pH values. The pH response of the PDMAEMA brushes also exhibits a salt-concentration dependence. As the salt concentration increases, the weakening of the pH response of the PDMAEMA brushes is attributed to the decrease in osmotic pressure within the brushes at relatively low pH values.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing.

    PubMed

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Yu, Yong; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Murakami, Daisuke; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Morizono, Ken; Iwasaki, Tomonori; Iwase, Yoko; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2015-07-01

    It is very difficult for dental professionals to objectively assess tooth brushing skill of patients, because an obvious index to assess the brushing motion of patients has not been established. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate toothbrush and arm-joint motion during tooth brushing. Tooth brushing motion, performed by dental hygienists for 15 s, was captured using a motion-capture system that continuously calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of object's motion relative to the floor. The dental hygienists performed the tooth brushing on the buccal and palatal sides of their right and left upper molars. The frequencies and power spectra of toothbrush motion and joint angles of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist were calculated and analyzed statistically. The frequency of toothbrush motion was higher on the left side (both buccal and palatal areas) than on the right side. There were no significant differences among joint angle frequencies within each brushing area. The inter- and intra-individual variations of the power spectrum of the elbow flexion angle when brushing were smaller than for any of the other angles. This study quantitatively confirmed that dental hygienists have individual distinctive rhythms during tooth brushing. All arm joints moved synchronously during brushing, and tooth brushing motion was controlled by coordinated movement of the joints. The elbow generated an individual's frequency through a stabilizing movement. The shoulder and wrist control the hand motion, and the elbow generates the cyclic rhythm during tooth brushing.

  2. Tooth brushing frequency and risk of new carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Richard D

    2016-12-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Embase, CINHAL and the Cochrane databases.Study selectionTwo reviewers selected studies, and case-control, prospective cohort, retrospective cohort and experimental trials evaluating the effect of toothbrushing frequency on the incidence or increment of new carious lesions were considered.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers undertook data abstraction independently using pre-piloted forms. Study quality was assessed using a quality assessment tool for quantitative studies developed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP). Meta-analysis of caries outcomes was carried out using RefMan and meta-regressions undertaken to assess the influence of sample size, follow-up period, caries diagnosis level and study methodological quality.ResultsThirty-three studies were included of which 13 were considered to be methodologically strong, 14 moderate and six weak. Twenty-five studies contributed to the quantitative analysis. Compared with frequent brushers, self-reported infrequent brushers demonstrated a higher incidence of carious lesions, OR=1.50 (95%CI: 1.34 -1.69). The odds of having carious lesions differed little when subgroup analysis was conducted to compare the incidence between ≥2 times/d vs <2 times/d; OR=1.45; (95%CI; 1.21 - 1.74) and ≥1 time/d vs <1 time/d brushers OR=1.56; (95%CI; 1.37 - 1.78). Brushing <2 times/day significantly caused an increment of carious lesions compared with ≥2/day brushing, standardised mean difference [SMD] =0.34; (95%CI; 0.18 - 0.49). Overall, infrequent brushing was associated with an increment of carious lesions, SMD= 0.28; (95%CI; 0.13 - 0.44). Meta-analysis conducted with the type of dentition as subgroups found the effect of infrequent brushing on incidence and increment of carious lesions was higher in deciduous, OR=1.75; (95%CI; 1.49 - 2.06) than permanent dentition OR=1.39; (95% CI: 1.29 -1.49). Meta-regression indicated that none of the included variables influenced the effect

  3. Early response of ponderosa pine to spacing and brush: observations on a 12-year-old plantation

    Treesearch

    William W. Oliver

    1979-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) was planted at five different spacings, from 6 by 6 to 18 by 18 feet, on a productive site in northern California. Spacing and brush effects on tree growth were evaluated both on plots where brush was allowed to develop and on plots kept free of brush. Competition between trees in brush-free plots began during...

  4. In vitro reproduction of incisal/occlusal cupping/cratering.

    PubMed

    Dzakovich, John J; Oslak, Robert R

    2013-06-01

    Occlusal cupping/cratering (depressed dentin surrounded by elevated rims of enamel) has been postulated to be the result of abrasion, bruxism, attrition, acid erosion, stress corrosion, or a combination of these. The primary etiology or the multifactorial sequence of occlusal cupping/cratering remains scientifically unsubstantiated. The purpose of this study was to reproduce occlusal/incisal cupping/cratering in vitro. This study was designed to create cupping/cratering on the occlusal surfaces of extracted human teeth rather than to quantify the amount of lost tooth structure caused by abrasion. One name-brand toothbrush was tested with 2 different dentifrices (of different abrasive potentials [low and high]) and water only (nonabrasive) on extracted human teeth. Six specimens of 4 teeth each (24 teeth) were subjected to horizontal brushing in a 1:1 toothpaste/water slurry and water only. The control group, brushed with water only, demonstrated no visible loss of tooth structure. Each of the specimens brushed with toothpaste, regardless of the degree of abrasivity, demonstrated visible wear of the dentin, resulting in occlusal/incisal cupping/cratering. Pronounced cupping/cratering was caused by horizontal brushing with commercial toothpastes. Brushing in water demonstrated no visual loss of occlusal tooth structure. (J Prosthet Dent 2013;109:384-391). Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical and microbiologic changes associated with the combined use of a powered toothbrush and a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice: a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bogren, Anna; Teles, Ricardo P; Torresyap, Gay; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Wennström, Jan L

    2007-09-01

    Different means are available for self-performed oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of a preventive homecare program including the combined use of a powered toothbrush and a triclosan/copolymer-containing dentifrice. A total of 160 adult subjects without signs of destructive periodontal disease were recruited for this 3-year randomized controlled trial. The subjects were assigned to a homecare program using an oscillating/rotating powered toothbrush and a triclosan/copolymer/fluoride-containing dentifrice (test) or a manual toothbrush and a standard fluoride-containing dentifrice (control). Supragingival polishing and reinforcement of homecare procedures were provided every 6 months. Plaque, bleeding on probing (BOP), and probing depth (PD) were scored at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the mesial aspect of each tooth at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years and were analyzed for their content of 40 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. All data analyses were based on "intention-to-treat" with the subject as the statistical unit. Compared to baseline, no significant changes in clinical parameters were observed during the 3 years, except for a reduction in the mean PD at the 2- and 3-year follow-up examinations (P <0.05). No significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to plaque, BOP, or PD or in the mean counts of the 40 species at any time point. The study failed to prove additional benefits of the combined use of a powered toothbrush and a triclosan/copolymer-containing dentifrice in adult subjects without signs of destructive periodontal disease.

  6. Impact of the Daily Use of a Microcrystal Hydroxyapatite Dentifrice on De Novo Plaque Formation and Clinical/Microbiological Parameters of Periodontal Health. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schlagenhauf, Ulrich; May, Theodor W.; Gravemeier, Martina; Prior, Karola; Petersilka, Gregor; Ehmke, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Aim This 12-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, two-center trial evaluated the impact of a microcrystalline zinc hydroxyapatite (mHA) dentifrice on plaque formation rate (PFR) in chronic periodontitis patients. We hypothesized that mHA precipitates cause delayed plaque development when compared to a fluoridated control (AmF/SnF2), and therefore would improve periodontal health. Material & Methods At baseline and after 4 and 12 weeks, PFR and other clinical and microbiological parameters were recorded. Seventy periodontitis patients received a mHA or AmF/SnF2 dentifrice as daily oral care without hygiene instructions. Four weeks after baseline, participants received full mouth debridement and continued using the dentifrices for another 8 weeks. Results Primary outcome PFR did not change statistically significantly from baseline to weeks 4 and 12, neither in mHA (n = 33; 51.7±17.2% vs. 48.5±16.65% vs. 48.4±19.9%) nor in AmF/SnF2-group (n = 34; 52.3±17.5% vs. 52.5±21.3% vs. 46.1±21.8%). Secondary clinical parameters such as plaque control record, gingival index, bleeding on probing, and pocket probing depth improved, but between-group differences were not statistically significant. Microbiological analyses showed similar slight decreases in colony-forming units in both groups. Conclusion In patients with mild-to-moderate periodontitis, periodontal therapy and use of a mHA-or AmF/SnF2 dentifrice without instructions induced comparable improvements in periodontal health but did not significantly reduce the PFR. Trial Registration ClincalTrials.gov NCT02697539 PMID:27467683

  7. Impact of the Daily Use of a Microcrystal Hydroxyapatite Dentifrice on De Novo Plaque Formation and Clinical/Microbiological Parameters of Periodontal Health. A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Harks, Inga; Jockel-Schneider, Yvonne; Schlagenhauf, Ulrich; May, Theodor W; Gravemeier, Martina; Prior, Karola; Petersilka, Gregor; Ehmke, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This 12-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, two-center trial evaluated the impact of a microcrystalline zinc hydroxyapatite (mHA) dentifrice on plaque formation rate (PFR) in chronic periodontitis patients. We hypothesized that mHA precipitates cause delayed plaque development when compared to a fluoridated control (AmF/SnF2), and therefore would improve periodontal health. At baseline and after 4 and 12 weeks, PFR and other clinical and microbiological parameters were recorded. Seventy periodontitis patients received a mHA or AmF/SnF2 dentifrice as daily oral care without hygiene instructions. Four weeks after baseline, participants received full mouth debridement and continued using the dentifrices for another 8 weeks. Primary outcome PFR did not change statistically significantly from baseline to weeks 4 and 12, neither in mHA (n = 33; 51.7±17.2% vs. 48.5±16.65% vs. 48.4±19.9%) nor in AmF/SnF2-group (n = 34; 52.3±17.5% vs. 52.5±21.3% vs. 46.1±21.8%). Secondary clinical parameters such as plaque control record, gingival index, bleeding on probing, and pocket probing depth improved, but between-group differences were not statistically significant. Microbiological analyses showed similar slight decreases in colony-forming units in both groups. In patients with mild-to-moderate periodontitis, periodontal therapy and use of a mHA-or AmF/SnF2 dentifrice without instructions induced comparable improvements in periodontal health but did not significantly reduce the PFR. ClincalTrials.gov NCT02697539.

  8. In vitro study of the effect of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate on acid-softened enamel.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aarti; Heu, Rod; Stranick, Michael; Sullivan, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the possible mode of action of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (Pro-Argin Technology), and sodium monofluorophosphate in delivering the benefits of preventing acid erosion and rehardening acid-softened enamel. The surfaces of acid-softened bovine enamel specimens were evaluated after application of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate in vitro. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electronic Spectrometry for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the enamel surfaces. Exposure of pristine enamel surfaces to citric acid resulted in clear roughening of the surface. Multiple applications of a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate to the surface of the enamel resulted in the disappearance of the microscopic voids observed by SEM as a function of treatment applications. The ESCA analysis demonstrated that both the nitrogen and carbonate levels increased as the number of treatments increased, which provides evidence that arginine and calcium carbonate were bound to the surface. Observance of arginine's signature mass fragmentation pattern by SIMS analysis confirmed the identity of arginine on the enamel surface. A series of in vitro experiments has demonstrated a possible mode of action by which a dentifrice containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and sodium monofluorophosphate delivers the benefits of preventing acid erosion and rehardening acid-softened enamel. The combination of arginine and calcium carbonate adheres to the enamel surface and helps to fill the microscopic gaps created by acid, which in turn helps repair the enamel and provides a protective coating against future acid attacks.

  9. Monitoring of the Abrasion Processes (by the Example of Alakol Lake, Republic of Kazakhstan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abitbayeva, Ainagul; Valeyev, Adilet; Yegemberdiyeva, Kamshat; Assylbekova, Aizhan; Ryskeldieva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the abrasion processes in the regions of dynamically changing Alakol lake shores. Using the field method, methods of positioning by the GPS receiver and interpretation of remote sensing data, the authors determined that abrasion processes actively contributed to the formation the modern landscape, causing the…

  10. Process Monitoring Evaluation and Implementation for the Wood Abrasive Machining Process

    PubMed Central

    Saloni, Daniel E.; Lemaster, Richard L.; Jackson, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading. PMID:22163477

  11. Abrasive wear of ceramic wear protection at ambient and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Adam, K.; Tumma, M.; Alessio, K. O.

    2017-05-01

    Ceramic wear protection is often applied in abrasive conditions due to their excellent wear resistance. This is especially necessary in heavy industries conveying large amounts of raw materials, e.g. in steel industry. Some plants also require material transport at high temperatures and velocities, making the need of temperature stable and abrasion resistant wear protection necessary. Various types and wear behaviour of ceramic protection are known. Hence, the goal of this study is to identify the best suitable ceramic materials for abrasive conditions in harsh environments at temperatures up to 950°C and severe thermal gradients. Chamottes, known for their excellent thermal shock resistance are compared to high abrasion resistant ceramic wear tiles and a cost efficient cement-bounded hard compound. Testing was done under high-stress three-body abrasion regime with a modified ASTM G65 apparatus enabling for investigations up to ~950°C. Thereto heated abrasive is introduced into the wear track and also preheated ceramic samples were used and compared to ambient temperature experiments. Results indicate a significant temperature influence on chamottes and the hard compound. While the chamottes benefit from temperature increase, the cement-bounded hard compound showed its limitation at abrasive temperatures of 950°C. The high abrasion resistant wear tiles represented the materials with the best wear resistance and less temperature influence in the investigated range.

  12. Air-propelled abrasive grit can damage the perennial weed, quackgrass, Elytrigia repens (L.) Nevski

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New techniques are needed to control quackgrass in organic crops. With greater than or equal to 2 applications of abrasive air-propelled (800 kPa) corncob grit to 15 cm tall quackgrass tillers, regrowth was minimal at 5 weeks after treatment. Abrasive grits may be effective tools to help manage pere...

  13. Modeling of Micro Deval abrasion loss based on some rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capik, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-10-01

    Aggregate is one of the most widely used construction material. The quality of the aggregate is determined using some testing methods. Among these methods, the Micro Deval Abrasion Loss (MDAL) test is commonly used for the determination of the quality and the abrasion resistance of aggregate. The main objective of this study is to develop models for the prediction of MDAL from rock properties, including uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, point load index, Schmidt rebound hardness, apparent porosity, void ratio Cerchar abrasivity index and Bohme abrasion test are examined. Additionally, the MDAL is modeled using simple regression analysis and multiple linear regression analysis based on the rock properties. The study shows that the MDAL decreases with the increase of uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, point load index, Schmidt rebound hardness and Cerchar abrasivity index. It is also concluded that the MDAL increases with the increase of apparent porosity, void ratio and Bohme abrasion test. The modeling results show that the models based on Bohme abrasion test and L type Schmidt rebound hardness give the better forecasting performances for the MDAL. More models, including the uniaxial compressive strength, the apparent porosity and Cerchar abrasivity index, are developed for the rapid estimation of the MDAL of the rocks. The developed models were verified by statistical tests. Additionally, it can be stated that the proposed models can be used as a forecasting for aggregate quality.

  14. Solidification/stabilization of spent abrasives and use as nonstructural concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Brabrand, D.J.; Loehr, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Tons of spent abrasives result each year from the removal of old paint from bridges. Because the spent abrasives contain metals from the paint, some spent abrasives may be considered hazardous by the Toxicity Characteristic (TC) criteria. Incorporation of the spent blasting abrasives in nonstructural concrete (rip-rap, dolphins) offers an opportunity to recycle the spent abrasives while immobilizing potentially leachable metals. This study focused on the Portland Cement Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) of spent blasting abrasives taken from a bridge located in Southeast Texas. The study examined (a) the cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations in extracts obtained by using the Toxicity Characteristicmore » Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and (b) the compressive strengths of Portland Cement mixes that contained different amounts of the spent abrasives. Performance was measured by meeting the TC criteria as well as the requirements for compressive strength. Study results indicated that considerable quantities of these spent abrasives can be solidified/stabilized while reducing the leachability of cadmium, chromium, and lead and producing compressive strengths over 6,895 kN/m[sup 2] (1,000 psi).« less

  15. Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Mary J.

    1992-01-01

    The Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application is in support of the Abrasion Resistance Materials Screening Test. The fundamental assumption made for the SEM abrasion analysis was that woven fabrics to be used as the outermost layer of the protective overgarment in the design of the future, planetary space suits perform best when new. It is the goal of this study to determine which of the candidate fabrics was abraded the least in the tumble test. The sample that was abraded the least will be identified at the end of the report as the primary candidate fabric for further investigation. In addition, this analysis will determine if the abrasion seen by the laboratory tumbled samples is representative of actual EVA Apollo abrasion.

  16. Behaviors of 40Cr steel treated by laser quenching on impact abrasive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhikai; Zhu, Qinghai; Wang, Jing; Yun, Xiao; He, Bing; Luo, Jingshuai

    2018-07-01

    In present work, laser quenching had been carried out to improve the impact abrasive wear resistance of 40Cr steel. The distinct microstructure between original and quenched region was demonstrated after laser quenching. Since the effect of temperature and cooling rate, the phase combinations were apparently different for quenched layer in depth. The impact abrasive wear resistance of sample was experimentally investigated and the improved level was assessed in light of the average mass loss of three repetitive tests. Worn surface was detected by means of SEM, OM and EDS, and results showed that three typical failure modes were performed during the processing of impact abrasive wear, including abrasive wear, impact effect and rolling contact fatigue. Basing on the different worn surface profile, the mainly failure mode was respectively pointed out for matrix and quenched sample, which was significantly in accordance with the result of impact abrasive wear.

  17. Wear resistance and mechanisms of composite hardfacings at abrasive impact erosion wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhenkov, A.; Viljus, M.; Simson, T.; Tarbe, R.; Saarna, M.; Casesnoves, F.

    2017-05-01

    Tungsten carbide based hardmetal containing sprayed and melted composite hardfacings are prospective for protection against abrasive wear. For selection of abrasive wear resistant hardfacings under intensive impact wear conditions, both mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, etc.) and abrasive wear conditions (type of abrasive, impact velocity, etc.) should be considered. This study focuses on the wear (wear rate and mechanisms) of thick metal-matrix composite hardfacings with hardmetal (WC-Co) reinforcement produced by powder metallurgy technology. The influence of the hardmetal reinforcement type on the wear resistance at different abrasive impact erosion wear (AIEW) conditions was studied. An optimal reinforcement for various wear conditions is described. Based on wear mechanism studies, a mathematical model for wear prediction was drafted.

  18. Effect of ceramic coating by aerosol deposition on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yohsuke; Hatono, Hironori; Mizukane, Masahiro; Tokita, Masahiro; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD coating) is a novel technique to coat solid substances with a ceramic film. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of AD coating on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material. A 5-microm-thick aluminum oxide layer was created on the polymerized resin composite. The specimen was cyclically abraded using a toothbrush abrasion simulator for 100,000 cycles. Abraded surface was then measured with a profilometer to determine the average roughness (Ra) and maximum roughness (Rmax). It was found that abrasion cycling increased the Ra value of the No-AD-coating group, but decreased the Ra and Rmax values of the AD coating group. Moreover, the AD coating group showed significantly smaller Ra and Rmax values after 100,000 abrasion cycles as compared to the No-coating control group. Microscopic observation supported these findings. In conclusion, the resistance of the resin composite against toothbrush abrasion was improved by AD coating.

  19. Polyacrylamide brush coatings preventing microbial adhesion to silicone rubber.

    PubMed

    Fundeanu, Irina; van der Mei, Henny C; Schouten, Arend J; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-07-15

    Silicone rubber is a frequently used biomaterial in biomedical devices and implants, yet highly prone to microbial adhesion and the development of a biomaterial-centered infection. Effective coating of silicone rubber to discourage microbial adhesion has thus far been impossible due to the hydrophobic character of its surface, surface deterioration upon treatment and instability of coatings under physiological conditions. Here we present a method to successfully grow polyacrylamide (PAAm) brushes from silicone rubber surfaces after removal of low molecular weight organic molecules (LMWOM), such as silane oligomers. PAAm brush coating did not cause any surface deterioration and discouraged microbial adhesion, even after 1-month exposure to physiological fluids. The method presented opens many new avenues for the use of silicone rubber as a biomaterial, without the risk of developing a biomaterial-centered infection.

  20. Brush reduces growth of thinned ponderosa pine in northern California

    Treesearch

    William W. Oliver

    1984-01-01

    The effects of tree spacing and brush competition were evaluated on a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. var. ponderosa) site of low productivity in California's North Coast Range. Eleven-year-old saplings were thinned to square spacings of 2.1, 2.4, 3.0, and 4.3 m (7, 8, 10, and 14 ft), and all, half, and none of...

  1. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Wear model simulating clinical abrasion on composite filling materials.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Gaute Floer; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien F; Haugen, Håvard J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a wear model for testing composite filling materials with abrasion properties closer to a clinical situation. In addition, the model was used to evaluate the effect of filler volume and particle size on surface roughness and wear resistance. Each incisor tooth was prepared with nine identical standardized cavities with respect to depth, diameter, and angle. Generic composite of 3 different filler volumes and 3 different particle sizes held together with the same resin were randomly filled in respective cavities. A multidirectional wet-grinder with molar cusps as antagonist wore the surface of the incisors containing the composite fillings in a bath of human saliva at a constant temperature of 37°C. The present study suggests that the most wear resistant filling materials should consist of medium filling content (75%) and that particles size is not as critical as earlier reported.

  3. Wire blade development for Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST) slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.; Smith, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost, effective slicing method is essential to make ingot technology viable for photovoltaics in terrestrial applications. The fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) combines the advantages of the three commercially developed techniques. In its development stage FAST demonstrated cutting effectiveness of 10 cm and 15 cm diameter workpieces. Wire blade development is still the critical element for commercialization of FAST technology. Both impregnated and electroplated wire blades have been developed; techniques have been developed to fix diamonds only in the cutting edge of the wire. Electroplated wires show the most near term promise and this approach is emphasized. With plated wires it has been possible to control the size and shape of the electroplating, it is expected that this feature reduces kerf and prolongs the life of the wirepack.

  4. Abrasive slurry jet cutting model based on fuzzy relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, C. H.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    The cutting process of pre-mixed abrasive slurry or suspension jet (ASJ) is a complex process affected by many factors, and there is a highly nonlinear relationship between the cutting parameters and cutting quality. In this paper, guided by fuzzy theory, the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ was developed. In the modeling of surface roughness, the upper surface roughness prediction model and the lower surface roughness prediction model were established respectively. The adaptive fuzzy inference system combines the learning mechanism of neural networks and the linguistic reasoning ability of the fuzzy system, membership functions, and fuzzy rules are obtained by adaptive adjustment. Therefore, the modeling process is fast and effective. In this paper, the ANFIS module of MATLAB fuzzy logic toolbox was used to establish the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ, which is found to be quite instrumental to ASJ cutting applications.

  5. Mars rover rock abrasion tool performance enhanced by ultrasonic technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macartney, A.; Li, X.; Harkness, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mars exploration Athena science goal is to explore areas where water may have been present on the early surface of Mars, and investigate the palaeo-environmental conditions of these areas in relation to the existence of life. The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) designed by Honeybee Robotics has been one of four key Athena science payload instruments mounted on the mechanical arm of the Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity Mars Exploration Rovers. Exposed rock surfaces weather and chemically alter over time. Although such weathered rock can present geological interest in itself, there is a limit to what can be learned. If the geological history of a landing site is to be constructed, then it is important to analyse the unweathered rock interior as clearly as possible. The rock abrasion tool's role is to substitute for a geologist's hammer, removing the weathered and chemically altered outer surface of rocks in order to view the pristine interior. The RAT uses a diamond resin standard common grinding technique, producing a 5mm depth grind with a relatively high surface roughness, achieved over a number of hours per grind and consumes approximately 11 watts of energy. This study assesses the benefits of using ultrasonic assisted grinding to improve surface smoothness. A prototype Micro-Optic UltraSonic Exfoliator (MOUSE) is tested on a range of rock types and demonstrates a number of advantages over the RAT. In addition to a smoother grind finish, these advantages include a lower rate of tool tip wear when using a tungsten carbide tip as opposed to diamond resin, less moving parts, a grind speed of minutes instead of hours, and a power consumption of only 1-5 Watts.

  6. Mixed polymer brushes by sequential polymer addition: anchoring layer effect.

    PubMed

    Draper, John; Luzinov, Igor; Minko, Sergiy; Tokarev, Igor; Stamm, Manfred

    2004-05-11

    Smart surfaces can be described as surfaces that have the ability to respond in a controllable fashion to specific environmental stimuli. A heterogeneous (mixed) polymer brush (HPB) can provide a synthetic route to designing smart polymer surfaces. In this research we study HPB comprised of end-grafted polystyrene (PS) and poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP). The synthesis of the HPB involves the use of an "intermolecular glue" acting as a binding/anchoring interlayer between the polymer brush and the substrate, a silicon wafer. We compare anchoring layers of epoxysilane (GPS), which forms a self-assembled monolayer with epoxy functionality, to poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA), which forms a macromolecular monolayer with epoxy functionality. The PS and P2VP were deposited onto the wafers in a sequential fashion to chemically graft PS in a first step and subsequently graft P2VP. Rinsing the HPB in selective solvents and observing the change in water contact angle as a function of the HPB composition studied the switching nature of the HPB. Scanning probe microscopy was used to probe the topography and phase imagery of the HPB. The nature of the anchoring layer significantly affected the wettability and morphology of the mixed brushes.

  7. Male brush-turkeys attempt sexual coercion in unusual circumstances.

    PubMed

    Wells, David A; Jones, Darryl N; Bulger, David; Brown, Culum

    2014-07-01

    Sexual coercion by males is generally understood to have three forms: forced copulation, harassment and intimidation. We studied Australian brush-turkeys, Alectura lathami, to determine whether some male behaviours towards females at incubation mounds could be classified as aggressive, whether males were attempting sexual coercion and, if so, whether the coercion was successful. We found that some male behaviours towards females were significantly more likely to be followed by the cessation of female mound activity, and hence could be classified as aggressive, while others were significantly more likely to be followed by the commencement of female mound activity, and hence could be classified as enticing. Copulation was preceded by higher rates of male enticement and by higher rates of certain types of male aggression. It therefore seemed that males were attempting sexual coercion. There was little evidence, however, that this combination of coercion and enticement was successful in obtaining copulations. While forced copulation did occur, it was infrequent, and no evidence could be found for intimidation. We conclude that harassment is the primary form of sexual coercion by male brush-turkeys. Although sexual coercion is understood to be a sub-optimal tactic, brush-turkey sexual coercion was employed as a primary tactic by dominant males who owned incubation mounds. One possible explanation for this apparent paradox is that aggression is the default solution for social conflicts in this species, and hence can be interpreted as a behavioural syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural analysis of paintings based on brush strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablatnig, Robert; Kammerer, Paul; Zolda, Ernestine

    1998-05-01

    The origin of works of art can often not be attributed to a certain artist. Likewise it is difficult to say whether paintings or drawings are originals or forgeries. In various fields of art new technical methods are used to examine the age, the state of preservation and the origin of the materials used. For the examination of paintings, radiological methods like X-ray and infra-red diagnosis, digital radiography, computer-tomography, etc. and color analyzes are employed to authenticate art. But all these methods do not relate certain characteristics in art work to a specific artist -- the artist's personal style. In order to study this personal style of a painter, experts in art history and image processing try to examine the 'structural signature' based on brush strokes within paintings, in particular in portrait miniatures. A computer-aided classification and recognition system for portrait miniatures is developed, which enables a semi- automatic classification and forgery detection based on content, color, and brush strokes. A hierarchically structured classification scheme is introduced which separates the classification into three different levels of information: color, shape of region, and structure of brush strokes.

  9. Technology of high-speed combined machining with brush electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, O. N.; Smolentsev, V. P.; Yukhnevich, S. S.

    2018-03-01

    The new method was proposed for high-precision dimensional machining with a brush electrode when the true position of bundles of metal wire is adjusted by means of creating controlled centrifugal forces appeared due to the increased frequency of rotation of a tool. There are the ultimate values of circumferential velocity at which the bundles are pressed against a machined area of a workpiece in a stable manner despite the profile of the machined surface and variable stock of the workpiece. The special aspects of design of processing procedures for finishing standard parts, including components of products with low rigidity, are disclosed. The methodology of calculation and selection of processing modes which allow one to produce high-precision details and to provide corresponding surface roughness required to perform finishing operations (including the preparation of a surface for metal deposition) is presented. The production experience concerned with the use of high-speed combined machining with an unshaped tool electrode in knowledge-intensive branches of the machine-building industry for different types of production is analyzed. It is shown that the implementation of high-speed dimensional machining with an unshaped brush electrode allows one to expand the field of use of the considered process due to the application of a multipurpose tool in the form of a metal brush, as well as to obtain stable results of finishing and to provide the opportunities for long-term operation of the equipment without its changeover and readjustment.

  10. Evidence to Support Tooth Brushing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully. PMID:21532045

  11. Evidence to support tooth brushing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ames, Nancy J

    2011-05-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully.

  12. [Effect of a tooth-brushing education program on oral health of preschool children].

    PubMed

    Kang, Bok-Hee; Park, Sun-Nam; Sohng, Kyeong-Yae; Moon, Jung-Soon

    2008-12-01

    To examine the effect of tooth-brushing education on the oral health of preschoolers. A quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent control group was used. Two kindergartens were selected and 39 preschoolers from one kindergarten were assigned to the experimental group with tooth-brushing education and 39 from the other kindergarten to the control group. The tooth-brushing education program included 1 session on oral health education, individual tooth-brushing instruction for 1 week and supervised tooth-brushing after lunch for 4 weeks. Oral health behavior including use of tooth paste, tooth-brushing time and method of tooth-brushing, plague, streptococcus mutans, lactobacillus and dental caries were measured before and after the education. Fisher's exact test, t-test and paired t-test with the Window SAS 9.1 program were used to analyze the data. A significant increase in the use of tooth paste, tooth-brushing time and the practice of correct tooth-brushing and a decrease in plague and development of dental caries were observed in the experimental group. This tooth-brushing education was partially effective in improving oral health of preschoolers.

  13. Self-Renewing Microns-Thick Biopolymer Brush Made of Hyaluronan under Active Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Washburn, J.; Weigel, P.; Curtis, J. E.

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a large anionic polysaccharide distributed throughout many vertebrate tissues. We introduce a technology to produce dynamic HA polymer brush interfaces. The strategy relies on the enzyme hyaluronan synthase (HA synthase), which synthesizes and extrudes HA polymers up to 20 microns in length. We show that interfaces decorated by HA synthase-rich membrane fragments robustly produce polymer brushes of predictable heights and concentration profiles. The brush thickness can be tuned by the duration of growth or the enzyme density in the membranes. The system is self-renewing in that old polymers desorb and new polymers are produced. The brush can also be replenished after enzymatic removal multiple times. The large extent of the polymer interface allows for characterization of the brush architecture and for studying dynamic processes inside the brush using optical microscopy. At low ionic strengths (1 mM), we measure one of the largest polymer brushes yet reported, an average of 7.8 microns thick. For applications that require a stable brush interface, we have covalently reinforced the HA to the surfaces, and demonstrated that the brush is stable for at least two months. This self-renewing, dynamic biopolymer brush has great potential as a new biomaterial for implants, antifouling, tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  14. Computer simulations of the mechanical response of brushes on the surface of cancerous epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicochea, A. Gama; Guardado, S. J. Alas

    2015-08-01

    We report a model for atomic force microscopy by means of computer simulations of molecular brushes on surfaces of biological interest such as normal and cancerous cervical epithelial cells. Our model predicts that the force needed to produce a given indentation on brushes that can move on the surface of the cell (called “liquid” brushes) is the same as that required for brushes whose ends are fixed on the cell’s surface (called “solid” brushes), as long as the tip of the microscope covers the entire area of the brush. Additionally, we find that cancerous cells are softer than normal ones, in agreement with various experiments. Moreover, soft brushes are found to display larger resistance to compression than stiff ones. This phenomenon is the consequence of the larger equilibrium length of the soft brushes and the cooperative association of solvent molecules trapped within the brushes, which leads to an increase in the osmotic pressure. Our results show that a careful characterization of the brushes on epithelial cells is indispensable when determining the mechanical response of cancerous cells.

  15. Evaluation of the tooth brushing skills in children aged 6-12 years.

    PubMed

    Pujar, P; Subbareddy, V V

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the tooth brushing skills in children aged between 6 and 12 years and its relation with age, type of grip used, duration of brushing and gender. A to