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Sample records for abrasive flow finishing

  1. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  2. Improved Soft Abrasive Flow Finishing Method Based on Turbulent Kinetic Energy Enhancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Jun; JI, Shiming; TAN, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    Soft abrasive flow(SAF) finishing can process the irregular geometric surfaces, but with the matter of low processing efficiency. To address the issue, an improved SAF finishing method based on turbulent kinetic energy enhancing is proposed. A constrained flow passage with serration cross-section is constructed to increase the turbulence intensity. Taking the constrained flow passage as the objective, a two-phase fluid dynamic model is set up by using particle trajectory model and standard k-ɛ turbulence model, and the flow field characteristics of the flow passage are acquired. The numerical results show that the serration flow passage can enhance the turbulence intensity, uniform the particles distribution, and increase the particle concentration near the bottom wall. The observation results by particle image velocimetry(PIV) show that the internal vortex structures are formed in flow passage, and the abrasive flow takes on turbulence concentrating phenomenon in near-wall region. The finishing experiments prove that the proposed method can obtain better surface uniformity, and the processing efficiency can be improved more 35%. This research provides an abrasive flow modeling method to reveal the particle motion regulars, and can offer references to the technical optimization of fluid-based precision processing.

  3. Surface quality control in diamond abrasive finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Yuriy D.; Sidorko, Volodymyr I.; Filatov, Olexandr Yu.; Yaschuk, Vasil P.; Heisel, Uwe; Storchak, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a procedure for measuring laser radiation reflection and scattering coefficients of polished surface. A relation between the scattered light intensity and the polished surface roughness is studied. It is demonstrated that colorimetric characteristics of non-metallic materials can be determined from the light scattering and reflection coefficients. This work has demonstrated a possibility of and created prerequisites for the development of an express method for tentative assessment of polished surface roughness. Of interest is the use of the β(Rz) function for the purposes of quality inspection of polished surfaces of natural and synthetic stone and other non-metallic materials. It was established that the most relevant parameter of roughness, which can be defined by the light reflection is Rz. The Dependency of the reflection factor from parameter of roughness Rz was approximated by formula with inaccuracy 5-10%. Inaccuracy of the determination of roughness Rz has formed 1%. It was shown that method of the surface roughness control using the light reflection factor is the most efficient for surfaces with roughness Rz <0.3 microns, typical for finish diamond-abrasive machining.

  4. Synthesis CNTs Particle Based Abrasive Media for Abrasive Flow Machining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sonu; Murtaza, Q.; Walia, R. S.; Dhull, S.; Tyagi, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    Abrasive flow machining (AFM) is a modem fine finishing process used for intricate and internal finishing of components or parts. It is based on flowing of viscoelastic abrasive media over the surface to be fine finished. The abrasive media is the important parameter in the AFM process because of its ability to accurately abrade the predefined area along it flow path. In this study, an attempt is made to develop a new abrasive, alumina with Carbon non tubes (CNTs) in viscoelastic medium. CNT s in house produced through chemical vapour deposition technique and characterize through TEM. Performance evaluation of the new abrasive media is carried out by increasing content of CNT s with fixed extrusion pressure, viscosity of media and media flow rate as process parameters and surface finish improvement and material removal as process responses in AFM setup. Significantly improvement has been observed in material removal and maximum improvement of 100% has been observed in the surface finish on the inner cylindrical surface of the cast iron work piece.

  5. Air flow exploration of abrasive feed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijin; Li, Xiaohong; Gu, Yilei

    2009-12-01

    An abrasive water-jet cutting process is one in which water pressure is raised to a very high pressure and forced through a very small orifice to form a very thin high speed jet beam. This thin jet beam is then directed through a chamber and then fed into a secondary nozzle, or mixing tube. During this process, a vacuum is generated in the chamber, and garnet abrasives and air are pulled into the chamber, through an abrasive feed tube, and mixes with this high speed stream of water. Because of the restrictions introduced by the abrasive feed tube geometry, a vacuum gradient is generated along the tube. Although this phenomenon has been recognized and utilized as a way to monitor nozzle condition and abrasive flowing conditions, yet, until now, conditions inside the abrasive feed line have not been completely understood. A possible reason is that conditions inside the abrasive feed line are complicated. Not only compressible flow but also multi-phase, multi-component flow has been involved in inside of abrasive feed tube. This paper explored various aspects of the vacuum creation process in both the mixing chamber and the abrasive feed tube. Based on an experimental exploration, an analytical framework is presented to allow theoretical calculations of vacuum conditions in the abrasive feed tube.

  6. New vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method for microstructured surface finishing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang; Kum, Chun Wai; Au, Ka Hing; Tan, Zhi'En Eddie; Wu, Hu; Liu, Kui

    2016-06-13

    In order to polish microstructured surface without deteriorating its profile, we propose a new vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method. In this method, magnetic force guarantees that the magnetic abrasives can well contact the microstructured surface and access the corners of microstructures while vibration produces a relative movement between microstructures and magnetic abrasives. As the vibration direction is parallel to the microstructures, the profile of the microstructures will not be deteriorated. The relation between vibration and magnetic force was analyzed and the feasibility of this method was experimentally verified. The results show that after polishing, the surface finish around microstructures was significantly improved while the profile of microstructures was well maintained.

  7. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  8. Mathematical modeling of surface roughness in magnetic abrasive finishing of BK7 optical glass.

    PubMed

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Rahimi, Abdolreza; Kazemi, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) is one of the advanced machining processes efficiently used to finish hard-to-machine materials. Simulation and modeling of the process is of particular importance to understand the mechanics of material removal and consequently achieve a high-quality surface with a minimum of surface defects. Hence, in this paper, we performed a numerical-experimental study to mathematically model the surface roughness during the MAF of BK7 optical glass. For this purpose, the initial roughness profile was estimated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a Gaussian filter. We obtained the final surface profile based on the material removal mechanisms and the corresponding chipping depth values evaluated by finite element analysis. We then validated experimentally the simulation results in terms of the arithmetic average surface roughness (R(a ). The comparison between the obtained results demonstrates that the theoretical and experimental findings are in good agreement when predicting the parameters' effect on surface roughness behavior.

  9. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  10. Contributions of nanodiamond abrasives and deionized water in magnetorheological finishing of aluminum oxynitriden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Chunlin; Lambropoulos, John C.; Romanofsky, Henry; Shafrir, Shai N.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2009-08-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a sub-aperture deterministic process for fabricating high-precision optics by removing material and smoothing the surface. The goal of this work is to study the relative contribution of nanodiamonds and water in material removal for MRF of aluminum oxynitride ceramic (ALON) based upon a nonaqueous magnetorheological (MR) fluid. Removal was enhanced by a high carbonyl iron concentration and the addition of nanodiamond abrasives. Small amounts of deionized (DI) water were introduced into the nonaqueous MR fluid to further influence the material removal process. Material removal data were collected with a spot-taking machine. Drag force (Fd) and normal force (Fn) before and after adding nanodiamonds or DI water were measured with a dual load cell. Both drag force and normal force were insensitive to the addition of nanodiamonds but increased with DI water content in the nonaqueous MR fluid. Shear stress (i.e., drag force divided by spot area) was calculated, and examined as a function of nanodiamond concentration and DI water concentration. Volumetric removal rate increased with increasing shear stress, which was shown to be a result of increasing viscosity after adding nanodiamonds and DI water. This work demonstrates that removal rate for a hard ceramic with MRF can be enhanced by adding DI water into a nonaqueous MR fluid.

  11. Evaluation of surface finish and polish of eight provisional restorative materials using acrylic bur and abrasive disk with and without pumice.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Wagner, Warren C; Pink, Frank E; Neme, Ann Marie

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two finishing techniques and pumice polishing on the surface roughness of eight different provisional materials. Provisional materials included polymethylmethacrylate-based Alike, Snap, Trim and Jetand composite-based provisional materials Temphase, Protemp 3 Garant, Luxatemp and Integrity. Baseline surface roughness was measured by a profilometer, then the provisional materials were finished using extra fine acrylic burs or medium abrasive disks. The surface roughness of each sample was measured following finishing using a profilometer as previously stated. Each surface was then polished with pumice and the surface roughness was measured again. The data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons (alpha = 0.05). The results indicated that with composite provisional materials, the unfinished surfaces are smoother than with bur or abrasive-disk finished surfaces. Pumice application did not smooth the surface finish for all materials. The different types of provisional materials required different finishing techniques to produce the smoothest finishes.

  12. Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation of Flow in Abrasive Water Jet Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, S.; Sathish, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Gopalakrishnan, T.

    2017-03-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting is one of the most recently developed non-traditional manufacturing technologies. In this machining, the abrasives are mixed with suspended liquid to form semi liquid mixture. The general nature of flow through the machining, results in fleeting wear of the nozzle which decrease the cutting performance. The inlet pressure of the abrasive water suspension has main effect on the major destruction characteristics of the inner surface of the nozzle. The aim of the project is to analyze the effect of inlet pressure on wall shear and exit kinetic energy. The analysis could be carried out by changing the taper angle of the nozzle, so as to obtain optimized process parameters for minimum nozzle wear. The two phase flow analysis would be carried by using computational fluid dynamics tool CFX. It is also used to analyze the flow characteristics of abrasive water jet machining on the inner surface of the nozzle. The availability of optimized process parameters of abrasive water jet machining (AWJM) is limited to water and experimental test can be cost prohibitive. In this case, Computational fluid dynamics analysis would provide better results.

  14. Can Wet Rocky Granular Flows Become Debris Flows Due to Fine Sediment Production by Abrasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Bianchi, G.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are rapid mass movements in which elevated pore pressures are sustained by a viscous fluid matrix with high concentrations of fine sediments. Debris flows may form from coarse-grained wet granular flows as fine sediments are entrained from hillslope and channel material. Here we investigate whether abrasion of the rocks within a granular flow can produce sufficient fine sediments to create debris flows. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we used a set of 4 rotating drums ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 m diameter. Each drum has vanes along the boundary ensure shearing within the flow. Shear rate was varied by changing drum rotational velocity to maintain a constant Froude Number across drums. Initial runs used angular clasts of granodiorite with a tensile strength of 7.6 MPa, with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions linearly scaled with drum radius. The fluid was initially clear water, which rapidly acquired fine-grained wear products. After each 250 m tangential distance, we measured the particle size distributions, and then returned all water and sediment to the drums for subsequent runs. We calculate particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting the Sternberg equation to the rate of mass loss from the size fraction > 2mm. Abundant fine sediments were produced in the experiments, but very little change in the median grain size was detected. This appears to be due to clast rounding, as evidenced by a decrease in the number of stable equilibrium resting points. We find that the growth in the fine sediment concentration in the fluid scales with unit drum power. This relationship can be used to estimate fine sediment production rates in the field. We explore this approach at Inyo Creek, a steep catchment in the Sierra Nevada, California. There, a significant debris flow occurred in July 2013, which originated as a coarse-grained wet granular flow. We use surveys to estimate flow depth and velocity where super

  15. A new methodology for hydro-abrasive erosion tests simulating penstock erosive flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumelas, V.; Maj, G.; Le Calvé, P.; Smith, M.; Gambiez, B.; Mourrat, X.

    2016-11-01

    Hydro-abrasive resistance is an important property requirement for hydroelectric power plant penstock coating systems used by EDF. The selection of durable coating systems requires an experimental characterization of coating performance. This can be achieved by performing accelerated and representative laboratory tests. In case of severe erosion induced by a penstock flow, there is no suitable method or standard representative of real erosive flow conditions. The presented study aims at developing a new methodology and an associated laboratory experimental device. The objective of the laboratory apparatus is to subject coated test specimens to wear conditions similar to the ones generated at the penstock lower generatrix in actual flow conditions. Thirteen preselected coating solutions were first been tested during a 45 hours erosion test. A ranking of the thirteen coating solutions was then determined after characterisation. To complete this first evaluation and to determine the wear kinetic of the four best coating solutions, additional erosion tests were conducted with a longer duration of 216 hours. A comparison of this new method with standardized tests and with real service operating flow conditions is also discussed. To complete the final ranking based on hydro-abrasive erosion tests, some trial tests were carried out on penstock samples to check the application method of selected coating systems. The paper gives some perspectives related to erosion test methodologies for materials and coating solutions for hydraulic applications. The developed test method can also be applied in other fields.

  16. Effect of Blade-surface Finish on Performance of a Single-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Jason J; Serovy, George, K

    1951-01-01

    A set of modified NACA 5509-34 rotor and stator blades was investigated with rough-machine, hand-filed, and highly polished surface finishes over a range of weight flows at six equivalent tip speeds from 672 to 1092 feet per second to determine the effect of blade-surface finish on the performance of a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Surface-finish effects decreased with increasing compressor speed and with decreasing flow at a given speed. In general, finishing blade surfaces below the roughness that may be considered aerodynamically smooth on the basis of an admissible-roughness formula will have no effect on compressor performance.

  17. Contact air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Porth, R

    1999-05-01

    The advantages of contact air abrasion techniques are readily apparent. The first, of course, is the greatly increased ease of use. Working with contact also tends to speed the learning curve by giving the process a more natural dental feel. In addition, as one becomes familiar with working with a dust stream, the potential for misdirecting the air flow is decreased. The future use of air abrasion for deep decay removal will make this the treatment of choice for the next millennium.

  18. Corrosion of RoHS-Compliant Surface Finishes in Corrosive Mixed Flowing Gas Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannigan, K.; Reid, M.; Collins, M. N.; Dalton, E.; Xu, C.; Wright, B.; Demirkan, K.; Opila, R. L.; Reents, W. D.; Franey, J. P.; Fleming, D. A.; Punch, J.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the corrosion resistance of printed wiring board (PWB) finishes has generated considerable interest due to field failures observed in various parts of the world. This study investigates the corrosion issues associated with the different lead-free PWB surface finishes. Corrosion products on various PWB surface finishes generated in mixed flowing gas (MFG) environments were studied, and analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray, x-ray diffraction, focused ion beam, and scanning Auger microscopy were used to quantify the corrosion layer thickness and determine the composition of corrosion products. The corrosion on organic solderability preservative samples shows similar corrosion products to bare copper and is mainly due to direct attack of copper traces by corrosive gases. The corrosion on electroless nickel immersion gold occurs primarily through the porosity in the film and is accelerated by the galvanic potential between gold and copper; similar results were observed on immersion silver. Immersion tin shows excellent corrosion resistance due to its inherent corrosion resistance in the MFG environment as well as the opposite galvanic potential between tin and copper compared with gold or silver and copper.

  19. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes a Corneal Abrasion? Your eye has other defenses besides the orbital bone: The eyelids and eyelashes ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  20. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... fingernails short, too.Use care when putting in contact lenses. Make sure you clean them properly each day.Don’t sleep in your contact lenses.Trim low-hanging tree branches. Corneal abrasion treatment ...

  1. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... can damage the cornea. This includes dust, sand, wood shavings, hay, sparks, bugs, pieces of paper, and ... prevent a corneal abrasion, make sure to wear protection for your eyes, such as safety goggles or ...

  2. Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Pimentel, Sam

    2014-08-01

    Field data and numerical modeling show that glaciations have the potential either to enhance relief or to dampen topography. We aim to model the effect of the subglacial hydraulic system on spatiotemporal patterns of glacial erosion by abrasion and quarrying on time scales commensurate with drainage system fluctuations (e.g., seasonal to annual). We use a numerical model that incorporates a dual-morphology subglacial drainage system coupled to a higher-order ice-flow model and process-specific erosion laws. The subglacial drainage system allows for a dynamic transition between two morphologies: the distributed system, characterized by an increase in basal water pressure with discharge, and the channelized system, which exhibits a decrease in equilibrium water pressure with increasing discharge. We apply the model to a simple synthetic glacier geometry, drive it with prescribed meltwater input variations, and compute sliding and erosion rates over a seasonal cycle. When both distributed and channelized systems are included, abrasion and sliding maxima migrate ~ 20% up-glacier compared to simulations with distributed drainage only. Power-law sliding generally yields to a broader response of abrasion to water pressure changes along the flowline compared to Coulomb-friction sliding. Multi-day variations in meltwater input elicit a stronger abrasion response than either diurnal- or seasonal variations alone for the same total input volume. An increase in water input volume leads to increased abrasion. We find that ice thickness commensurate with ice sheet outlet glaciers can hinder the up-glacier migration of abrasion. Quarrying patterns computed with a recently published law differ markedly from calculated abrasion patterns, with effective pressure being a stronger determinant than sliding speeds of quarrying rates. These variations in calculated patterns of instantaneous erosion as a function of hydrology-, sliding-, and erosion-model formulation, as well as model

  3. UltraForm finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.

    2005-05-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics manufacturing (COM). The UltraForm tool is a pressurized, elastomeric bladder in the shape of a toroid. Finishing pads are attached to the periphery, allowing the use of a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive pads. The toroidal tool is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the surface. Currently this process has specific interest for the finishing of conformal ALON Domes. Also to be discussed will be new versions of the UltraForm Tools which are currently be developed and tested.

  4. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  5. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  6. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  7. Flow Charts for Determining Your Requirements: Nine Metal Fabrication and Finishing Source Categories Area Sources National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Subpart XXXXXX

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains a July 2008 document that has flow charts to help determine if this National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) rule for Nine metal Fabrication and Finishing Area Source Categories applies to your facility.

  8. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  9. Investigation on Multi-Physics Simulation-Based Virtual Machining System for Vibratory Finishing of Integrally Bladed Rotors (IBRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiamah-Ampomah, N.; Cheng, Kai

    2016-02-01

    An investigation was carried out to improve the slow surface finishing times of integrally bladed rotors (IBRs) in the aerospace industry. Traditionally they are finished by hand, or more currently by abrasive flow machining. The use of a vibratory finishing technique to improve process times has been suggested; however as a largely empirical process, very few studies have been done to improve and optimize the cycle times, showing that critical and ongoing research is still needed in this area. An extensive review of the literature was carried out, and the findings used to identify the key parameters and model equations which govern the vibratory process. Recommendations were made towards a multi-physics-based simulation model, as well as projections made for the future of vibratory finishing and optimization of surface finishes and cycle times.

  10. Treating corneal abrasions.

    PubMed

    Wingate, S

    1999-06-01

    Although corneal abrasions are commonly seen in primary care settings, the primary care literature contains scant references on detecting and managing this problem. This article provides an overview of corneal abrasion assessment and treatment. Four common etiologies of abrasion are discussed: traumatic abrasion, contact lens abrasion, foreign body abrasion, and recurrent erosion. Parameters for the history and physical examination are outlined, including sections on contact lens removal, lid eversion, and fluorescein staining. Treatment regimens for each of the etiologies are discussed, with a focus on current research on using pressure eye patches as an intervention. Indications for referral to an ophthalmologist are noted.

  11. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 5; Abrasion: Plowing and Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5 discusses abrasion, a common wear phenomenon of great economic importance. It has been estimated that 50% of the wear encountered in industry is due to abrasion. Also, it is the mechanism involved in the finishing of many surfaces. Experiments are described to help in understanding the complex abrasion process and in predicting friction and wear behavior in plowing and/or cutting. These experimental modelings and measurements used a single spherical pin (asperity) and a single wedge pin (asperity). Other two-body and three-body abrasion studies used hard abrasive particles.

  12. UltraForm finishing; Techical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; Schoen, John; Bechtold, Michael; Mohring, D.

    2005-05-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM). The UltraForm tool is a pressurized, elastomeric bladder in the shape of a toroid. Finishing pads are attached to the periphery, allowing the use of a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive pads. The toroidal tool is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the surface. Currently this process has specific interest for the finishing of conformal ALON domes. Also to be discussed will be new versions of the UltraForm Tool, which are currently being developed and tested.

  13. Surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Hefferman, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive, covering the adhesive with a sheet of flexible film material under tension on the film material whereby the tensioned film material is bonded to the surface by the adhesive.

  14. Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain

    DOEpatents

    Plovnick, Ross; Celikkaya, Ahmet; Blake, Rodger D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.

  15. Wind abrasion on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Aeolian activity was predicted for Mars from earth based observations of changing surface patterns that were interpreted as dust storms. Mariner 9 images showed conclusive evidence for aeolian processes in the form of active dust storms and various aeolian landforms including dunes and yardangs. Windspeeds to initiate particle movement are an order of magnitude higher on Mars than on Earth because of the low atmospheric density on Mars. In order to determine rates of abrasion by wind blown particles, knowledge of three factors is required: (1) particle parameters such as numbers and velocities of windblown grains as functions of windspeeds at various heights above the surface; (2) the susceptibility to abrasion of various rocks and minerals; and (3) wind frequencies and speeds. For estimates appropriate to Mars, data for the first two parameters can be determined through lab and wind tunnel tests; data for the last two factors are available directly from the Viking Lander meteorology experiments for the two landing sites.

  16. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  17. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  18. Influence of finishing on the electrochemical properties of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Hattori, M; Hasegawa, K; Yoshinari, M; Kawada, E; Oda, Y

    2000-05-01

    Dental alloy surface finishing procedures of may influence their electrochemical behavior, which is used to evaluate their corrosion resistance. We examined the polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization profile of the precious-metal alloys, Type 4 gold alloy and silver-palladium alloy, and the base-metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy, cobalt-chromium alloy, and CP-titanium. Three types of finishing procedure were examined: mirror-finishing using 0.05 micron alumina particles, polishing using #600 abrasive paper and sandblasting. Dissolution of the alloy elements in 0.9% NaCl solution was also measured and compared with the electrochemical evaluation. The corrosion resistance of the dental alloys was found to relate to finishing as follows: The polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization behavior revealed that the corrosion resistance improved in the order of sandblasting, #600-abrasive-paper polishing, and mirror-finishing. While the corrosion potential, critical current density and passive current density varied depending on the type of finishing, the transpassive potential remained unchanged. The influence of finishing on the corrosion resistance of precious-metal alloys was less significant than on that of base-metal alloys. A mirror-finishing specimen was recommended for use in evaluation of the corrosion resistance of various dental alloys.

  19. The effects of abrasives on electrical submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The electrical submersible pump (ESP) is a high-speed rotating device. Its operational life in oil wells can depend on the type and quantities of abrasives present in the produced fluid. This paper reports on a set of experiments performed in a specialized abrasive test loop. In the test, the size and quantity of abrasives were varied along with flow rate through the pump. This paper also examines recent literature on sand production and explores some of the practical problems in sand measurement.

  20. Abrasion protection in process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, J.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

  1. Abrasion resistant composition

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  2. UltraForm finishing process for optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.; Bouvier, C.

    2005-09-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM). The latest version of the UltraForm tool "V3" is of a belted design whereby a belt of finishing material is passed over a toroidal elastomeric wheel. Finishing materials used include a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive bands. The toroidal wheel is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the optical surface. Presented will be the current results in optical glasses and crystalline ceramics such as ALON, Spinel and Polycrystalline Alumina.

  3. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  4. Acidic magnetorheological finishing of infrared polycrystalline materials

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; West, G.; ...

    2016-10-12

    Here, chemical-vapor–deposited (CVD) ZnS is an example of a polycrystalline material that is difficult to polish smoothly via the magnetorheological–finishing (MRF) technique. When MRF-polished, the internal infrastructure of the material tends to manifest on the surface as millimeter-sized “pebbles,” and the surface roughness observed is considerably high. The fluid’s parameters important to developing a magnetorheological (MR) fluid that is capable of polishing CVD ZnS smoothly were previously discussed and presented. These parameters were acidic pH (~4.5) and low viscosity (~47 cP). MRF with such a unique MR fluid was shown to reduce surface artifacts in the form of pebbles; however,more » surface microroughness was still relatively high because of the absence of a polishing abrasive in the formulation. In this study, we examine the effect of two polishing abrasives—alumina and nanodiamond—on the surface finish of several CVD ZnS substrates, and on other important IR polycrystalline materials that were finished with acidic MR fluids containing these two polishing abrasives. Surface microroughness results obtained were as low as ~28 nm peak-to-valley and ~6-nm root mean square.« less

  5. Acidic magnetorheological finishing of infrared polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; West, G.; Marshall, K. L.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2016-10-12

    Here, chemical-vapor–deposited (CVD) ZnS is an example of a polycrystalline material that is difficult to polish smoothly via the magnetorheological–finishing (MRF) technique. When MRF-polished, the internal infrastructure of the material tends to manifest on the surface as millimeter-sized “pebbles,” and the surface roughness observed is considerably high. The fluid’s parameters important to developing a magnetorheological (MR) fluid that is capable of polishing CVD ZnS smoothly were previously discussed and presented. These parameters were acidic pH (~4.5) and low viscosity (~47 cP). MRF with such a unique MR fluid was shown to reduce surface artifacts in the form of pebbles; however, surface microroughness was still relatively high because of the absence of a polishing abrasive in the formulation. In this study, we examine the effect of two polishing abrasives—alumina and nanodiamond—on the surface finish of several CVD ZnS substrates, and on other important IR polycrystalline materials that were finished with acidic MR fluids containing these two polishing abrasives. Surface microroughness results obtained were as low as ~28 nm peak-to-valley and ~6-nm root mean square.

  6. Cyanoacrylates and corneal abrasion.

    PubMed

    Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1989-01-01

    Cyanoacrylate-containing adhesives such as Super Glue, Krazy Glue, and a vast array of artificial nail adhesives are monomers which rapidly polymerize and bond in the presence of water or weak bases. Inadvertent contact with skin or tissue can also cause rapid bonding with resultant irritation. To assess the magnitude of problems associated with ocular contamination involving cyanoacrylates, a 12-month prospective study was conducted. 34 cases (21 adult and 13 pediatric) were collected. In all cases, contaminated eyes were thoroughly irrigated with tepid water for 15 minutes. 15 patients (44%) suffered a corneal abrasion, as determined by ophthalmic exam, necessitating treatment with antibiotics, cycloplegics, and patching. Individuals reporting complete resolution were irrigated with 20 minutes of exposure, while patients suffering mechanical injury delayed decontamination for a minimum of 15 minutes. In addition to immediate irrigation of eyes exposed to cyanoacrylates, we recommend an ophthalmologic evaluation to rule out the possibility of mechanical injury.

  7. The effect of three finishing systems on four esthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, D C; Neme, A M; Pink, F E; Hughes, P J

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the finishing and smoothness of composite and traditional glass-ionomer restorations, but few have included resin-modified glass-ionomer cements or more recent finishing systems. The results of using three different finishing systems (Sof-Lex, Enhance, finishing burs) on two composites (Silux, Prisma TPH), a traditional glass ionomer (Ketac-Fil), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC) were studied. Sixty samples were condensed into sectioned acrylic tubes, covered with a Mylar matrix plus a glass slide at each surface, then cured as per the manufacturers' instructions. Samples were randomized to three groups of five for each material and testing with a Surfanalyzer 4000 of unfinished samples (cured with Mylar matrix) was done to obtain baseline average surface roughness (Ra). Samples were then finished as per the manufacturers' instructions using polishing disks, abrasive impregnated disks, and finishing burs before further surface testing. Samples finished with burs and with abrasive impregnated disks were further polished using polishing paste (Prisma Gloss) and again tested. Data were analyzed with ANOVA testing and Tukey's HSD pairwise comparison. Initial testing after randomization to groups showed no significant difference in surface roughness (P = 0.24). Two-factor analysis revealed no significant difference between materials (P = 0.34), a significant difference in method of finish (P < or = 0.00), with no significant interaction between type of material and method of finish (P = 0.11). Aluminum oxide disk and impregnated disk systems provided the best finish for microfilled composite and both glass-ionomer materials (P < or = 0.00). No significant difference in method of finish existed with the hybrid composite (P = 0.07). Overall, esthetic restorative material finishing is best accomplished using abrasive impregnated disks or aluminum oxide disks. Finishing burs gave a significantly rougher surface than the

  8. Surface finish and subsurface damage in polycrystalline optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafrir, Shai Negev

    We measure and describe surface microstructure and subsurface damage (SSD) induced by microgrinding of hard metals and hard ceramics used in optical applications. We examine grinding of ceramic materials with bonded abrasives, and, specifically, deterministic microgrinding (DMG). DMG, at fixed nominal infeed rate and with bound diamond abrasive tools, is the preferred technique for optical fabrication of ceramic materials. In DMG material removal is by microcracking. DMG provides cost effective high manufacturing rates, while attaining higher strength and performance, i.e., low level of subsurface damage (SSD). A wide range of heterogeneous materials of interest to the optics industry were studied in this work. These materials include: A binderless tungsten carbide, nonmagnetic Ni-based tungsten carbides, magnetic Co-based tungsten carbides, and, in addition, other hard optical ceramics, such as aluminum oxynitride (Al23O27N5/ALON), polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3/PCA), and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (Si4C/SiC). These materials are all commercially available. We demonstrate that spots taken with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) platforms can be used for estimating SSD depth induced by the grinding process. Surface morphology was characterized using various microscopy techniques, such as: contact interferometer, noncontact white light interferometer, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The evolution of surface roughness with the amount of material removed by the MRF process, as measured within the spot deepest point of penetration, can be divided into two stages. In the first stage the induced damaged layer and associated SSD from microgrinding are removed, reaching a low surface roughness value. In the second stage we observe interaction between the MRF process and the material's microstructure as MRF exposes the subsurface without introducing new damage. Line scans taken parallel to the MR

  9. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  10. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  11. Materials selection for abrasive duty

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The abrasion of equipment caused by the throughput of large volumes of solids or dust is a major problem in mining, handling and processing minerals such as coal and limestone, and in the disposal of waste products such as ash. Loss of material from the surfaces over which these materials pass is caused by the combined effects of impact abrasion, sliding abrasion, and chemical attack. Factors which affect these processes include properties of the conveying medium, and properties of the solids, such as particle size, structural composition, size mix, as well as the velocity of the material, the bulk volume of material passing, and the frequency of plant operation. Guidelines are given for materials selection and the use of linings in the coal handling plant, pulverized coal pipework, and ash disposal plant is reviewed for coal-fired power plants.

  12. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  13. New concepts in air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Porth, R N

    1998-03-01

    There is no doubt that air abrasion is going to be part of the millennial shift in dentistry away from traditional treatment modalities. With the change in incidence and morphology of caries as a result of the hardening effect of fluoride on enamel, this ability to remove only decayed areas and permanently seal the less susceptible areas becomes increasingly desirable.

  14. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides shall... Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1964. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding...

  18. Effects of Nanodiamond Abrasive Friability in Experimental MR Fluids with Phosphate Laser Glass LHG-8 and Other Optical Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Spencer, K.E.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2005-09-22

    Research is currently being conducted to better understand the role that nanodiamond abrasives play in the removal process of Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF). The following presents removal rate data for a set of six optical glasses that were spotted (not polished out) with four different MR fluids, as well as texturing/smoothing data for phosphate laser glass LHG-8.

  19. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1990-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, a swivel assembly for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and a tubular end section for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  20. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1989-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, means for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and means for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  1. Measuring pebble abrasion on a mixed sand and gravel beach using abrasion baskets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Stephenson, Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The abrasion of sediments on mixed sand and gravel beaches has important consequences for local sediment budgets as abrasion often accounts for the major loss of beach volume. Here we report an innovative method using abrasion baskets to measure abrasion in the swash zone of mixed sand and gravel beaches. This method offers significant advantages over laboratory-based tumbler experiments traditionally used to determine abrasion rates. The very high recovery rate from our method is also a significant advantage over previous field methods using radio frequency identification technology to measure abrasion where tagged particles are often lost. Either three or five abrasion baskets were placed across the swash zone on a mixed sand and gravel beach at Timaru, South Island, New Zealand, to measure the abrasion occurring on labeled sediments placed in the baskets. Over two experiments, results showed measurable abrasion across the swash zone with higher abrasion rates occurring in the middle of the swash zone and lower rates towards the swash limit and at the breaker zone. Results also illustrate the role of changing wave energy on abrasion loss. A relationship between particle size and abrasion rate was also found, similar to previous laboratory results reported in the literature. Our preliminary experiments lead us to define an abrasion zone and this idea may help shape future research on abrasion processes on mixed sand and gravel beaches.

  2. Experimental abrasion of detrital gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeend, Warren E.

    1975-01-01

    The physical breakdown and abrasion rates of gold were studied using a tumbler to simulate natural high-energy environments. The gold fragments were tumbled for periods ranging from 30 to 240 h with different combinations of sand, cobbles, and water at velocities of 0.5 and 2.0 mi/h (0.85 and 3.22 km/h). With sand and gravel, the common bedload of the rivers that deposited the gold-bearing Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Sierra Nevada, gold is abraded at rates of 0.015 to 0.007 percent (by weight) per hour of travel (at 0.5 mi/h or 0.845 km/h). Cobbles, rather than sand, are responsible for most of the physical changes and abrasion of the gold. Ten gold fragments tumbled for 120 h with cobbles and water (no sand) were broken down to 68 recoverable fragments and lost about 25 percent of their weight to particles smaller than could be recovered using conventional panning techniques. Gold tumbled for 120 h with sand and water lost less than 1 percent of its weight. Gold was abraded faster by wet sand than by dry sand. Velocity appears to be more important as a factor in abrasion of gold than travel distance a fourfold increase in velocity produced a tenfold increase in hourly abrasion rates of gold. Scanning electron microscope examination of the gold fragments after the tumbling experiments revealed differences in surface texture between fragments tumbled with (1) sand, (2) sand and cobbles, and (3) cobbles only.

  3. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-04-15

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parametrized in terms of root-mean-square roughnesses, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse power-law spectra and are parametrized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudoparameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish.

  4. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parameterized in terms of root-mean-square roughness, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly-finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse-power-law spectra and are parameterized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudo parameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Evaluation of finishing and polishing techniques on surface roughness of chromium-cobalt castings.

    PubMed

    Aydin, A K

    1991-06-01

    The effect of finishing and polishing techniques on surface roughness of a chromium-cobalt alloy was evaluated by means of a stylus profile instrumentation and scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron micrographs, surface profile tracings, surface roughness recordings, and statistical analysis of data support the finding that the best surface finish is obtained when sandblasting, hard stone, medium abrasive disk, second sandblasting, electropolishing, hard rubber point, hard felt disk with pumice slurry, and felt disk and soft brush with polishing paste are used progressively. The results of this study indicate that the finishing procedure should be carried out in a logical, systematic sequence of steps.

  6. Rate of wind abrasion on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R. N.; Williams, S. H.; Krinsley, D. H.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A brief description is given of the experiments performed to obtain data on windblown particles and abrasion of rocks in a simulated Martian environment. Preliminary results are presented and combined with Viking meteorological data in estimating rates of wind abrasion at the VL-1 site on Mars. Attention is also given to the implications that the results have for Martian surface history. Calculations of the present rates of abrasion by windblown particles on Mars yield values ranging from 0.021 cm/yr to nearly zero, depending on the target, the agent of abrasion, and the availability of windblown particles.

  7. Abrasive drill for resilient materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Resilient materials normally present problem in obtaining accurate and uniform hole size and position. Tool is fabricated from stiff metal rod such as tungsten or carbon steel that has diameter slightly smaller than required hole. Piercing/centering point is ground on one end of rod. Rod is then plasma-sprayed (flame-sprayed) with suitable hard abrasive coating. High-speed, slow-feed operation of tool is necessary for accurate holes, and this can be done with drill press, hard drill, or similar machines.

  8. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  9. A Study of the Pickup of Abrasive Particles during Abrasion of Annealed Aluminum on Silicon Carbide Abrasive Papers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    annealed aluminium during abrasion on silicon carbide abrasive papers. Neither optical nor scanning electron microscopy adequately characterises the...despite its limitations when examining rough surfaces. The present results show that the pickup of silicon carbide particles increases with increase in

  10. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  11. Drywall Finishing Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengert, Gerald

    This manual, a self-study guide for apprentices in the drywall finishing trade in British Columbia, attempts to establish standards for the trade. It tells how to produce a properly taped and filled drywall surface and describes what that surface should look like. The standards emphasize quality work that can be realistically achieved on the job.…

  12. Restorative resins: abrasion vs. mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K D

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to examine whether it is possible by simple and reliable laboratory tests to evaluate the abrasion by food of Class 1 restorative resins. The results point to the following main conclusions: for the smooth-surface resins, i.e. the micro-filled composite and the unfilled resins, the Wallace hardness test appears to be a valid parameter for abrasion; the greater the depth of penetration of the Vickers diamond of this apparatus, the more severe abrasion is to be expected. The mode of abrasion in this type of resin is scratching. Porosity in the resins strongly enhances the abrasion. For the rough-surface resins, i.e. the conventional composites, a dual effect of the filler particles was concluded. The filler particles on the one hand protect the matrix against abrasion, but cause, on the other hand, in time an increase of the surface roughness of the composite and thereby via increased friction an increase of the abrasion. Considerations on possible ways to improve the present-day restorative resins are presented. It is stressed that the results obtained refer only to abrasion of Class 1 fillings by food.

  13. Bendable Extension For Abrasive-Jet Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Hard-to-reach places cleaned more easily. Extension for abrasive-jet apparatus bent to provide controlled abrasive cleaning of walls in deep cavities or other hard-to-reach places. Designed for controlled removal of penetrant inspection dyes from inside castings, extension tube also used for such general grit-blasting work as removal of scratches.

  14. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  15. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  16. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  17. Urolithiasis in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D G D; Vrielinck, J; Millet, S; Janssens, G P J; Deprez, P

    2004-11-01

    Urolithiasis in sows and neonatal pigs is well-known, but information on its occurrence and impact in finishing pigs is sparse. This study reports three outbreaks of urolithiasis in finishing pigs. In one herd, no symptoms were observed, whereas in the other herds the presence of calculi caused obstruction of the urinary tract resulting in death. Using infra-red spectroscopy, the predominant mineral-type found in the uroliths was calcium carbonate (calcite). Only small amounts of calcium oxalate (< 1%) could be detected. A high urinary pH, small abnormalities in the mineral composition of the feed and insufficient drinking water were the most important risk factors identified. To prevent urolithiasis, it is important to ensure adequate water intake, to provide a balanced mineral diet, and to avoid urinary tract infections.

  18. Correlation Between Particle Velocities and Conditions of Abrasive Waterjet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Long

    1990-01-01

    The velocities of water and abrasive particles in abrasive waterjet(AWJ) were measured by the use of Laser Transit Anemometer(LTA). A setup for the velocity measurement was constructed and a statistical technique was used to improve the accuracy of the velocity determination. A comparison of the magnitude of velocities determined by LTA, Piezoelectric Force Transducer and Schlieren Photograph clearly indicates the feasibility of the use of LTA. The velocities of water and particles were measured for different diameters of water and slurry nozzles, abrasive mass flow rates and particle sizes. The performed experiments enabled us to evaluate the effects of conditions of jet formation on the particles velocities. An empirical equation for the prediction of particles velocities was constructed by the use of obtained results. The coefficient of correlation between experimental and computed results is equal to 0.93. The acquired information can be used to select the operational parameters in AWJ cutting. The obtained results also provide information on the acceleration mechanism of entrained particles, which may be used to improve the design of slurry nozzle.

  19. Surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements: effects of finishing/polishing systems.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tan, W S; Yeo, J C; Yap, W Y; Ong, S B

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the surface texture of two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) in the vertical and horizontal axis after treatment with different finishing/polishing systems. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (GC) and Photac-Fil Quick (ESPE) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with 8-flute tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups and finished/polished with (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) Super-Snap system (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Points (CS). The sample size for each material-finishing/polishing system combination was eight. The mean surface roughness (microm) in vertical (RaV) and horizontal (RaH) axis was measured using a profilometer. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's tests and Independent Samples t-test at significance level 0.05. Mean RaV ranged from 0.59-1.31 and 0.83-1.52, while mean RaH ranged from 0.80-1.43 and 0.85-1.58 for Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil, respectively. Results of statistical analysis were as follows: Fuji II LC: RaV-RC, SSfinished with RC. The use of carbides (RC) and one-step rubber abrasive system (OG) for finishing/polishing of RMGICs is not recommended. Graded abrasive disk (SS) or two-step rubber abrasive (CS) systems should be used instead.

  20. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated.

  1. Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get rid of the infection. Luckily, most cuts, scratches, and abrasions will go away on their own, thanks to your body's amazing ability to heal ... Story on Scars Cellulitis Taking Care of Your Skin What's a Scab? ...

  2. Abrasion and resistant discharge valve developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, W. L.

    1969-01-01

    Discharge valve capable of withstanding intense radiation and high abrasion was developed for use in a fluidized bed reactor. The valve which employs a replaceable Teflon seal, has only one moving part and is designed for remote assembly and disassembly.

  3. Abrasion Collar Around Shrapnel Entry Wound.

    PubMed

    Gujaral, Pootheril Balan; Ajay, Balachandran

    2017-02-28

    Abrasion collar is usually described as a feature of bullet entry wounds caused by friction and indentation. The present case is that of the peculiar entry wound caused by a piece of flying shrapnel which was ejected from a furnace in a steel plant. The scrap metal which exploded in the plant was sourced from the West Asia region. The entry wound on the chest was circular and had an abrasion collar around it. The projectile was a cylindrical object of obscure origin. The forensic science laboratory put forth the possibility that the projectile was a component of an artillery fuze. A decades old study which employed high-speed photography has rejected the possibility that abrasion collars are produced by friction. High-velocity projectiles other than bullets can also produce abrasion collars as the rubbing of the bullet against the skin or its rotation are not the causative mechanisms.

  4. The measurement of abrasive particles velocities in the process of abrasive water jet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Říha, Zdeněk

    2014-08-01

    An optimization of the design of the abrasive cutting head using the numerical simulation requires gathering as much information about processes occurring in the cutting head as possible. Detailed knowledge of velocities of abrasive particles in the process of abrasive water jet generation is vital for the verification of the numerical model. A method of measurement of abrasive particles at the exit of focusing tube using the FPIV technique was proposed and preliminary tests are described in the paper. Results of analysis of measured velocity fields are presented in the paper.

  5. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  6. History of magnetorheological finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel C.

    2011-06-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic method for producing complex optics with figure accuracy <50 nm and surface roughness <1 nm. MRF was invented at the Luikov Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer in Minsk, Belarus in the late 1980s by a team led by William Kordonski. When the Soviet Union opened up, New York businessman Lowell Mintz was invited to Minsk in 1990 to explore possibilities for technology transfer. Mintz was told of the potential for MRF, but did not understand whether it had value. Mintz was referred to Harvey Pollicove at the Center for Optics Manufacturing of the University of Rochester. As a result of their conversation, they sent Prof. Steve Jacobs to visit Minsk and evaluate MRF. From Jacobs' positive findings, and with support from Lowell Mintz, Kordonski and his colleagues were invited in 1993 to work at the Center for Optics Manufacturing with Jacobs and Don Golini to refine MRF technology. A "preprototype" finishing machine was operating by 1994. Prof. Greg Forbes and doctoral student Paul Dumas developed algorithms for deterministic control of MRF. In 1996, Golini recognized the commercial potential of MRF, secured investment capital from Lowell Mintz, and founded QED Technologies. The first commercial MRF machine was unveiled in 1998. It was followed by more advanced models and by groundbreaking subaperture stitching interferometers for metrology. In 2006, QED was acquired by and became a division of Cabot Microelectronics. This paper recounts the history of the development of MRF and the founding of QED Technologies.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Nozzle in Abrasive Water Jet Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, S.; Chandresekaran, M.; Muthuraman, V.; Sathish, S.

    2017-03-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting is one of the most recently developed non-traditional manufacturing technologies. The general nature of flow through the machining, results in rapid wear of the nozzle which decrease the cutting performance. It is well known that the inlet pressure of the abrasive water suspension has main effect on the erosion characteristics of the inner surface of the nozzle. The objective of the project is to analyze the effect of inlet pressure on wall shear and exit kinetic energy. The analysis would be carried out by varying the inlet pressure of the nozzle, so as to obtain optimized process parameters for minimum nozzle wear. The two phase flow analysis would be carried by using computational fluid dynamics tool CFX. The availability of minimized process parameters such as of abrasive water jet machining (AWJM) is limited to water and experimental test can be cost prohibitive.

  8. CFD Based Erosion Modelling of Abrasive Waterjet Nozzle using Discrete Phase Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim Kamarudin, Naqib; Prasada Rao, A. K.; Azhari, Azmir

    2016-02-01

    In Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) machining, the nozzle is the most critical component that influences the performance, precision and economy. Exposure to a high speed jet and abrasives makes it susceptible to wear erosion which requires for frequent replacement. The present works attempts to simulate the erosion of the nozzle wall using computational fluid dynamics. The erosion rate of the nozzle was simulated under different operating conditions. The simulation was carried out in several steps which is flow modelling, particle tracking and erosion rate calculation. Discrete Phase Method (DPM) and K-ε turbulence model was used for the simulation. Result shows that different operating conditions affect the erosion rate as well as the flow interaction of water, air and abrasives. The simulation results correlates well with past work.

  9. Advanced cleaning by mass finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, M. W.

    1983-10-01

    The effectiveness of vibratory finishing for removing a variety of radioactively contaminated soils was investigated by measuring the radiation levels of the test material, the lining of the vibratory finishing tub, and the media. Many soils including corrosion products, scale, oil, grease and paint were removed from steels, aluminum, polyvinyl chloride, plexiglass, glass and flexible materials such as rubber. Zinc, copper, and lead were not cleaned. Results indicate that vibratory finishing should be an effective cleaning process or a variety of manufacturing operations.

  10. Investigations on the trajectories of magnetic abrasive grains in magnetic induction-free abrasive wire sawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Chunyan; Tang, Chen; Qiu, Tengwei; Xu, Xuefeng

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a novel method of magnetic induction-free abrasive wire sawing. The ferromagnetic wire is magnetized in a uniform magnetic field, forming a high-gradient magnetic field that separates into paramagnetic and diamagnetic regions. Paramagnetic abrasive grains are attracted to the paramagnetic region and adhere to the wire surface but are repelled from the diamagnetic region. The trajectory of the magnetic abrasive grains is analyzed in a mathematical model and in COMSOL Multiphysics simulations. The results are verified by test investigations on the motions and adsorption of the magnetic abrasive grains using a dynamic microscope system. The detailed grain trajectories are investigated in a numerical model. Because it actively transports grains toward the wire (where they can be transported to the sawing channel), our proposed method achieves more efficient wire sawing performance than traditional free abrasive wire sawing. Such efficient performance is highly sought in silicon wafering technologies, which are commonly used in the solar and semiconductor industries.

  11. Abrasion resistance of medical glove materials.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Donna L; Schwerin, Matthew R; Kisielewski, Richard W; Kotz, Richard M; Chaput, Maria P; Varney, George W; To, Theresa M

    2004-01-15

    Due to the increasing demand for nonlatex medical gloves in the health-care community, there is a need to assess the durability of alternative glove materials. This study examines durability characteristics of various glove materials by abrasion resistance testing. Natural rubber latex (latex), polyvinyl chloride (vinyl), acrylonitrile butadiene (nitrile), polychloroprene (neoprene), and a styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were tested. All test specimens, with the exception of the vinyl, were obtained from surgical gloves. Unaged out-of-the-box specimens as well as those subjected to various degrees of artificial aging were included in the study. After the abrasion sequence, the barrier integrity of the material was assessed through the use of a static leak test. Other traditional tests performed on these materials were viral penetration to validate the abrasion data and tear testing for comparative purposes. The results indicate that specific glove-material performance is dependent upon the particular test under consideration. Most notably, abrasion, even in controlled nonsevere conditions, may compromise to varying degrees the barrier integrity of latex, vinyl, SEBS, nitrile, and neoprene glove materials. However, as evidenced by the results of testing three brands of neoprene gloves, the abrasion resistance of any one glove material may be significantly affected by variations in production processes.

  12. Mechanics of the pad-abrasive-wafer contact in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Dincer

    2009-12-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), a rigid wafer is forced on a rough, elastomeric polishing pad, while a slurry containing abrasive particles flows through the interface. The applied pressure on the wafer is carried partially by the 2-body pad-wafer contact (direct contact) and partially by the 3-body contact of pad, wafer and abrasive particles ( particle contact). The fraction of the applied pressure carried by particle contacts is an important factor affecting the material removal rate (MRR) as the majority of the material is removed by the abrasive particles trapped between the pad asperities and the wafer. In this thesis, the contact of a rough, deformable pad and a smooth, rigid wafer in the presence of rigid abrasive particles at the contact interface is investigated by using contact mechanics and finite element (FE) modeling. The interactions between the pad, the wafer and the abrasive particles are modeled at different scales of contact, starting from particle level interactions, and gradually expanding the contact scale to the multi-asperity contact of pad and wafer. The effect of surface forces consisting of van der Waals and electrical double layer forces acting between the wafer and the abrasive particles are also investigated in this work. The wear rate due to each abrasive particle is calculated based on the wafer-abrasive particle contact force, and by considering adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms. A passivated layer on the wafer surface with a hardness and thickness determined by the chemical effects is modeled, in order to characterize the effect of chemical reactions between slurry and wafer on the MRR. The model provides accurate predictions for the MRR as a function of pad related parameters; pad elastic modulus, pad porosity and pad topography, particle related parameters; particle size and concentration, and slurry related parameters; slurry pH, thickness and hardness of the passivated surface layer of wafer. A good qualitative

  13. Hardfacing and wear plates battle abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.F.

    1983-06-01

    This article examines abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing as two effective weapons at the disposal of material handlers. It points out that abrasion is probably the single most destructive form of wear in the mixing and processing of coal. Particulate matter such as quartz sand and other minerals including coal curtail in-service life of dragline buckets, chute, crusher rolls, gates and valves, exhauster fan blades, target plates, truck beds, hoppers, vibrating pans, grinding mills, piping elbows, etc. The advantages of abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing can be obtained in the form of a composite wear plate-hardfacing on a carbon steel backup plate. It concludes that the composite wear plate represents a major innovation since its advantages include ease of handling, low cost and easy installation, minimum on-site welding time and versatility. Its use is limited only to the consumer's creativity in application.

  14. Sliding-gate valve for use with abrasive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Jr., William J.; Carter, Charles R.; Griffith, Richard A.; Loomis, Richard B.; Notestein, John E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a flow and pressure-sealing valve for use with abrasive solids. The valve embodies special features which provide for long, reliable operating lifetimes in solids-handling service. The valve includes upper and lower transversely slidable gates, contained in separate chambers. The upper gate provides a solids-flow control function, whereas the lower gate provides a pressure-sealing function. The lower gate is supported by means for (a) lifting that gate into sealing engagement with its seat when the gate is in its open and closed positions and (b) lowering the gate out of contact with its seat to permit abrasion-free transit of the gate between its open and closed positions. When closed, the upper gate isolates the lower gate from the solids. Because of this shielding action, the sealing surface of the lower gate is not exposed to solids during transit or when it is being lifted or lowered. The chamber containing the lower gate normally is pressurized slightly, and a sweep gas is directed inwardly across the lower-gate sealing surface during the vertical translation of the gate.

  15. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  16. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J.; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  17. Understanding Characteristic of Abrasion of Refractory Lining Caused by Bath Oscillation in BOF Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, Zongshu

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the refractory abrasion occurring widely inside basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. The mechanism of refractory abrasion is examined numerically referring to the bath oscillation with regard to flows, turbulence and wall shear stress inside a BOF. The simulation results reveal that the refractory abrasion tends to occur on the wall region between the slag/atmosphere and slag/metal interfaces due to the oscillation of the bath in the blowing process, which generally promotes slag-line erosion. The decreased nozzle angle, and either increased lance height or operation pressure can lead to more serious refractory erosion that occurs more likely during the slag-making period in the operation of BOF.

  18. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  19. Abrasive waterjet cutting of high purity uranium metal: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dravland, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Abrasive Waterjet Cutting process was evaluated to determine if the equivalent could be utilized for cutting uranium metal at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). In the process, a thin stream of ultrahigh pressure water carried grit material through a designated piecepart. In order to be acceptable for use at the FMPC, the equipment must be cost effective, minimize waste, and be adaptableto operating in an enclosure, and improve health and safety conditions. Observation of the cutting process showed that health and safety aspects could be optimized with an enclosed ventilated system. Also the equipment can be easily automated. The cutting action produced sparks similar to the sparks caused by a grinding operation. The sparks are captured in a water container under the workpiece that not only catches the sparks, but also serves to dissipiate the stream of water and residues produced by the cut. Metallographic tests performed on the cut surface of the block of depleted uranium showed no contamination of the uranium metal and the surface finish. 2 figs.

  20. Permanent flame retardant finishing of textiles by allyl-functionalized polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Gall, Thomas; Knittel, Dierk; Gutmann, Jochen S; Opwis, Klaus

    2015-05-13

    Despite their excellent flame retardant properties, polyphosphazenes are currently not used as flame retardant agents for textile finishing, because a permanent fixation on the substrate surface has failed so far. Here, we present the successful synthesis and characterization of a noncombustible and foam-forming polyphosphazene derivative, that can be immobilized durably on cotton and different cotton/polyester blended fabrics using photoinduced grafting reactions. The flame retardant properties are improved, a higher limiting oxygen index is found, and the modified textiles pass several standardized flammability tests. As flame retardant mechanism a synergistic effect between the immobilized polyphosphazene and the textile substrate was observed. The polyphosphazene finishing induces an earlier decomposition of the material with a reduced mass loss in thermogravimetric analysis. The decomposition of cotton and polyester leads to the formation of phosphorus oxynitride, which forms a protecting barrier layer on the fiber surface. In addition, the permanence of the flame retardant finishing was proven by laundry and abrasion tests.

  1. Surface Treatment of Anti-Crease Finished Cotton Fabric Based on Sol-Gel Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxia; Chen, Li

    The silica sol was applied onto 1, 2, 3, 4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) finished cotton fabrics with the attempt to improve the physical properties especially the tensile strength which had a big loss in the previous anti-crease finishing processing. The parameters including the dosage of the coupling agent, the concentration and pH of the sol and the processing methods were studied in detail. Compared to the sample finished with BTCA, 11.8% of the increase in the crease recovery angle and 18.6% of the enhancement in the tensile strength of the cotton fabric also treated with silica sol in the better selected conditions were obtained. The abrasion resistance was also improved.

  2. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (j) All employees using abrasive wheels shall be protected by eye protection equipment in accordance with the requirements of subpart I of this part except when adequate eye protection is afforded by eye shields which are permanently attached to the bench or floor stand....

  3. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides... Protection of Abrasive Wheels. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding, shall...

  8. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  9. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  10. NICE3 Textile Finishing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, S.

    1999-01-29

    This new energy-saving approach to fabric finishing can help our domestic textile industry compete in an increasingly competitive global market. Learn how this new technology can lower your maintenance costs and increase your productivity.

  11. Abrasion in pyroclastic density currents: Insights from tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Putz, Constanze; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    During granular mass movements of any kind, particles may interact with one another. The degree of interaction is a function of several variables including; grain-size distribution, particle concentration, density stratification and degree of fluidisation. The impact of particle interaction is additionally influenced by the relative speed, impact angle and clast temperature. Thus, both source conditions and transport-related processes are expected to influence the flow dynamics of pyroclastic density currents and their subsequent deposition. Here, we use tumbling experiments to shed light on the susceptibility of porous clasts to abrasion. We investigated the abrasion of unaltered volcanic rocks (5.7-80 vol.% porosity) from Unzen (Japan), Bezymianny (Russia) and Santorini (Greece) volcanoes as well as one synthetic analogue material, an insulating material with the trade name Foamglas® (95 vol.% porosity). Each experiment started with angular fragments generated in a jaw crusher from larger clasts. Two experimental series were performed; on samples with narrow and broader grain-size distributions, respectively. The dry samples were subject to rotational movement at constant speed and ambient temperature in a gum rotational tumbler for durations of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min. The amount of volcanic ash (particles <2 mm) generated was evaluated as a function of experimental duration and sample porosity. We term “abrasion” as the ash fraction generated during the experiments. The observed increase of “abrasion” with increasing sample porosity and experimental duration is initially non-linear but becomes linear for experiments of 30 min duration or longer. For any given sample, abrasion appears to be more effective for coarser samples and larger initial mass. The observed range of ash generated in our experiments is between 1 and 35 wt.%. We find that this amount generally increases with increasing initial clast size or increasing breadth of the initial grain

  12. Abrasive waterjet machining of fiber reinforced composites: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, D. K.; Dhanasekaran, P. S.; Zhang, B.; Asmatulu, R.

    2012-04-01

    Machining of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is a major secondary manufacturing activity in the aircraft and automotive industries. Traditional machining of these composites is difficult due to the high abrasiveness nature of their reinforcing constituents. Almost all the traditional machining processes involve in the dissipation of heat into the workpiece which can be resulted in damage to workpiece and rapid wear of the cutting tool. This serious issue has been overcome by water jetting technologies. Abrasive waterjet machining (AWJM) is a nontraditional method and one of the best options for machining FRPs. This paper presents a review of the ongoing research and development in AWJM of FRPs, with a critical review of the physics of the machining process, surface characterization, modeling and the newer application to the basic research. Variable cutting parameters, limitations and safety aspects of AWJM and the noise related issues due to high flow rate of water jet will be addressed. Further challenges and scope of the future development in AWJM are also presented in detail.

  13. Abrasion-Resistant Technology and its Prospect for CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Li, Y. J.; Wang, L. J.; Liu, S. H.; Dou, Q. R.

    In recent years, CFB boilers (CFBB) have been widely used in the commercial power plants due to its environmental benefits, high combustion efficiency, wide coal flexibility, and some other advantages. At the same time, the abrasion problem, the greatest weakness of this kind of boiler, has been gradually exposed in its application process. The abrasion, particularly on key parts such as the heating surface of water-cooled wall, furnace corners, separator entrance, seriously restricts the long-period operation ability of the CFBB. This article discusses current development status for various abrasion resistant refractory materials used in a CFBB. Some comments are provided for developing new high-performance abrasion resistant refractory materials and rapid-repaired materials according to the abrasion principle and the abrasion on different parts, as well as the economical and environmental requirements for the material. The abrasion solution and operation period of CFBB can be better improved given realization.

  14. Abrasive wear of alumina fibre-reinforced aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, N.; Alahelisten, A.; Jacobson, S.

    1994-04-01

    The friction and abrasive wear behaviour of an Al-Si1MgMn aluminium alloy reinforced with 10, 15 and 30 vol.% of alumina fibers has been evaluated. The influence of fiber content, matrix hardness, applied load as well as the hardness and size of the abrasive grits was investigated. The tests were performed with a pin-on-drum two-body abrasion apparatus. The wear mechanisms were studied using scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that fiber reinforcement increases the wear resistance in milder abrasive situations, i.e. small and soft abrasives and low loads. However, in tougher abrasive situations, meaning coarse and hard abrasives and high loads, the wear resistance of the composites is equal to or, in some cases, even lower than that of the unreinforced material. It is also shown that the coefficient of friction decreases with increasing fiber content and matrix hardness of the composites.

  15. [Evaluation of potential risks of abrasive water jet osteotomy in-vivo].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, C; Pude, F; Bishup, C; Krömer, S; Kirsch, L; Andreae, A; Wacker, K; Schmolke, S

    2005-10-01

    Since the 80's the water jet scalpel is an established tool in some surgical fields. It is used in particular in visceral surgery for preparation of parenchymatous organs. By the addition of biocompatible abrasives, this technique is able to effectively machine hard biological tissues. Free defined cutting geometries can be realised in a non contact process. Therewith this method has crucial advantages compared to conventional osteotomy techniques and gives new impulses to the development in endoprosthetics and correction osteotomies of hollow bones. In the presented work the new developed abrasive water injection jet (AWIJ) was used the first time for in-vivo osteotomies. Aim of this study was the detection of potential thrombembolic effects and wash in effects of the cutting fluid. Hollow bones of the fore and hind leg of 20 house pigs were treated with the new cutting technique. Intraoperative documentation of relevant vital parameters was performed by a multi monitoring system. Thrombembolic effects during the osteotomy were detected by transthoracic Doppler ultrasonography and transesophagale echocardiography. The hollow bones were prepared in consideration of the vascularisation's protection especially in respect to the venous flow. Thrombembolic effects with temporary haemodynamic respectively respiratory consequences could be detected exclusively by using the so called "3-component jet", which consists of 90 vol % of air. The usage of an abrasive suspension enables the airfree dosing of dry soluable abrasives. Thrombembolic effects could not be monitored in this case. Intramedullary fluid in-wash effects as well as resulting electrolytic disorders could not be proven. For abrasive waterjet osteotomies with 3 component jet a relevant risk of thrombembolic effects could be shown. This knowledge has also to be considered for abdominal and neurosurgical applications in the future. Due to the usage of an abrasive suspension this risk can fully be avoided.

  16. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber & Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO`s Decontamination group and Kleiber & Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided.

  17. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  18. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  19. Predicting abrasive wear with coupled Lagrangian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a mesh-less approach for the simulation of a fluid with particle loading and the prediction of abrasive wear is presented. We are using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for modeling the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for the solid particles, which represent the loading of the fluid. These Lagrangian methods are used to describe heavily sloshing fluids with their free surfaces as well as the interface between the fluid and the solid particles accurately. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations model is applied for handling turbulences. We are predicting abrasive wear on the boundary geometry with two different wear models taking cutting and deformation mechanisms into account. The boundary geometry is discretized with special DEM particles. In doing so, it is possible to use the same particle type for both the calculation of the boundary conditions for the SPH method as well as the DEM and for predicting the abrasive wear. After a brief introduction to the SPH method and the DEM, the handling of the boundary and the coupling of the fluid and the solid particles are discussed. Then, the applied wear models are presented and the simulation scenarios are described. The first numerical experiment is the simulation of a fluid with loading which is sloshing inside a tank. The second numerical experiment is the simulation of the impact of a free jet with loading to a simplified pelton bucket. We are especially investigating the wear patterns inside the tank and the bucket.

  20. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  1. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  2. Concrete Finisher Program. Apprenticeship Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the concrete finishing program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  3. Surface finishing. [for aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Heffernan, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive. The adhesive is covered with a sheet of flexible film material under tension, and the adhesive is set while maintaining tension on the film material.

  4. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use. PMID:20582212

  5. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  6. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  7. The Role of Nanodiamonds in the Polishing Zone During Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF)

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-01-07

    In this work we discuss the role that nanodiamond abrasives play in magnetorheological finishing. We hypothesize that, as the nanodiamond MR fluid is introduced to the magnetic field, the micron sized spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles are pulled down towards the rotating wheel, leaving a thin layer of nanodiamonds at the surface of the stiffened MR fluid ribbon. Our experimental results shown here support this hypothesis. We also show that surface roughness values inside MRF spots show a strong correlation with the near surface mechanical properties of the glass substrates and with drag force.

  8. Controlled toothbrush abrasion of softened human enamel.

    PubMed

    Voronets, J; Jaeggi, T; Buergin, W; Lussi, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare toothbrush abrasion of softened enamel after brushing with two (soft and hard) toothbrushes. One hundred and fifty-six human enamel specimens were indented with a Knoop diamond. Salivary pellicle was formed in vitro over a period of 3 h. Erosive lesions were produced by means of 1% citric acid. A force-measuring device allowed a controlled toothbrushing force of 1.5 N. The specimens were brushed either in toothpaste slurry or with toothpaste in artificial saliva for 15 s. Enamel loss was calculated from the change in indentation depth of the same indent before and after abrasion. Mean surface losses (95% CI) were recorded in ten treatment groups: (1) soft toothbrush only [28 (17-39) nm]; (2) hard toothbrush only [25 (16-34) nm]; (3) soft toothbrush in Sensodyne MultiCare slurry [46 (27-65) nm]; (4) hard toothbrush in Sensodyne MultiCare slurry [45 (24-66) nm]; (5) soft toothbrush in Colgate sensation white slurry [71 (55-87) nm]; (6) hard toothbrush in Colgate sensation white slurry [85 (60-110) nm]; (7) soft toothbrush with Sensodyne MultiCare [48 (39-57) nm]; (8) hard toothbrush with Sensodyne MultiCare [40 (29-51) nm]; (9) soft toothbrush with Colgate sensation white [51 (37-65) nm]; (10) hard toothbrush with Colgate sensation white [52 (36-68) nm]. Neither soft nor hard toothbrushes produced significantly different toothbrush abrasion of softened human enamel in this model (p > 0.05).

  9. [Temperature measurements during abrasive water jet osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Schmolke, S; Pude, F; Kirsch, L; Honl, M; Schwieger, K; Krömer, S

    2004-01-01

    Working on bone is a major aspect of orthopaedic surgery. Despite its well-known appreciable thermal effects on the edges of the bone cut, the oscillating bone saw blade the oscillating saw remains the standard instrument both for cutting long bones and creating a bed for an endoprosthesis. The application of abrasive water jets offers the possibility of achieving an extremely precise curved cut in bone with no accompanying thermal effect. The thermographically measured absolute temperature increase at the cut edges seen with the water jet was 13 K maximum. The small process forces permit the application in automated handling systems.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  11. Pebble Jammed in Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity stopped working on sol 199 (Aug. 15, 2004), rover operators used the panoramic camera to take this image the next day for help in diagnosing the problem. The tool was closer than the camera could focus on sharply, but the image does show a dark spot just left of center, which engineers have determined is likely to be a pebble jammed between the cutting-blade rotor and the wire-brush rotor. If that diagnosis is confirmed by further analysis, the tool will likely be commanded to turn the rotors in reverse to release the pebble.

  12. Effect of temperature and O-ring gland finish on sealing ability of Viton V747-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the redesign project of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) following the Challenger accident, the field joint was redesigned to minimize the relative joint motion caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the field joint were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure-assisted sealing. Tests were conducted in various face seal fixtures to evaluate the ability of Viton V747-75 O-rings to seal for a range of temperatures and surface finishes of the redesigned O-ring gland. The effect of surface finish on the sealing performance and wear characteristics of the O-rings was evaluated during simulated launch conditions that included low-frequency vibrations, gap openings, and rapid pressurizations. The effect of contamination on the sealing performance was also investigated. The O-rings sealed throughout the 75 deg F leak check test and for the seal tests from 50 deg F to 120 deg F for the range of surface finishes investigated. Although abrasions were found in the O-rings from pressurization against the rougher finishes, these abrasions were not detrimental to sealing. Below 50 deg F, Viton V747-75 O-rings were insufficiently resilient to track the test gap opening.

  13. Evaluation of the polished surface characteristic of cobalt-chrome castings subsequent to various finishing and polishing techniques.

    PubMed

    Ponnanna, A A; Joshi, S M; Bhat, S; Shetty, P

    2001-01-01

    Finishing and Polishing constitutes an essential requisite after the fabrication of removable partial dentures. Improper finishing and polishing of cast framework will adversely affect the quality of functional units of partial dentures due to reduced dimensions. In this study the polished surface characteristic and loss of weight of the casting were evaluated and compared following different finishing and polishing techniques. A total number of thirty test specimens were cast and each surface finishing and polishing technique was carried out with a high speed polishing motor and an electropolishing unit under standardised conditions. Surface roughness was evaluated by means of a surface roughness analyzing instrument, Perthometer. The loss of weight due to the metal lost was observed on a sensitive electronic balance. The results of polishing technique employed with G3 group revealed better surface characteristic. It may be understood that sandblasting causes initial roughness and the sequence of coarse cylindrical abrasive, Black hard rubber polisher (coarse grit-Dentauram), Grey hard rubber polisher (Med-grit-Dentauram), Green hard rubber polisher (Fine-grit-Dentauram), Grey flexible rubber polisher (Fine grit-Renfert), felt buff with pumice slurry and felt buff with green polishing compound (Degussa) produced improved surface in this case. The loss of weight due to metal lost show concern with technique groups G4, G5, G6. It can be avoided by judicious sandblasting and application of proper grit of abrasive agents.

  14. Neutralization of potential land mine hazards by abrasive waterjet use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, David A.; Fossey, Robert D.; Thompson, S. J.

    1998-09-01

    A method of neutralizing landmines in which the integrity of the surrounding terrain is retained is herein described. High pressure waterjets which can be used to detect the presence of landmines can then be used to remove the soil and other cover in a plane immediately adjacent to and around the mine so that the side of the mine can be visually inspected through a remote television camera. At that time the flow of water is channeled through a line in which small particles of sand are added to the waterjet which is at a pressure of between 3,000 and 10,000 psi depending on the device which is used. Jet flow rates are on the order of 5 gpm depending on the nozzle configuration used. By bringing this abrasive stream in along a lateral plane through the mine it is possible to intersect, and neutralize, the fusing systems most likely to be used to initiate the charge, in a single pass. At higher flow rates, as the cut is made the jet will generate significant turbulence in the mine body, sufficient to remove a considerable quantity of the explosive which is resident within the mine at the same time as the mine is being dissected. The precision of cut achievable is shown by the longitudinal cutting into two parts of live detonators, as well as representative mine bodies.

  15. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  16. Diamond-Fluoroplastic Composites for Abrasive Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrianova, O. A.; Kirillin, A. D.; Chersky, I. N.

    2001-07-01

    Composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and natural technical diamond powders from Yakutia diamond deposits are developed. It is shown that the compositions based on PTFE and a technical diamond powder at a content of up to 60 wt.%, due to their good physicomechanical characteristics, low friction coefficient, and good wetting of diamond particles by polymer, make is possible to create abrasive tools for polishing and grinding hard metals and semiprecious and precious stones with high serviceability and operational life combined with a considerable increase in the quality of treated surfaces and operational stability of the tools. It is found that PTFE, being a more elastic and softer matrix than the traditional ones, exhibits a self-sharpening effect of diamond grains upon grinding hard surfaces, when the grains go deep into the elastic matrix, the matrix wears out, and the working part of the tool becomes enriched with the diamond powder. These conclusions are confirmed by electron microscopic investigations. It is shown that the introduction of ultradisperse fillings (up to 2 wt.%) into such compositions allows us to improve the characteristics of abrasive tools considerably, especially for grinding hard semiprecious stones. The physicomechanical and frictional characteristics of the compositions and specific examples of their application in the jewelry industry and in stone working are discussed.

  17. Stochastic simplified modelling of abrasive waterjet footprints

    PubMed Central

    Torrubia, P. Lozano; Axinte, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive micro-waterjet processing is a non-conventional machining method that can be used to manufacture complex shapes in difficult-to-cut materials. Predicting the effect of the jet on the surface for a given set of machine parameters is a key element of controlling the process. However, the noise of the process is significant, making it difficult to design reliable jet-path strategies that produce good quality parts via controlled-depth milling. The process is highly unstable and has a strong random component that can affect the quality of the workpiece, especially in the case of controlled-depth milling. This study describes a method to predict the variability of the jet footprint for different jet feed speeds. A stochastic partial differential equation is used to describe the etched surface as the jet is moved over it, assuming that the erosion process can be divided into two main components: a deterministic part that corresponds to the average erosion of the jet and a stochastic part that accounts for the noise generated at different stages of the process. The model predicts the variability of the trench profiles to within less than 8%. These advances could enable abrasive micro-waterjet technology to be a suitable technology for controlled-depth milling. PMID:27118905

  18. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  19. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  20. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  1. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  2. 27 CFR 25.231 - Finished beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finished beer. 25.231... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Beer Purchased From Another Brewer § 25.231 Finished beer. (a) A brewer may obtain beer in barrels and kegs, finished and ready for sale from another brewer. The...

  3. Comparative study for surface topography of bone drilling using conventional drilling and loose abrasive machining.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet; Jain, Vivek; Gupta, Dheeraj

    2015-03-01

    Drilling through the bone is a complicated process in orthopaedic surgery. It involves human as a part of the work so it needs better perfection and quality which leads to the sustainability. Different studies were carried out on this curious topic and some interesting results were obtained, which help the orthopaedic surgeon on the operation table. Major problems faced during bone drilling were crack initiation, thermal necrosis and burr formation. The surface topography of the bone is an indirect indication for the sustainability of bone joint. In this study, a comparison is made between conventional and a loose abrasive unconventional drilling technique for the surface characterization of the bone. The attempt has been made to show the feasibility of bone drilling with non-conventional technique and its aftereffect on the bone structure. The burr formation during conventional bone drilling was found to be more which leads to problems such as crack initiation and thermal necrosis. Scanning electrode microscope and surface roughness tester were used to characterize the surface of the fine drilled bone specimen and the results testified quite better surface finish and least crack formation while drilling with loose abrasive unconventional technique.

  4. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Studies on parametric optimization for abrasive water jet machining of Al7075-TiB2 in-situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavya, J. T.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on optimization and determination of significant process parameter for Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Al7075-TiB2metal matrix composite. Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite is synthesized by stir casting using in-situ technique. Optimization of machining parameters is done using Taguchi's L25orthogonal array for the experimental trials, with cutting speed, stand-off distance and Abrasive Flow rate as input parameters at five different levels. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) method is used for identifying the effect of machining parameters on volumetric material removal rate, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. Then the results are validated by conducting verification experiments.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.215 Abrasive wheel machinery. (a) General requirements—(1) Machine guarding. Abrasive wheels shall be used only on machines provided with... omitted; and (ii) The spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts,...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts,...

  9. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts,...

  10. Design of abrasive tool for high-rate grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilinykh, AS

    2017-02-01

    The experimental studies aimed to design heavy-duty abrasive wheels for high-rate grinding are presented. The design of abrasive wheels with the working speed up to 100 m/s is based on the selection of optimized material composition and manufacture technology of the wheels.

  11. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    PubMed Central

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  12. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 872.6030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the teeth. The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup)....

  13. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 872.6030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the teeth. The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup)....

  14. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 872.6030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the teeth. The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup)....

  15. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 872.6030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the teeth. The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup)....

  16. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  17. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  18. Recent developments in finishing of deep concave, aspheric, and plano surfaces utilizing the UltraForm 5-axes computer controlled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambrick, Scott; Bechtold, Mike; DeFisher, Scott; Mohring, David; Meisenzahl, Joe

    2009-05-01

    OptiPro Systems has developed a robust 5-axes computer controlled platform, for implementation of the sub-aperture UltraForm Finishing (UFF) process specifically focused on finishing AlON, spinel and transparent polycrystalline alumina (PCA) steep concave, convex and ogive shaped infrared domes and aspheres. Traditional manufacturing of optical components typically involves a three-stage process: grinding, lapping and polishing. The lapping and polishing stages are focused at reducing the surface roughness while preserving the integrity of the form acquired during grinding. Polishing of non spherical and irregular shapes is nearly impossible using traditional full aperture techniques. However, finishing these non-spherical and irregular shapes is possible using UltraForm Finishing. A brief description of the evolution of the UltraForm hardware and processes will be presented, with the current hardware developments. A review of the results with regard to form/figure and roughness improvements on glass, AlON and transparent PCA will be presented using a variety of grinding and finishing abrasives. Differences in the abrasive materials, some bound, and others loose in a slurry have a large impact on the process cycle time and resultant surface roughness.

  19. Finishing of advanced ceramic balls for bearing applications by magnetic float polishing (MFP) involving fine polishing followed by chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming

    Scope and method of study. This investigation deals with the development of science and technology of finishing advanced ceramics, such as Sisb3Nsb4 balls for bearing applications by magnetic float polishing (MFP) technology. Experimental design and analysis based on Taguchi method are applied to determine the optimum processing conditions for improving the surface quality in fine mechanical polishing by MFP technology. Polishing with various abrasives, different operating conditions, and polishing environments for Sisb3Nsb4 bearing balls have been investigated. Fundamental mechanisms of chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) have been studied based on thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. Findings and conclusions. The methodology, involved mechanical polishing followed by CMP for finishing of Sisb3Nsb4 balls from the as-received condition to a sphericity of 0.15 mum and surface finish of Ra 4 nm by MFP technology has been developed. It takes about 20 hours to finish a batch of balls compared to a range of several weeks to several months by conventional grinding and polishing technology. High material removal rates (1 mum/min) with minimal subsurface damage are possible by mechanical polishing with harder abrasives such as Bsb4C or SiC in MFP. CeOsb2 and ZrOsb2 are found to be most effective abrasives followed by Fesb2Osb3 and Crsb2Osb3 for CMP of Sisb3Nsb4. CMP is found to be particularly effective in a water-based environment. There are similarities between polishing glass and polishing Sisb3Nsb4 workmaterial including the role of water, polishing environment, and chemical effectiveness and mechanical hardness of abrasive for effective polishing.

  20. Robotic abrasive water jet cutting of aerostructure components

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce tooling and labor costs associated with net trimming of aerostructure components, a system has been designed and implemented which combines the flexibility and accuracy of robotics with the productivity of abrasive water jet cutting. The system is comprised of a large, six-axis gantry robot which uses specially developed abrasive water jet end effectors to trim the edge-of-panel (EOP) and integral stiffener blades. These end effectors employ compact catchers to contain the spent stream, and thereby eliminate the need for large catcher tanks commonly used in abrasive water jet cutting. The robot is offline programmed to perform trimming on large, complex contoured panels.

  1. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  2. International innovations in optical finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-10-01

    Every few years new polishing technologies attempt to make the transition from the research laboratory into the commercial sector. Success awaits any process that is well controlled and predictable (e.g., deterministic), rapid, capable of smoothing to sub-nm rms roughness levels while removing damage from grinding, affordable, and easily implemented. Applicability to different optical materials and a variety of part sizes and shapes is extremely important, but may not be required for a new technology to succeed in a niche market. This paper reviews six innovations in polishing of precision optics: Canon"s Super-Smooth Polisher (CSSP) that uses a sub-aperture pitch lap - a relatively mature but important base-line technology; Nikon / Osaka University"s RF Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining (CVM); Epion"s Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) Process; the IOM University of Leipzig / NTGL Ion Beam Finishing (IBF) Technology; Zeeko"s "Precessions" Process with a sub-aperture section of an inflatable pad; and QED Technology"s Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) with a magnetic fluid ribbon. The removal mechanism and some recent achievements for each process are discussed.

  3. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  4. Correlating field and laboratory rates of particle abrasion, Rio Medio, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, P. J.; Sklar, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    River bed sediments commonly fine downstream due to a combination of particle abrasion, selective transport of finer grains, and fining of the local sediment supply from hillslopes and tributaries. Particle abrasion rates can be directly measured in the laboratory using tumbling barrels and annular flumes, however, scaling experimental particle abrasion rates to the field has proven difficult due to the confounding effects of selective transport and local supply variations. Here we attempt to correlate laboratory and field rates of particle abrasion in a field setting where these confounding effects can be controlled. The Rio Medio, which flows westward from the crest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in north central New Mexico, is one of several streams studied by John P. Miller in the early 1960's. Several kilometers downstream of its headwaters, the river crosses the Picuris-Pecos fault. Upstream of the fault the river receives quartzite, sandstone and shale clasts from the Ortega Formation, while downstream sediments are supplied by the Embudo Granite. Because the upstream lithologies are not resupplied downstream of the fault, any observed fining of these clasts should be due only to abrasion and selective transport. We hypothesize that we can account for the effects of selective transport by comparing relative fining rates for the different upstream lithologies from both the field and a laboratory tumbler. By correlating laboratory abrasion rates with rock strength, we can predict the relative fining rates due solely to abrasion expected in the field; differences between the predicted and observed fining rates could then be attributed to selective transport. We used point counts to measure bed surface sediment grain size distributions at 15 locations along a 25 kilometer reach of the Rio Medio, beginning just downstream of the fault and ending upstream of a developed area with disturbed channel conditions. We recorded intermediate particle diameter as well

  5. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  6. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  7. Factors influencing dust exposure: finishing activities in drywall construction.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Catherine E; Jones, Rachael M; Boelter, Fred W

    2011-05-01

    Sanding drywall joint compound is a dusty construction activity. We studied potential factors influencing exposure to respirable and total dust for sanders and bystanders in the area of drywall joint compound finishing in 17 test events within a room-scale isolation chamber. We found the air change rate to be negatively correlated with dust C(twa) both in the sander's personal breathing zone and surrounding area. We could not conclude that sanding tool type systematically influences dust C(twa), but the use of 80-grit abrasive was associated with the highest dust C(twa). We found respirable dusts were uniformly dispersed 1-8.2 m from sanding activities at a fixed location. As anticipated, both respirable and total dust C(twa) in the sander's personal breathing zone are higher than in the surrounding area. The respirable fraction of the total dust mass C(twa) was greater in the surrounding area than in the sander's personal breathing zone. Respirable dust concentrations measured in real time increased over the duration of sanding, exhibiting a temporal trend that is similar to that predicted by the well-mixed box model with contaminant removal by mechanical ventilation only, and continuous emission. Dust concentrations returned to pre-activity (background) levels 2-4 hr after cessation of the sanding activity.

  8. Resistance of dentin coating materials against abrasion by toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Gando, Iori; Ariyoshi, Meu; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Thin-film coating of root dentin surface by all-in-one adhesives has been shown to be an effective option to prevent root surface caries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear resistance against toothbrush abrasion of two all-in-one coating materials; Shield Force (SF) and Hybrid Coat (HC). Bovine dentin surfaces were covered with one of the coating materials; SF or HC. After storage in water for 24 h, the testing surface was subjected to the toothbrush abrasion test up to 50,000 cycles either in water or toothpaste slurry. The remaining thickness of the coating material was measured using SEM. Toothpaste slurry significantly increased rate of tooth brush abrasion of the coating materials. While SF and HC wore at a similar pace under toothbrush abrasion, SF had a thicker coat and could protect dentin longer, up to 50,000 cycles.

  9. Improved wound healing in blue LED treated superficial abrasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Bacci, Stefano; De Siena, Gaetano; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco; Alfieri, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    A blue-LED photocoagulator device was designed in order to induce a selective photocoagulation effect in superficial bleeding. An in vivo study in rat back skin evidenced an improved healing process in the LED treated abrasions.

  10. Interaction between attrition,abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Shellis, R P

    2006-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence seems insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear through formation of pellicle and by remineralisation but cannot prevent it.

  11. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it.

  12. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... excessive restorative materials, such as gold, and to smooth rough surfaces from oral restorations, such...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... excessive restorative materials, such as gold, and to smooth rough surfaces from oral restorations, such...

  14. Tribological investigation of a functional medical textile with lubricating drug-delivery finishing.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, L-C; Lottenbach, R; Rossi, R M; Derler, S

    2013-08-01

    Textile-based drug delivery systems have a high potential for innovative medical and gerontechnological applications. In this study, the tribological behaviour and lubrication properties of a novel textile with drug delivery function/finishing was investigated by means of friction experiments that simulated cyclic dynamic contacts with skin under dry and wet conditions. The textile drug delivery system is based on a loadable biopolymer dressing on a polyester (PES) woven fabric. The fabrics were finished with low (LC) and highly cross-linked (HC) polysaccharide dressings and investigated in the unloaded condition as well as loaded with phytotherapeutic substances. The mechanical resistance and possible abrasion of the functional coatings on the textile substrate were assessed by friction measurements and scanning electron microscopical analyses. Under dry contact conditions, all investigated fabrics (PES substrate alone and textiles with loaded and unloaded dressings) showed generally low friction coefficients (0.20-0.26). Under wet conditions, the measured friction coefficients were typically higher (0.34-0.51) by a factor of 1.5-2. In the wet condition, both loaded drug delivery textiles exhibited 7-29% lower friction (0.34-0.41) than the PES fabric with unloaded dressings (0.42-0.51), indicating pronounced lubrication effects. The lubrication effects as well as the abrasion resistance of the studied textiles with drug delivery function depended on the degree of dilution of the phytotherapeutic substances. Lubricating formulations of textile-based drug delivery systems which reduce friction against the skin might be promising candidates for advanced medical textile finishes in connection with skin care and wound (decubitus ulcer) prevention.

  15. Dentifrice fluoride and abrasivity interplay on artificial caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Hani M; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    Incipient caries lesions on smooth surfaces may be subjected to toothbrushing, potentially leading to remineralization and/or abrasive wear. The interplay of dentifrice abrasivity and fluoride on this process is largely unknown and was investigated on three artificially created lesions with different mineral content/distribution. 120 bovine enamel specimens were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n = 10), resulting from the association of (1) lesion type [methylcellulose acid gel (MeC); carboxymethylcellulose solution (CMC); hydroxyethylcellulose gel (HEC)], (2) slurry abrasive level [low (REA 4/ RDA 69); high (REA 7/RDA 208)], and (3) fluoride concentration [0/275 ppm (14.5 mM) F as NaF]. After lesion creation, specimens were brushed in an automated brushing machine with the test slurries (50 strokes 2×/day). Specimens were kept in artificial saliva in between brushings and overnight. Enamel surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry after lesion creation, 1, 3 and 5 days. Two enamel sections (from baseline and post-brushing areas) were obtained and analyzed microradiographically. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 5%). Brushing with high-abrasive slurry caused more SL than brushing with low-abrasive slurry. For MeC and CMC lesions, fluoride had a protective effect on SL from day 3 on. Furthermore, for MeC and CMC, there was a significant mineral gain in the remaining lesions except when brushed with high-abrasive slurries and 0 ppm F. For HEC, a significant mineral gain took place when low-abrasive slurry was used with fluoride. The tested lesions responded differently to the toothbrushing procedures. Both slurry fluoride content and abrasivity directly impacted SL and mineral gain of enamel caries lesions.

  16. Abrasive-waterjet machining of isogrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark; Monserud, David

    1990-12-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of machining isogrid structures with abrasive-waterjets (AWJs). The main objective was to mill isogrid patterns in surfaces with accurate depth control using an AWJ. Three different approaches using AWJs were tested: linear cutting of isogrid patterns for diffusion bonding, milling with conventional AWJ nozzles, and milling with a single-angled rotary AWJ nozzle. It was shown that pocket milling with conventional AWJs is the most feasible of those tested. The milling can be done internally on preformed aluminum tubes, and the AWJ can also be used on materials other than aluminum. Accurate depth control can be achieved at high productivity rates. As an example, it is projected that a 48-inch-diameter skirt 12 inches high could be milled with an isogrid pattern in 6.3 hours. Milled isogrid patterns can be controlled to 0.001 inch, and thin walls of less than 0.025 inch are achievable. Milling isogrid patterns with conventional AWJs could be very economical, but additional development efforts are required to optimize the milling process and to demonstrate the milling of prototype parts.

  17. Dynamical simulation of an abrasive wear process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalem, Khaled; Li, D. Y.

    1999-05-01

    A dynamic computer model was developed to simulate wear behavior of materials on micro-scales. In this model, a material system is discretized and mapped onto a lattice or grid. Each lattice site represents a small volume of the material. During a wear process, a lattice site may move under the influence of external force and the interaction between the site and its adjacent sites. The site-site interaction is a function of mechanical properties of the material such as the elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening and the fracture strain. Newton's law of motion is used to determine the movement of lattice sites during a wear process. The strain between a pair of sites is recoverable if it is within the elastic deformation range; otherwise plastic deformation takes place. A bond between two adjacent sites is broken when its strain exceeds a critical value. A site or a cluster of sites is worn away if all bonds connecting the site or the cluster to its nearest neighbors are broken. The model well describes the strain distribution in a contact region, in consistence with a finite element analysis. This model was applied to several metallic materials abraded under the ASTM G65 abrasion condition, and the results were compared to experimental observations. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiment was found.

  18. Method of protecting surfaces from abrasion and abrasion resistant articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-06-09

    Surfaces of fabricated structures are protected from damage by impacting particulates by a coating of hard material formed as a mass of thin flexible filaments having root ends secured to the surface and free portions which can flex and overlap to form a resilient cushioning mat which resembles hair or fur. The filamentary coating covers the underlying surface with hard abrasion resistance material while also being compliant and capable of local accommodation to particle impacts. The coating can also function as thermal and/or acoustical insulation and has a friction reducing effect. 11 figs.

  19. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  20. METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFPPT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Tool (MFFPPT) is being developed to allow the metal finishing industry an easy method to evaluate potential pollution prevention options. In order to reduce the quantity of pollutants generated by a process, the sources of pollutants within ...

  1. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  2. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  3. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  4. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  5. 25 CFR 301.8 - Finish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finish. 301.8 Section 301.8 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO, PUEBLO, AND HOPI SILVER AND TURQUOISE PRODUCTS; STANDARDS § 301.8 Finish. All silver is to be hand polished....

  6. JSC Metal Finishing Waste Minimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Erica

    2003-01-01

    THe paper discusses the following: Johnson Space Center (JSC) has achieved VPP Star status and is ISO 9001 compliant. The Structural Engineering Division in the Engineering Directorate is responsible for operating the metal finishing facility at JSC. The Engineering Directorate is responsible for $71.4 million of space flight hardware design, fabrication and testing. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility processes flight hardware to support the programs in particular schedule and mission critical flight hardware. The JSC Metal Finishing Facility is operated by Rothe Joint Venture. The Facility provides following processes: anodizing, alodining, passivation, and pickling. JSC Metal Finishing Facility completely rebuilt in 1998. Total cost of $366,000. All new tanks, electrical, plumbing, and ventilation installed. Designed to meet modern safety, environmental, and quality requirements. Designed to minimize contamination and provide the highest quality finishes.

  7. In vitro effect of air-abrasion operating parameters on dynamic cutting characteristics of alumina and bio-active glass powders.

    PubMed

    Milly, H; Austin, R S; Thompson, I; Banerjee, A

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry advocates the maintenance of all repairable tooth structures during operative caries management in combination with remineralization strategies. This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion operating parameters on its cutting efficiency/pattern using bio-active glass (BAG) powder and alumina powder as a control in order to develop its use as a minimally invasive operative technique. The cutting efficiency/pattern assessment on an enamel analogue, Macor, was preceded by studying the powder flow rate (PFR) of two different commercial intraoral air-abrasion units with differing powder-air admix systems. The parameters tested included air pressure, powder flow rate, nozzle-substrate distance, nozzle angle, shrouding the air stream with a curtain of water, and the chemistry of abrasive powder. The abraded troughs were scanned and analyzed using confocal white light profilometry and MountainsMap surface analysis software. Data were analyzed statistically using one-way and repeated-measures analysis of variance tests (p=0.05). The air-abrasion unit using a vibration mechanism to admix the abrasive powder with the air stream exhibited a constant PFR regardless of the set air pressure. Significant differences in cutting efficiency were observed according to the tested parameters (p<0.05). Alumina powder removed significantly more material than did BAG powder. Using low air pressure and suitable consideration of the effect of air-abrasion parameters on cutting efficiency/patterns can improve the ultraconservative cutting characteristics of BAG air-abrasion, thereby allowing an introduction of this technology for the controlled cleaning/removal of enamel, where it is indicated clinically.

  8. An experiment system for testing synergetic erosion caused by sand abrasion and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Liu, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhu, L.; Xu, H. Q.; Meng, X. C.; Yu, J. C.; Ma, S. P.; Wang, K.

    2014-03-01

    An advanced comprehensive test system, designed for testing synergetic erosion due to cavitation and sand abrasion in hydraulic machinery, is presented in this paper. This system includes an integrated test rig, control platform, and state-of-the-art measurement etc. For the integrated test system, there are three test modes, Venturi-section water tunnel, rotating disc and rotating disc with jet nozzle. The maximum velocity is 45 m/s for Venturi-section water tunnel test mode, and 85 m/s for rotating disc test mode. The pressure range for those two test modes can be regulated within -0.09 MPa~0.6 MPa. The highest flow relative velocity is 120 m/s for rotating disc with jet nozzle test mode. All key parameters measured from the test rig, such as flow discharge, pressure, sand concentration, temperature etc, can be displayed online and processed in the control platform. This new test system provides researchers with the possibility to measure cavitation erosion, sand abrasion and the synergetic damage in hydraulic machinery. Further, flow visualization analysis, weight loss measurements and erosion outline measurements are available using the system.

  9. Pebble and bedrock abrasion during fluvial transport in active orogenic setting : experimental study and application to natural hydrographic networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, M.; Lavé, J.

    2003-04-01

    At mountain range scale, rivers play an important role in shaping the landscape : in response to active uplift, they incise into bedrock and ensure base level lowering for hillslopes erosion. At the same time, they ensure evacuation of erosion products out of the range as suspended- or bedload. Incision rates are commonly equated with a stream power law, assuming that river incision depends only on hydrodynamic variables. However, this simplification is not mechanically satisfying : in many settings, river bedload fluxes exert an important control on incision rates, by limiting bedrock exposure or by providing an efficient tool for river mechanical abrasion. It is therefore important to better quantify the abrasion processes during bedload transport both to deduce pebble size reduction that controls carrying capacity and bedrock exposure, and to derive bedrock incision laws. Such characterization can be constrained through experimental studies or field measurements. Experimental studies on pebble and bedrock abrasion have been conducted for a long time [e.g. Daubree, 1879]. They generally provide incision rates around two orders of magnitude below natural downstream fining rates. Previous authors have suggested that this discrepancy could be explained by the fact that experimental device doesn’t reproduce really the abrasion phenomena effective in natural rivers, like saltation and following impacts. In this way, we have built an experimental device in order to reproduce these abrasion phenomena. It consists of a circular flume of 30 cm width and of 60 cm curvature radius. Water is injected tangentially on four points ; it generates a flow that produce sediment motion. Velocity vertical profile is roughly similar to what could be observed in natural rivers. The bottom and the sides of the device are interchangeable, in order to measure distinctly pebble abrasion or the interactions between sediment load and substratum. The aim of this experimental study is to

  10. FON: From Start to Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, L. K.; Andruk, V. M.; Golovnia, V. V.; Shatokhina, S. V.; Yizhakevych, O. M.; Ivanov, G. A.; Yatsenko, A. I.; Sergeeva, T. P.

    Almost 40-year history of FON project ended with the creation of the whole northern sky catalog of objects down to B ≤ 16.5m. The idea of 4-fold overlapping of the northern sky with 6 wide-field astrographs has not been realized in full. For historical reasons it has been transformed into the 2-fold overlapping observational program of MAO NAS of Ukraine, resulted in three versions of the multimillion catalog of positions, proper motions, and B-magnitudes of stars. The first version of 1.2 million stars had been finished before the 2000s and is based on the AC object list. The measurements of plates were made by automatic measuring complex PARSEC, specially developed for massive photographic reviews. As the input list was limited by AC objects, the most part of stars on the FON plates remained unmeasured. Principles of workflow organization of such works formed the basis for the further development of the project using the latest IT-technologies. For the creation of the second and the third versions of the catalog, the list of objects was obtained as a result of total digitizing of plates and their image processing. The final third version contains 19.5 million stars and galaxies with the maximum possible for the photographic astrometry accuracy. The collection of plates, obtained in other observatories - participants of the project, are partially safe and can be used for the same astrometric tasks.

  11. Abrasive tip treatment for use on compressor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    A co-spray process was used which simultaneously but separately introduces abrasive grits and metal matrix powder into the plasma stream and entraps the abrasive grits within a molten matrix to form an abrasive coating as the matrix material solidifies on test specimen surfaces. Spray trials were conducted to optimize spray parameter settings for the various matrix/grit combinations before actual spraying of the test specimens. Rub, erosion, and bond adhesion tests were conducted on the coated specimens in the as-sprayed condition as well as on coated specimens that were aged for 100 hours at a temperature of 866K (1100 F). Microscopic examinations were performed to determine the coating abrasive-particle content, the size and shape of the adhesive particles in the coating, and the extent of compositional or morphological changes resulting from the aging process. A nickel chromium/aluminum composite with No. 150 size (0.002 to 0.005 inch) silicon carbide grits was selected as the best matrix/abrasive combination of the candidates surveyed for coating compressor blade tips.

  12. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During recent soil-brushing experiments, the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became covered with dust, as shown here. An abundance of iron oxide minerals in the dust gave the device a reddish-brown veneer. Investigators were using the rock abrasion tool to uncover successive layers of soil in an attempt to reveal near-surface stratigraphy. Afterward, remnant dirt clods were visible on both the bit and the brush of the tool. Designers of the rock abrasion tool at Honeybee Robotics and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a plan to run the brush on the rock abrasion tool in reverse to dislodge the dirt and return the tool to normal operation. Subsequent communications with the rover revealed that the procedure is working and the rock abrasion tool remains healthy.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 893rd sol, or Martian day (July 8, 2006). The image combines exposures taken through three of the camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 430 nanometers.

  13. System for pressure letdown of abrasive slurries

    DOEpatents

    Kasper, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for releasing erosive slurries from containment at high pressure without subjecting valves to highly erosive slurry flow. The system includes a pressure letdown tank disposed below the high-pressure tank, the two tanks being connected by a valved line communicating the gas phases and a line having a valve and choke for a transfer of liquid into the letdown tank. The letdown tank has a valved gas vent and a valved outlet line for release of liquid. In operation, the gas transfer line is opened to equalize pressure between tanks so that a low level of liquid flow occurs. The letdown tank is then vented, creating a high-pressure differential between the tanks. At this point, flow between tanks is controlled by the choke. High-velocity, erosive flow through a high-pressure outlet valve is prevented by equalizing the start up pressure and thereafter limiting flow with the choke.

  14. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  15. Aeolian abrasion on Venus: Preliminary results from the Venus simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, D. W.; Pollack, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    The role of atmospheric pressure on aeolian abrasion was examined in the Venus Simulator with a constant temperature of 737 K. Both the rock target and the impactor were fine-grained basalt. The impactor was a 3 mm diameter angular particle chosen to represent a size of material that is entrainable by the dense Venusian atmosphere and potentially abrasive by virtue of its mass. It was projected at the target 10 to the 5 power times at a velocity of 0.7 m/s. The impactor showed a weight loss of approximately 1.2 x 10 to the -9 power gm per impact with the attrition occurring only at the edges. Results from scanning electron microscope analysis, profilometry, and weight measurement are summarized. It is concluded that particles can incur abrasion at Venusian temperatures even with low impact velocities expected for Venus.

  16. Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan

    SciTech Connect

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-05-24

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  17. Aeolian Abrasion, a Dominant Erosion Agent in the Martian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Cooper, G.; Eddlemon, E.; Greeley, R.; Laity, J.; Phoreman, J.; Razdan, A.; van Note, S.; White, B.; Wilson, G.

    2004-12-01

    Aeolian abrasion is one of the predominant erosion mechanisms on Mars today. Martian ventifacts record the climate under which the rocks were modified (wind direction, wind speeds and particle flux) and therefore tie into the overall climatic regime of the planet. By better understanding the rates at which rocks abrade and the features diagnostic of specific climatic conditions, we can gain insight into past climates. Herein we report on numerical models, wind tunnel experiments, and field work to determine 1) Particle and kinetic fluxes on Earth and Mars, 2) the degree to which these parameters control abrasion, and 3) how, in detail, rocks of various shapes and compositions erode over time. Kinetic energy generally increases with height, whereas flux decreases, and impact angles, which affect energy transfer, and rebound effects are functions of the rock facet angle. This results in a non-linear relationship between abrasion potential and height that is a function of wind speed, planetary environment, and target geometry. We have computed the first three of these parameters numerically using a numerical saltation code, combined with published flux calculations These results have been compared to wind tunnel tests of flux vs. height, abrasion of erodible targets, and high speed video analysis under terrestrial and Martian pressures. We are also using high resolution laser scanning to characterize textures, shapes, and weathering changes for terrestrial and Martian rocks at the 100s of microns scale. We find that facet angle, texture, and rock heterogeneity are of critical importance in determining the rate and style of abrasion. Field and theoretical results demonstrate that high speed winds, not the integrated flux of lower speeds, and sand, not dust, produce most rock abrasion. On Mars, this requires sustained winds above 20-25 m/s at the near surface, a challenge in the current environment.

  18. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  19. Analysis of silt abrasion of the impeller ring in a centrifugal pump with J-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z. D.; Wang, Z. Y.; Guo, Z. W.; Dong, J.; Lu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The water flow and movement of silt in a prototype double-suction centrifugal pump was simulated using an Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model. J-Grooves were adopted to protect the impeller ring from silt abrasion. The influence of J-grooves on the silt concentration and pump efficiency was analyzed. The results show that the radial component of the relative velocity around the impeller ring is too low to move the silt out of the spacing between the impeller plate and the casing. The high silt concentration around the impeller ring is the major contributor to silt abrasion of the impeller ring. The J-grooves induce two strong vortices, which increase the radial component of the relative velocity of water and reduce the silt concentration around the impeller ring, but additional friction losses are introduced and the pump efficiency is decreased. Optimization of the number and shape of J-grooves decreases losses in the efficiency of the pump, and effectively protects the impeller ring. Case 4 was found the most effective configuration in this study.

  20. Automated finishing of diamond turned dies for hard x-ray and EUV optics replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T. H.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Freeman, Richard R.

    2012-10-01

    Ultra-precision diamond turning can deliver very accurate form, often less than 100nm P-V. A possible manufacturing method for thin Wolter type-1 mirrors in hard X-ray space telescopes thus involves generating electroless nickel plated mandrels by diamond turning, before coating them with a reflective film and substrate. However, the surface texture after turning falls far short from the requirements of X-ray and EUV applications. The machining marks need to be removed, with hand polishing still widely employed. There is thus a compelling need for automated finishing of turned dies. A two step finishing method is presented that combines fluid jet and precessed bonnet polishing on a common 7-axis CNC platform. This method is capable of finishing diamond turned electroless nickel plated dies down to 0.28nm rms roughness, while deterministically improving form error down to 30nm P-V. The fluid jet polishing process, which consists of pressurizing water and abrasive particles for delivery through a nozzle, has been specially optimized with a newly designed slurry delivery unit and computer simulations, to remove diamond turning marks without introducing another waviness signature. The precessed bonnet polishing method, which consists of an inflated membrane rotated at an angle from the local normal to the surface and controlled by geometrical position relative to the work-piece, is subsequently employed with a novel control algorithm to deliver scratch-free surface roughness down to 0.28 nm rms. The combination of these two deterministic processes to finish aspheric and freeform dies promises to unlock new frontiers in X-ray and EUV optics fabrication.

  1. The Sea of Azov: Recent abrasion processes and problems of coastal protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Bespalova, L. A.; Ivlieva, O. V.; Tsygankova, A. E.; Kropyanko, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    The abrasion processes of the Sea of Azov have been assessed on the basis of long-term monitoring. The coast has been zoned by the degree of abrasion. The current condition of coast protection measures has been studied.

  2. Polishing is made cheaper by disposable diamond-impregnated abrasive cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Diamond impregnated abrasive cloth eliminated expensive diamond pastes and was economically disposed of to avoid contamination. Cloth was spunbonded nylon, but any napless fabric could be used. Cloth was sprayed with diamond abrasive gel.

  3. Innovative decontamination technology by abrasion in vibratory vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, Silvio; Ilarri, Sergio

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The possibility of using conventional vibratory vessel technology as a decontamination technique is the motivation for the development of this project. The objective is to explore the feasibility of applying the vibratory vessel technology for decontamination of radioactively-contaminated materials such as pipes and metal structures. The research and development of this technology was granted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Abrasion processes in vibratory vessels are widely used in the manufacture of metals, ceramics, and plastics. Samples to be treated, solid abrasive media and liquid media are set up into a vessel. Erosion results from the repeated impact of the abrasive particles on the surface of the body being treated. A liquid media, generally detergents or surfactants aid the abrasive action. The amount of material removed increases with the time of treatment. The design and construction of the machine were provided by Vibro, Argentina private company. Tests with radioactively-contaminated aluminum tubes and a stainless steel bar, were performed at laboratory level. Tests showed that it is possible to clean both the external and the internal surface of contaminated tubes. Results show a decontamination factor around 10 after the first 30 minutes of the cleaning time. (authors)

  4. Abrasive water-jet cutting; remote hot cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.; Funnell, G.J.

    1988-09-01

    In the process of selecting a failed equipment cut-up tool for the Process Facility Modifications (PFM) Project, a system using an Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) was developed and tested for remote disassembly of failed equipment by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, PFM Mechanical Development Unit.

  5. Review of Artificial Abrasion Test Methods for PV Module Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Muller, Matt T.; Simpson, Lin J.

    2016-08-01

    This review is intended to identify the method or methods--and the basic details of those methods--that might be used to develop an artificial abrasion test. Methods used in the PV literature were compared with their closest implementation in existing standards. Also, meetings of the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force Task Group 12-3 (TG12-3, which is concerned with coated glass) were used to identify established test methods. Feedback from the group, which included many of the authors from the PV literature, included insights not explored within the literature itself. The combined experience and examples from the literature are intended to provide an assessment of the present industry practices and an informed path forward. Recommendations toward artificial abrasion test methods are then identified based on the experiences in the literature and feedback from the PV community. The review here is strictly focused on abrasion. Assessment methods, including optical performance (e.g., transmittance or reflectance), surface energy, and verification of chemical composition were not examined. Methods of artificially soiling PV modules or other specimens were not examined. The weathering of artificial or naturally soiled specimens (which may ultimately include combined temperature and humidity, thermal cycling and ultraviolet light) were also not examined. A sense of the purpose or application of an abrasion test method within the PV industry should, however, be evident from the literature.

  6. Reduction of Surface Errors over a Wide Range of Spatial Frequencies Using a Combination of Electrolytic In-Process Dressing Grinding and Magnetorheological Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    We present a rapid process for producing flat and smooth surfaces. In this technical note, a fabrication result of a carbon mirror is shown. Electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding with a metal bonded abrasive wheel, then a metal-resin bonded abrasive wheel, followed by a conductive rubber bonded abrasive wheel, and finally magnetorheological finishing (MRF) were performed as the first, second, third, and final steps, respectively in this process. Flatness over the whole surface was improved by performing the first and second steps. After the third step, peak to valley (PV) and root mean square (rms) values in an area of 0.72 x 0.54 mm2 on the surface were improved. These values were further improved after the final step, and a PV value of 10 nm and an rms value of 1 nm were obtained. Form errors and small surface irregularities such as surface waviness and micro roughness were efficiently reduced by performing ELID grinding using the above three kinds of abrasive wheels because of the high removal rate of ELID grinding, and residual small irregularities were reduced by short time MRF. This process makes it possible to produce flat and smooth surfaces in several hours.

  7. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  8. Brushing abrasion of eroded bovine enamel pretreated with topical fluorides.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Lugtenborg, M; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2006-01-01

    Topical fluorides have been proposed for the prevention of erosive dental wear. This study evaluated the in vitro effect of a single professional application of 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4), 1% amine fluoride (AmF) and 0.1% difluorosilane varnish (FV) in preventing wear due to combined erosion and brushing abrasion. One hundred and eight bovine enamel samples were used. Control groups were not pretreated with any product (C), pretreated with a fluoride-free varnish (FV-bl) or pretreated with fluoride varnish and subsequently submitted to varnish removal (FV-r). Wear was modeled by submitting the fluoride-treated and control groups to 3 cycles of the following regimens: erosion/remineralization (er/remin), abrasion/remineralization (abr/remin) or erosion/abrasion/remineralization (er/abr/remin). Erosion was simulated by immersion of the samples for 10 min in citric acid 50 mM (pH 3). Abrasion was carried out for 1 min (200 strokes, load 150 g) in a wear device. Remineralization (2 h artificial saliva) took place between the cycles. Two-way ANOVA showed that there was a significant interaction (pabrasion in vitro.

  9. Loose abrasive lapping hardness of optical glasses and its interpretation.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, J C; Xu, S; Fang, T

    1997-03-01

    We present an interpretation of the lapping hardness of commercially available optical glasses in terms of a micromechanics model of material removal by subsurface lateral cracking. We analyze data on loose abrasive microgrinding, or lapping at fixed nominal pressure, for many commercially available optical glasses in terms of this model. The Schott and Hoya data on lapping hardness are correlated with the results of such a model. Lapping hardness is a function of the mechanical properties of the glass: The volume removal rate increases approximately linearly with Young's modulus, and it decreases with fracture toughness and (approximately) the square of the Knoop hardness. The microroughness induced by lapping depends on the plastic and elastic properties of the glass, depending on abrasive shape. This is in contrast to deterministic microgrinding (fixed infeed rate), where it is determined from the plastic and fracture properties of the glass. We also show that Preston's coefficient has a similar dependence as lapping hardness on glass mechanical properties, as well as a linear dependence on abrasive size for the case of brittle material removal. These observations lead to the definition of an augmented Preston coefficient during brittle material removal. The augmented Preston coefficient does not depend on glass material properties or abrasive size and thus describes the interaction of the glass surface with the coolant-immersed abrasive grain and the backing plate. Numerical simulations of indentation are used to locate the origin of subsurface cracks and the distribution of residual surface and subsurface stresses, known to cause surface (radial) and subsurface (median, lateral) cracks.

  10. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  11. The Development of Surface Profile Models in Abrasive Slurry Jet Micro-machining of Brittle and Ductile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouraei, Hooman

    In low-pressure abrasive slurry jet micro-machining (ASJM), a slurry jet of fine abrasive particles is used to erode micro-sized features such as holes and channels in a variety of brittle and ductile materials with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability without the need for a patterned mask. ASJM causes no tool wear and thermal damage, applies small forces on the workpiece, allows multilevel etching on a single substrate and is relatively quick and inexpensive. In this study for the first time, the mechanics of micro-slurry jet erosion and its relation to the fluid flow of the impinging jet was investigated using a newly developed ASJM system. Existing surface evolution models, previously developed for abrasive air jet machining (AJM), were evaluated and modified through the use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models for profile modeling of micro-channels and micro-holes machined with ASJM in brittle materials. A novel numerical-empirical model was also developed in order to compensate for the shortcoming of existing surface evolution models and provide a higher degree of accuracy in predicting the profiles of features in ductile materials machined with ASJM. In addition, the effect of process parameters on the minimum feature size attainable with ASJM as a maskless process was also examined and it was shown that the size of machined features could be further reduced.

  12. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  13. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U,.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  14. APPROACHING ZERO DISCHARGE IN SURFACE FINISHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides guidance to surface finishing manufacturers on control technologies and process changes for approaching zero discharge (AZD). AZD is a key theme underlying the Strategic Goals Program (SGP). The SGP is a cooperative effort between the EPA nd the American El...

  15. Drywall Finishing Apprenticeship. Course Outline (C-6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengert, Gerald

    This course outline was prepard to help apprentice drywall installers and teachers of drywall finishing courses to learn or teach the skills necessary for the apprenticeship course in British Columbia. The course outline consists of 11 tracks (units) that cover the following topics: estimating, job inspection, safety, applying bead, filling…

  16. Why Do Photo Finish Images Look Weird?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with effects that appear on photographs of rotating objects when taken by a photo finish camera, a rolling shutter camera or a computer scanner. These effects are very similar to Roget's palisade illusion. A simple quantitative analysis of the images is also provided. The effects are explored using a computer scanner in a way that…

  17. Proper bit design improves penetration rate in abrasive horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Gentges, R.J. )

    1993-08-09

    Overall drilling penetration rates nearly tripled, and drill bit life nearly doubled compared to conventional bits when specially designed natural diamond and polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits were used during a seven-well horizontal drilling program. The improvement in drilling performance from better-designed bits lowered drilling costs at ANR Pipeline Co.'s Reed City gas storage field in Michigan. Laboratory tests with scaled down bits used on abrasive cores helped determine the optimum design for drilling the gas storage wells. The laboratory test results and actual field data were used to develop a matrix-body natural diamond bit, which was later modified to become a matrix-body, blade-type polycrystalline diamond compact bit. This bit had excellent penetration rates and abrasion resistance. The paper describes the background to the project, bit selection, natural diamond bits, field results, new bit designs, and field results from the new design.

  18. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  19. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  20. Abrasive blast material utilization in asphalt roadbed material

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.L.; Nehring, K.W.; Heath, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The State of California has promulgated rules on California-only hazardous wastes that offer the potential for some of these wastes to be recycled or reused. Abrasive blast material (ABM) from military and commercial operations such as sandblasting may fall into the category of waste that can be reused. Experiments were conducted on spent sandblasting grit to determine whether the grit could be incorporated into asphalt concrete for use as roadbed material, and a test roadbed was laid to evaluate the long-term stability of the metals found in the grit. Incorporation of the ABM in asphalt helps reduce the mobility of metal contaminants making the material suitable for reuse. The results of the initial characterization, treatability testing, and follow-up measurements of core samples taken from the test roadbed are presented to show that the use of abrasive blast material in asphalt roadbed material is a viable option under the proposed California regulatory standards.

  1. Abrasion resistance of muscovite in aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Calvin J.; Struble, Alexander; Whitmore, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Complementary aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments showed a trend in muscovite abrasion that may be useful for identifying ancient sandstones as aeolian or subaqueous in origin. We found that our experimental aeolian processes pulverized the micas quickly, while our subaqueous processes did not. In a pair of abrasion resistance experiments conducted with micaceous quartz sand, it was found that large muscovite grains were (1) reduced by aeolian processes to less than 500 μm in just 4 days, and (2) preserved by subaqueous processes to 610 ± 90 μm even after 356 days. At 20 days of aeolian transport no loose micas could be found even under the microscope, but after a year of subaqueous transport loose muscovite grains could still be seen with the naked eye. Thus, the occurrence and character of micas in a sandstone, particularly muscovite, may be helpful in determining the ancient depositional process.

  2. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Metals Selection for Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Hoffman, Richard; Hill, Maria M.; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of metals was examined for suitability for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment, one of ten microrover experiments of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. The seven candidate metals were: Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Ni, Pt, and W. Thin films of candidate metals from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer thick were deposited on black anodized aluminum coupons by e-beam and resistive evaporation and chemical vapor deposition. Optical, corrosion, abrasion, and adhesion criteria were used to select Al, Ni, and Pt. A description is given of the deposition and testing of thin films, followed by a presentation of experimental data and a brief discussion of follow-on testing and flight qualification.

  3. Self inflicted corneal abrasions due to delusional parasitosis

    PubMed Central

    Meraj, Adeel; Din, Amad U; Larsen, Lynn; Liskow, Barry I

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of self inflicted bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage due to ophthalmic and cutaneous delusional parasitosis. A male in his 50s presented with a 10 year history of believing that parasites were colonizing his skin and biting into his skin and eyes. The patient had received extensive medical evaluations that found no evidence that symptoms were due to a medical cause. He was persistent in his belief and had induced bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage by using heat lamps and hair dryers in an attempt to disinfect his body. The patient was treated with olanzapine along with treatment for his skin and eyes. His delusional belief system persisted but no further damage to his eyes and skin was noted on initial follow-up. PMID:22689836

  4. Finishing procedures in orthodontic-surgical cases.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    To ensure optimal results, we must do our utmost to achieve targets based on order, symmetry and precision, our ultimate aim being to strive towards the desired harmony, planned contrast and exact proportions. Orthodontic-surgical treatments require specific finishing procedures, which most often call for multidisciplinary, or even transdisciplinary, collaboration. Finishing will involve the dental arches just as much as the orofacial environment. Above all, treatment of this kind demands a highly targeted approach in combination with well-defined and perfectly executed techniques. To finish a case satisfactorily, reasonable targets should be aimed for to ensure they are achieved. One must be ambitious and yet wise. A tight alliance of surgeon and orthodontist will nurture convincing and achievable projects and good, lifelong outcomes. Following the consolidation phase, roughly 4 to 6 weeks post-surgery, we can initiate the final orthodontic treatment, which, in effect, constitutes a mini-treatment in its own right. "Details make perfection, but perfection is not a detail" (Leonardo Da Vinci). "A lucid mind is the ante-chamber of intelligence" (Léo Ferré). In the order of life, every form of unity is always unique, and if each of us is unique, it is because everyone else is too. Ambition, wisdom, lucidity and efficiency will guarantee a successful result, the successful result. We must not be mere observers of our treatments, but the architect, project manager and site foreman at one and the same time. One could talk ad infinitum about finishing orthodontic-surgical cases because everything else leads up to the case-finishing and even the fullest description could never be exhaustive.

  5. Development of underwater cutting system by abrasive water-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi

    1993-09-01

    The technology to cut objects in the ocean's depths with abrasive water jets was examined for possible application in view of the greater water depths and sophistication involved in work on the ocean floor today. A test model was developed to study this technology's safety and practicability. The test model was designed for use at great water depths and has functions and a configuration that are unlike equipment used on land. A continuous, stable supply of abrasive is a distinctive design feature. In land applications, there had been problems with plugged tubes and an uneven supply. For this reason, the abrasive was converted to slurry form, and a continuous pressurized tube pump system was adopted for supply to the nozzle head. Also, a hydraulic motor that does not employ oil or electric power was used to provide an underwater drive that is environment-friendly. The report outlines the technology's general design concept including its distinctive functions and its configuration for use at great depths, and the report provides great detail on the equipment.

  6. Characterization of Effective Parameters in Abrasive Waterjet Rock Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2014-03-01

    The rock cutting performance of an abrasive waterjet is affected by various parameters. In this study, rock cutting tests are conducted with different energy (i.e., water pressure, traverse speed, and abrasive feed rate), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), and material parameters [i.e., uniaxial compressive strength (UCS)]. In particular, experimental tests are carried out at a long standoff distance (up to 60 cm) to consider field application. The effective parameters of the rock cutting process are identified based on the relationships between the cutting performance indices (depth, width, and volume) and parameters. In addition, the cutting efficiency is analyzed with effective parameters as well as different pump types and the number of cutting passes considering the concept of kinetic jet energy. Efficiency analysis reveals that the cutting depth efficiency tends to increase with an increase in the water pressure and traverse speed and with a decrease in the standoff distance and UCS. Cutting volume efficiency strongly depends on standoff distance. High efficiency of cutting volume is obtained at a long standoff distance regardless of the pump type. The efficiency analysis provides a realistic way to optimize parameters for abrasive waterjet rock excavation.

  7. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar(Registered TradeMark), Vectran(Registered TradeMark), Orthofabric, and Tyvek(Registered TradeMark)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran(Registered TradeMark)) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek , the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek(Registered TradeMark). This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran(Registered TradeMark) and Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  8. Characterization of the resistance of pyrolytic carbon to abrasive wear.

    PubMed

    Vitale, E; Giusti, P

    1995-12-01

    Si-alloyed pyrolitic carbon (PyC) is currently employed in many biomedical devices, due to its fairly good biological compatibility and non biodegradeability. For prosthetic heart valve applications, required to operate safely for many years, the resistance to abrasive wear is one of the limiting factors which must be accurately evaluated. The present study reports on abrasive wear testing of Ti/PyC and PyC/PyC sliding couples. For both couples it was found that the wear behaviour can be shifted from a low wear regime, characterised by very small wear rates and reduced scatter, to a high wear regime, characterised by high wear rates and high scatter, due to the presence of particle contamination coming from the environment and/or from the specimen polishing process. Actual biomedical devices, particularly heart valves, should not experience the high wear regime, due to the absence of any hard particle contamination source. The wear observed in these items is in fact minimal and may depend on mechanisms other than abrasive wear. In these conditions the experimental evaluation of the wear behaviour should definetely be performed by tests on actual devices.

  9. Surface characterization of current composites after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Jin, Jian; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Hickel, Reinhard; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the surface roughness and the gloss of current composites before and after toothbrush abrasion. We assessed forty dimensionally standardized composite specimens (n=8/group) from five composites: two nanohybrids (i. e., IPS Empress Direct Enamel and IPS Empress Direct Dentin), two microhybrids (i. e., Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Z250) and one organically modified ceramics (Admira). All of the specimens were polished with 4000-grid silicon carbide papers. Surface roughness was measured with a profilometer and gloss was measured with a glossmeter before and after powered toothbrush abrasion with a 1:1 slurry (dentifrice/tap water) at 12,000 strokes in a toothbrush simulator. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness and a reduction in gloss after toothbrush abrasion in all of the composites except Clearfil AP-X (p<0.05). Simple regression analysis showed that there was not an association between the surface roughness and the gloss (R(2)=0.191, p<0.001).

  10. Pilot Plant Demonstration of a Sulfide Precipitation Process for Metal-Finishing Wastewater Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    TOAD Metal-Finishing Wastewater Treatment System 6 3 View of Portion of Treatment System 7 4 Section of Treatment System, Showing Clearwell 7 5 Filter... Clearwell Effluent Suspended Solids 21 10 Effluent Oil and Grease 22 1 1 Dewatered Sludge Solids 23 12 Operating Time, Wastewater Flows, and Volume of...showing clearwell . S S S - - - - - - - - - - S 0C C0 CL U. * 4 Figure 6. Control panel. c. Flow Equalization. The effluents from the cyanide

  11. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Melissa H X; Hill, Robert G; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38-80 μm) versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm) in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p < 0.05) despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine.

  12. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Melissa H. X.; Hill, Robert G.; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38–80 μm) versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm) in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p < 0.05) despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine. PMID:26697067

  13. Basic research needs and opportunities at the solid-solid interface - Adhesion, abrasion and polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowkes, F. M.; Butler, B. L.; Schissel, P.; Butler, G. B.; Hartman, J. S.; Hoffman, R. W.; Inal, O. T.; Miller, W. G.; Tompkins, H. G.; Delollis, N. J.

    1982-04-01

    Solid-solid interfaces in solar technologies such as photovoltaics, mirrored surfaces, and absorbers in flate plate collectors are examined theoretically along with degradation and protective measures. The energetics of adhesion are modeled in terms of intermolecular forces such as covalent and electrostatic bonds. Finite element analyses are noted to be useful for calculating the stress fields in layered solar cells, although inclusion of plastic flow and relaxation processes is not yet possible. The effects of physical degradation of protective coatings and front surfaces of reflectors are outlined, and research in abrasion-erosion resistance, particulate deposition resistance, and detergents for washing solar surfaces is indicated. Finally, polymeric coatings are discussed for solar cells and for wind turbine blades for providing environmental protection.

  14. Abrasive water jet cutting as a new procedure for cutting cancellous bone--in vitro testing in comparison with the oscillating saw.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Karsten; Carrero, Volker; Rentzsch, Reemt; Becker, Axel; Bishop, Nick; Hille, Ekkehard; Louis, Hartmut; Morlock, Michael; Honl, Matthias

    2004-11-15

    The quality of bone cuts is assessed by the accuracy and biological potency of the cut surfaces. Conventional tools (such as saws and milling machines) can cause thermal damage to bone tissue. Water jet cutting is nonthermal; that is, it does not generate heat. This study investigates whether the abrasive jet cutting quality in cancellous bone with a biocompatible abrasive is sufficient for the implantation of endoprostheses or for osteotomies. Sixty porcine femoral condyles were cut with an abrasive water jet and with an oscillating saw. alpha-lactose-monohydrate was used as a biocompatible abrasive. Water pressure (pW = 35 and 70 MPa) and abrasive feed rate (m = 0.5, 1, and 2 g/s) were varied. As a measure of the quality of the cut surface the cutting gap angle (delta) and the surface roughness (Ra) were determined. The surface roughness was lowest for an abrasive feed rate of m = 2 g/s (jet direction: 39 +/- 16 microm, advance direction: 54 +/- 22 microm). However, this was still significantly higher than the surface roughness for the saw group (jet direction: 28 +/- 12 microm, advance direction: 36 +/- 19 microm) (p < 0.001 for both directions). At both pressure levels the greatest cutting gap angle was observed for a mass flow rate of m = 1 g/s (pW = 35 MPa: delta = 2.40 +/- 4.67 degrees ; pW = 70 MPa: delta = 4.13 +/- 4.65 degrees), which was greater than for m = 0.5 g/s (pW = 35 MPa: delta = 1.63 +/- 3.89 degrees ; pW = 70 MPa: delta = 0.36 +/- 1.70 degrees) and m = 2 g/s (pW =70 MPa: delta = 0.06 +/- 2.40 degrees). Abrasive water jets are suitable for cutting cancellous bone. The large variation of the cutting gap angle is, however, unfavorable, as the jet direction cannot be adjusted by a predefined value. If it is possible to improve the cutting quality by a further parameter optimization, the abrasive water jet may be the cutting technique of the future for robotic usage.

  15. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear: Final report for period September 15, 1981--March 14, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.

    1988-03-08

    This report summarizes research performed on abrasion of metallic alloys. The work was designed to improve our understanding of the factors affecting abrasion rates in two-phase alloys containing large, hard second-phase particles (SPPs) such as carbides, since this class of alloys generally has very high abrasion resistance owing to the presence of such carbides. The project was divided into sections dealing with material removal in the carbide and matrix phases. The materials studied included Stellite and high Cr-Mo white cast irons and a set of specially prepared model alloys containing one of six types of artificial SPPs dispersed in a sintered matrix of pure Cu. Scratch tests were employed to simulate abrasion mechanisms, and specially designed scratch test systems were fabricated to permit scratch testing in-situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to permit scratches to be made at fixed depths of cut rather than fixed loads. Three types of abrasion tests were employed; a dry-sand rubber wheel abrasion test; a low-speed ''gouging'' abrasion test employing a special low-speed Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ grinding wheel; and a pin-on-disc abrasion test using abrasive paper. Abrasive type and size was varied in the rubber wheel and the pin-on-disc tests. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FINISHED CASTINGS ARE ONLY GROUND BEFORE THEY ARE SHIPPED TO CUSTOMERS WHO COMPLETE THE FINISHING IN THEIR OWN MACHINE SHOPS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. CANVAS FINISH TO REMOVE FLOAT MARKS. View is to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANVAS FINISH TO REMOVE FLOAT MARKS. View is to the northwest of deck finishing operations - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  18. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... into mass units of pounds. (2) Volume measurements of each applied finish can be obtained with a flow measurement device. For each flow measurement device, you must perform the items listed in paragraphs (c)(2)(i... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pounds. (2) Volume measurements of each applied finish can be obtained with a flow measurement device. For each flow measurement device, you must perform the items listed in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (v... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...

  20. 40 CFR 63.5385 - How do I measure the quantity of finish applied to the leather?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pounds. (2) Volume measurements of each applied finish can be obtained with a flow measurement device. For each flow measurement device, you must perform the items listed in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (v... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...

  1. 9 CFR 381.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... Finished product inspection. (a) Finished product inspections must be handled according to: (1) A HACCP.... (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for finished product inspections where the HACCP plan for thermally...

  2. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  3. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  4. Lathe Attachment Finishes Inner Surface of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancki, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely smooth finishes are machined on inside surfaces of tubes by new attachment for a lathe. The relatively inexpensive accessory, called a "microhone," holds a honing stone against workpiece by rigid tangs instead of springs as in conventional honing tools. Inner rod permits adjustment of microhoning stone, while outer tube supports assembly. Outer tube is held between split blocks on lathe toolpost. Microhoning can be done with either microhone or workpiece moving and other member stationary.

  5. Laser Window Surface Finishing and Coating Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    IKlf il fie. r . *ttt\\ mil nlrol’ly h\\ lllm k Itumhvr ■ LasLr windows. Surface finishing, Thin films , Antireflection coatings , 10.6...Zuccaro) During the course of our program it is our objective to prepare antireflection (AR) film coatings for candidate infrared laser window...antireflection coatings under UHV conditions and to compare; these films with (.host- prepared under ordinary vacuum conditions. a. Experimental Results

  6. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  7. A Profilometric Study to Assess the Role of Toothbrush and Toothpaste in Abrasion Process

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar Singh, Siddharth; Gupta, Anjali; Roy, Sayak; Sareen, Mohit; Khajuria, Sarang

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Despite of many studies conducted on toothbrushes and toothpaste to find out the culprit for abrasion, there is no clear cut evidence to pin point the real cause for abrasion. Purpose An in vitro assessment of the role of different types of toothbrushes (soft/ medium/hard) in abrasion process when used in conjunction with and without a dentifrice. Materials and Method Forty five freshly extracted, sound, human incisor teeth were collected for this study. Enamel specimens of approximately 9 mm2 were prepared by gross trimming of extracted teeth using a lathe machine (Baldor 340 Dental lathe; Ohio, USA). They were mounted on separate acrylic bases. The specimens were divided into three groups, each group containing 15 mounted specimens. Group 1 specimens were brushed with soft toothbrush; Group 2 brushed with medium toothbrush and Group 3 with hard toothbrush. Initially, all the mounted specimens in each group were brushed using dentifrice and then the same procedure was repeated with water as control. Profilometric readings were recorded pre and post to tooth brushing and the differences in readings served as proxy measure to assess surface abrasion. These values were then compared to each other. Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test were performed. Results The results showed that brushing, with water alone, caused less abrasion than when toothpaste was added (p< 0.008). When brushed with water, the harder toothbrush caused more abrasion (higher Ra-value), but when toothpaste was added, the softer toothbrush caused more abrasion (p< 0.001). Conclusion Besides supporting the fact that toothpaste is needed to create a significant abrasion, this study also showed that a softer toothbrush can cause more abrasion than harder ones. The flexibility of bristles is only secondary to abrasion process and abrasivity of dentifrice has an important role in abrasion process. PMID:26535407

  8. Aeolian Abrasion at the Curiosity Landing Site: Clues to the Role of Wind in Landscape Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Hallet, B.; Newman, C. E.; Rice, M. S.; Blaney, D. L.; Calef, F. J.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K. W.; Maurice, S.; Pinet, P. C.; Wiens, R. C.; de Pablo, M.; Renno, N. O.

    2013-12-01

    The broad scale geomorphology of Gale Crater reflects diverse aeolian processes, from airfall settling that likely deposited much of the upper and some of the lower units of Mt. Sharp, to evidence of extensive wind exhumation and removal of material exterior to the mound, to active dunes on the crater floor. The integrated effect of aeolian sand transport can also be examined on a much smaller scale by the study of ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles. A diversity of ventifacts are found along Curiosity's traverse through the upper 'hummocky' (HY) geomorphic unit and the lower Yellowknife Bay (YKB) sedimentary rocks. The textures are analogous to abrasion features found on Earth and include cm-scale facets, keels, elongated pits, grooves, flutes, and basal sills. High-resolution images from ChemCam's Remote Micro-Imager also show mm-scale lineations. Evidence of differential erosion is common, with HY conglomerates (e.g., Hottah, Link) and the YKB Sheepbed mudstone unit containing distinct wind tails in the lee of resistant pebbles, and bedding features within Rocknest 3, the YKB Shaler sandstone unit, and other layered rocks displaying prominent ridge-groove topography. ChemCam LIBS depth profile data so far show no strong evidence for chemical differences in the elemental composition between abraded and non-abraded surfaces (as determined from qualitative assessment), as might be expected if there were rock coatings or weathering rinds undergoing active abrasion. Preliminary measurements of ventifact texture and wind tail orientations indicate sandblasting in HY and YKB from predominantly southwesterly and northerly directions, respectively. Based on meso-scale models of current winds and REMS results, SW flow is uncommon whereas N winds are frequent. Compositional and textural information from the suite of MSL instruments indicate that HY rocks are dominated by various types of basalt (either as whole rocks or the resistant clasts in

  9. Lab-scale ash production by abrasion and collision experiments of porous volcanic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S. B.; Lane, S. J.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-09-01

    In the course of explosive eruptions, magma is fragmented into smaller pieces by a plethora of processes before and during deposition. Volcanic ash, fragments smaller than 2 mm, has near-volcano effects (e.g. increasing mobility of PDCs, threat to human infrastructure) but may also cause various problems over long duration and/or far away from the source (human health and aviation matters). We quantify the efficiency of ash generation during experimental fracturing of pumiceous and scoriaceous samples subjected to shear and normal stress fields. Experiments were designed to produce ash by overcoming the yield strength of samples from Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), Sicily and Lipari Islands (Italy), with this study having particular interest in the < 355 μm fraction. Fracturing within volcanic conduits, plumes and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) was simulated through a series of abrasion (shear) and collision (normal) experiments. An understanding of these processes is crucial as they are capable of producing very fine ash (< 10 μm). These particles can remain in the atmosphere for several days and may travel large distances (~ 1000s of km). This poses a threat to the aviation industry and human health. From the experiments we establish that abrasion produced the finest-grained material and up to 50% of the generated ash was smaller than 10 μm. In comparison, the collision experiments that applied mainly normal stress fields produced coarser grain sizes. Results were compared to established grain size distributions for natural fall and PDC deposits and good correlation was found. Energies involved in collision and abrasion experiments were calculated and showed an exponential correlation with ash production rate. Projecting these experimental results into the volcanic environment, the greatest amounts of ash are produced in the most energetic and turbulent regions of volcanic flows, which are proximal to the vent. Finest grain sizes are produced in PDCs

  10. Mechanical issues in laser and abrasive water jet cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jogender; Jain, Sulekh C.

    1995-01-01

    In forging and other metal-working industries, lasers and abrasive water jets are being applied to cut a variety of metal products to improve productivity and reduce costs. As described in the following, both the processes have their unique cutting capabilities and characteristics. Before selecting one, however, users must be aware of how each technique influences the end product as well as its performance (e.g., high-cycle fatigue life). For this article, we examined the mechanics of these two cutting processes by studying their effects on Ti-6Al-4Vand A286 steel.

  11. Mechanical issues in laser and abrasive water jet cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jogender; Jain, Sulekh C.

    1995-01-01

    In forging and other metal-working industries, lasers and abrasive water jets are being applied to cut a variety of metal products to improve productivity and reduce costs. As described, both the processes have their unique cutting capabilities and characteristics. Before selecting one, however, users must be aware of how each technique influences the end product as well as its performance (e.g., high-cycle fatigue life). For this article, we examined the mechanics of these two cutting processes by studying their effects on Ti-6Al-4V and A286 steel.

  12. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  13. Solution of the Roth-Marques-Durian rotational abrasion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge

    2011-03-01

    We solve the rotational abrasion model of Roth, Marques, and Durian [Phys. Rev. EPRLTAO1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.031303 83, 031303 (2011)], a one-dimensional quasilinear partial differential equation resembling the inviscid Burgers equation with the unusual feature of a step function factor as a coefficient. The complexity of the solution is primarily in keeping track of the cases in the piecewise function that results from certain amputation and interpolation processes, so we also extract from it a model of an evolving planar tree graph that tracks the evolution of the coarse features of the contour.

  14. Diffuse corneal abrasion after ocular exposure to laundry detergent pod.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Rachel E; Baum, Carl R; Aronson, Paul L

    2015-02-01

    Although ocular injury from alkaline household cleaning products is well described, there is less known about the significance and extent of injury with ocular exposure to detergent pods. We report a 12-month-old with diffuse corneal abrasion caused by ocular contact with a laundry detergent pod. In addition to the known risks with aspiration with detergent pods, the potential for severe ocular injury is important for parents and clinicians to recognize. Children with ocular exposure to detergent pods should seek immediate medical care.

  15. Evidence for Martian electrostatic charging and abrasive wheel wear from the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on the Pathfinder Sojourner rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Siebert, Mark W.; Wilt, David M.; Matijevic, Jacob R.

    1999-04-01

    The Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE) on the Mars Pathfinder rover was designed to find out how abrasive the Martian dust would be on strips of pure metals attached to one of the wheels. A specially modified wheel, with 15 thin film samples (five each of three different metals), specularly reflected sunlight to a photovoltaic sensor. When the wheel was rotated to present the different sample surfaces to the sensor, the resulting signal was interpreted in terms of dust adhesion and abrasive wear. Many data sequences were obtained. Ground tests of similar wheels in a simulated Martian environment showed that static charging levels of 100-300 V could be expected. To prevent the possibility of Paschen discharge in the low-pressure Martian atmosphere, charge dissipation points were added to the Sojourner rover and were shown in ground tests to keep charging levels at 80 V or less. Nevertheless, significant dust accumulations on Sojourner's wheels may be interpreted as evidence for electrostatic charging. Simple considerations of the expected maximum level of charging and electrostatic dust adhesion lead to an estimate for the size of the adhering dust grains. From the WAE data, it is hypothesized that the photoelectric effect is the most important mechanism for slow discharge in Martian daylight. Sensor signals obtained late in the Pathfinder mission show that significant wheel wear was seen on the metal wheel strips, with the most wear on the thinnest aluminum samples and the least on the thickest nickel and platinum samples. An estimate is made of the reflectance of the adhering Martian dust. The depth of dig of the WAE wheel shows that the dust is in some places very loose and in others tightly packed. Finally, comparison of the WAE results with ground test results makes possible a comparison of the Martian soil with mineral grain types and sizes found on Earth and show that the Martian dust is fine-grained and of limited hardness.

  16. Carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii pasture-finished cattle and Hawaii-originated, mainland feedlot-finished cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Soo; Fukumoto, Glen Kazumi; Kim, Sunae

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture with those of mainland US feedlot-finished cattle that were shipped from Hawaii after weaning. Rib-eye steak samples were collected from 30 feedlot-finished cattle harvested at a slaughter house in Washington State, USA and from 13 subtropical pasture-finished cattle harvested at a local slaughter house in Hawaii, then shipped to meat science laboratory at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Samples were aged for 2 weeks at 4°C and frozen for later proximate analysis and meat tenderness measurement. Feedlot-finished cattle had significantly heavier carcass weight (353 vs 290 kg) and thicker backfat (13.5 vs 6.6 mm), but no significant difference was observed in rib-eye area between the two groups. Marbling score (Small) and United States Department of Agriculture quality grade (Choice) of the pasture-finished beef were not significantly (P < 0.05) different from those of feedlot-finished beef. The shear force value of pasture-finished beef (5.18 kg) was not statistically different (P < 0.05) from that of feedlot-finished beef (4.40 kg). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture produced as tender beef as mainland feedlot-finished cattle with less intramuscular fat.

  17. Development of an alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process for microelectromechanical systems micropore x-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Riveros, Raul E; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Takagi, Utako; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Kato, Fumiki; Sugiyama, Susumu; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-20

    X-ray astronomy research is often limited by the size, weight, complexity, and cost of functioning x-ray optics. Micropore optics promises an economical alternative to traditional (e.g., glass or foil) x-ray optics; however, many manufacturing difficulties prevent micropore optics from being a viable solution. Ezoe et al. introduced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micropore optics having curvilinear micropores in 2008. Made by either deep reactive ion etching or x-ray lithography, electroforming, and molding (LIGA), MEMS micropore optics suffer from high micropore sidewall roughness (10-30nmrms) which, by current standards, cannot be improved. In this research, a new alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process was developed using a mixture of ferrofluid and microscale abrasive slurry. A machine was built, and a set of working process parameters including alternating frequency, abrasive size, and polishing time was selected. A polishing experiment on a LIGA-fabricated MEMS micropore optic was performed, and a change in micropore sidewall roughness of 9.3+/-2.5nmrms to 5.7+/-0.7nmrms was measured. An improvement in x-ray reflectance was also seen. This research shows the feasibility and confirms the effects of this new polishing process on MEMS micropore optics.

  18. Development of an alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process for microelectromechanical systems micropore x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Riveros, Raul E.; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Takagi, Utako; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Kato, Fumiki; Sugiyama, Susumu; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-20

    X-ray astronomy research is often limited by the size, weight, complexity, and cost of functioning x-ray optics. Micropore optics promises an economical alternative to traditional (e.g., glass or foil) x-ray optics; however, many manufacturing difficulties prevent micropore optics from being a viable solution. Ezoe et al. introduced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micropore optics having curvilinear micropores in 2008. Made by either deep reactive ion etching or x-ray lithography, electroforming, and molding (LIGA), MEMS micropore optics suffer from high micropore sidewall roughness (10-30nmrms) which, by current standards, cannot be improved. In this research, a new alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process was developed using a mixture of ferrofluid and microscale abrasive slurry. A machine was built, and a set of working process parameters including alternating frequency, abrasive size, and polishing time was selected. A polishing experiment on a LIGA-fabricated MEMS micropore optic was performed, and a change in micropore sidewall roughness of 9.3{+-}2.5nmrms to 5.7{+-}0.7nmrms was measured. An improvement in x-ray reflectance was also seen. This research shows the feasibility and confirms the effects of this new polishing process on MEMS micropore optics.

  19. A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing method using magnetic compound slurry and its performance in mirror surface finishing of miniature V-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youliang; Wu, Yongbo; Mitsuyoshi, Nomura

    2016-05-01

    A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing technique was proposed for finishing 3D structured surface using a magnetic compound (MC) slurry. The MC slurry was prepared by blending carbonyl-iron-particles, abrasive grains and α-cellulose into a magnetic fluid which contains nano-scale magnetite particles. An experimental setup was constructed firstly by installing an oscillation worktable and a unit onto a polishing machine. Then, experimental investigations were conducted on oxygen-free copper workpiece with parallel distributed linear V-grooves to clarify the influence of the polishing time and abrasive impact angle on the grooves surface qualities. It was found that (1) the groove form accuracy, i.e. the form retention rate η varied with the polishing locations. Although the form retention rate η deteriorated during the polishing process, the final η was greater than 99.4%; (2) the effective impact angle θm affected the material removal and form accuracy seriously. An increase of the absolute value θm resulted with an increase of material removal rate and a decrease of the form accuracy; (3) the work-surface roughness decreased more than 6 times compared with the original surface after MC slurry polishing. These results confirmed the performance of the proposed new magnetic field-assisted polishing method in the finishing of 3D-structured surface.

  20. Cutting meat with bone using an ultrahigh pressure abrasive waterjet.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Shanmugam, D K

    2009-04-01

    An experimental study of abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting of beef, pork and lamb meat with and without bone is presented. Salt particles were used as the abrasives. It has been found that an AWJ could significantly increase the depth of cut with much improved cut quality in cutting pure meat as compared to plain (or pure) waterjet cutting, while a plain waterjet was incapable of cutting bone satisfactorily. The study shows that AWJ cutting produced a very narrow kerf of less than 1mm and hence resulted in mush less meat loss than the traditional cutting processes, and meat can be cut at room temperature to eliminate the freezing or chilling costs. It is shown that a traverses speed of 20mm/s can be used to cut through 44mm thick beef rib bones with good cut quality. When slicing pure meat of 150mm thickness, the traverse speed of 66.67mm/s can yield very good cut quality. It is suggested that AWJ cutting is a viable technology for meat cutting. Plausible trends for the depth of cut, cutting rate and cut quality with respect to the process variables are discussed. Recommendations are finally made for the selection of the most appropriate process parameters for cutting meat of a given thickness.

  1. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  2. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  3. Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Aldis, D.F.

    1991-10-25

    As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

  4. Abrasive-assisted Nickel Electroforming Process with Moving Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REN, Jianhua; ZHU, Zengwei; XIA, Chunqiu; QU, Ningsong; ZHU, Di

    2017-03-01

    In traditional electroforming process for revolving parts with complex profiles, the drawbacks on surface of deposits, such as pinholes and nodules, will lead to varying physical and mechanical properties on different parts of electroformed components. To solve the problem, compositely moving cathode is employed in abrasive-assisted electroforming of revolving parts with complicated profiles. The cathode translates and rotates simultaneously to achieve uniform friction effect on deposits without drawbacks. The influences of current density and translation speed on the microstructure and properties of the electroformed nickel layers are investigated. It is found that abrasive-assisted electroforming with compound cathode motion can effectively remove the pinholes and nodules, positively affect the crystal nucleation, and refine the grains of layer. The increase of current density will lead to coarse microstructure and lower micro hardness, from 325 HV down to 189 HV. While, faster translational linear speed produces better surface quality and higher micro hardness, from 236 HV up to 283 HV. The weld-ability of the electroformed layers are also studied through the metallurgical analysis of welded joints between nickel layer and 304 stainless steel. The electrodeposited nickel layer shows fine performance in welding. The novel compound motion of cathode promotes the mechanical properties and refines the microstructure of deposited layer.

  5. Cutting Tools, Files and Abrasives. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on cutting tools, files, and abrasives is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to enable students to identify and explain the proper use and care of various knives, saws, snips, chisels, and abrasives. The module may contain some or all of the…

  6. Process monitoring evaluation and implementation for the wood abrasive machining process.

    PubMed

    Saloni, Daniel E; Lemaster, Richard L; Jackson, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading.

  7. Solidification/stabilization of spent abrasives and use as nonstructural concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Brabrand, D.J.; Loehr, R.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Tons of spent abrasives result each year from the removal of old paint from bridges. Because the spent abrasives contain metals from the paint, some spent abrasives may be considered hazardous by the Toxicity Characteristic (TC) criteria. Incorporation of the spent blasting abrasives in nonstructural concrete (rip-rap, dolphins) offers an opportunity to recycle the spent abrasives while immobilizing potentially leachable metals. This study focused on the Portland Cement Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) of spent blasting abrasives taken from a bridge located in Southeast Texas. The study examined (a) the cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations in extracts obtained by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and (b) the compressive strengths of Portland Cement mixes that contained different amounts of the spent abrasives. Performance was measured by meeting the TC criteria as well as the requirements for compressive strength. Study results indicated that considerable quantities of these spent abrasives can be solidified/stabilized while reducing the leachability of cadmium, chromium, and lead and producing compressive strengths over 6,895 kN/m[sup 2] (1,000 psi).

  8. Monitoring of the Abrasion Processes (by the Example of Alakol Lake, Republic of Kazakhstan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abitbayeva, Ainagul; Valeyev, Adilet; Yegemberdiyeva, Kamshat; Assylbekova, Aizhan; Ryskeldieva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the abrasion processes in the regions of dynamically changing Alakol lake shores. Using the field method, methods of positioning by the GPS receiver and interpretation of remote sensing data, the authors determined that abrasion processes actively contributed to the formation the modern landscape, causing the…

  9. Finishing bacterial genome assemblies with Mix

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Among challenges that hamper reaping the benefits of genome assembly are both unfinished assemblies and the ensuing experimental costs. First, numerous software solutions for genome de novo assembly are available, each having its advantages and drawbacks, without clear guidelines as to how to choose among them. Second, these solutions produce draft assemblies that often require a resource intensive finishing phase. Methods In this paper we address these two aspects by developing Mix , a tool that mixes two or more draft assemblies, without relying on a reference genome and having the goal to reduce contig fragmentation and thus speed-up genome finishing. The proposed algorithm builds an extension graph where vertices represent extremities of contigs and edges represent existing alignments between these extremities. These alignment edges are used for contig extension. The resulting output assembly corresponds to a set of paths in the extension graph that maximizes the cumulative contig length. Results We evaluate the performance of Mix on bacterial NGS data from the GAGE-B study and apply it to newly sequenced Mycoplasma genomes. Resulting final assemblies demonstrate a significant improvement in the overall assembly quality. In particular, Mix is consistent by providing better overall quality results even when the choice is guided solely by standard assembly statistics, as is the case for de novo projects. Availability Mix is implemented in Python and is available at https://github.com/cbib/MIX, novel data for our Mycoplasma study is available at http://services.cbib.u-bordeaux2.fr/mix/. PMID:24564706

  10. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Leslie L.; Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline material that has proven difficult to polish due to its grain structure. Bound abrasives are an effective means for polishing ALON, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices were created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load were studied. Metrology procedures were developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate grain boundary decoration. Strategies were developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  11. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer; Gregg, Leslie L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a material with desirable qualities for a variety of applications that has proven difficult to polish because of its grain structure. Bound abrasives may prove to be an effective means of polishing it, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces on ALON, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices have been created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load are being studied. Metrology procedures are being developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate its decoration. Strategies have been developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  12. Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Mary J.

    1992-01-01

    The Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application is in support of the Abrasion Resistance Materials Screening Test. The fundamental assumption made for the SEM abrasion analysis was that woven fabrics to be used as the outermost layer of the protective overgarment in the design of the future, planetary space suits perform best when new. It is the goal of this study to determine which of the candidate fabrics was abraded the least in the tumble test. The sample that was abraded the least will be identified at the end of the report as the primary candidate fabric for further investigation. In addition, this analysis will determine if the abrasion seen by the laboratory tumbled samples is representative of actual EVA Apollo abrasion.

  13. Abrasivity of toothpastes. An in vitro study of toothpastes marketed in Norway.

    PubMed

    Svinnseth, P N; Gjerdet, N R; Lie, T

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the abrasivity of 23 toothpastes available on the Norwegian market. Additionally, the pH was registered. The testing was based on The British Standards Institution's specification for toothpastes, using a profilometer technique to evaluate the abrasion. The results showed that the abrasivity ranged from 0.049 to 1.367 relative to a standard reference paste. The products were classified as having 'none/slight', 'medium', or 'high' abrasivity. The pH varied between 3.7 and 10.1. Products with low pH showed evidence of a combined erosive/abrasive effect. For some brands there were statistically significant differences between the fluoride and the nonfluoride version.

  14. [Experimental analysis of finishing lines in ceramometal restorations].

    PubMed

    Gascón, F; Gil, J A; Fons, A; Badal, R

    1990-11-01

    The preparation is the first step of any tooth reconstruction. The biological integration of the protesis is depending on the marginal adaptation (finish line of the preparation), occlusal adaptation (occlusal reduction), longevity of the restoration (retention and luting) and esthetics. The effect the two finish line of the preparation is studied using experimental design. In porcelain-fused-to-metal the finish line of the preparation in chanfer is superior at the beveled shoulder, because proportioning better marginal adaptation.

  15. 11. Exterior detail view of northeast corner, showing stucco finish ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Exterior detail view of northeast corner, showing stucco finish and woodwork details - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  16. Micro-finish hard anodized coatings on aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1992-03-01

    The production of thin hard anodized coatings on Single Point Diamond Turned (SPDT) 6061-T6 aluminum has been studied. The investigation centered on producing a surface finish of less than 10 microinch after anodizing. By starting with a 2 microinch (AA) surface finish and controlling time, temperature, current density and solution chemistry, coatings with surface finishes of 8 microinch and a thickness of .0003 inch, are obtained. Surface roughness from several anodizing solutions is compared. The operational life of a PTFE sliding seal against a coated cylinder bore is used as verification of finish quality.

  17. Wire blade development for Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST) slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.; Smith, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost, effective slicing method is essential to make ingot technology viable for photovoltaics in terrestrial applications. The fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) combines the advantages of the three commercially developed techniques. In its development stage FAST demonstrated cutting effectiveness of 10 cm and 15 cm diameter workpieces. Wire blade development is still the critical element for commercialization of FAST technology. Both impregnated and electroplated wire blades have been developed; techniques have been developed to fix diamonds only in the cutting edge of the wire. Electroplated wires show the most near term promise and this approach is emphasized. With plated wires it has been possible to control the size and shape of the electroplating, it is expected that this feature reduces kerf and prolongs the life of the wirepack.

  18. Fatigue Testing of Abrasive Water Jet Cut Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.; Williford, Ralph E.

    2009-06-08

    Battelle Memorial Institute as part of its U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 to operate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provides technology assistance to qualifying small businesses in association with a Technology Assistance Program (TAP). Qualifying companies are eligible to receive a set quantity of labor associated with specific technical assistance. Having applied for a TAP agreement to assist with fatigue characterization of Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) cut titanium specimens, the OMAX Corporation was awarded TAP agreement 09-02. This program was specified to cover dynamic testing and analysis of fatigue specimens cut from titanium alloy Ti-6%Al-4%V via AWJ technologies. In association with the TAP agreement, a best effort agreement was made to characterize fatigue specimens based on test conditions supplied by OMAX.

  19. Cover and Erosion Asymmetry in Saltation-Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. P.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion in bedrock-floored rivers is both driven and limited by the amount of sediment transported along the bed. Some sediment boosts wear rates, whereas too much generates a protective cover. This phenomenon determines the shape of river channels in a variety of landscapes and limits how fast they evolve. Here we reevaluate data from a well-known bedrock wear experiment to throw new light on how the saltation-abrasion process. Instead of a symmetric form for erosion versus sediment flux relative to transport capacity, we find the erosion rate peak shifts towards lower sediment fluxes when blocking of oblique saltation trajectories is taken into account. The theoretical context for this reevaluation is a cover-saltation-abrasion model, based on queueing theory (QT), for bedload transport over a planar bedrock bed. The QT approach provides some clarity in the stochastic treatment of granular impacts and cover, and generates closed-form solutions for wear rate in terms of sediment flux and simplified saltation geometry. Applied to the Sklar & Dietrich (2001) experiments in a very small recirculating flume, the two-parameter QT model fits the observed relation between erosion rate and sediment load, infers sediment flux as a function of load, admits non-negligible wear rates for a mean sediment depth of one grain, i.e., for full cover on average, but also suggests that bedrock erosion is blocked at >=50% instantaneous cover. The QT model makes testable predictions for future laboratory experiments and highlights the need for specific improvements in more comprehensive treatments of bedrock erosion and cover.

  20. Effects of varying machine stiffness and contact area in UltraForm Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis E.; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic, subaperture, computer numerically controlled, grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to measure the stiffness variations in the system and how it can affect material removal rates. The stiffness of the entire system is evaluated using a triaxial load cell to measure forces and a capacitance sensor to measure deviations in height. Because the wheel is conformal and elastic, the shapes of contact areas are also of interest. For the scope of this work, the shape of the contact area is estimated via removal spot. The measured forces and removal spot area are directly related to material removal rate through Preston's equation. Using our current testing apparatus, we will demonstrate stiffness measurements and contact areas for a single UFF belt during different states of its lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. This investigation will ultimately allow us to make better estimates of Preston's coefficient and develop spot-morphing models in an effort to more accurately predict instantaneous material removal functions throughout the lifetime of a belt.

  1. The cleaning of float glass and how it affects the corrosion of finished mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Goggin, R.; Pohlman, S.; Russell, P.

    1981-10-01

    The basic concept of solar energy thermal conversion concentrator systems relies on the use of reflective surfaces. These are typically silvered glass mirrors made using a wet chemical process. A typical wet chemical process includes the cleaning of the float glass, sensitization with stannous chloride, application of a silver film, deposition of a copper film, and application of a protective paint coating. To evaluate the effect of each process variable, facilities were developed to duplicate the mirroring procedure. They were then utilized to provide precise control over each step. The results so far indicate that the cleaning step is most critical to the durability of the finished product. Several cleaning procedures were assessed, and utilizing a felt block with pumice as an abrasive proved to be most effective. It is thought that the pumice removes the surface ''gel'' layer of glass, as well as dirt, grease, and any other contaminants present, allowing better adhesion of the silver to the glass surface. A poorly prepared sheet of glass can result in a poor adhesive bond between the silver film and the glass substrate and subsequent rapid deterioration of the reflectance of the mirror.

  2. [Finishing and detailing, stability and harmony].

    PubMed

    Fourquet, Lucile; Göttle, Magalie; Bounoure, Guy

    2014-03-01

    The finishing and detailing phase, the last stage of active orthodontic treatment, makes it possible to perfect the occlusion, by adhering to criteria defined by various authors and to improve the esthetic result, while achieving the treatment objectives made during the pre-planning phase. The reliability of end of treatment results cannot be ensured without an initial individualized analysis of the risk factors for relapse specific to each patient. It is only after this analysis, that the orthodontist will be able to determine how to comply with these criteria for stability, common in any treatment, and to individually choose and implement reliable procedures. When planning for stability as the treatment objective, orthodontic patients are able to achieve stable alignment. This course of action is the necessary process to help ensure equilibrium and alignment. Eight different methods of alignment, already frequently discussed in the literature, will be described and analyzed in this paper.

  3. Functional finishes of stretch cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; Amr, A; Eid, B M; Almetwally, A A; Mourad, M M

    2013-11-06

    Functionalized cotton cellulose/spandex woven fabrics with different structures namely plain (1/1), twill (2/2) and satin were produced. Factors affecting the imparted functional properties such as weave structure and constituents of the finishing formulations including ether or ester cross-linker and catalyst type, silicone-micro-emulsion, water/oil repellent, Ag-NP(,)s and TiO2-NP(,)s were studied. The treated fabrics were found to have easy care property together with one or more of the imparted functional properties such as soft-handle, water/oil repellence, antibacterial, UV-protection and self cleaning. The effectiveness of the imparted properties is not seriously affected even after 10 washing cycles. Surface modifications as well as the composition of certain samples were confirmed by SEM images and EDX spectra. Mode of interactions was also suggested.

  4. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z. ); Church, E.L. . Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. An Investigation of Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Al 2014-SiC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalin, Recep; Cilasun, Niyazi Selçuk

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of SiC reinforcement volume fractions on hardness, porosity and abrasive wear behaviour were examined in Al 2014-SiC (<92.3 μm) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) of 3%, 6% and 12% reinforcement-volume (R-V) ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 320 mesh Al2O3 abrasive paper and a pin-on-disc wear test apparatus, under 10N, 20N and 30N load, and at 0.2 ms-1 sliding speed. The same specimens were tested by 150, 240 and 320 mesh abrasive paper at 0.2 ms-1 sliding speed, under 10N, 20N and 30N load. After the tests, the microstructures of the worn surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies and EDS analyses. Besides, the amount of hardness and porosity of the specimens were identified. It was recorded that the amounts of hardness and porosity increases as the SiC reinforcement in the composite increases. The highest amount of abrasive wear was recorded in the specimens with 3% reinforcements. It was identified that the amount of abrasive wear decreases while the SiC reinforcement in the composite structure increases by volume, and that the amount of porosity and reinforcement volume (R-V) ratio are important parameters in abrasive wear.

  6. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  7. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  8. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler.

  9. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-12-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5-6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance.

  10. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance. PMID:26656260

  11. An experimental study on the ultra-precision polishing of quartz crystal using MR fluids and micro abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; Lee, J. W.; Cho, M. W.; Choi, S. B.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents ultra-precision MR polishing results of quartz crystal, which has been widely used in many applications, such as piezo-electric transducer, surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters and SAW resonators, etc. It is known that smooth surface with sub-nanometer roughness is needed for higher-frequency application. The MR fluids, used for the polishing, consist of DI water based carbonyl iron (CI), nonmagnetic polishing micro abrasives, and required amount of stabilizers. In the process, mixed fluids were supplied into the gap between a rotating wheel (with electromagnetic field) and the workpiece. Then, the micro abrasives contained in the fluids perform material removal action from the workpiece. Such material removal mechanism in the MR polishing is considered as a process governed by the Bingham flow in the contact zone. In this study, material removal characteristics and generated surface roughness of the quartz crystal specimens using the MR polishing process were investigated through a series of experiments. The surface roughness variations of the polished specimens were investigated by changing imposed polishing conditions, such as wheel speed, magnetic field intensity. As a result, very fine surface roughness of Ra=0.770nm was obtained.

  12. Characterization and dispersion of pollutant releases from the abrasive blasting of lead paint from steel bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Rana, B.

    1999-07-01

    The characterization of airborne and spent material for abrasive blasting of steel paint was performed as part of the Environmental Impact Statement for Lead Paint Removal Operations on New York City Department of Transportation Bridges1. Laboratory tests were performed on painted steel components of the Williamsburg Bridge, to determine the sizes of particles typically released into the air as aerosol and onto the ground as bulk material, as a result of accidental releases from abrasive blasting operations. Two of the most commonly used abrasives for paint removal on steel structures, recyclable steel grit and expendable abrasives were subjected to the laboratory tests. The results of the tests were used to determine the percentage of existing paint and abrasive which becomes airborne and the resultant particle size distributions, which were employed in the air quality concentration and deposition modeling for the EIS. Particle size distributions of the airborne material indicated that the profiles of airborne lead and particulate matter have a mean particle size between 15 and 21 microns. Spent abrasives and paint chips that settle on the floor are larger in size with a mean diameter greater than 259 microns, although up to 6% of this material has a mean diameter less than 50 microns. The percentage of paint and expendable abrasives that become airborne as a result of abrasive blasting were estimated to be as high as 9.0 and 12.4%, respectively. Potential release rates were derived for total accumulation (duration of the project), annual, quarterly, 24-hour, and 1-hour time averaging periods for abrasives, lead, and other metals. Pollutant releases were simulated as individual sources at multiple release heights with the Environment Protection Agency's ISC3ST model for six representative bridges near potential places of public exposure.

  13. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  14. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  15. 16 CFR 1508.7 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Construction and finishing. 1508.7 Section 1508.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.7 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood...

  16. NATIONAL METAL FINISHING ENVIRONMENTAL R&D PLAN - AN UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an update to the National Metal Finishing Environmental R&D Plan (EPA/600/R-97/095), dated September 1997. The 1997 Plan and Update are available on the National Metal Finishing Resource Center's web site, www.nmfrc.org. The primary purpose in preparing an up...

  17. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a...

  18. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a...

  19. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a...

  20. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a...

  1. 30 CFR 18.33 - Finish of surface joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Finish of surface joints. 18.33 Section 18.33 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND... Requirements § 18.33 Finish of surface joints. Flat surfaces between bolt holes that form any part of a...

  2. EPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL - 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help metal finishing facilities meet the goal of profitable pollution prevention, the USEPA is developing the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), a computer program that estimates the rate of solid, liquid waste generation and air emissions. This progr...

  3. Optical-model abrasion cross sections for high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of eikonal scattering theory, a generalized optical model potential approximation to the nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series is used in an abrasion-ablation collision model to predict abrasion cross sections for relativistic projectile heavy ions. Unlike the optical limit of Glauber theory, which cannot be used for very light nuclei, the abrasion formalism is valid for any projectile target combination at any incident kinetic energy for which eikonal scattering theory can be utilized. Results are compared with experimental results and predictions from Glauber theory.

  4. Three-Body Abrasion Testing Using Lunar Dust Simulants to Evaluate Surface System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Budinski, Kenneth G.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Klaus, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous unexpected operational issues relating to the abrasive nature of lunar dust, such as scratched visors and spacesuit pressure seal leaks, were encountered during the Apollo missions. To avoid reoccurrence of these unexpected detrimental equipment problems on future missions to the Moon, a series of two- and three-body abrasion tests were developed and conducted in order to begin rigorously characterizing the effect of lunar dust abrasiveness on candidate surface system materials. Two-body scratch tests were initially performed to examine fundamental interactions of a single particle on a flat surface. These simple and robust tests were used to establish standardized measurement techniques for quantifying controlled volumetric wear. Subsequent efforts described in the paper involved three-body abrasion testing designed to be more representative of actual lunar interactions. For these tests, a new tribotester was developed to expose samples to a variety of industrial abrasives and lunar simulants. The work discussed in this paper describes the three-body hardware setup consisting of a rotating rubber wheel that applies a load on a specimen as a loose abrasive is fed into the system. The test methodology is based on ASTM International (ASTM) B611, except it does not mix water with the abrasive. All tests were run under identical conditions. Abraded material specimens included poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), hardened 1045 steel, 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and 1018 steel. Abrasives included lunar mare simulant JSC- 1A-F (nominal size distribution), sieved JSC-1A-F (<25 m particle diameter), lunar highland simulant NU-LHT-2M, alumina (average diameter of 50 m used per ASTM G76), and silica (50/70 mesh used per ASTM G65). The measured mass loss from each specimen was converted using standard densities to determine total wear volume in cm3. Abrasion was dominated by the alumina and the simulants were only similar to the silica (i.e., sand) on the softer materials of

  5. Target correlation effects on neutron-nucleus total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Second order optical model solutions to the elastic scattering amplitude were used to evaluate total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections for neutron nucleus scattering. Improved agreement with experimental data for total and absorption cross sections is found when compared with first order (coherent approximation) solutions, especially below several hundred MeV. At higher energies, the first and second order solutions are similar. There are also large differences in abrasion cross section calculations; these differences indicate a crucial role for cluster knockout in the abrasion step.

  6. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  7. Study on planarization machining of sapphire wafer with soft-hard mixed abrasive through mechanical chemical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongchao; Lu, Jing; Xu, Xipeng

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the material removal mechanism of sapphire wafer with soft-hard mixed abrasives through mechanical chemical polishing (MCP). The polishing film, which contains diamond as hard abrasives and high reactivity silica as soft abrasives, is prepared through sol-gel technology. Silica abrasives with regular spherical shape and high reactivity are prepared through hydrolysis-precipitation. Diamond grits with three different particle sizes are used as abrasives. Results show that the rate of material removal of mixed abrasives during MCP is more than 52.6% of that of single hard abrasives and the decrease in surface roughness is more than 21.6% of that of single hard abrasives. These results demonstrate that the ideal planarization of sapphire wafer with high removal rate and good surface quality can be achieved when the effect of mechanical removal of hard abrasives and the chemical corrosion effect of soft abrasives are in dynamic equilibrium. A model that describes the material removal mechanism of sapphire with mixed abrasives during MCP is proposed. The results of thermodynamic calculation and polishing residue analysis are used to demonstrate the rationality of the model.

  8. Surface assessment and modification of concrete using abrasive blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millman, Lauren R.

    Composite systems are applied to concrete substrates to strengthen and extend the service life. Successful restoration or rehabilitation requires surface preparation prior to the application of the overlay. Surface coatings, waterproofing systems, and other external surface applications also require surface preparation prior to application. Abrasive blast media is often used to clean and uniformly roughen the substrate. The appropriate surface roughness is necessary to facilitate a strong bond between the existing substrate and overlay. Thus, surface modification using abrasive blast media (sand and dry ice), their respective environmental effects, surface roughness characterization prior to and after blasting, and the adhesion between the substrate and overlay are the focus of this dissertation. This dissertation is comprised of an introduction, a literature review, and four chapters, the first of which addresses the environmental effects due to abrasive blasting using sand, water, and dry ice. The assessment considered four response variables: carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, fuel and energy consumption, and project duration. The results indicated that for sand blasting and water jetting, the primary factor contributing to environmental detriment was CO22 emissions from vehicular traffic near the construction site. The second chapter is an analysis of the International Concrete Repair Institute's (ICRI) concrete surface profiles (CSPs) using 3-D optical profilometry. The primary objective was to evaluate the suitability of approximating the 3-D surface (areal) parameters with those extracted from 2-D (linear) profiles. Four profile directions were considered: two diagonals, and lines parallel and transverse to the longitudinal direction of the mold. For any CSP mold, the estimation of the 3-D surface roughness using a 2-D linear profile resulted in underestimation and overestimation errors exceeding 50%, demonstrating the inadequacy of 2-D linear profiles to

  9. Abrasive Particle Trajectories and Material Removal Non-Uniformity during CMP and Filtration Characteristics of CMP Slurries - A Simulation and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Vahid

    Nanoscale finishing and planarization are integral process steps in multilevel metallization designs for integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing since it is necessary to ensure local and global surface planarization at each metal layer before depositing the next layer. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) has been widely recognized as the most promising technology to eliminate topographic variation and has allowed the construction of multilevel interconnection structures with a more regularly stacked sequence, resulting in better device performance [1]. Understanding fundamental of the CMP mechanisms can offer guidance to the control and optimization of the polishing processes. CMP kinematics based on slurry distribution and particle trajectories have a significant impact on MRR profiles. In this work a mathematical model to describe particle trajectories during chemical mechanical polishing was developed and extended to account for the effect of larger particles, particle location changes due to slurry dispensing and in-situ conditioning. Material removal rate (MRR) and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) were determined based on the calculated particle trajectory densities. Rotary dynamics and reciprocating motion were optimized to obtain best MRR uniformity. Edge-fast MRR profile was discussed based on mechanical aspect of CMP. Using the model, we also investigated the effect of variable rotational speeds of wafer and pad, and of large particles on WIWNU and scratch growth. It was shown that the presence of even a small portion of large particles can deteriorate the WIWNU significantly and also lead to more scratches. Furthermore, it was shown that the in-situ conditioning improves the uniformity of the polished wafers. Furthermore, a combined experimental and computational study of fibrous filters for removal of larger abrasive particles from aqueous dispersions, essential to minimize defects during chemical mechanical polishing, was performed. Dilute aqueous

  10. Phosphorus requirement of finishing feedlot calves.

    PubMed

    Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Milton, C T; Brink, D; Orth, M W; Whittet, K M

    2002-06-01

    Dietary P supplied to feedlot cattle is important because an inadequate supply will compromise performance, whereas excess P may harm the environment. However, P requirements of feedlot cattle are not well documented. Therefore, 45 steer calves (265.2+/-16.6 kg) were individually fed to determine the P required for gain and bone integrity over a 204-d finishing period. The basal diet consisted of 33.5% high-moisture corn, 30% brewers grits, 20% corn bran, 7.5% cottonseed hulls, 3% tallow, and 6% supplement. Treatments consisted of 0.16 (no supplemental inorganic P), 0.22, 0.28, 0.34, and 0.40% P (DM basis). Supplemental P was provided by monosodium phosphate top-dressed to the daily feed allotment. Blood was sampled every 56 d to assess P status. At slaughter, phalanx and metacarpal bones were collected from the front leg to determine bone ash and assess P resorption from bone. Dry matter intake and ADG did not change linearly (P > 0.86) or quadratically (P > 0.28) due to P treatment. Feed efficiency was not influenced (P > 0.30) by P treatment and averaged 0.169. Plasma inorganic P averaged across d 56 to 204 responded quadratically, with calves fed 0.16% P having the lowest concentration of plasma inorganic P. However, plasma inorganic P concentration (5.7 mg/dL) for steers fed 0.16% P is generally considered adequate. Total bone ash weight was not influenced by dietary P for phalanx (P = 0.19) or metacarpal bones (P = 0.37). Total P intake ranged from 14.2 to 35.5 g/d. The NRC (1996) recommendation for these calves was 18.7 g/d, assuming 68% absorption. Based on performance results, P requirements for finishing calves is < 0.16% of diet DM or 14.2 g/d. Based on these observations, we suggest that typical grain-based feedlot cattle diets do not require supplementation of inorganic mineral P to meet P requirements.

  11. Studies on polishing of Ti and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy with five dental abrasives.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Nakamura, T; Takashima, F; Maruyama, T; Taira, M; Takahashi, J

    2001-08-01

    Titanium (Ti) and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy were examined for their polishing behaviour by conducting manually controlled polishing tests using five dental abrasives [carborundum point (CR) and silicone points (R1 and R2)] driven by a high torque micromotor with rotational speeds ranging from 2000 to 15 000 r.p.m. Polishing of Ti resulted in less volume of removal upon polishing, a rougher surface and larger loss of abrasives, compared with polishing of Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. Polishing of Ti with a rotational speed of 15 000 r.p.m. led to the largest volume of removal upon polishing, whilst that of 10 000 r.p.m. produced the optimal volume for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. It was concluded that Ti was much more difficult to polish, requiring special care (e.g. frequent exchange of abrasives). Development of new abrasives for polishing Ti is required.

  12. Drawing Light-fields: Hand-drawn Approaches to Abrasion Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, T.

    2013-02-01

    Abrasion holography has received little attention since the technique was described by William J. Beaty in the early 1990's. In this paper the limitations of abrasion holography are explored, and new approaches are presented which expand the possibilities of the medium. New tools presented here offer new possibilities to the artist wishing to draw holograms by hand. Methods are described by which complex curves and organic forms can be constructed by hand more easily and intuitively than previously described. In an analysis of reconstruction lighting and viewing geometries, new solutions to reduce or eliminate distortions are suggested. Various tools, materials, and scratch geometries are considered for optimum 3D illusion. A new class of abrasion holograms is presented that use elliptical, hypotrochoidal, and epitrochoidal scratch geometries, exhibiting novel animation effects. In conclusion, a method for embossing abrasion holograms with the aid of an etching press is described.

  13. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  14. Surface roughness and gloss of current CAD/CAM resin composites before and after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Okazaki, Tomoyo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gloss and surface roughness behaviors of newly developed CAD/CAM composite blocks with different filler contents and characteristics. The gloss and surface roughness were quantified before and after a toothbrush dentifrice abrasion test; the results were compared to the gloss and surface roughness of a ceramic CAD/CAM block. Knoop hardness was determined before abrasion test. The results were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey HSD, and Dunnett t test (p<0.05). The rank order of Knoop hardness was as follows: Vita Mark II>Vita Enamic>Gradia block>Shofu Block HC, Lava Ultimate≥Katana Avencia block≥Cerasmart. After toothbrush abrasion, a significant difference in the gloss unit was detected between the Shofu Block HC material and the ceramic block. The Ra and Rz of the Cerasmart and Shofu Block HC materials were significantly larger than those of the ceramic block after toothbrush abrasion.

  15. Hardness and Abrasion Resistance of Nanocrystalline Nickel Alloys Near the Hall-Petch Breakdown Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    for structural applications. In this work we discuss the hardness and scratch resistance of nanocrystalline nickel and nickel-tungsten solid solution alloys...hardness and abrasion data. The role of solid solution alloying on this breakdown is also discussed.

  16. The effect on cast post dimensions of casting investment and airborne particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Danya; German, Matthew J; Wassell, Robert W

    2011-09-01

    Cast posts can sometimes prove difficult to seat fully during fitting. This study compared two different liquid/water dilutions for phosphate bonded investment and the effect of controlled airborne particle abrasion on resulting post diameter. After measuring polymeric post patterns (n = 18), 3 groups were invested using concentrated solution and 3 groups using dilute solution. After casting they were weighed and remeasured then exposed to airborne particle abrasion. Both solutions produced oversized cast posts. Mean diameter reduction during airborne particle abrasion was 8 microm/10s taking an average of 41s to reach precast size. Where a post pattern fits tightly, airborne particle abrasion for 70s should reduce the casting sufficiently to accommodate the cement lute.

  17. Third-body abrasive wear challenge of 32 mm conventional and 44 mm highly crosslinked polyethylene liners in a hip simulator model.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, T; Clarke, I C; Williams, P A; Gustafson, A; Yamamoto, K

    2009-07-01

    finish of HXPE liners was superior to that of CXPE liners. In phase-2 abrasion, wear rates increased sixfold and eighty-fold for CXPE and HXPE bearings respectively. These data confirmed that HXPE bearings were particularly sensitive to 'severe' test modes. The Co-Cr balls revealed numerous surface patches representing transferred PMMA with average transient roughness increased to 25 nm and 212 nm for the 32 mm and 44 mm balls respectively. These PMMA patches produced an aggressive two-body abrasion wear of the polyethylene. After cleaning, the ball roughness returned to near normal. Therefore the Co-Cr roughness was not an issue in this severe test mode. In phase 3, the wear decreased to near the index values of phase 1, while liner roughness dropped by more than 90 per cent. The control CXPE liners now demonstrated twice the wear of the HXPE, as would be predicted comparing the diameter and cross-linking algorithms. No previous study has correlated polyethylene roughness profiles to wear performance. In phase 2, PMMA abrasion created significant damage to the polyethylene surfaces. The average roughness Sa of CXPE liners increased to 3.6 microm, a twenty-four-fold increase with some scratches up to 40 microm deep. The HXPE roughness also increased but only to 1.5 microm, a ninefold increase. The scratch indices Sz and Sp for HXPE surfaces were also 50 per cent less severe than on CXPE surfaces. However, within 2 x 10(6) cycles duration of phase 3, all liners had recovered to virtually their original surface finish in phase 1. In all test phases, the surface finish of the HXPE liners remained superior to control liners. These experimental data confirmed many of the results from the previous simulator study with the PMMA abrasion models. Thus the 44 mm liners appeared an excellent clinical alternative to the smaller ball designs used in total hip replacements.

  18. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  19. Metal finishing wastewater pressure filter optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.; Martin, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    The 300-M Area Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an end-of-pipe industrial wastewater treatment facility, that uses precipitation and filtration which is the EPA Best Available Technology economically achievable for a Metal Finishing and Aluminum Form Industries. The LETF consists of three close-coupled treatment facilities: the Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF), which uses wastewater equalization, physical/chemical precipitation, flocculation, and filtration; the Chemical Treatment Facility (CTF), which slurries the filter cake generated from the DETF and pumps it to interim-StatuS RCRA storage tanks; and the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) which stores the waste from the CTF until the waste is stabilized/solidified for permanent disposal, 85% of the stored waste is from past nickel plating and aluminum canning of depleted uranium targets for the SRS nuclear reactors. Waste minimization and filtration efficiency are key to cost effective treatment of the supernate, because the waste filter cake generated is returned to the IT/SF. The DETF has been successfully optimized to achieve maximum efficiency and to minimize waste generation.

  20. Metal finishing wastewater pressure filter optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.; Martin, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    The 300-M Area Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an end-of-pipe industrial wastewater treatment facility, that uses precipitation and filtration which is the EPA Best Available Technology economically achievable for a Metal Finishing and Aluminum Form Industries. The LETF consists of three close-coupled treatment facilities: the Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF), which uses wastewater equalization, physical/chemical precipitation, flocculation, and filtration; the Chemical Treatment Facility (CTF), which slurries the filter cake generated from the DETF and pumps it to interim-StatuS RCRA storage tanks; and the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) which stores the waste from the CTF until the waste is stabilized/solidified for permanent disposal, 85% of the stored waste is from past nickel plating and aluminum canning of depleted uranium targets for the SRS nuclear reactors. Waste minimization and filtration efficiency are key to cost effective treatment of the supernate, because the waste filter cake generated is returned to the IT/SF. The DETF has been successfully optimized to achieve maximum efficiency and to minimize waste generation.

  1. Three-body abrasive wear characteristics under reciprocating motion of CFRP in vibrating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Sadakazu; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Nakagawa, Tatsuo

    1996-12-31

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in industry because of their attractive mechanical characteristics. Such CFRP parts are invariably subjected to three-body wear due to small indentations and machine vibrations. In this study, the wear characteristics under the three-body condition and the abrasive wear of CFRP were investigated by using a vibrating environment and silicon carbide abrasive grains.

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Particulate Matter Concentrations from Asphalt Pavement Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullová, Daša; Đurčanská, Daniela

    2016-12-01

    The issue of emissions from road traffic is compounded by the fact that the number of vehicles and driven kilometres increase each year. Road traffic is one of the main sources of particulate matter and traffic volume is still increasing and has unpleasant impact on longevity of the pavements and the environment. Vehicle motions cause mechanical wearing of the asphalt pavement surface - wearing course by vehicle tyres. The contribution deals with abrasion of bituminous wearing courses of pavements. The asphalt mixtures of wearing courses are compared in terms of mechanically separated particulate matter. The samples of asphalt mixtures were rutted in wheel tracking machine. The particulate matter measurements were performed in laboratory conditions. The experimental laboratory measurements make it possible to sample particulates without contamination from exhaust emissions, abraded particles from vehicles, resuspension of road dust and climate affects. The contribution offers partial results of measurements on six trial samples of asphalt mixtures with different composition. It presents particulate matter morphology and the comparison of rutted asphalt samples in terms of PM mass concentrations and chemical composition.

  3. Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute in abrasion studies?

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Widmer, Raffaella; Attin, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The study aimed to compare the wear behaviour of human and bovine dentine due to toothbrushing with different relative dentin abrasivity (RDA) toothpastes. Forty human and 40 bovine dentine samples were prepared from bovine lower incisors or human premolars roots, and baseline surface profiles were recorded. The samples were distributed to four groups (each group n = 10 human and 10 bovine samples) and brushed with fluoridated experimental toothpastes with different RDAs (group A: RDA 10, B: RDA 20, C: RDA 50, and D: RDA 100). Toothbrushing was performed in an automatic brushing machine with a brushing frequency of 60 strokes per minute and a brushing force of 2.5 N. After 2, 5, 10, and 25 min of toothbrushing, new surface profiles were recorded, and the dentine wear was calculated with a customized computer programme. The dentine wear of human and bovine dentine within the four groups was compared with unpaired t tests. No statistically significant difference was recorded for the dentine wear of human and bovine samples within the different groups.

  4. Recent Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J.; Paulsen, G.; Davis, K.; Gorevan, S.; Zacny, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) serves as the sample preparation device on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) science payload. The RAT grinds Martian rock in a cylindrical volume, 45 mm in diameter and to a depth of up to 10 mm. This grinding action is intended to remove the altered outer layers of rock as well as overlying surface fines in preparation for imaging and spectral observations. In addition to acting as a facilitator for other instruments in the MER payload, RAT telemetry acquired during grinding may be used to assess the physical properties of the rocks that it grinds. RAT instruments on both Spirit and Opportunity have continued to operate and return useful data since 2004, despite minor problems that have recently occurred. The RAT on Spirit has recently been used for a purpose outside its original design capabilities: brushing away thin layers of loose soil without solid rock underneath. By progressing into the soil a few millimeters at a time, the RAT has been instrumental in helping to reveal the stratigraphy of this soft material. These results have helped in assessing soil properties and in turn will facilitate extrication of Spirit from its current location. Recent results from the Mars Exploration Rovers are presented along with data from laboratory RAT testing.

  5. Relationships Between Abrasion Index and Shape Properties of Progressively Abraded Dolerite Railway Ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okonta, F. N.

    2014-07-01

    Sub-angular-shaped aggregates are used as rail foundation ballasts and must remain sub-angular during their service life time to maintain particle-particle interlocking, in order to ensure the stability of the rail line and prevent accidents by derailment. Here, the screening of dolerite quarry aggregates for use as railway foundation ballasts was investigated by employing simple digital image and chart methods. The average particle size ( d 50), flakiness index (FI), Los Angeles abrasion index (LAAI), sphericity (SPH) and roundness (RND) were determined for two batches of dolerite ballasts from the Rooikraal quarry in Johannesburg and Ngagane quarry in Newcastle. Thirty samples from each of the two batches of ballast were analysed. The ballasts were progressively abraded using a Los Angeles abrasion device and were analysed after each cycle of abrasion. A decrease in d 50 and an increase in FI with increased number of abrasion cycles were observed for both batches of dolerite ballast. The difference in the chart and digital image values of RND and SPH were marginal before abrasion; however, these differences increased with each abrasion cycle. The LAAI, d 50, mean RND and mean SPH correlated significantly and were found to have high regression coefficients. Thus, statistical models are proposed for the non-destructive routine screening of in-place ballasts in order to track marginal changes in aggregate shapes, facilitate ballast replacement programmes and avoid rail line instability.

  6. Dressing of diamond grinding wheels by abrasive water jet for freeform optical surface grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Peng; Li, Chengwu; Huang, Chuanzhen; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Hongtao; Liu, Zengwen

    2014-08-01

    During the ultra-precision grinding of a large aperture mirror made of RB-SiC, the grinding wheel becomes dull rapidly, which will lead to an increase of grinding force and a decrease of grinding ratio. In this paper, diamond grinding sticks were dressed with micro SiC abrasive water jet and water jet. Through single factorial experiments, the influence of jet pressure on the dressing performance was investigated. To analyze and evaluate the effect of dressing quantitatively, the 3D roughness and the wheel topography were measured and compared with laser scanning confocal microscope before and after dressing. The experimental results show that the abrasive grains are well protruded from binder and the distribution of the abrasive grains becomes uniform after dressing by abrasive water jet when the dressing parameters are properly selected. The dressing performance of abrasive water jet is much better than water jet. For dressing ultra-fine grit size wheels, the abrasive size of the jet should be smaller than the wheel grit size to achieve a better result. The jet pressure is an obvious influence factor of the surface topography.

  7. [Grinding of titanium. 2. Commercial vitrified wheels made of alumina abrasives].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Shiokawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Tamura, H

    1990-01-01

    Cast titanium was ground with commercial vitrified wheels made of alumina abrasives, and their grinding performance was investigated. For cutting, the appropriate circumferential speed of the alumina wheels was about 700 m/min. A speed lower or higher than this yielded unfavorable grinding results, which were attributed to wheel loading or chemical attrition of the abrasive, respectively. The hard wheel made of the A abrasive was suitable for grinding of titanium, and moreover, the wheel of the WA abrasive was more suitable than that made of the A abrasive. Generally, the cutting rate of the alumina wheels was inferior to that of the silicon carbide ones investigated previously. Depression of the wheel against the work yielded unfavorable grinding results; the manner in which the wheel was moved over the work during grinding was very important, compared with the silicon carbide wheels. Although the wheel was moved over the work, the high circumferential speed of the wheel resulted in chemical attrition of the abrasive and discoloration of the work surface, or grinding burn. The grinding burn layer mainly consisted of a few microns-thick titanium oxide.

  8. Bending and abrasion fatigue of common suture materials used in arthroscopic and open orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Savage, Earle; Hurren, Christopher J; Slader, Simon; Khan, Lukman A K; Sutti, Alessandra; Page, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery, the reattachment of tendon to bone requires suture materials that have stable and durable properties to allow time for healing at the tendon-bone interface. The suture, not rigidly restrained within the anchor eyelet, is free to move during surgery and potentially after surgery with limb motion. During such movement, the suture is subjected to bending and frictional forces that can lead to fatigue-induced failure. We investigated some common contemporary commercial number-two-grade suture materials and evaluated their resistance to bending abrasion fatigue and the consequent failure. Sutures were oscillated over a stainless steel wire at low frequency under load. Number of abrasion cycles to failure, changes in suture morphology, and fatigue-failure method was recorded for each material. Suture structure had a significant effect on abrasion resistance, with braided sutures containing large numbers of fine high tenacity core filaments performing 15-20 times better than other braided suture structures. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) core filaments resisted bending abrasion failure better than other core materials due to the load spreading and abrasion resistance of these filaments. Sutures with UHMWPE cores also had high resistance to tensile failure. Limited correlation was observed between tensile strength and abrasion resistance.

  9. The effectiveness of a modified hydrochloric acid-quartz-pumice abrasion technique on fluorosis stains: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, G

    1998-02-01

    Endemic dental fluorosis is a form of enamel hypoplasia characterized by moderate-to-severe staining of the tooth surface. Since 1916, numerous investigators have used hydrochloric acid alone on fluorosis stains. More recently, 18% hydrochloric acid-pumice microabrasion has been used to achieve color modification. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the high concentration and low viscosity of hydrochloric acid, which can cause damage to oral and dental tissues. To eliminate this problem, quartz particles can be mixed with the hydrochloric acid. The quartz particles prevent the hydrochloric acid from flowing uncontrollablely by altering it to a gel-like form. A modified 18% hydrochloric acid-quartz-pumice abrasion technique was used to remove fluorine stains from vital teeth in a teenager.

  10. Finishing of enamel surfaces after debonding of orthodontic attachments.

    PubMed

    Retief, D H; Denys, F R

    1979-01-01

    The finishing of enamel surfaces after removal of directly bonded attachments is essential. The following procedures are suggested: 1. The bonding of mesh-backed stainless steel brackets with a lightly filled resin system. 2. Debonding of attachments with a direct bonding bracket remover. 3. Removal of the bulk of the remaining resin with a 12-bladed tungsten carbide bur operated at high speed with adequate air cooling. 4. Finishing of the residual resin and underlying enamel with graded polishing discs or Ceramisté wheels used with light pressure and adequate air cooling. 5. Final finishing with a rubber cup and a water slurry of pumice.

  11. An overview of plastic optical fiber end finishers at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mishina, M.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Korienek, J.

    1993-11-01

    Several years ago the need for equipment to precisely finish the ends of plastic optical fibers was recognized. Many high energy physics experiments use thousands of these fibers which must be polished on one or both ends. A fast, easy-to-operate machine yielding repeatable finishes was needed. Three types of machines were designed and constructed that are in daily use at Fermilab, all finish the fiber ends by flycutting with a diamond tool. Althrough diamond flycutting of plastic is not new, the size and fragility of plastic optical fibers present several challenges.

  12. 40 CFR 463.30 - Applicability; description of the finishing water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Finishing... the finishing water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic...

  13. 40 CFR 463.30 - Applicability; description of the finishing water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Finishing... the finishing water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic...

  14. Influence of Diamond Sono-Abrasion, Air-Abrasion and Er:YAG Laser Irradiation on Bonding of Different Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Different surface treatments may affect bonding performance of adhesive systems to dentin. This study evaluated the influence of different methods of surface treatment on adhesion of bonding agents to dentin. Methods Dentin surfaces abraded with #600-grit SiC paper were used as control. Three methods of surface treatment (sono-abrasion, air-abrasion and Er:YAG laser irradiation) were used under specific parameters. Four adhesive systems (Tyrian, Clearfil SE Bond, Unifil Bond and Single Bond) were applied to treated surfaces, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Composite blocks were built on bonded surfaces, then restored teeth were vertically and serially sectioned to obtain bonded slices for interfacial micromorphologic analysis or to produce beam specimens for μ-TBS bond test. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a significance level of 5%. Results The results indicated that the preparation of dentin with sono-abrasion or laser did not affect the bond strength, while the preparation of dentin with SiC paper and air-abrasion influenced the bond strength for some systems. A clear difference of the preparation of dentin surfaces and formation of hybrid layer and resin tags were noted. Conclusion Bonding effectiveness of both the etch-and-rinse and the self-etch adhesives can be influenced by different methods of dentin preparation. PMID:19212560

  15. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J. R.; Meloy, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere themselves to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs' hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated

  16. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment MECA Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J.; Meloy, T. P.; Cobbly, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs'hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated: note that

  17. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  18. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF JOURNAL LATHE, AXLE FINISHING AREA. Grinding bearing diameters on locomotive axle. Norton grinder, 1942 (dated). Melvin Grassmeyer, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  19. Implementing Cleaner Printed Wiring Board Technologies: Surface Finishes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the problems, solutions, and time and effort involved in implementing alternative surface finish technologies, and this guide is produced as part of the DfE Printed Wiring Board Project

  20. 6. INTERIOR OF BASEMENT UNDER KITCHEN SHOWING FINISHED SECTION. OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR OF BASEMENT UNDER KITCHEN SHOWING FINISHED SECTION. OPEN DOOR TO UNFINISHED SECTION IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  1. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    SciTech Connect

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-12-03

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the plutonium finishing plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  2. LARGE DIAMETER WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LARGE DIAMETER - WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON CAR. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF KLEBSIELLA FROM TEXTILE FINISHING PLANT EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Klebsiella strains are found in abnormally high numbers in a stream receiving wastewater from a textile finishing plant. Representative strains are randomly selected to determine biochemical, serotype, and virulence patterns. All strains conform to the commonly accepted biochemic...

  5. VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED INTERIOR ARCH. SSW BY 205 DEGREES - Chasm Brook Bridge, Spanning Chasm Brook on West Sargent Mountain Carriage Road, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  6. Specifying the surface finish of x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1993-12-31

    Our measurements of x-ray mirrors at Brookhaven indicate that the power spectral densities of their finish errors have inverse power-law or fractal forms, rather than being flat at low frequencies as is usually assumed. This paper reviews these data and discusses how this apparent divergent behavior leads to finite but unconventional effects in imaging. Results are then used to develop more rational and realistic surface-finish specifications.

  7. 8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from infield tote board. Shown are all the best locations for viewing the finish line, including the Clubhouse on the left and Original Grandstand on the right. For a similar view taken in 1939 by a photographer for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper, see photo WA-201-24. (August 1993) - Longacres, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  8. Behavior of HVOF WC-10Co4Cr Coatings with Different Carbide Size in Fine and Coarse Particle Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabchi, Arash; Varis, Tommi; Turunen, Erja; Suhonen, Tomi; Liu, Xuwen; Hannula, S.-P.

    2010-01-01

    A modified ASTM G 65 rubber wheel test was employed in wet and dry conditions using 220 nm titania particles and 368 μm sand particles, respectively. Both tests were conducted on WC-CoCr coatings produced with two powders with different carbide grain sizes (conventional and sub-micron) to address the effect of carbide size and abrasive medium characteristics on the wear performance. The same spot before and after the wet abrasion wear testing was analyzed in detail using SEM to visualize wear mechanisms. It was shown that the wear mechanism depends on the relative size of the carbide and abrasive particles. Wear mechanisms in dry sand abrasion were studied by analyzing the single scratches formed by individual abrasive particles. Interaction of surface open porosity with moving abrasive particles causes formation of single scratches. By tailoring the carbide size, the wear performance can be improved.

  9. Preparation of methoxyl poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG)-coated carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and their application in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) magnetorheological finishing (MRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fang; Xu, Min; Wang, Baorui; Wang, Chao; Li, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Yunfei; Zhou, Ming; Huang, Wen; Wei, Qilong; Tang, Guangping; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-01

    KDP is a common type of optics that is extremely difficult to polish by the conventional route. MRF is a local polishing technology based on material removal via shearing with minimal normal load and sub-surface damage. In contrast to traditional emendation on an abrasive, the MPEG soft coating is designed and prepared to modify the CIP surface to achieve a hardness matched with that of KDP because CIP inevitably takes part in the material removal during finishing. Morphology and infrared spectra are explored to prove the existence of homogeneous coating, and the improvement of MPEG for the polishing quality is validated by the analysis of roughness, turning grooves, and stress. The synthesized MPEG-coated CIP (MPEG-CIP) is chemically and physically compatible with KDP, which can be removed after cleaning. Our research exhibits the promising prospects of MPEG-CIP in KDP MRF.

  10. Performance of Flame Sprayed Ni-WC Coating under Abrasive Wear Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Agarwal, A.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the influence of a post spray heat treatment on the microstructure, microhardness and abrasive wear behavior of the flame sprayed Ni-WC (EWAC 1002 ET) coating deposited on the mild steel. Coatings were deposited by using an oxy-acetylene flame spraying torch (Superjet Eutalloy L & T, India). The wear behavior of the coating was evaluated using a pin on disc wear system against SiC abrasive medium of 120 and 600 grades at 5, 10, 15, and 20 N normal load. Results revealed that the influence of normal load on wear is governed by the microstructure, hardness and abrasive grit size. The heat treatment increased average microhardness of the coating. However, it was found that the hardness does not correctly indicate the abrasive wear resistance of Ni-WC coating in an as sprayed and heat treated condition. The heat treatment of the coating improved its abrasive wear resistance against fine abrasive medium while the wear resistance against coarse abrasive was found to be a function of a normal load. At low-normal load (5 and 10 N) the heat treated coating showed lower-wear rate than as spayed coating while at high-normal loads (15 and 20 N) heat treated coating was subjected to higher-wear rate than as sprayed coating. In general, an increase in normal load increased the wear rate. The scanning electron microscopy study indicated that the wear largely takes place by groove formation and scoring of eutectic matrix and the fragmentation of the carbide particles.

  11. Investigating selective transport and abrasion on an alluvial fan using quantitative grain size and shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Selective sorting and abrasion are the two major fluvial processes that are attributed to the downstream fining of sediments in rivers and alluvial fans. Selective transport is the process by which smaller grains are preferentially transported downstream while larger grains are deposited closer to the source. Abrasion is defined by the production of fine sediments and sand that occurs by saltation of gravel, where particle-to-particle collisions supply the energy required to break apart grains. We hypothesize that abrasion results in the gradual fining of large grains and the production of fine sands and silts, while sorting accounts for the differences in transport of these two grain-size fractions produced from abrasion, thereby creating the abrupt gravel-sand transition observed in many channel systems. In this research, we explore both selective transport and abrasion processes on the Dog Canyon alluvial fan near Alamogordo, New Mexico. We complete an extensive grain size analysis down the main channel of the fan employing an image-based technique that utilizes an autocorrelation process. We also characterize changes in grain shape using standard shape parameters, as well as Fourier analysis, which allows the study of contributions of grain roughness on a variety of length scales. Sorting appears to dominate the upper portion of the fan; the grain-size distribution narrows moving downstream until reaching a point of equal mobility, at which point sorting ceases. Abrasion exerts a subtle but persistent effect on grains during transport down the fan. Shape analysis reveals that particles become more rounded by the removal of small-scale textural features, a process that is expected to only modestly influence grain size of gravel, but should produce significant quantities of sand. This study provides a better understanding of the importance of grain abrasion and sorting on the downstream fining of channel grains in an alluvial fan, as well as an improved knowledge

  12. An evaluation of wear of human enamel opposed by ceramics of different surface finishes

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Gauri; Dugal, Ramandeep; Buhranpurwala, Murtuza

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Surface of porcelain restoration is a matter of clinical concern because of its abrasive action on the opposing enamel. Purpose: This study comparatively evaluated wear of enamel when opposed by three different surface finishes of ceramic. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 metal-ceramic discs (10 mm × 2 mm) with different surface finishes were fabricated. They were divided into four groups of autoglazed ceramic surface, over glazed ceramic surface, ceramic surface polished with Shofu polishing kit and ceramic surface polished with DFS polishing wheels and paste. Each group comprised of 15 discs. Sixty human teeth samples were prepared from freshly extracted, unrestored, caries free, nonattrited maxillary first premolars. Each tooth sample was weighed before wear testing using AT200 Mettler Toledo electronic analytical balance of 0.0001 g accuracy. Occlusal surfaces of these teeth were then abraded against the substrates in a wear machine for a total of 10,000 cycles. Each tooth sample was weighed after 5000 cycles and after the total of 10,000 cycles, respectively, using the same balance. Differences in weight of tooth samples before and after wear testing were evaluated statistically using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction for multiple group comparisons. Results: The values obtained for percentage weight loss after 10,000 cycles for over glazed ceramic surface were marginally higher than values obtained for autoglazed surface. It was observed that values obtained for percentage weight loss by polished ceramic after 10,000 cycles were statistically less as compared to the values obtained with autoglazed and over glazed ceramic surface (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the values obtained by polished ceramic surfaces of two different groups. Conclusion: Enamel wear produced by polished porcelain is substantially less than autoglazed and over glazed porcelain. No significant

  13. Failure of a novel silicone–polyurethane copolymer (Optim™) to prevent implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead insulation abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert G.; Abdelhadi, Raed H.; McGriff, Deepa M.; Kallinen Retel, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to determine if Optim™, a unique copolymer of silicone and polyurethane, protects Riata ST Optim and Durata implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads (SJM, St Jude Medical Inc., Sylmar, CA, USA) from abrasions that cause lead failure. Methods and results We searched the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturers and User Device Experience (MAUDE) database on 13 April 2012 using the simple search terms ‘Riata ST Optim™ abrasion analysis’ and ‘Durata abrasion analysis’. Lead implant time was estimated by subtracting 3 months from the reported lead age. The MAUDE search returned 15 reports for Riata ST Optim™ and 37 reports for Durata leads, which were submitted by SJM based on its analyses of returned leads for clinical events that occurred between December 2007 and January 2012. Riata ST Optim™ leads had been implanted 29.1 ± 11.7 months. Eight of 15 leads had can abrasions and three abrasions were caused by friction with another device, most likely another lead. Four of these abrasions resulted in high-voltage failures and one death. One failure was caused by an internal insulation defect. Durata leads had been implanted 22.2 ± 10.6 months. Twelve Durata leads had can abrasions, and six leads had abrasions caused by friction with another device. Of these 18 can and other device abrasions, 13 (72%) had electrical abnormalities. Low impedances identified three internal insulation abrasions. Conclusions Riata ST Optim™ and Durata ICD leads have failed due to insulation abrasions. Optim™ did not prevent these abrasions, which developed ≤4 years after implant. Studies are needed to determine the incidence of these failures and their clinical implications. PMID:22915789

  14. Pelton turbine Needle erosion prediction based on 3D three- phase flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongji, Z.; Yexiang, X.; Wei, Z.; Yangyang, Y.; Lei, C.; Zhengwei, W.

    2014-03-01

    Pelton turbine, which applied to the high water head and small flow rate, is widely used in the mountainous area. During the operation period the sediment contained in the water does not only induce the abrasion of the buckets, but also leads to the erosion at the nozzle which may damage the needle structure. The nozzle and needle structure are mainly used to form high quality cylindrical jet and increase the efficiency of energy exchange in the runner to the most. Thus the needle erosion will lead to the deformation of jet, and then may cause the efficiency loss and cavitation. The favourable prediction of abrasion characteristic of needle can effectively guide the optimization design and maintenance of needle structure. This paper simulated the unsteady three-dimensional multi-phase flow in the nozzle and injected jet flow. As the jet containing water and sediment is injected into the free atmosphere air with high velocity, the VOF model was adopted to predict the water and air flow. The sediment is simplified into round solid particle and the discrete particle model (DPM) was employed to predict the needle abrasion characteristic. The sand particle tracks were analyzed to interpret the mechanism of sand erosion on the needle surface. And the numerical result of needle abrasion was obtained and compared with the abrasion field observation. The similarity of abrasion pattern between the numerical results and field observation illustrated the validity of the 3D multi-phase flow simulation method.

  15. Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute for human dentine in erosion/abrasion tests?

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, F; Gries, D; Wiegand, A; Attin, T

    2008-05-01

    The study aimed to compare the dentine wear of primary and permanent human and bovine teeth because of erosion/abrasion and evaluate if bovine dentine is an appropriate substitute for human dentine in further erosion/abrasions tests. Dentine samples from deciduous molars and human third molars as well as from calves' and cattle's lower incisors were prepared and baseline surface profiles were recorded. Each day all samples were demineralized in 1% citric acid, tooth brushed with 100 brushing strokes with toothpaste slurry and stored in artificial saliva for the rest of the day. This cycle was run for 20 days. Afterwards, new surface profiles were recorded and dentine wear was calculated by a customized computer program. Dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion was not statistically, significantly different for human third molars and cattle's lower incisors (P = 0.7002). The dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion of deciduous molars and calves' lower incisors was significantly different (P < 0.0000). No statistically significant difference in the dentine wear of human third molars and cattle's lower incisors was observed, so that the use of cattle's lower incisors as substitute for adult human teeth for further investigations in erosion/abrasion studies could be accepted.

  16. [Grinding of titanium. 1. Commercial and experimental wheels made of silicon carbide abrasives].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Shiokawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Tamura, H

    1990-01-01

    Cast titanium was ground with commercial and experimental wheels made of silicon carbide abrasives, and their grinding performance was investigated. With the vitrified wheels made of the GC abrasive, at a higher the wheel circumferential speed and heavier the grinding pressure, the cutting rate was greater, accompanied by violent wear of the wheel. Being independent of the wheel speed, the grinding ratio reached about 1 under pressure heavier than 100 gf. The MgO-MgCl2-bonded wheels of the C abrasive exhibited a similar tendency. The manner in which the wheel was moved over the work during grinding proved to be very important, compared with the Ni-Cr alloy as reported previously. Only depression of the wheel against the work resulted in chemical attrition of the abrasive and discoloration of the work surface, or grinding burn, due to oxidation of titanium. Even when the wheel was moved over the work, chip-formation process of the cutting edge was far from ideal, and the work surface was contaminated due to reaction of titanium with the abrasive. At a higher wheel circumferential speed, more chips were loaded or built-up in the wheel and strongly rubbed the work surface, resulting in violent wear of the wheel; loading and dislodging of such chips were repeated.

  17. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing PMID:26229264

  18. The effect of erosion and abrasion on surface properties of composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Munteanu, A.; Balan, A.; Iovan, G.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the surface roughness of two commercial composite resins submitted to erosive attack, to abrasive wear and to association of erosive and abrasive challenge. Standardized samples of G-snial anterior (GC Company) and Essentia (GC Company) composite resins were randomly split in 6 groups. In group 1 the samples were maintained in artificial saliva until the evaluation of surface roughness. In group 2 the samples were submitted only to erosive attack, in group 3 only to abrasive challenge and in groups 4,5, and 6 the erosive attack was followed by abrasive challenge immediately (group 4), 30 minutes after the erosive attack (group 5) and one hour after the erosive attack (group 6). The specimens were evaluated using surface roughness measuring tester SJ-210 (Mitutoyo Corporation, Japan) and the mean surface roughness values (Ra, μm) of each specimen were registered. A significantly increase of both composite resins surface roughness was recorded after erosive attack and abrasive challenge. Toothbrushing 60 minutes after acidic contact determined no significant differences in surface roughness of composite resins.

  19. Assessment of the abrasion potential of pesticide-treated seeds using the Heubach test

    PubMed Central

    Zwertvaegher, Ingrid K. A.; Foqué, Dieter; Devarrewaere, Wouter; Verboven, Pieter; Nuyttens, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During sowing of pesticide-treated seeds, pesticide-laden dust and abraded seed particles may be emitted to the environment, possibly leading to environmental contamination and posing health risks. In many countries there is currently no legislation concerning the acceptable amount of dust of treated seeds. This study aimed to gain insight in the abrasion potential of available pesticide-treated seeds and its associated factors. The abrasion potential of 45 seed samples of 7 different species (viz. sugar beet, oat, barley, wheat, spelt, pea, and maize) was determined using the Heubach test and amounts of dust were expressed as g 100 kgseeds −1, g 100,000 seeds−1, and g ha−1. The abrasion potential fell generally within the boundaries of maximum permissible values adopted by different countries. Species, seed treatment company, number of active ingredient (AIs) and combination of AIs had significant effects on the abrasion potential, whereas little or no effect of agitation and conservation was found. However, species were situated differently with respect to each other depending on the unit in which the abrasion potential was expressed. A standard unit that takes into account the species’ seed rate is suggested to give the fairest assessment of dust drift risk and would allow international comparison. PMID:27812241

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Gingival Depigmentation using Tetrafluoroethane Cryosurgery and Gingival Abrasion Technique: Two Years Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santhosh; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of the gingival depigmentation by using Tetrafluoroethane cryosurgery and the gingival abrasion technique – 2 years of follow up. Material and Methods: Ten systemically healthy patients who were aged 18 to 36 years were selected for the study. Tetrafluoroethane was used for the cryosurgical depigmentation and the gingival abrasion technique used a coarse flame shaped bur. The presence or absence of pigmentation was tabulated, based on the GPI (Gingival Pigmentation Index). For the statistical analysis, Freidman’s test was used. Results: The keratinization was completed within a week after the application of the cryogen and about 10 days after the gingival abrasion technique was done. The statistical analysis which was done after 90th, 180th days and 2 years. The p-value which was obtained (p<.001) showed the superiority of cryosurgery over the gingival abrasion. During the follow up period, no side effects were seen for both the techniques and the improved aesthetics was maintained upto 2 years. Conclusion: The use of cryogen Tetrafluoroethane is easy, practical and inexpensive as compared to gingival abrasion, due to its high rate of recurrence. Hence, it is more acceptable to the patients and the operator. Further studies are needed to assess the long term effectiveness of the cryosurgical method of depigmentation. PMID:23543863

  1. Assessment of the abrasion potential of pesticide-treated seeds using the Heubach test.

    PubMed

    Zwertvaegher, Ingrid K A; Foqué, Dieter; Devarrewaere, Wouter; Verboven, Pieter; Nuyttens, David

    2016-10-01

    During sowing of pesticide-treated seeds, pesticide-laden dust and abraded seed particles may be emitted to the environment, possibly leading to environmental contamination and posing health risks. In many countries there is currently no legislation concerning the acceptable amount of dust of treated seeds. This study aimed to gain insight in the abrasion potential of available pesticide-treated seeds and its associated factors. The abrasion potential of 45 seed samples of 7 different species (viz. sugar beet, oat, barley, wheat, spelt, pea, and maize) was determined using the Heubach test and amounts of dust were expressed as g 100 kgseeds(-1), g 100,000 seeds(-1), and g ha(-1). The abrasion potential fell generally within the boundaries of maximum permissible values adopted by different countries. Species, seed treatment company, number of active ingredient (AIs) and combination of AIs had significant effects on the abrasion potential, whereas little or no effect of agitation and conservation was found. However, species were situated differently with respect to each other depending on the unit in which the abrasion potential was expressed. A standard unit that takes into account the species' seed rate is suggested to give the fairest assessment of dust drift risk and would allow international comparison.

  2. 40 CFR 433.10 - Applicability; description of the metal finishing point source category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal finishing point source category. 433.10 Section 433.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) METAL FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Metal Finishing Subcategory § 433.10 Applicability; description of the metal finishing...

  3. 40 CFR 433.10 - Applicability; description of the metal finishing point source category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metal finishing point source category. 433.10 Section 433.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Metal Finishing Subcategory § 433.10 Applicability; description of the metal finishing point source category....

  4. 40 CFR 433.10 - Applicability; description of the metal finishing point source category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal finishing point source category. 433.10 Section 433.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) METAL FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Metal Finishing Subcategory § 433.10 Applicability; description of the metal finishing...

  5. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Flórez, Alvaro; Barbosa-Lis, Diana María; Zapata-Noreña, Oscar Arturo; Marín-Velásquez, Julissa Andrea; Afanador-Bayona, Sergio Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG) consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old) treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old) selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG). Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048), respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8) (p = 0.009) and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6) (p = 0.007). Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8) (p = 0.62) and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9) (p = 0.65). Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system. PMID:27275620

  6. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2016-07-12

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shuangye

    2012-06-01

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Photodetector Development for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on the Sojourner Microrover of the Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    On-board the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, launched in December of 1996, is a small roving vehicle named Sojourner. On Sojourner is an experiment to determine the abrasive characteristics of the Martian surface, called the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The experiment works as follows: one of the wheels of the rover has a strip of black anodized aluminum bonded to the tread. The aluminum strip has thin coatings of aluminum, nickel and platinum deposited in patches. There are five (5) patches or samples of each metal, and the patches range in thickness from 200 A to 1000 A. The different metals were chosen for their differing hardness and their environmental stability. As the wheel is spun in the Martian soil, the thin patches of metal are abraded away, exposing the black anodization. The abrasion is monitored by measuring the amount of light reflected off of the samples. A photodetector was developed for this purpose, and that is the subject of this paper.

  9. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  10. Estimation of the abrasive wear coefficient in Lillehei-Kaster cardiac valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Reif, T H; Silver, M D; Koppenhoefer, H; Huffstutler, M C

    1986-01-01

    An approximate hemodynamic theory, which predicts the opening dynamics of the Lillehei-Kaster heart valve, is used in conjunction with an abrasive wear model to predict the wear process on the shields. The hemodynamic theory predicts markedly different opening dynamics between the mitral and aortic positions and is shown to give excellent correlation with the experimental results of other investigations. The abrasive wear model is also shown to give excellent correlation with the experiments of others when the abrasive wear coefficient is taken as k = 6.4 X 10(-6). The theoretical results of this effort and the experimental data from clinical explants of other investigators is used to predict that occluder dislodgement is unlikely in less than 90 yr for either the mitral or aortic positions (for a mean cardiac output of 3.8 l.min-1 and a mean heart rate of 70 beats min-1).

  11. Improvement in high stress abrasive wear property of steel by hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Mondal, D.P.; Khaira, H.K.; Jha, A.K.

    1999-12-01

    High stress abrasive wear behavior of mild steel, medium carbon steel, and hardfacing alloy has been studied to ascertain the extent of improvement in the wear properties after hardfacing of steel. High stress abrasive wear tests were carried out by sliding the specimen against the abrasive media consisting of silicon carbide particles, rigidly bonded on paper base and mounted on disk. Maximum wear was found in the case of mild steel followed by a medium carbon alloy steel and a hardfacing alloy. Different compositions of steels and constituent phases present led to different wear rates of the specimen. The extent of improvement in wear performance of steel due to hardfacing is quite appreciable (twice compared to mild steel). Microstructural examination of the wear surface has been carried out to understand the wear mechanism.

  12. Influence of material characteristics on the abrasive wear response of some hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, A.K.; Prasad, B.K.; Dasgupta, R.; Modi, O.P.

    1999-04-01

    This study examines the abrasive wear behavior of two iron-base hardfacing materials with different combinations of carbon and chromium after deposition on a steel substrate. Effects of applied load and sliding distance on the wear behavior of the specimens were studied. Operating material removal mechanisms also were analyzed through the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of typical wear surfaces, subsurface regions, and debris particles. The results suggest a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the hardfaced layers over that of the substrate. Further, the specimens overlaid with the material with low carbon and high chromium contents attained better wear resistance than the one consisting of more carbon but less chromium. The former specimens also attained superior hardness. Smoother abrasion grooves on the wear surfaces and finer debris formation during the abrasion of the hardfaced samples were consistent with wear resistance superior to that of the substrate.

  13. Abrasion-ablation model for neutron production in heavy ion reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1995-01-01

    In heavy ion reactions, neutron production at forward angles is observed to occur with a Gaussian shape that is centered near the beam energy and extends to energies well above that of the beam. This paper presents an abrasion-ablation model for making quantitative predictions of the neutron spectrum. To describe neutrons produced from the abrasion step of the reaction where the projectile and target overlap, the authors use the Glauber model and include effects of final-state interactions. They then use the prefragment mass distribution from abrasion with a statistical evaporation model to estimate the neutron spectrum resulting from ablation. Measurements of neutron production from Ne and Nb beams are compared with calculations, and good agreement is found.

  14. Abrasive wear: The efects of fibres size on oil palm empty fruit bunch polyester composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasolang, S.; Kalam, A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Suhadah, W. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to determine the effect of palm oil empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre size in dry sliding testing of polyester composite. These composite samples were produced by mixing raw OPEFB fibre with resin. The samples were prepared at different sizes of fibre (100, 125, 180 and 250μm). Abrasion Resistance Tester (TR-600) was used to carried out abrasive wear tests in dry sliding conditions. These tests were performed at room temperature for two different loads (10 and 30N) and at a constant sliding velocity of 1.4m/s. The specific wear rates of OPEFB polyester composites were obtained. The morphology of composite surface before and after tests was also examined using 3D microscope imaging. Preliminary work on thermal distribution at the abrasive wheel point was also conducted for selected samples.

  15. A study of the abrasive resistance of metal alloys with applications in dental prosthetic fixators.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Fernández, E; Manero, J M; Planell, J A; Sabrià, J; Cortada, M; Giner, L

    1995-01-01

    Wear is one of the main surface failure mechanisms in materials and it will play a leading role in substitutive dental biomaterials. The aim of the present study is to compare the abrasive wear of different metallic materials used in dental applications. The results show that the abrasive wear of alloys based on precious metals such as Pt, Pd, Au and Ag is higher than for Ti and Ti based alloys. The alloy with the highest wear resistance is the Co-Cr which exhibits as well the highest hardness and Young's modulus. Since the method corresponds to a well-established abrasive wear standard, the behaviour of the different materials can be easily compared.

  16. Brushing abrasion of eroded dentin after application of sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Zirkel, C; Hellwig, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of sodium fluoride solutions on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin. Dentin specimens were prepared from 60 bovine incisors. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin, ground flat, polished and subsequently covered with tape exposing an area of 1.8 mm x 10.0 mm in the center of the exposed dentin. The samples were alternatingly stored in a demineralizing solution (5 min) and a remineralizing solution (1 min) for 5 times. The erosive soft drink Sprite light(R) served as a demineralizing solution and artificial saliva was used as a remineralizing solution. Prior to storage in artificial saliva 15 specimens were each treated for 1 min with 250 and 2,000 ppm fluoride solution, respectively. Fifteen specimens were treated with distilled water instead of the fluoride solution (= eroded controls). The remaining samples were neither eroded with the soft drink nor fluoridated (= uneroded controls). After each immersion in artificial saliva the specimens were submitted to abrasion in a toothbrushing machine. After 5 demineralization-remineralization brushing cycles the total amount of tooth wear due to erosion and subsequent abrasion was profilometrically evaluated. Statistical analysis revealed the significantly lowest wear in the uneroded controls and the highest amount of abrasion in the eroded controls. Application of the fluoride solutions increased the wear resistance of the eroded dentin specimens, showing significantly better protection by the high-concentration compared to the low-concentration solution. The susceptibility to abrasion of the eroded dentin specimens treated with the high-concentration fluoride solution did not differ significantly from the uneroded dentin samples. It is concluded that application of 2,000 ppm sodium fluoride solutions immediately before toothbrushing significantly reduces abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro.

  17. Design of erosion/abrasion studies--insights and rational concepts.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In vitro and in situ studies modelling the wear of dental hard tissues due to erosion and abrasion are characterised by a high variation in study designs and experimental parameters. Based on a summary of the existing protocols, the present review aimed to describe and discuss the parameters which must be carefully considered in erosion-abrasion research, especially when it is intended to simulate clinical conditions. Experimental characteristics and parameters were retrieved from a total of 42 in vitro and 20 in situ studies. The key experimental characteristics included parameters of erosion (duration and pH) and abrasion (duration, kinds of toothbrush and toothpaste, brushing force, and time point) as well as co-factors (e.g. dental hard tissue). The majority of studies used models with alternating erosion/abrasion treatments intended to simulate clinical conditions, while other studies exaggerated clinical conditions intentionally, often using only a single erosion/abrasion treatment. Both in vitro and in situ models shared a high level of standardisation, but several studies showed a trend to severe erosion (e.g. >5 min/cycle) or extensive brushing (e.g. >100 brushing strokes/cycle) at a high frequency and repetition rate. Thus, studies often tend to produce a higher amount of wear than in the clinical situation, especially as modifying biological factors (e.g. the dilution of the erosive solution by saliva and the protective effect of the pellicle) cannot be simulated adequately. With respect to the existing models, it seems advisable to diminish duration and frequency of erosion and abrasion to more realistic clinical conditions when the everyday situation is to be simulated. Experimental parameters must be chosen with care to ensure that the problem is investigated in an appropriate mode at standardised conditions and with adequate measuring systems to allow prediction of clinical outcomes.

  18. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  19. Microstructure Evolution and Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadke, Shreyash; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Shekhawat, Satish K.; Jain, Shreyans; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of quenching and aging treatment on microstructure and abrasive wear of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The as-received alloy was solution treated at 1339 K, then oil quenched, followed by aging at 823 K for 4 h (14,400 s). The microstructures of as-received and quench-aged specimens were characterized by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and electron backscattered diffraction techniques. The as-received specimen consisted of very fine α grains (average grain size 2 μm) with β phase uniformly dispersed throughout. The microstructure of the quench-aged specimen showed α plates (formed by the decomposition of α' during aging). The β phase precipitated out of α' martensite during aging and hence was dispersed uniformly in the α matrix. Ti-6Al-4V alloy was quench-aged to achieve maximum hardness with a view that the increased hardness would lead to an improvement in abrasive wear behavior. Two-body abrasive wear tests were carried out on the as-received and quench-aged specimens using pin-on-disk apparatus with SiC as abrasive media (150-grit size). The effect of sliding distance and normal load on the abrasive wear behavior was studied. The wear resistance of the as-received specimen was greater than that of quench-aged specimen, while hardness of the as-received specimen was lower than that of quench-aged specimen. The abrasive wear behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy has been explained based on morphology/microstructure of the alloy and the associated wear mechanism(s).

  20. Methods for atomistic abrasion simulations of laterally periodic polycrystalline substrates with fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Gkagkas, K.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we discuss a method to generate laterally periodic polycrystalline samples with fractal surfaces for use in molecular dynamics simulations of abrasion. We also describe a workflow that allows us to produce random lateral distributions of simple but realistically shaped hard abrasive particles with Gaussian size distribution and random particle orientations. We evaluate some on-the-fly analysis and visualization possibilities that may be applied during a molecular dynamics simulation to considerably reduce the post-processing effort. Finally, we elaborate on a parallelizable post-processing approach to evaluating and visualizing the surface topography, the grain structure and orientation, as well as the temperature distribution in large atomistic systems.

  1. Subsurface mechanical damage during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaineau, P.; André, D.; Laheurte, R.; Darnis, P.; Darbois, N.; Cahuc, O.; Neauport, J.

    2015-10-01

    The subsurface damage (SSD) introduced during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass was measured using a wet etch technique. Various process parameters and grinding configurations were studied. The relation between the SSD depth, the process parameters and forces applied by the grinding wheel on the sample was investigated and compared to a simulation using a discrete element method to model the grinding interface. The results reveal a relation between the SSD depth and the grinding forces normalized by the abrasive concentration. Regarding the creation of the SSD, numerical simulations indicate that only a small fraction of the largest particles in the diamond wheel are responsible for the depth of the damaged layer.

  2. Water jet and abrasive water jet cutting of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramulu, M.; Arola, D.

    1993-06-01

    Unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite material has been machined by water jet and abrasive water jet cutting processes. Topography and morphology of the machined surfaces were evaluated with surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. The surface characteristics in terms of roughness and the micromechanisms of material removal for both processes were analyzed and compared. Abrasive water jet surface characteristics of graphite/epoxy were found to be significantly different from those of the water jet cutting process and micromechanical behavior of material removal was strongly dependent on the fiber orientation.

  3. Studies on Application of Aroma Finish on Silk Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipparagi, Sanganna Aminappa; Srinivasa, Thirumalappa; Das, Brojeswari; Naik, Subhas Venkatappa; Purushotham, Serampur Parappa

    2016-10-01

    Aromatic treatments on textiles have gained importance in the recent years. In the present article work has been done on fragrance finish application on silk material. Silk is an expensive natural fibre used for apparel purpose and known for its feel and appeal. Incorporation of fragrance material in silk product, will add more value to it. Present work focuses to impart durable aroma finish for silk products to be home washed or subjected to dry cleaning. Microencapsulated aroma chemical has been used for the treatment. Impregnation method, Exhaust method, Dip-Pad-Dry method and Spray method have been used to see the influence of application method on the uptake and performance. Evaluation of the aroma treated material has been done through subjective evaluation as per Odor Intensity Reference Scaling (OIRS). Effect of the aroma finishing on the physical properties of the fabric has also been studied. No adverse effect has been observed on the stiffness of the fabric after the aroma treatment.

  4. Impact of Abrasion on Mass Loss and Surface Appearance of Woven Fabrics Made with Injected Slub Yarn in Weft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Nemai Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Arunangshu; Midha, Vinay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Fancy yarn fabrics are susceptible to abrasive damage during washing and usage but the extent of damage varies with construction and type of fabric. In the present study, effect of different slub parameters viz. slub length, slub thickness and slub frequency of single base injected slub yarn on abrasive damage of woven fabrics has been studied when injected slub yarns are used in weft only. Abrasive damage has been assessed by two ways using loss in fabric mass and deterioration in fabric appearance due to abrasion. These two techniques provide entirely different effect of injected slub yarn parameters on abrasive damage of woven fabric. Fabric abrasion damage in terms of mass loss is not affected by slub thickness and damage is least when both slub length and slub frequency are at central/medium level. Under visual assessment it is observed that all the slub parameters have significant influence on abrasive damage of woven fabric. It is possible to have lower damage in surface appearance in spite of higher mass loss of fabric due to abrasion.

  5. NK cells are necessary for recovery of corneal CD11c+ dendritic cells after epithelial abrasion injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms controlling CD11c(+) MHCII(+) DCs during corneal epithelial wound healing were investigated in a murine model of corneal abrasion. Selective depletion of NKp46(+) CD3- NK cells that normally migrate into the cornea after epithelial abrasion resulted in >85% reduction of the epithelial CD1...

  6. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the current work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.

  7. Inheritance of the initial structure in steel 4Kh5MF1S after a finish heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmanov, N. S.

    1997-05-01

    The life of dies and press molds that fail due to abrasion is determined predominantly by the structure and properties of the surface layers, which change most when operating under a cyclic effect of the temperature and pressure. For this reason, the use of methods of surface strengthening is an effective way for increasing the service life of dies and press molds. An analysis of premature failure of some batches of molds for pressure casting has shown that they were fabricated with distortions of the technological process, namely, deviations from the forging temperature regime and an insufficient degree of deformation (forging without fiber entangling, often practiced in forge shops). The structure formed in forging is preserved in the quenched and tempered state. After the finish operation of nitriding the deformation in such press molds increases (the sizes of the tool change), cleavage develops in the operation, and the strengthened layer scales off. The aim of the present study consists in establishing an interrelation between the structure attained in the first stage of fabricating the press mold (after forging) and the structure attained after the subsequent operations of annealing, quenching, tempering, and nitriding.

  8. A critical review of non-carious cervical (wear) lesions and the role of abfraction, erosion, and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D W; Shah, P

    2006-04-01

    The terms 'abfraction' and 'abrasion' describe the cause of lesions found along the cervical margins of teeth. Erosion, abrasion, and attrition have all been associated with their formation. Early research suggested that the cause of the V-shaped lesion was excessive horizontal toothbrushing. Abfraction is another possible etiology and involves occlusal stress, producing cervical cracks that predispose the surface to erosion and abrasion. This article critically reviews the literature on abrasion, erosion, and abrasion, and abfraction. The references were obtained by a MEDLINE search in March, 2005, and from this, hand searches were undertaken. From the literature, there is little evidence, apart from laboratory studies, to indicate that abfraction exists other than as a hypothetical component of cervical wear.

  9. Platelet recruitment promotes keratocyte repopulation following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corneal abrasion not only damages the epithelium but also induces stromal keratocyte death at the site of injury. While a coordinated cascade of inflammatory cell recruitment facilitates epithelial restoration, it is unclear if this cascade is necessary for keratocyte recovery. Since platelet and ne...

  10. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  11. High stress abrasive wear behavior of some hardfaced surfaces produced by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Gachake, Arati; Prasad, B. K.; Dasgupta, Rupa; Singh, M.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    2002-02-01

    Steel surfaces were thermally sprayed with nickel chromium boron (NCB) powder (with and without tungsten carbide) using an oxy-acetylene torch. The sprayed (hard) surfaces and substrate were characterized for abrasive wear properties. Test parameters such as load and sliding distance were varied. A significant improvement in the abrasive wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) was noted for the thermally sprayed surfaces as compared to that of the substrate. Wear surfaces, subsurface regions, and debris were examined in order to ascertain the operating wear mechanisms. Substrate (mild steel), because of its low hardness, suffered severe wear through the cutting, ploughing, and wedging action of the hard abrasive (silicon carbide). Deep cuts on the worn surface, a bulky transfer layer, subsurface cracks, and large-size debris were observed. However, wear was reduced due to high hardness of the layer of NCB powder on the substrate, which resisted the penetration of abrasive into the surface. Presence of tungsten carbide in the layer of NCB powder further reduced the wear of the corresponding specimen because of very high hardness of the tungsten carbide. Shallow wear grooves and finer debris were observed for the NCB coating with and without tungsten carbide. Cutting was the predominating wear mechanism in the case of coatings.

  12. Raman study of diamond-based abrasives, and possible artefacts in detecting UHP microdiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Steger, Simon; Reissner, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectral characteristics of a range of diamond-based abrasives (powders and sprays) and drilling and cutting tools, originating from preparation laboratories worldwide, are presented. Some abrasives show strong broadening of the main diamond band [FWHM (full width at half band-maximum) > 5 cm- 1] accompanied by strong band-downshift (ν˜ = 1316-1330 cm- 1). Others are characterised by moderate band broadening (FWHM = 1.8-5 cm- 1) at rather regular band position (ν˜ = 1331-1333 cm- 1). In addition we found that a ;fresh; abrasive and its used analogue may in some cases show vast differences in their Raman spectra. The Raman parameters of diamond-based abrasives overlap widely with Raman parameters of UHP (ultra-high pressure) microdiamond. It is hence impossible to assign diamond detected in a geological specimen to either an introduced artefact or a genuine UHP relict, from the Raman spectrum alone. Raman is an excellent technique for the detection of minute amounts of diamond; however it does not provide conclusive evidence for the identification of UHP microdiamond. The latter requires thorough verification, for instance by optical microscopy or, if doubts cannot be dispelled, transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Laser abrasion for cosmetic and medical treatment of facial actinic damage

    SciTech Connect

    David, L.M.; Lask, G.P.; Glassberg, E.; Jacoby, R.; Abergel, R.P.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser to be effective in the treatment of actinic cheilitis. After CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion, normal skin and marked cosmetic improvement of the lip were noted. In our study, twenty-three patients were treated with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasions for cosmetic improvement of facial lines and actinic changes. Pre- and postoperative histopathologic examinations were made on two patients. Preoperative examination of specimens from actinically damaged skin showed atypical keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, with overlying dense compact orthokeratosis and parakeratosis. Abundant solar elastosis was seen in the papillary dermis. Postoperative histologic specimens showed a normal-appearing epidermis with fibrosis in the papillary dermis and minimal solar elastosis (about four weeks after laser treatment). At present, various modalities are available for the regeneration of the aged skin, including chemical peels and dermabrasion. Significantly fewer complications were noted with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion than with these methods. Thus, CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion can be useful in the cosmetic and medical treatment of the aged skin. Marked clinical and histologic improvement has been demonstrated.

  14. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior.

  15. Rapid prototyping of silicon structures by aid of laser and abrasive-jet machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusing, Arvi; Leppaevuori, Seppo; Uusimaki, Antti; Uusimaki, Matti

    1999-03-01

    Rapid prototyping of silicon microstructures for fluidic devices using laser machining in water and abrasive-jet machining through mask is described. For laser machining a Q-switched 1-2 W 1 kHz pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam and 60 mJ XeCl excimer laser beam were used. The laser beam was scanned along the silicon surface at speeds 0.1-2 mm/s. Using excimer laser, the silicon nitride layer was patterned for subsequent chemical etching. Nd:YAG laser was used for fabrication of cavities and channels of depth down to 200 micrometers . Comparison of Nd:YAG laser machining of silicon in air and in water has been performed. Machining in water yields more even surfaces and there is no debris. By abrasive jet of velocity approximately 200 m/s and abrasive feed rate of 0.4 g/s, the silicon was eroded at speed of 40 micrometers /min. Several masking materials were compared, whereby a styrene based glue was found to have the best abrasion resistivity. The polymer masks were spun on the surface and patterned by excimer laser point or by knife. The described fabrication methods were used for making the fluid channels and chambers in silicon and for releasing silicon nitride and oxide films.

  16. Abrasive Wear Behaviour of COPPER-SiC and COPPER-SiO2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umale, Tejas; Singh, Amarjit; Reddy, Y.; Khatitrkar, R. K.; Sapate, S. G.

    The present paper reports abrasive wear behaviour of copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide and silica particles. Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites were prepared by powder metallurgical technique. Metallography, image analysis and hardness studies were carried out on copper composites. The abrasive wear experiments were carried out using pin on disc apparatus. The effect of sliding distance and load was studied on Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abrasive wear volume loss increased with sliding distance in both the composites although the magnitude of increase was different in each case. Copper - SiC (12%) composites exhibited relatively better abrasion resistance as compared to and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abraded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the morphology of abraded surfaces and operating wear mechanism. The analysis of wear debris particles was also carried out to substantiate the findings of the investigation.

  17. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  18. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  19. Water and abrasive jetting, and mechanical techniques expedite hard rock drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Kolle, J.J.

    1998-04-20

    Construction activities that require the placement of gas, electrical, or communication utilities in hard rock will benefit from lightweight systems capable of precisely drilling short, constant-radius arcs. Existing mechanical drilling systems are capable of drilling shallow directional holes, but the equipment is heavy, drilling rates are low, and costs are high. A comparison of approaches for rapidly drilling small-diameter (25--50 mm) and near-surface holes along a short-radius (30 m) arc, in a variety of hard rock types, is describes. Four approaches are considered: (1) rotary diamond drilling with a downhole motor; (2) ultra-high pressure (UHP) water jet drilling; (3) mechanically assisted UHP water jet drilling; and (4) abrasive jet drilling -- abrasive water jet and abrasive slurry jet. Data relating mechanical and hydraulic drilling parameters for each approach were compiled from literature and drilling tests for all four techniques. The drilling data are summarized in a common format to provide direct drilling efficiency comparisons for: jet pressure and hydraulic power, and thrust and torque requirements and abrasive feed.

  20. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1512 - Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reflectorized Bicycle Wheel Rim Abrasion Test Device 8 Figure 8 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part...

  5. PAGMan - propelled abrasive grit to manage weeds in soybean and corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean and corn production in organic systems or in systems in which weeds developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Here we report on two developments: (i) the safety to soybean seedlings of using air-propelled abrasive grit (PAG) for managing...

  6. An in vitro evaluation of selective demineralised enamel removal using bio-active glass air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Avijit; Pabari, Hiten; Paolinelis, George; Thompson, Ian D; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-12-01

    Unnecessary over-preparation of carious enamel often occurs clinically during operative caries management. The working hypothesis to be investigated in this study is the potential for bio-active glass air abrasion to remove selectively only demineralised enamel in artificial enamel lesions when compared to equivalent alumina air abrasion, so potentially minimising cavity over-preparation. Bisected artificial, paired smooth surface enamel lesions on ethics-approved, extracted sound human molars were created and subsequently air abraded with 27 μm alumina (n = 19) and bio-active glass (n = 19). The difference between pre-operative lesion boundary and post-operative cavity margin was calculated following optical confocal fluorescent assessment of the lesion boundary. Data indicated mean% over-preparation (sound enamel removal) of 176% with alumina and 15.2% for bio-active glass (p = 0.005). Bio-active glass abrasion removed completely the demineralised enamel from artificial lesions with clinically insignificant over-preparation of sound tissue, indicating technique selectivity towards grossly demineralised enamel. Alumina air abrasion resulted in substantial enamel removal in both sound and demineralised tissues indicating the operator selectivity required to use the techniques effectively in clinical practice.

  7. NK cells modulate the inflammatory response to corneal epithelial abrasion and thereby support wound healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural killer cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that have crucial cytotoxic and regulatory roles in adaptive immunity and inflammation. Herein, we consider a role for these cells in corneal wound healing. After a 2-mm central epithelial abrasion of the mouse cornea, a subset of clas...

  8. Comparison of dry wear characteristics of two abrasion-resistant steels: Q/T C1095 and 15B37H

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, G.; Tandon, K.N.; Iqbal, K.; Wang, Y.

    1995-10-01

    The dry reciprocating wear characteristics of two abrasion-resistant steels, C1095 and 15B37H, against an abrasive material were studied. Results showed that abrasive wear and surface fatigue were the primary wear mechanisms. The wear failure of the steels was related to frictional softening during wear.

  9. The Effect of Pleural Abrasion on the Treatment of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mo-yu; Cai, Shuang-qi; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural abrasion has been widely used to control the recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, controversy still exists regarding the advantages and disadvantages of pleural abrasion compared with other interventions in preventing the recurrence of PSP. Methods The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched up to December 15, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of pleural abrasion with those of other interventions in the treatment of PSP. The study outcomes included the PSP recurrence rate and the occurrence rate of adverse effects. Results Mechanical pleural abrasion and apical pleurectomy after thoracoscopic stapled bullectomy exhibited similarly persistent postoperative air leak occurrence rates (p = 0.978) and 1-year PSP recurrence rates (p = 0.821), whereas pleural abrasion led to reduced residual chest pain and discomfort (p = 0.001) and a smaller rate of hemothorax (p = 0.036) than did apical pleurectomy. However, the addition of minocycline pleurodesis to pleural abrasion did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with apical pleurectomy (3.8% for both procedures) but was associated with fewer complications. There was no statistical difference in the pneumothorax recurrence rate between mechanical pleural abrasion and chemical pleurodesis with minocycline on either an intention-to-treat basis (4 of 42 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.12; Fisher exact test) or after exclusions (2 of 40 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.24; Fisher exact test). Pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis also did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with pleural abrasion alone (p = 0.055). Moreover, pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis was associated with more intense acute chest pain. The postoperative overall recurrence rate in patients who underwent staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue was similar to that

  10. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have occurred with the most notable being the 1993 episode in Milwaukee. As a result, the past decade has seen a massive effort expended on the development of methods to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in source and finish...

  11. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces of non-full-size baby cribs shall be smooth and free from splinters. (b) All wood parts of non-full-size baby cribs shall be free from splits, cracks, or other defects that might lead to...

  12. 16 CFR 1509.8 - Construction and finishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.8 Construction and finishing. (a) All wood surfaces of non-full-size baby cribs shall be smooth and free from splinters. (b) All wood parts of non-full-size baby cribs shall be free from splits, cracks, or other defects that might lead to...

  13. Exposure to organic solvents during cosmetic finishing of cars.

    PubMed

    Bråtveit, M; Moen, B E

    2001-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the exposure to organic solvents during degreasing, washing and polishing of cars, and to obtain information about acute health symptoms in car-finishing workers. Fifteen car shops participated in this study, and at these locations 36 workers had car finishing as their main working task. All 36 car-finishing workers and 17 randomly selected office workers from six of these car shops completed questionnaires on acute health symptoms. Personal monitoring of exposure to organic solvents was carried out in three representative shops. The highest exposure levels were found during degreasing of new cars, the median level of aliphatic hydrocarbons (C9-C13) being 22 p.p.m. (range 7-215 p.p.m.). This exposure level represents 50% (range 20-540%) of the Norwegian 8 h limit value for additive factor for these compounds. Only 28% of the workers used gas respirators regularly during this process. Very low exposure levels were detected during washing of second-hand cars and during polishing processes. The present study shows that car-finishing workers are exposed to high levels of organic solvents only for short periods of time. It seems that they are not adequately protected during these periods. However, the presence of acute symptoms was low, i.e. comparable to the prevalences in the reference group.

  14. Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Processes. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course in graphic arts concentrating on printing presses and the finishing process for publications. Seven units of instruction cover the following topics: (1) offset press systems; (2) offset inks and dampening chemistry; (3) offset press operating procedures; (4) preventive maintenance…

  15. Plutonium Finishing Plant assessment of confinement system bypass leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document walk-through`s of the safety class confinement systems at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In addition this document outlines the actions taken to assess the confinement system for bypass leakage as well as establishing disposition for discovered deficiencies at the PFP.

  16. Almost finished: the complete genome sequence of Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella graminicola causes septoria tritici blotch of wheat. An 8.9x shotgun sequence of bread wheat strain IPO323 was generated through the Community Sequencing Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and was finished at the Stanford Human Genome Center. The ...

  17. Method and means for producing fluorocarbon finishes on fibrous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, Madeline S. (Inventor); Stringham, Roger S. (Inventor); Fogg, Lawrence C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved process and apparatus is provided for imparting chemically bonded fluorocarbon finishes to textiles. In the process, the textiles are contacted with a gaseous mixture of fluoroolefins in an inert diluent gas in the presence of ultraviolet light under predetermined conditions.

  18. 7 CFR 58.525 - Storage of finished product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION... distribution and storage prior to sale the product should be maintained at a temperature of 45 °F. or lower... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Storage of finished product. 58.525 Section...

  19. Early Childhood Education in Eritrea, Proceeding as We Would Finish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreoni, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Describes the success of early childhood education programs in Eritrea which are based on the principle "we should proceed in the way we wish to finish." Identifies the social, cultural, and developmental factors an educator must consider. Notes how multilingualism and multiculturalism are of special importance in Eritrean early…

  20. Interior Finishes. Floors, Walls, Ceilings: Performance Criteria. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    A research program and the testing methods it developed are described, indicating the performance criteria of interior finishes for walls, ceilings and floors. Material exposure criteria are given with the probability of damage ratings for--(1) physical impact, (2) chemical damage, (3) biological, food and water damage. The relationship of…

  1. Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, William G.; Chingos, Matthew M.; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The United States has long been a model for accessible, affordable education, as exemplified by the country's public universities. And yet less than 60 percent of the students entering American universities today are graduating. Why is this happening, and what can be done? "Crossing the Finish Line" provides the most detailed exploration…

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancement of the US Environmental Protection Agency's
    Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST)

    William M. Barrett Jr, Ph.D., P.E. , P.E.; Paul Harten, Ph.D.1, Matt Lorber , Charles Peck , and Steve Schwartz, P.E., Q.E.P.3

    Recently, the US Environ...

  3. THE USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmetal ProtectionAgenccy's Metal Finishing
    Facility Risk Screening Tool (MFFRST)

    William M. Barrett Jr, Ph.D. , P.E. ; Paul Harten, Ph.D.1, and Matthew Lorber

    The US Environmental Protection Agency completed the development of the first version of...

  4. Carpentry and Finishing Procedures. Building Maintenance. Module II. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Sam; Brunk, Art

    This curriculum guide, keyed to the building maintenance competency profile developed by industry and education professionals, provides three units on carpentry and finishing procedures. The first unit, Exterior Carpentry, contains the following lessons: carpentry safety procedures, ladder and scaffolding safety, door installation/repair,…

  5. Finishing lambs and kids on pasture in Appalachia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional sheep, hair sheep and meat goat industries are growing rapidly in the Appalachian Region, particularly on small farms, to help produce meats for ethnic markets. Numerous forage types and qualities are used in small ruminant finishing systems. With the expansion of non-traditional lamb ...

  6. 21 CFR 106.30 - Finished product evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finished product evaluation. 106.30 Section 106.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES Quality Control Procedures...

  7. Course in Carpentry: Interior Finish. Workbook and Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    Designed for use in carpentry apprenticeship classes, this workbook contains nine units on carpentry skills in the area of interior finish, lists of recommended and required instructional materials, and nine unit tests. Each instructional unit includes a listing of performance statements and text covering skills addressed in individual performance…

  8. 9 CFR 318.309 - Finished product inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... be handled according to: (1) A HACCP plan for canned product that addresses hazards associated with... this section. (b)-(c) (d) Procedures for handling finished product inspections where the HACCP plan...

  9. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.; Baker, W.E.

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  10. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Finishing and Distribution Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the finishing and distribution cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards…

  11. A survey of grass-finished beef producers in Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To meet our goal of quantifying the environmental impacts of grass-finished beef production, data on production practices in Pennsylvania were collected at the farm level via visits and online surveys. Twenty-three responses represented a total of 1,055 animals on 2,155 acres of land. Farms were rel...

  12. Micro topography of different material surface by solid abrasive lapped at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunlin; Yang, Jiandong; Fan, Jingfeng; Zhou, Huawen

    2007-12-01

    The principle of solid abrasives lapping is that the abrasives are fixed and made into a special lapping tool; the workpiece is lapped in high speed lapping machine tool. It possesses many advantages compared with traditional low speed lapping with particulate abrasives, e.g. high machining efficiency, low machining cost, high and stable machining accuracy. So the highly efficient lapping method has been paid close attention to. This paper made a study on surface micro topography of different material by solid abrasive lapped at high speed. In experiments the lapping technique parameter is fixed, and different workpiece which are made by T10 steel, carbide, ceramic glass and alumina ceramics are lapped. The surface micro topography is measured by SEM, from the measuring result, it can be known that there is some shallow scribe on the surface of T10 steel, and the obvious plastic deformation can be observed. The SEM pictures show that there is some scribe on the surface of ceramics glass after lapped, with more magnification times many micro cracking and some plastic hump can be observed on the scribe. These scribes and humps are first cause of depressing surface quality, and these micro cracking can result in a lot of diffuse reflection on workpiece surface, it decreases the glossiness of mirror surface. On the surface of alumina ceramics there are a lot of defects, the size of such defect is more than the scribe of abrasive, it can be sure that the defect is not produced by lapping, so the material quality is an important effect fact to surface macro topography. On the surface of carbide there are a little of scribe and air cavity, and the scribe is very shallow; the defect of powder metallurgy martial is the primary reason.

  13. Ultra-smooth finishing of aspheric surfaces using CAST technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, John; Young, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Growing applications for astronomical ground-based adaptive systems and air-born telescope systems demand complex optical surface designs combined with ultra-smooth finishing. The use of more sophisticated and accurate optics, especially aspheric ones, allows for shorter optical trains with smaller sizes and a reduced number of components. This in turn reduces fabrication and alignment time and costs. These aspheric components include the following: steep surfaces with large aspheric departures; more complex surface feature designs like stand-alone off-axis-parabola (OAP) and free form optics that combine surface complexity with a requirement for ultra-high smoothness, as well as special optic materials such as lightweight silicon carbide (SiC) for air-born systems. Various fabrication technologies for finishing ultra-smooth aspheric surfaces are progressing to meet these growing and demanding challenges, especially Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) and ion-milling. These methods have demonstrated some good success as well as a certain level of limitations. Amongst them, computer-controlled asphere surface-finishing technology (CAST), developed by Precision Asphere Inc. (PAI), plays an important role in a cost effective manufacturing environment and has successfully delivered numerous products for the applications mentioned above. One of the most recent successes is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), the world's most powerful planet-hunting instrument, with critical aspheric components (seven OAPs and free form optics) made using CAST technology. GPI showed off its first images in a press release on January 7, 2014 . This paper reviews features of today's technologies in handling the ultra-smooth aspheric optics, especially the capabilities of CAST on these challenging products. As examples, three groups of aspheres deployed in astronomical optics systems, both polished and finished using CAST, will be discussed in detail.

  14. The potential of deciduous and permanent bovine enamel as substitute for deciduous and permanent human enamel: Erosion-abrasion experiments.

    PubMed

    Attin, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian; Gries, David; Wiegand, Annette

    2007-10-01

    Aim of the present study was to compare toothbrushing abrasion of eroded human and bovine enamel utilizing a toothpaste slurry. The surfaces of each 36 teeth from cattle and calves and from each 36 human wisdom teeth and deciduous teeth were polished. Each 12 specimens from the respective tooth type were used for assessing toothbrushing abrasion only (A), erosion only (E) and the combination of erosion and toothbrushing abrasion (EA). The EA samples were subjected to 20 cycles comprising a demineralization/remineralization procedure directly followed by toothbrushing abrasion (100 strokes, 300 g load, toothpaste slurry: 3 ml artificial saliva mixed with 1g dentifrice). Demineralization in form of erosion was performed with 1% citric acid (1 min), remineralization with artificial saliva (15 min). Between the cycles, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. Wear of the treated surfaces with reference to untreated areas was determined profilometrically. The samples subjected to abrasion only (A) did not show a significantly different wear between the different kinds of teeth. The comparisons of substance loss between teeth of different species revealed that hard tissue loss of the human deciduous teeth was significantly lower as compared to calves' teeth after both erosion and erosion-abrasion. Also, both erosion only and erosion-abrasion caused higher enamel loss in cattle's teeth than in human wisdom teeth. It is concluded that human eroded enamel offers better resistance against brushing than bovine enamel.

  15. Scanning electron microscopic study of the in situ effect of salivary stimulation on erosion and abrasion in human and bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniela; Honório, Heitor Marques; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio da; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2008-01-01

    This in situ study investigated, using scanning electron microscopy, the effect of stimulated saliva on the enamel surface of bovine and human substrates submitted to erosion followed by brushing abrasion immediately or after one hour. During 2 experimental 7-day crossover phases, 9 previously selected volunteers wore intraoral palatal devices, with 12 enamel specimens (6 human and 6 bovine). In the first phase, the volunteers immersed the device for 5 minutes in 150 ml of a cola drink, 4 times a day (8h00, 12h00, 16h00 and 20h00). Immediately after the immersions, no treatment was performed in 4 specimens (ERO), 4 other specimens were immediately brushed (0 min) using a fluoride dentifrice and the device was replaced into the mouth. After 60 min, the other 4 specimens were brushed. In the second phase, the procedures were repeated but, after the immersions, the volunteers stimulated the salivary flow rate by chewing a sugar-free gum for 30 min. Enamel superficial alterations of all specimens were then evaluated using a scanning electron microscope. Enamel prism core dissolution was seen on the surfaces submitted to erosion, while on those submitted to erosion and to abrasion (both at 0 and 60 min) a more homogeneous enamel surface was observed, probably due to the removal of the altered superficial prism layer. For all the other variables--enamel substrate and salivary stimulation -, the microscopic pattern of the enamel specimens was similar.

  16. Effect of salivary stimulation on erosion of human and bovine enamel subjected or not to subsequent abrasion: an in situ/ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Rios, D; Honório, H M; Magalhães, A C; Delbem, A C B; Machado, M A A M; Silva, S M B; Buzalaf, M A R

    2006-01-01

    This in situ/ex vivo study evaluated whether saliva stimulated by chewing gum could prevent or reduce the wear and the percent change in microhardness (%SMH) of bovine and human enamel submitted to erosion followed by brushing abrasion immediately or after 1 h. During 2 experimental 7-day crossover phases, 9 previously selected volunteers wore intraoral palatal devices, with 12 enamel specimens (6 human and 6 bovine). In the first phase, the volunteers immersed the device for 5 min in 150 ml of cola drink, 4 times per day (at 8, 12, 16 and 20 h). Immediately after the immersions, no treatment was performed in 4 specimens, 4 other specimens were immediately brushed (0 min) using a fluoride dentifrice, and the device was replaced into the mouth. After 60 min, the remaining 4 specimens were brushed. In the second phase, the procedures were repeated, but after the immersions, the volunteers stimulated the salivary flow rate by chewing a sugar-free gum for 30 min. Changes in wear and %SMH were measured. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed statistical differences (p<0.05) for the following comparisons. The chewing gum promoted less wear and %SMH. A decreasing %SMH and an increasing enamel wear were observed in the following conditions: erosion only, 60 min and 0 min. The human enamel presented greater %SMH and less wear compared to bovine enamel. The data suggest that the salivary stimulation after an erosive or erosive/abrasive attack can reduce the dental wear and the %SMH.

  17. RPP-WTP Slurry Wear Evaluation: Slurry Abrasivity

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2002-06-03

    This report deals with the task of evaluating wear in the cross-flow ultrafiltration system and specifically the need to define a representative slurry in order to obtain prototypic wear rates. The filtration system will treat many different wastes, but it is not practical to run a test for each one. This is especially true when considering that the planned period for testing is 2000 hours long and procurement of appropriate simulants is costly. Considering time and cost, one waste stream needs to be chosen to perform the wear test.

  18. Finishing tooth-colored restorations in vitro: an index of surface alteration and finish-line destruction.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Göhring, Till N

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the surface characteristics of finishing and polishing instruments on different restorative materials using two- and three-dimensional models based on mechanical and optical techniques. However, only limited data are available regarding the problem of marginal causing detectable surface alterations such as scratches or grooves may also cause marginal damage. This study aimed to correlate the smooth-surface polishing efficacy of different instruments with their potential for destructive effects on restoration margins and enamel finish lines. An index was created that will help to evaluate future polishing instruments and select suitable ones for different clinical situations. A planar inlay system with a 100 microm wide defined gap was simulated in vitro. Pre-fabricated ceramic (n = 40) and composite blocks (n = 40) were connected to bovine enamel without luting material. After standardized pre-polishing, mean surface roughness and marginal quality were assessed using a profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Enamel and restorative surfaces were colored, and subsequently prepared using one of 10 different finishing and polishing instruments. Four specimens per instrument and material were evaluated, resulting in eight interfaces for each test group. Surface roughness (Ra) and marginal quality (expressed as the percentage fracture-free margin) were measured and compared statistically using unpaired t-tests and two-way ANOVA, respectively. The level of significance was set at 0.05 Eight-micrometer diamond burs and 40-fluted tungsten carbide finishers produced smoother surfaces and less finishing-line destructions than the other instruments under evaluation. The index values developed will prove helpful in evaluating and selecting appropriate instruments.

  19. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  20. Immunological, physiological and behavioral effects of Salmonella enterica carriage and shedding in experimentally infected finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. This study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and associated immunological, physiological, and behavioral alterations, by longitudinally ...

  1. 77 FR 61025 - Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards: Notice of Institution of Formal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards: Notice of Institution of Formal... States after importation of certain prepregs, laminates, and finished circuit boards that...

  2. Early abrasion of outer silicone insulation after intracardiac lead friction in a patient with cardiac device-related infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, Andrej; Małecka, Barbara; Kołodzińska, Agnieszka; Maziarz, Andrej; Lelakowski, Jacek; Kutarski, Andrej

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a 76-year-old woman on a permanent pacing device, with early abrasion of silicone endocardial lead insulations complicated by lead-dependent infective endocarditis 13 months after placement of an implantable pulse generator. The leads were removed using transvenous technique with direct traction, and with no additional tools. In the previous report, a set of additional tools was used, and therefore intraoperative endocardial lead abrasions or mechanical damage of leads could have not been excluded. The present case undoubtedly proves that the friction of leads against each other may result in abrasions of insulation of the intracardiac section of the lead.

  3. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior

  4. Bedform genesis in bedrock substrates: Insights into formative processes from a new experimental approach and the importance of suspension-dominated abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Daowei; Peakall, Jeff; Parsons, Dan; Chen, Zhongyuan; Averill, Heather Macdonald; Wignall, Paul; Best, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Bedrock channels are common in the natural environment, and bedrock channel erosion sets the pace of denudation in many river catchments. However, in comparison to the large number of studies concerning the formation of alluvial bedforms, relatively few investigations have concerned bedrock bedform genesis. Field-based analysis of sculptured forms within bedrock channels has been restricted notably by the slow rate of bedform development in such environments. Furthermore, only a limited number of flume-scale experiments have been conducted that attempt to simulate the genesis of sculpted bedforms in bedrock channels. This study demonstrates that optimisation of clay beds through analysis of clay strength enables the development of features analogous to bedrock river channel bedforms - even at a scale that is orders of magnitude smaller than some natural examples. Three sets of suspended sediment-laden experiments were carried out using hard, medium, and soft clay bed substrates. A suite of erosive bedforms (including potholes, flutes, and furrows) developed on all experimental beds. All observed erosional features have clear equivalents to those observed in natural bedrock rivers. Bed shear strength was found to be a significant factor for the genesis of different types of simulated bedrock bedforms in our experiments with other factors, such as flow velocity, bed slope, and flow depth held approximately constant. Importantly, in a subset of experiments performed with an absence of suspended sediment, fluid flow did not result in the erosion and development of bedforms in the clay bed. Hence, this work illustrates that abrasion by suspended sediments is the key process required for the formation of these simulated bedrock bedforms in our experiments, in the absence of bedload abrasion; other processes such as plucking, cavitation, and dissolution will have been negligible.

  5. Effect of Finishing System on Subcutaneous Fat Melting Point and Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus-cross steers (n = 69) were used to determine the effect of finishing system on subcutaneous fat melting point and fatty acid composition. Three finishing systems were evaluated: 1) mixed pasture for 134 d [MP], 2) mixed pasture for 93 d and alfalfa for 41 d [AL], or 3) concentrate finishing f...

  6. School Building Finishing and Economy. The School Building Economy Series, No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    Materials, elements, and methods of economical school construction are illustrated through explanatory outlines and accompany photographs and diagrams. Finishing elements covered include--(1) finished floorings, (2) ceilings and acoustical finishes, (3) carpentry and millwork, (4) chalkboards and tackboards, (5) toilet partitions, (6) finishing…

  7. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must be entered on the finish log for each type of finish applied. You are not required to test the materials that you use, but the Administrator may require a test using EPA Method 24 (or another approved... section for each finish when you perform one of the actions listed in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of...

  8. 26. A battery of calender presses at work finishing magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A battery of calender presses at work finishing magazine paper. After the coated paper has been dried and put into rolls, as shown in the preceding pictures, it is brought to the room shown here. A roll is put in the reel at the man's shoulder in the foreground and started through the machine. It passes between the two top rollers and then in and out between the succeeding rollers, until it reaches the bottom. Many tons' pressure have ironed it before it comes out and is rolled up again. This process gives it the finish that the National Geographic must have to maintain its high standard. (p.240.) - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  9. Farmer and Public Attitudes Toward Lamb Finishing Systems.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Grahame; Jongman, Ellen; Greenfield, L; Hemsworth, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To develop research and policy on the welfare of lambs in intensive finishing systems, it is important to understand public and sheep farmers' attitudes. The aim of this research was to identify and compare farmer and community attitudes relevant to the intensification of lamb finishing. The majority of respondents in the community sample expressed concern about all listed welfare issues, but particularly about feedlotting of lambs and the associated confinement. These attitudes correlated with community views on the importance of welfare issues including social contact and freedom to roam. Farmers expressed much lower levels of concern than did the general public except with regard to the health of lambs, disease control, access to shade, and lack of access to clean water.

  10. Surface profiling in mating parts by combined nonabrasive finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolentsev, EV; Fedonin, ON; Smolentsev, VP

    2017-02-01

    Nonabrasive finishing of precision mating surfaces in locking devices with the use of a combined erosion-chemical process at the first stage of the processing and with the use of anodic dissolution by alternating low-voltage current at the final stage of a refinement operation till gapless joints obtaining is considered. It is shown that the application of electro-erosion, electrochemical and combined nonabrasive finishing in mating parts opens up a possibility to ensure stable impermeability in locking devices on a macro- and micro-level through the method of a substantiated purpose of technological modes. A procedure is created for the development of such modes, and on their basis technological processes for the obtaining of gapless mating surfaces meeting the performance requirements for locking devices are developed. For this purpose, qualitative devices resistant to hostile environment are manufactured that is urgent for the mechanical engineering including repetition work for the equipment of petrochemical industry, transport and household machinery.

  11. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    DOEpatents

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  12. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  13. Effect of longitudinal surface finish on elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, T. A.; Kannel, J. W.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of longitudinal-lay surface finish on the elastohydrodynamic film thickness and the percentage of film between rolling disks in contact were evaluated using a rolling disk apparatus. Film thickness was measured by transmitted X-rays, and percentage of film was monitored by an alternating-current continuity circuit. Disk finish was varied on both the crowned upper disk and the cylindrical lower disk. A type-2 ester and a synthetic paraffinic oil were used as lubricants. It was shown that the roughness with longitudinal lay has a deleterious effect on both film thickness and percentage of film. Measured film thicknesses for the two lubricants were comparable at equivalent test conditions. The percentage of film where a change in surface topography was observed was approximately 20 percent for the synthetic paraffinic oil and 10 percent for the type-2 ester.

  14. A new seamless, smooth, interior, absorptive finishing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Government architecture typically employs classic forms of vaults, domes and other focusing or reflective shapes, usually created with hard materials like concrete and plaster. The use of conventional porous absorption is typically rejected as an acoustical surface material for aesthetic reasons. Hence, many of these new and existing facilities have compromised speech intelligibility and music quality. Acousticians have sought a field-applied, absorptive finishing system that resembles a smooth plaster or painted drywall surface, since the dawn of architectural acoustics. Some success has been achieved using sprayed cellulose or cementitious materials, but surface smoothness has been a challenge. A new approach utilizing a thin microporous layer of mineral particles applied over a mineral wool panel will be described. This material can be applied to almost any shape surface, internally pigmented to match almost any color and renovated. Because of these unique characteristics the new seamless, absorptive, finishing system is being specified for many new and renovated spaces. Application examples will be presented.

  15. Reflective fiber optic probe for surface finish survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniuk, Leszek

    1995-06-01

    The Report relates to verification of the design of refractive fiber optic probes designed for checking surface finish condition and provides a description of tests on the models of such probes. Presented in the paper are the results of performance tests of a bifurcated probe to the concept of application of a non-random bundle of light guides for identification of surfaces representing different CLA values (0.32, 0.63, 1.25, 2.50 micrometers).

  16. Surface finishing of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    PubMed

    Liporoni, Priscila; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Dos Santos Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paradella, Thais Cachute

    2003-01-01

    This study utilized spectrophotometry to evaluate in vitro superficial dye deposition on resin-modified glass ionomer, following different surface finishing and polishing treatments. Materials that were photocured adjacent to the mylar strip produced the surfaces with the lowest mean after superficial staining. A restorative technique without excesses resulted in a smoother surface and prolonged the life of the restoration. The resin-modified glass ionomers tested offer adequate clinical performance.

  17. The Analysis of Metal Finishing Solutions by Ion Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    traditional chemical methods now in use. This report describes procedures for the analysis of solutions for chromium plating, acid finishing, metal...samples and standards must have similar acid -base characteristics. These methods are an improvement to standard methods now in practice and have been...CITED ............................... 195 iv LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Ionization Constants of Acids (12) . 29 Table 2. Common Anion Eluents

  18. Marathon finishers and pre-race drop-outs.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, P J; Shepherd, J; Maughan, R J

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal questionnaire study was to investigate the effects of participation or non participation in a marathon race on future running behaviour. The majority (70 per cent) of the participants who intended to run a future marathon actually did so and only 11 per cent stopped running altogether. Fewer of the pre-race drop-outs (31 per cent) who indicated their intention to run a future marathon actually did so (P less than 0.001) and more of them (24 per cent) stopped running altogether (P less than 0.001) compared with the runners in the finishers' sample. These results suggest that the experience of running in a marathon does not negatively influence future running habits. However, failure to run in a race for which an entry has been made may lead to a reduced involvement in running. The present study also examined the reasons for pre-race drop-out. Injury (36 per cent), lack of training (31 per cent) and illness (12 per cent) were the most frequently given reasons for drop-out. Few differences were found between the pre-race drop-outs and the finishers, but the drop-outs did feel that running was less important (P less than 0.001), reported a greater number of longer term injuries (P less than 0.001) and did significantly less training (P less than 0.001) than the finishers. Images p101-a PMID:2605449

  19. Development of laser finishing for non-circular profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.W.; Sheng, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    A laser-based technique for finishing of non-circular cylindrical parts is presented. In this process, the frequency characteristics of a desired non-circular shape is extracted from a CAD through a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm and implemented through a CO{sub 2} laser machining system. A galvanometer-based scanner is used in the process to achieve programmable beam trajectories and high-speed finishing. An error estimation scheme can be developed to determine the final dimensional error of the non-circular profile. This process can be selected as both a batch production tool and a rapid prototyping tool based on the designated processing rate and precision. Initial experimental results include the production of two- and three-lobed profiles, as well as definition of part feature using higher-order harmonics, in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with corresponding R{sub a} values of less than 1 {mu}m. The machine tool elements and general procedure for non-circular laser finishing are also presented.

  20. Dust control technology usage patterns in the drywall finishing industry.

    PubMed

    Young-Corbett, Deborah E; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2009-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to quantify drywall finishing industry usage rates of dust control technology, identify barriers to technology adoption, and explore firm owner perception of risk. Industry use of the following technologies was described: wet methods, respiratory protection, pole sanders, ventilated sanders, and low-dust joint compound. A survey instrument composed of both Likert-type scaled items and open-ended items was developed and administered by telephone to the census population of the owners of member firms of trade associations: Finishing Contractors Association and Association of the Wall and Ceiling Industries. Of 857 firms, 264 interviews were completed. Along with descriptive statistics, results were analyzed to examine effects of firm size and union affiliation on responses. Responses to open-ended items were analyzed using content analysis procedures. Firm owners rated the risk of dust to productivity and customer satisfaction as low-moderate. Half rated the dust as having some impact on worker health, with higher impacts indicated by owners of small firms. Among the available control technologies, respiratory protection was used most frequently. Several barriers to implementation of the more effective control technologies were identified. Barriers associated with technology usability, productivity, and cost, as well as misperceptions of risk, should be addressed to improve dust control in the drywall finishing industry.

  1. Influence of air abrasion tips and operation modes on enamel-cutting characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Peruchi, Cláudia; Santos-Pinto, Ary; Dias, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Ana Carolina Mascarenhas; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of air abrasion tips and system operation modes on enamel cutting. Methods: Forty bovine teeth were abraded with the air abrasion system Mach 4.1 for 10 and 15 seconds, employing conventional and sonic tips of 0.45-mm inner diameter and a 90° angle, and 27.5-μm aluminum oxide at 5.51 bar air pressure in continuous and pulsed modes. The width and depth of the resulting cuts were measured in SEM. Results: The multivariate analysis of variances revealed that, compared to the sonic tip, the conventional tip produced shallower cuts independent of the operation mode and the application period. Conclusions: The cutting patterns observed in this study suggest that the pulsed mode produced deeper cuts when both the conventional and sonic tips were used, and that the sonic tip cut more dental tissue than the conventional one. PMID:23408157

  2. M"ossbauer study of corrosion and abrasion products in oil transporting pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Perez Mazariego, Jose Luis; Marquina, Vivianne; Marquina, Ma. Luisa; Ridaura, Rosalia; Martinez, Lorenzo

    2012-02-01

    It is known that one of the main technological problems in carbon steel oleoducts is the corrosion produced by different substances, such as water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, and microorganisms. In addition, if in such mixture there is sand, aggressive sludge can be form that abrasions material from the oleoduct. A room temperature M"ossbauer study of corroded material taken from different sites of oleoducts is presented. Most of the M"ossbauer spectra reveal the presence of nanoparticles, indicating that in these pipes the abrasion problem is severe. A preliminary identification of the oxidized samples suggests the presence of magnetite, and some Iron hydroxides. Further studies are in course in order to identify unambiguously the products present in the corroded materials.

  3. An experimental modeling and acoustic emission monitoring of abrasive wear in a steel/diabase pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The earthmoving of permafrost soil is a critical task for excavation of minerals and construction on new territories. Failure by abrasive wear is the main reason for excavation parts of earthmoving and soil cutting machines. Therefore investigation of this type of wear is a challenge for developing efficient and wear resistant working parts. This paper is focused on conducting tribological experiments with sliding the steel samples over the surface of diabase stone sample where abrasive wear conditions of soil cutting are modeled experimentally. The worn surfaces of all samples have been examined and transfer of metal and stone particles revealed. The acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. he acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. As shown the wear intensity correlates to that of acoustic emission. Both acoustic emission signal median frequency and energy are found to be sensitive to the wear mode.

  4. Abrasive water suspension jet -- A multifunctional working tool for underwater applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.; Louis, H.; Meier, G.; Tebbing, G.

    1995-12-31

    It is the aim of the paper to show the possibilities of Abrasive Water Suspension Jets (AWSJ) for underwater machining tasks in the offshore industry and other deep sea operations. The AWSJ is a remote-controllable and multifunctional tool for different underwater purposes like maintenance and repair as well as salvage, removal and decommissioning. Therefore it is possible to clean structures from rust and marine growth, to remove concrete and other functional coatings, to cut through different materials as well as composite materials and also to carry out the preparation for repair welding. First the paper will give some basic information about Abrasive Water Jets under water and about the equipment to produce AWSJ. Afterwards the possibilities of jet generation for cutting (round jet), cleaning and material removal (flat jet) and multifunctional operation will be demonstrated. Test results which were carried out under water will be presented. The influence of relevant parameters on processing efficiency is given and discussed.

  5. Self-healing of the superhydrophobicity by ironing for the abrasion durable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingxia; Li, Jingye; Deng, Bo; Jiang, Haiqing; Wang, Ziqiang; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Yongjin

    2013-01-01

    Self-healing of the superhydrophobic cotton fabric (SCF) obtained by the radiation-induced graft polymerization of lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and n-hexyl methacrylate (HMA), can be achieved by ironing. Through the steam ironing process, the superhydrophobicity of the SCFs will be regenerated even after the yarns are ruptured during the abrasion test under a load pressure of 44.8 kPa. SCFs made from LMA grafted cotton fabric can ultimately withstand at least 24,000 cycles of abrasion with periodic steam ironing. The FT-IR microscope results show that the migration of the polymethacrylates graft chains from the interior to the surface is responsible for the self-healing effect. PMID:24135813

  6. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  7. Abrasion, erosion, and abfraction combined with linear enamel hypoplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Boston, D W; al-bargi, H; Bogert, M

    1999-10-01

    Linear enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance of enamel resulting in clinically visible horizontal defects in enamel that are present on eruption of the tooth. Nondevelopmental lesions of the hard tissues of the tooth, including carious, abrasion, erosion, attrition, and abfraction lesions, require varying amounts of time after tooth eruption to develop. Because linear enamel hypoplasia lesions are present on eruption and are exposed to the factors responsible for abrasion, erosion, and abfraction, nondevelopmental lesions could occur within them in any combination. This report describes a patient with multiple teeth with linear enamel hypoplasia lesions containing nondevelopmental defects as well as nondevelopmental defects that occurred separately. Severe pain and a unique lesion morphology were associated with the linear enamel hypoplasia defects. Affected teeth were extracted because of advanced periodontitis and were sectioned to determine the nature of the enamel and dentin lesions.

  8. Relationship of cheek tooth abrasion to fluoride-induced permanent incisor lesions in livestock.

    PubMed

    Shupe, J L; Christofferson, P V; Olson, A E; Allred, E S; Hurst, R L

    1987-10-01

    Teeth from cattle, sheep, and horses that ingested various fluoride intakes and teeth from field studies of these species plus deer, elk, and bison were examined for abnormalities. Approximately 99,000 animals in 322 herds were examined for fluorosis. From field studies, 988 cattle of various ages and with different degrees of dental fluorosis were slaughtered and necropsied. The severity of fluoride-induced mottling, hypoplasia, and abnormal abrasion of paired permanent incisor teeth was correlated with abrasion of premolar and molar (cheek) teeth that form and mineralize at approximately the same age. Severe irregular wear of cheek teeth impaired mastication and resulted in poor utilization of feed and unthriftiness. Excessive amounts of fluoride during tooth formation and mineralization induce characteristic dental changes. Offspring from the fluoride-affected animals did not have discernible fluoride-induced lesions in the deciduous teeth.

  9. A study on practical use of underwater abrasive water jet cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Demura, Kenji

    1993-09-01

    The practicality of underwater abrasive water jet cutting technology was studied in experiments. A study of abrasives in slurried form showed that optimum polymer concentration can be selected to suit underwater conditions. For the long-distance transport of slurry from the ocean surface to the ocean floor, a direct supply system by hose proved to be practical. This system takes advantage of the insolubility of the slurry in water due to a difference in specific gravity. For cutting thick steel plate at great ocean depths, a simulation with a pressurized container revealed the requirements for actual cutting. Confirmation of remote cutting operations will become the most important technology in field applications. Underwater sound vibration characteristics were found to change significantly in direct response to modifications in cutting conditions. This will be important basic data to develop an effective sensoring method.

  10. [Effect of abrasion on three types of sutures in a metallic anchor].

    PubMed

    Acosta Rodríguez, Eduardo; Almazán Díaz, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    It is necessary to slide the suture into the articulation in the arthroscopic techniques, this produce friction and abrasion of the suture, this is the principal cause of failure in the union of anchor-suture. We used a Fastak 2.4 anchor, Sawbones, No 2 Ethibond, No 2 Fiberwire and No 2 Herculine. Each suture was introduce to the anchor eyelet and was cycled in four times with 40N. The angles of traction were 0 degrees and 45 degrees at the same direction of the anchor eyelet and 45 degrees with different direction of the anchor eyelet. Five sutures were used in every test. We performed the Kolmogorov-Smirnof and "t" Student tests. In all the tests there were a significant differences. The strength of the suture is affected by the abrasion in the anchor eyelet.

  11. A Study on 3-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 8011 / Graphite Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha Shankar, B.; Anil, K. C.; Patil, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Metals and alloys have found their vital role in many applications like structural, corrosive, tribological, etc., in engineering environment. The alloys/composites having high strength to low weight ratio have gained attention of many researchers recently. In this work, graphite reinforced Aluminium 8011 metal matrix composite was prepared by conventional stir casting route, by varying the weight % of reinforcement. Uniform distribution of Graphite in matrix alloy was confirmed by optical micrographs. Prepared composite specimens were subjected to 3-body abrasive testing by varying applied load and time, the silica particles of 400 grit size were used as abrasive particles. It was observed that with the increase of weight% of Graphite the wear resistance of composite was also increasing and on comparison it was found that reinforced composite gives good wear resistance than base alloy.

  12. Process for producing a well-adhered durable optical coating on an optical plastic substrate. [abrasion resistant polymethyl methacrylate lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A low temperature plasma polymerization process is described for applying an optical plastic substrate, such as a polymethyl methacrylate lens, with a single layer abrasive resistant coating to improve the durability of the plastic.

  13. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research.

  14. Abrasive Wear of Four Direct Restorative Materials by Standard and Whitening Dentifrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    creating cervical lesions and altering tooth surface is an area of interest in the dental community . This has led to the development of a number of...study of root caries : baseline and incidenc data. Journal of Dental Restorations, 64(9), 1141-1144. Barnes, D., Blank, L., Gingell, J., & Gilner, P... Community Dental Oral Epidemiology, 7(1), 57-64. Bull, W. H., Callender, R. M., Pugh, B. R., & Wood, G. D. (1968). The abrasion and cleaning

  15. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  16. Abrasive stripping square-wave voltammetry of blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, pomegranate, and sweet and blue potatoes.

    PubMed

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Šebojka; Novak, Ivana

    2011-08-01

    Electro-oxidation potentials of 7 fruits and vegetables were determined by abrasive stripping voltammetry. The responses were characterized by 2 peaks with maxima at 0.45 and 0.55 V compared with Ag/AgCl, respectively. Both electrode reactions appear reversible at a frequency of 8 Hz. They can be ascribed to anthocyanidins and ellagic acid as electroactive compounds. By this method, an antioxidative capacity of a certain plant can be quickly estimated without extraction of active components.

  17. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width as currently defined by the ASTM G 171 Standard. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement, in some cases considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for detailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness parameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Data are presented to show that different combinations of scratch tips and abraded materials can actually yield the same scratch width, but result in different volume displacement or removal measurements and therefore, the ZOI method is more discriminating than the ASTM method scratch width. Furthermore, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for our specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. This work lays the foundation for updating scratch measurement standards to improve modeling and characterization of three-body abrasion test results.

  18. Development of intermetallic-hardened abrasion-resistant weld hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    School, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium and cobalt are strategic materials in the US and both are major constituents in many weld hardfacing alloys. Substitution for these materials or alternatives to their use was a primary direction of this investigation which was conducted in conjunction with the US Bureau of Mines. Minimization of the use of strategic materials was the criteria guiding the development of intermetallic-hardened abrasion resistant weld hardfacing materials. Other criteria were that the new alloy contain a hard intermetallic compound in an FCC matrix, and that these intermetallic compounds be stable at room temperature. A survey of ternary systems was made and the Fe-Mo-Ni system was selected to provide a basis for alloy development. Fe-Mo-Ni alloys synthesized by arc-melting and similar alloys made by welding possessed similar microstructures, a (Fe, Ni){sub 7}Mo{sub 6} intermetallic plus austenite eutectic in an austenitic matrix. These materials exhibited poor abrasive resistance. Silicon additions to the alloy promoted formation of a Laves phase FeMoSi intermetallic which helped increase the abrasive wear resistance. Through a series of alloy chemistry iterations a final composition of Fe-20Mo-15Ni-5Si was selected. Heat treatment of this alloy at 550 to 650 C caused second phase precipitation in the matrix and raised the hardness about 14 points HRC to 50 HRC. The alloy's wear rate, measured with the pin-on-drum abrasive wear test, was 6.3 to 6.5 mg/m. However this was twice the wear rate observed in commercial high-carbon high-chromium alloys. Based on examination of the alloy microstructures, their chemistry, and an analysis of the Fe-Mo-Si phase system; directions for further research are to increase the molybdenum and silicon content to produce a Fe-20Mo-10Ni-15Si composition.

  19. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric. [clothing and containers for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are flexible, lightweight, and air impermeable and can be made using heat or dielectric sealing procedures.

  20. Shear bond strength of enamel surface treated with air-abrasive system.

    PubMed

    Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Catirse, Alma Blásida Elisaur Benitez; Palma Dibb, Regina Guenka; Nascimento, Telma Nunes do; Rocha, Renata Andréa Salvitti de Sá; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to dental enamel, using three different surface treatments. Fifteen sound third molars were randomly assigned to three groups. The mesial and distal surfaces were flattened and covered using adhesive tape with a central orifice delimiting the adhesion area (7.07 mm2). Group I, the enamel surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s; group II, the surface was treated using air abrasion with aluminum oxide; group III, the enamel surface was treated using an association of air abrasion with aluminum oxide and 37% phosphoric acid. The Single Bond (3M) adhesive system was applied and a Teflon matrix was placed and filled with composite resin Z-100 (3M) and light-cured. The shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. The acid etching technique and air abrasion with aluminum oxide associated with acid etching had the highest shear bond strength values. Data were subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA and the Turkey test, and no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength was observed between group I (12.49 +/- 2.85 MPa) and group III (12.59 +/- 2.68 MPa). In contrast, both groups had statistically better shear bond strengths compared to group II (0.29 +/- 0.56 MPa; p < 0.05). Air abrasion with aluminum oxide does not substitute acid etching. The association of these methods to obtain adequate adhesion to the substrate is necessary.

  1. Effects of an Air-Powder Abrasive Device When Used during Periodontal Flap Surgery in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    some of the effects of an air- powder abrasive system when used during periodontal flap surgery in dogs. In the first part of the study, periodontal...Histologically, signi- ficantly less inflammation was found on the experimental side at four days. In the second part of the study, the possible localized...apparent histologically in all the dogs through day seven. The third part of the study examined the possible damage which might occur if a periodontal flap

  2. Performance analysis of cutting graphite-epoxy composite using a 90,000psi abrasive waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choppali, Aiswarya

    Graphite-epoxy composites are being widely used in many aerospace and structural applications because of their properties: which include lighter weight, higher strength to weight ratio and a greater flexibility in design. However, the inherent anisotropy of these composites makes it difficult to machine them using conventional methods. To overcome the major issues that develop with conventional machining such as fiber pull out, delamination, heat generation and high tooling costs, an effort is herein made to study abrasive waterjet machining of composites. An abrasive waterjet is used to cut 1" thick graphite epoxy composites based on baseline data obtained from the cutting of ¼" thick material. The objective of this project is to study the surface roughness of the cut surface with a focus on demonstrating the benefits of using higher pressures for cutting composites. The effects of major cutting parameters: jet pressure, traverse speed, abrasive feed rate and cutting head size are studied at different levels. Statistical analysis of the experimental data provides an understanding of the effect of the process parameters on surface roughness. Additionally, the effect of these parameters on the taper angle of the cut is studied. The data is analyzed to obtain a set of process parameters that optimize the cutting of 1" thick graphite-epoxy composite. The statistical analysis is used to validate the experimental data. Costs involved in the cutting process are investigated in term of abrasive consumed to better understand and illustrate the practical benefits of using higher pressures. It is demonstrated that, as pressure increased, ultra-high pressure waterjets produced a better surface quality at a faster traverse rate with lower costs.

  3. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  4. A scanning electron-microscopic study of in vitro abrasion of mammalian tooth enamel under compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Maas, M C

    1994-01-01

    Microscopic tooth-wear (microwear) patterns can be an important tool for assessing modes and rates of abrasive tooth wear, but their analysis and interpretation is complicated by the fact that microwear is influenced by many factors. Three of these factors were here tested under conditions of compressive loading: (1) species differences in enamel structure, (2) abrasive particle size and (3) magnitude of force. Teeth of four species (Homo sapiens, Lemur fulvus, Ovis aries and Crocodylus rhombifer) were abraded in vitro using three sizes of abrasive silicon-carbide grit (average diameters 73, 23 and 14 microns), at two loads (50 and 100 kg). Microwear features were assessed by scanning electron microscopy of lightly etched enamel surfaces and epoxy replicas. Microwear pits (length:width < 4:1) were the predominant feature type. Factorial analysis of variance of rank-transformed, feature-area measurements demonstrated that, under conditions of compressive loading, the size of abrasive particles was the primary determinant of microwear size. These results contrast with previous experimental tests of abrasion by predominantly shearing loads, where feature size was influenced by interaction among experimental factors, including the microscopic orientation of enamel crystallites. Although magnitude of compressive force was not a factor in microwear size variation, it may be a critical factor in explaining the presence or absence of microwear on tooth surfaces. The relatively small compressive bite force generated during typical chewing may not consistently produce abrasive pitting. These experiments demonstrate that, as the same abrasive regime can produce both large and small pits, the mechanism by which wear features are formed (i.e. compression or adhesion) cannot be determined from the size of features alone. Nevertheless, the dependence of pit size on abrasive particle size demonstrates that metrical variation in wear features can elucidate important attributes of

  5. Adhesion of a self-etching system to dental substrate prepared by Er:YAG laser or air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa C; Chinelatti, Michelle A; Delfino, Carina S; Pécora, Jesus D; Palma-Dibb, Regina G; Corona, Silmara A M

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system to enamel and dentin prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation or air abrasion, as well as to evaluate the adhesive interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For microtensile bond strength test, 80 third molars were randomly assigned to five groups: Group I, carbide bur, control (CB); II, air abrasion with standard tip (ST); III, air abrasion with supersonic tip (SP); IV, Er:YAG laser 250 mJ/4 Hz (L250); V, Er:YAG laser 300 mJ/4 Hz (L300). Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 8) (enamel, E and dentin, D). E and D surfaces were treated with the self-etching system Adper Prompt L-Pop and composite buildups were done with Filtek Z-250. Sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm(2) (+/-0.2 mm(2)) were obtained and the bond strength tests were performed. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test. For morphological analysis, disks of 30 third molars were restored, sectioned and prepared for SEM. Dentin presented the highest values of adhesion, differing from enamel. Laser and air-abrasion preparations were similar to enamel. Dentin air-abrasion with standard tip group showed higher bond strength results than Er:YAG-laser groups, however, air-abrasion and Er:YAG laser groups were similar to control group. SEM micrographs revealed that, for both enamel and dentin, the air-abrasion and laser preparations presented irregular adhesive interfaces, different from the ones prepared by rotary instrument. It was concluded that cavity preparations accomplished by both Er:YAG laser energies and air abrasion tips did not positively influence the adhesion to enamel and dentin.

  6. Susceptibility of acid-softened enamel to mechanical wear--ultrasonication versus toothbrushing abrasion.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, A; Wegehaupt, F; Werner, C; Attin, T

    2007-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the amounts of softened enamel removable by ultrasonication and by toothbrushing abrasion of briefly eroded samples. Thirty bovine enamel samples were demineralized in hydrochloric acid (pH 2.1) for 60 s and were then either brushed with 350 brushing strokes in toothpaste slurry (group A) or distilled water (group B) or were ultrasonicated for 120 s (group C). Enamel loss was measured after 10, 20, 50 and then after every 50 brushing strokes or after 5, 30, 60 and 120 s ultrasonication. Samples were indented with a Knoop diamond after erosion, and enamel loss due to abrasion or wear was calculated from the change in indentation depth after mechanical treatment. Within- and between-group comparisons were performed by ANOVA or t test. Initially, enamel loss increased with increasing brushing treatment or ultrasonication time. Enamel loss did not increase after 300 brushing strokes in group A (534 +/- 169 nm) or 250 brushing strokes in group B (423 +/- 80 nm), or after 60 s ultrasonication (231 +/- 72 nm). Enamel loss was significantly higher in groups A and B than in group C. The results confirm that ultrasonication removes only the outer, more highly demineralized part of the softened enamel layer. Results also indicate that toothbrushing abrasion removes more softened enamel from briefly eroded enamel than ultrasonication, and therefore probably removes partly demineralized enamel from the deeper part of the softened layer. In vivo, excessive toothbrushing might remove the softened enamel layer almost completely.

  7. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of Ni-Wc Composite Microwave Clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, Ni-WC powder was deposited on mild steel substrate to develop clads through microwave hybrid heating technique. The cladding trials were carried out in an industrial microwave applicator at 1.1 kW for 540 s. The Ni-WC composite clads were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of x-ray diffraction, electron and optical microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests. Phase analysis of the Ni-WC clad indicated the presence of stable carbides such as WC, W2C, Ni2W4C, and Fe6W6C. The microstructure study of the clad layer revealed the presence of a uniformly distributed interlocked WC-based reinforcement embedded in the Ni-based matrix. The average Vicker's microhardness in the clad layer was observed to be 1028 ± 90 HV, which was approximately three times the microhardness of the substrate. Abrasive wear resistance of the microwave clads was superior to the MS substrate. Abrasion was the main wear mechanism in the Ni-WC clads and the substrate samples. However, the presence of WC-based reinforcement in the composite clads reduced microcutting, resulting in enhanced wear resistance.

  8. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, September 15-December 15, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, N F; Kosel, T H; Channigiri, M; Desai, V; Fulcher, J

    1980-01-15

    This is the 11th quarterly report describing research aimed at establishing quantitative relations between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials, including high-Cr white irons and experimental Co-base and Ni-base powder metallurgy (PM) alloys. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion and transfer applications. The white irons range in carbide volume fracton (v/sub f/) from 10 to 45%. They are of carefully balanced composition to produce maximum carbide hardness, v/sub f/ and matrix hardenability at minimum alloy content. Effort has been devoted to metallographic characterization of these alloys and to low-stress abrasion testing against dry SiO/sub 2/. Low-stress abrasion resistance passes through a maximum at intermediate v/sub f/, a finding which corroborates wet-sand, low-stress test results from another laboratory. Low- and high-matrix alloy content Co-base alloys are also under investigation. Both types of alloys have been processed by powder metallurgy (PM) to display a uniform array of fine, medium or coarse carbides in a FCC matrix. Extensive effort has been expended to develop metallographic procedures for characterizing the microstructures of the alloys. Of particular significance is the development of a one-step electrolytic etching-staining procedure which reveals matrix, matrix grain boundaries and carbides simultaneously in high contrast.

  9. The surface quality of AWJ cut parts as a function of abrasive material reusing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnakovszky, C.; Herghelegiu, E.; Radu, M. C.; Tampu, N. C.

    2015-11-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting (AWJ) has been extensively used during the last years to process a large variety of materials since it offers important advantages as a good quality of the processed surface, without heat affected zones, low environmental impact (no emission of dust or other compounds that endanger the health of the user), small induced mechanical stresses etc. The main disadvantage is the high cost of processing (cost of equipment and consumables). In view of this, the effects of reusing the abrasive material on the quality of processed surface are investigated in this paper. Two steel materials were used: OL 37 (S 235) with large applicability in machine building industry and 2P armor steel used in the arms industry. The reusing rate of the garnet abrasive material was: 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. The quality of processed surface was quantified by the following parameters: width at the jet inlet (Li), width at the jet outlet (Lo), inclination angle (α), deviation from perpendicularity (u) and roughness (Ra).

  10. Nuclear-chemical methods in a hard tooth tissue abrasion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosman, A.; Spěváček, V.; Koníček, J.; Vopálka, D.; Houŝová, D.; Doležalová, L.

    1999-01-01

    The advanced method consists in implantation—labelling of the thin surface layers of the solid objects, e.g. hard tooth tissue, by atoms of suitable natural or artificial radionuclides. Nuclides from the uranium series were implanted into the surface by using nuclear recoil effect at alpha decay of 226Ra to 222Rn, alpha decay of 222Rn to RaA, alpha decay of RaA to RaB (beta-emitter) and further alpha or beta emitters. With regard to chosen alpha detection and to the half—lives of the radionuclides, there was actually measured the activity of 222Rn, RaA and RaC’ in the thin surface layer. This was followed by the laboratory simulation of the abrasion in the system of “toothbrush—various suspensions of the tooth-pastes—hard tooth tissue (or material standard—ivory)” in specially designed device—the dentoabrasionmeter. The activities of the tissue surface measured before and after abrasion were used for calculations of the relative drop of the surface activity. On this basis the influence of various tooth-pastes containing various abrasive substances was determined.

  11. Influence of air abrasion preparation on microleakage in glass ionomer cement restorations.

    PubMed

    Reis, Lucia da Silva; Chinelatti, Michelle A; Corona, Silmara A M; Palma-Dibb, Regina G; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess microleakage in class V cavities prepared by air abrasion or high-speed dental bur and restored with different glass ionomer cements. Sixty bovine incisors were equally divided into 6 groups: I, II and III (preparation by high-speed) and IV, V and VI (preparation by air abrasion). Groups I and IV were restored with Fuji IX; groups II and V with Ketac Molar; and groups III and VI with Vitremer. After 24 h (37 degrees C), specimens were thermocycled, isolated with nail varnish, immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for microleakage using an optical microscope connected to a digital camera and a computer. The images were digitized and a software allowed the quantitative evaluation of microleakage in millimeters. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. It was observed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05) between incisal (enamel) and cervical (dentine/cementum) margins, mainly for Ketac Molar; there was no difference (p > 0.05) between preparation methods, except for group II (high-speed/Ketac Molar) that showed higher infiltration; regarding the materials, Ketac Molar demonstrated the highest microleakage values (p < 0.05), and only Vitremer sealed completely both margins of restorations. It was concluded that air abrasion preparation did not influence microleakage in class V restorations with the employed glass ionomer cements.

  12. Development and Testing of Abrasion Resistant Hard Coats For Polymer Film Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Gee, R.; DiGrazia, M.

    2010-10-01

    Reflective polymer film technology can significantly reduce the cost of solar reflectors and installed Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants by both reduced material cost and lower weight. One challenge of polymer reflectors in the CSP environment pertains to contact cleaning methods typically used with glass mirrors. Such contact cleaning methods can scratch the surface of polymer reflectors and thereby reduce specular reflectance. ReflecTech, Inc. (a subsidiary of SkyFuel, Inc.) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to devise and develop an abrasion resistant coating (ARC) suitable for deposition onto polymer based mirror film. A number of candidate ARC products were identified as candidate formulations. Industrial collaborators prepared samples having their ARCs deposited onto ReflecTech Mirror Film pre-laminated to aluminum sheet substrates. Samples were provided for evaluation and subjected to baseline (unweathered) and accelerated exposure conditions and subsequently characterized for abrasion resistance and adhesion. An advanced ARC product has been identified that exhibits outstanding initial abrasion resistance and adhesion to ReflecTech Mirror Film. These properties were also retained after exposure to the various accelerated stress conditions. This material has been successfully manufactured as a 1.5 m wide roll-to-roll construction in a production environment.

  13. Peripheral snap-fit locking mechanisms and smooth surface finish of tibial trays reduce backside wear in fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Łapaj, Łukasz; Mróz, Adrian; Kokoszka, Paweł; Markuszewski, Jacek; Wendland, Justyna; Helak-Łapaj, Celina; Kruczyński, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Severe backside wear, observed in older generations of total knee replacements (TKRs), led to redesign of locking mechanisms to reduce micromotions between tibial tray and inlay. Since little is known about whether this effectively reduces backside wear in modern designs, we examined backside damage in retrievals of various contemporary fixed-bearing TKRs. Patients and methods — A consecutive series of 102 inlays with a peripheral (Stryker Triathlon, Stryker Scorpio, DePuy PFC Sigma, Aesculap Search Evolution) or dovetail locking mechanism (Zimmer NexGen, Smith and Nephew Genesis II) was examined. Articular and backside surface damage was evaluated using the semiquantitative Hood scale. Inlays were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine backside wear mechanisms. Results — Mean Hood scores for articular (A) and backside (B) surfaces were similar in most implants—Triathlon (A: 46, B: 22), Genesis II (A: 55, B: 24), Scorpio (A: 57, B: 24), PFC (A: 52, B: 20); Search (A: 56, B: 24)—except the NexGen knee (A: 57, B: 60), which had statistically significantly higher backside wear scores. SEM studies showed backside damage caused by abrasion related to micromotion in designs with dovetail locking mechanisms, especially in the unpolished NexGen trays. In implants with peripheral liner locking mechanism, there were no signs of micromotion or abrasion. Instead, “tray transfer” of polyethylene and flattening of machining was observed. Interpretation — Although this retrieval study may not represent well-functioning TKRs, we found that a smooth surface finish and a peripheral locking mechanism reduce backside wear in vivo, but further studies are required to determine whether this actually leads to reduced osteolysis and lower failure rates. PMID:27781667

  14. Comparison of the mechanical effects of a toothbrush and standard abrasive on human and bovine dentine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, T

    2001-01-01

    Dentine abrasion is an important possible side effect of individually used mechanical oral hygiene products. Since human teeth are sometimes not available in sufficient numbers for research purposes, bovine teeth are often used as a substitute for in vitro tests of dentine abrasion. The aim of the present comparative study was to determine the mechanical effects of a manual toothbrush and a standard abrasive on human and bovine dentine under standardized conditions. Roots of human and bovine teeth were radioactivated and subjected to standardized machine brushing using a manual toothbrush and a standard abrasive slurry. Dentine abrasion was assessed by measuring radioactive phosphorus contained in the slurry after brushing. Non-radioactive human and bovine roots were brushed in the same machine, and the generated surface roughness was assessed using profilometry. Artificially stained human and bovine roots were brushed as described, and the cleaning effect was expressed as the extent of stain-free surfaces after different brushing times. The results for abrasion and surface roughening found with bovine and human dentine suggest that if standardized methods are used, roots of bovine mandibular front teeth can be used in place of human roots for in vitro studies of the mechanical effects of toothbrushes and toothpastes on dentine. The use of bovine dentine for measuring the cleaning effects of these products is, however, not recommended.

  15. The Contribution of Abrasion and Size-Selective Sorting to Downstream Fining in a Tropical Montane Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, T.; Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the effect of abrasion vs. size-selective transport on downstream diminution of grain size and mass is a long-standing question in fluvial systems. While some authors have emphasized sorting by size-selective transport as the dominant fining mechanism in various rivers, others demonstrated the effectiveness of abrasion in certain fluvial systems. We present a synthetic grain-scale model in which we combine a recently developed geometric abrasion model (the so-called 'box equations' [1]) with a simplistic selective deposition rule. Box equations are capable to describe the evolution of both the shape and the size of the particles during abrasion, as opposed to previous models which only dealt with the size (or alternatively, the mass) diminution. We adapt our synthetic model to numerically simulate the downstream grain size and shape evolution in a short tropical river in Puerto Rico where we conducted a detailed field study. By switching off abrasion and selective deposition separately in the numerical model, the individual effects of these two processes can be examined. Based on our simplistic model we deduce that 1/3 of the mass of the grains may be lost only by abrasion in the examined river system. [1] Domokos, G., and G. W. Gibbons (2012), The evolution of pebble size and shape in space and time, Proc. R. Soc. A, 468(2146), 3059-3079, doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0562.

  16. Abrasions and lameness in piglets born in different farrowing systems with different types of floor

    PubMed Central

    Zoric, Mate; Nilsson, Ebba; Mattsson, Sigbrit; Lundeheim, Nils; Wallgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of the floor is essential to the welfare of piglets as abrasions often are recorded in newborn piglets, and such lesions may lead to lameness. Apart from animal suffering, lameness contributes to losses in form of dead piglets, decreased growth, and increased use of antibiotics and manual labour. Methods In a herd with three different farrowing systems, 37 litters (390 piglets) were studied until the age of 3 weeks with respect to presence of skin wounds and abrasions. Lameness was registered until the age of 7 weeks. Eight lame piglets were sacrificed before medical treatment and subjected to necropsy including histopathological and microbiological examinations. Isolates of streptococci, staphylococci and E. coli were tested with respect to antimicrobial resistance. Mastitis was observed in ten sows. Results The most severe abrasions at carpus and soles were seen in the system with a new solid concrete floor with a slatted floor over the dunging area. The lowest magnitude was observed in the deep litter system with peat. Sole bruising was more common in the systems with concrete floor compared to the deep litter system with peat, and the differce in prevalence was significant at all examination days. The lesions decreased with time and about 75% of the treatments for lameness were performed during the first three weeks of life. The overall prevalence of lameness was highest in the system with new solid concrete floor with a slatted floor over the dunging area (9.4%) followed by the old solid concrete floor (7.5%). A lower (p < 0.05) prevalence was seen in the deep litters system with peat (3.3%). No significant relationship between mastitis and abrasions or lameness in the offspring was observed. Conclusion There were large differences in the prevalence of abrasions and lameness between the floor types. The deep litter system with peat provided a soft and good floor for piglets. The overall prevalence of lameness was only diagnosed in every

  17. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Marcela Charantola; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Ulian; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; BASEGGIO, Wagner; WANG, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Material and Methods: Fifty (50) fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm x 5 mm) were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10) according to the product utilized: G1 (control)= silicone polisher (TDV), G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE) + pumice stone (SS White), G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment), G4= Opalustre (Ultradent) and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products). Roughness and wear were the responsible variables used to analyze these surfaces in four stages: baseline, 60 s and 120 s after the micro-abrasion and after polishing, using a Hommel Tester T1000 device. After the tests, a normal distribution of data was verified, with repeated ANOVA analyses (p≤0.05) which were used to compare each product in different stages. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied for individual comparisons between the products in each stage (p≤0.05). Results: Means and standard deviations of roughness and wear (mm) after all the promoted stages were: G1=7.26(1.81)/13.16(2.67), G2=2.02(0.62)/37.44(3.33), G3=1.81(0.91)/34.93(6.92), G4=1.92(0.29)/38.42(0.65) and G5=1.98(0.53)/33.45(2.66). At 60 seconds, all products tended to produce less surface roughness with a variable gradual decrease over time. After polishing, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups, except for G1. Independent of the product utilized, the enamel wear occurred after the micro-abrasion. Conclusions: In this in vitro study, enamel micro-abrasion presented itself as a conservative approach, regardless of the type of the paste compound utilized. These products promoted minor roughness alterations and minimal wear. The use of phosphoric acid and pumice stone showed similar results to commercial products for the micro-abrasion with regard to the surface roughness and wear. PMID:23739863

  18. Rock Abrasion as Seen by the MSL Curiosity Rover: Insights on Physical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Day, M. D.; Le Mouelic, S.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ullan, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is a dry planet, with actively blowing sand in many regions. In the absence of stable liquid water and an active hydrosphere, rates of chemical weathering are slow, such that aeolian abrasion is a dominant agent of landscape modification where sand is present and winds above threshold occur at sufficient frequency. Reflecting this activity, ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles, and wind-eroded outcrops, are common. They provide invaluable markers of the Martian wind record and insight into climate and landscape modification. Ventifacts are distributed along the traverse of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. They contain one or more diagnostic features and textures: Facets, keels, basal sills, elongated pits, scallops/flutes, grooves, rock tails, and lineations. Keels at the junction of facets are sharp enough to pose a hazard MSL's wheels in some areas. Geomorphic and textural patterns on outcrops indicate retreat of windward faces. Moonlight Valley and other depressions are demarcated by undercut walls and scree boulders, with the valley interiors containing fewer rocks, most of which show evidence for significant abrasion. Together, this suggests widening and undercutting of the valley walls, and erosion of interior rocks, by windblown sand. HiRISE images do not show any dark sand dunes in the traverse so far, in contrast to the large dune field to the south that is migrating up to 2 m per year. In addition, ChemCam shows that the rock Bathurst has a rind rich in mobile elements that would be removed in an abrading environment. This indicates that rock abrasion was likely more dominant in the past, a hypothesis consistent with rapid scarp retreat as suggested by the cosmogenic noble gases in Yellowknife Bay. Ventifacts and evidence for bedrock abrasion have also been found at the Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity sites, areas, like the Curiosity traverse so far, that lack evidence for current high sand fluxes. Yardangs

  19. Effect of Substrate Surface Finish on the Lubrication and Failure Mechanisms of Molybdenum Disulfide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrates were rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  20. Effect of substrate surface finish on the lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run-in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic-colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha-iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha-iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.