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Sample records for abrasive flow rate

  1. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated.

  2. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2016-01-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  3. Can Wet Rocky Granular Flows Become Debris Flows Due to Fine Sediment Production by Abrasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Bianchi, G.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are rapid mass movements in which elevated pore pressures are sustained by a viscous fluid matrix with high concentrations of fine sediments. Debris flows may form from coarse-grained wet granular flows as fine sediments are entrained from hillslope and channel material. Here we investigate whether abrasion of the rocks within a granular flow can produce sufficient fine sediments to create debris flows. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we used a set of 4 rotating drums ranging from 0.2 to 4.0 m diameter. Each drum has vanes along the boundary ensure shearing within the flow. Shear rate was varied by changing drum rotational velocity to maintain a constant Froude Number across drums. Initial runs used angular clasts of granodiorite with a tensile strength of 7.6 MPa, with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions linearly scaled with drum radius. The fluid was initially clear water, which rapidly acquired fine-grained wear products. After each 250 m tangential distance, we measured the particle size distributions, and then returned all water and sediment to the drums for subsequent runs. We calculate particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting the Sternberg equation to the rate of mass loss from the size fraction > 2mm. Abundant fine sediments were produced in the experiments, but very little change in the median grain size was detected. This appears to be due to clast rounding, as evidenced by a decrease in the number of stable equilibrium resting points. We find that the growth in the fine sediment concentration in the fluid scales with unit drum power. This relationship can be used to estimate fine sediment production rates in the field. We explore this approach at Inyo Creek, a steep catchment in the Sierra Nevada, California. There, a significant debris flow occurred in July 2013, which originated as a coarse-grained wet granular flow. We use surveys to estimate flow depth and velocity where super

  4. Convergent evolution of abrading flow obstacles: Insights from analogue modelling of fluvial bedrock abrasion by coarse bedload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew; Lavé, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Upstream-facing convex surfaces (UFCS) are formed by bedload abrasion in bedrock rivers and indicate the recent, significant action of bedload abrasion in causing channel incision. Beyond this, little is known of the dynamics of UFCS and the effect of substrate and bedload properties on rates and distribution of bedload abrasion for these bed roughness elements. Grain size populations from 1 to 8 cm (b-axis, in 1- or 2-cm bin widths) were used to bombard preshaped marble and limestone targets bolted to the base of an annular flume. The control of initial shape and lithology of the target and the erodent grain size and lithology were investigated by monitoring the evolution of the target form using laser scanning at predefined time intervals. Eleven experiment suites were carried out containing three initial target shapes constructed from two lithologies, four bedload (erodent) grain sizes of either granodiorites or limestone, or clear water flow. All 10 targets abraded by bedload evolved from their initial form into a steady state (time invariant) form, producing UFCSs. Steady state forms were closely similar for all targets despite different initial conditions. Bedload grain size has a strong control on this equilibrium form, related to the transit path of the grains when moving over the target, whilst initial target form has only a weak control. Steady state morphology is achieved more rapidly with harder erodent bedload particles and/or softer targets. Upstream-facing convex surface stoss sides were characterised by a brighter, sugary, granular appearance on the rock-forming grain scale. Increasing erodent grain size, for a fixed bedload mass, increased the bulk abrasion rate at fixed flow speed and discharge. No detectable erosion occurred for a limestone block in clear water flows under the same flow conditions, indicating solution and cavitation were insignificant mechanisms of erosion in this study. During the experiment suites, suspended load abrasion was

  5. Seasonal-scale abrasion and quarrying patterns from a two-dimensional ice-flow model coupled to distributed and channelized subglacial drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Pimentel, Sam

    2014-08-01

    Field data and numerical modeling show that glaciations have the potential either to enhance relief or to dampen topography. We aim to model the effect of the subglacial hydraulic system on spatiotemporal patterns of glacial erosion by abrasion and quarrying on time scales commensurate with drainage system fluctuations (e.g., seasonal to annual). We use a numerical model that incorporates a dual-morphology subglacial drainage system coupled to a higher-order ice-flow model and process-specific erosion laws. The subglacial drainage system allows for a dynamic transition between two morphologies: the distributed system, characterized by an increase in basal water pressure with discharge, and the channelized system, which exhibits a decrease in equilibrium water pressure with increasing discharge. We apply the model to a simple synthetic glacier geometry, drive it with prescribed meltwater input variations, and compute sliding and erosion rates over a seasonal cycle. When both distributed and channelized systems are included, abrasion and sliding maxima migrate ~ 20% up-glacier compared to simulations with distributed drainage only. Power-law sliding generally yields to a broader response of abrasion to water pressure changes along the flowline compared to Coulomb-friction sliding. Multi-day variations in meltwater input elicit a stronger abrasion response than either diurnal- or seasonal variations alone for the same total input volume. An increase in water input volume leads to increased abrasion. We find that ice thickness commensurate with ice sheet outlet glaciers can hinder the up-glacier migration of abrasion. Quarrying patterns computed with a recently published law differ markedly from calculated abrasion patterns, with effective pressure being a stronger determinant than sliding speeds of quarrying rates. These variations in calculated patterns of instantaneous erosion as a function of hydrology-, sliding-, and erosion-model formulation, as well as model

  6. The surface quality of AWJ cut parts as a function of abrasive material reusing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnakovszky, C.; Herghelegiu, E.; Radu, M. C.; Tampu, N. C.

    2015-11-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting (AWJ) has been extensively used during the last years to process a large variety of materials since it offers important advantages as a good quality of the processed surface, without heat affected zones, low environmental impact (no emission of dust or other compounds that endanger the health of the user), small induced mechanical stresses etc. The main disadvantage is the high cost of processing (cost of equipment and consumables). In view of this, the effects of reusing the abrasive material on the quality of processed surface are investigated in this paper. Two steel materials were used: OL 37 (S 235) with large applicability in machine building industry and 2P armor steel used in the arms industry. The reusing rate of the garnet abrasive material was: 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. The quality of processed surface was quantified by the following parameters: width at the jet inlet (Li), width at the jet outlet (Lo), inclination angle (α), deviation from perpendicularity (u) and roughness (Ra).

  7. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  8. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-01-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  9. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-07-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  10. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  11. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

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  12. Abrasivity Assessment of Granitic Building Stones in Relation to Diamond Tool Wear Rate Using Mineralogy-Based Rock Hardness Indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Nurdan Güneş

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the abrasive wear potential of granites in circular sawing using some mineralogy-based rock hardness indexes. A literature study indicated that little or no attention has been given to assessing this kind of relationship in the field of stone processing. To accomplish this objective, sawing experiments were performed on nine different granites used widely as building and decorative stone materials. The measured sawblade-specific wear rates were correlated with three different rock hardness indexes attained by combining the percentage content of hard mineral constituents with their known hardness values. Statistical analysis of the experimental data revealed that rock hardness indexes that are based on both Vickers hardness number and Rosiwal hardness could be accepted as reliable indicators of granite abrasivity. These two indexes were also found to correlate well with the average power drawn during the process. However, the rock abrasivity index based on Mohs relative scratch hardness did not show statistically significant correlations with sawblade wear rate and power drawn. Although quartz percentage content is regarded as an important abrasivity parameter by practitioners, the observations made here indicate that consideration of quartz percentage content alone is not sufficient to describe the abrasive potential of granites, and thus incorporation of other hard mineral constituents could be more suitable.

  13. High-rate deposition of abrasion resistant coatings using a dual-source expanding thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepkens, M.; Selezneva, S.; Moeleker, P.; Iacovangelo, C. D.

    2003-07-01

    A unique high-rate plasma deposition process has been developed to generate abrasion resistant coatings on polymeric substrates. The process relies on the integration of a plurality of individual expanding thermal plasma sources into a multisource setup. In this work, we will discuss the effects of various hardware and process parameters on the performance of a dual-source system that has been used to apply abrasion resistant coatings to polycarbonate substrates. It will be shown that a properly engineered dual-source system can generate transparent organosilicon-based coatings that provide uniform glasslike abrasion resistance across a 30 cm width on substrates that are laterally translated past the dual-source array.

  14. Investigation of Noise Level and Penetration Rate of Pneumatic Drill vis-à-vis Rock Compressive Strength and Abrasivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivade, S. B.; Murthy, Ch. S. N.; Vardhan, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, detailed studies were carried out to determine the influence of rock properties on the sound level produced during pneumatic drilling. Further, investigation was also carried out on the effect of thrust, air pressure and compressive strength on penetration rate and the sound level produced. For this purpose, a fabricated pneumatic drill set up available in the institute was used. Rock properties, like compressive strength and abrasivity, of various samples collected from the field were determined in the laboratory. Drilling experiments were carried out on ten different rock samples for varying thrust and air pressure values and the corresponding A-weighted equivalent continuous sound levels were measured. It was observed that, very low thrust results in low penetration rate. Even very high thrust does not produce high penetration rate at higher operating air pressures. With increase in thrust beyond the optimum level, the penetration rate starts decreasing and causes the drill bit to `stall'. Results of the study show that penetration rate and sound level increases with increase in the thrust level. After reaching the maximum, they start decreasing despite the increase of thrust. The main purpose of the study is to develop a general prediction model and to investigate the relationships between sound level produced during drilling and physical properties such as uniaxial compressive strength and abrasivity of sedimentary rocks. The results were evaluated using the multiple regression analysis taking into account the interaction effects of predictor variables.

  15. The effects of abrasives on electrical submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The electrical submersible pump (ESP) is a high-speed rotating device. Its operational life in oil wells can depend on the type and quantities of abrasives present in the produced fluid. This paper reports on a set of experiments performed in a specialized abrasive test loop. In the test, the size and quantity of abrasives were varied along with flow rate through the pump. This paper also examines recent literature on sand production and explores some of the practical problems in sand measurement.

  16. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  17. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  18. Ultra-fast X-ray particle velocimetry measurements within an abrasive water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balz, R.; Mokso, R.; Narayanan, C.; Weiss, D. A.; Heiniger, K. C.

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-fast X-ray velocimetry measurements were taken to measure velocities and spatial positions of individual abrasive particles within the solid-liquid-gaseous three-phase flow of a high-pressure injection method-based abrasive water jet (AWJ). A synchrotron X-ray source provided sufficient photon flux to take double-frame images of the AWJ with an inter-frame time interval of 5 μs. Abrasive particles with a Sauter mean diameter of 265.5 μm were detected by a scintillator optically coupled to a gated image intensifier and a high-speed camera running at a frame rate of 11,250 Hz. A commercially available particle tracking velocimetry software was used to process the acquired images and evaluate the spatial positions and velocities of abrasive particles as a function of water pressure and abrasive mass flow. The acquired data show a Gaussian radial distribution of abrasive particles within the AWJ and an almost uniform mean axial velocity, irrespective of water jet velocity and abrasive flow rates. These results are useful to validate theoretical models for the momentum/energy transfer in AWJ, to provide input for abrasion/erosion models, to further understand and advance the AWJ process, and to develop new process opportunities such as AWJ milling.

  19. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  20. Wind abrasion on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Aeolian activity was predicted for Mars from earth based observations of changing surface patterns that were interpreted as dust storms. Mariner 9 images showed conclusive evidence for aeolian processes in the form of active dust storms and various aeolian landforms including dunes and yardangs. Windspeeds to initiate particle movement are an order of magnitude higher on Mars than on Earth because of the low atmospheric density on Mars. In order to determine rates of abrasion by wind blown particles, knowledge of three factors is required: (1) particle parameters such as numbers and velocities of windblown grains as functions of windspeeds at various heights above the surface; (2) the susceptibility to abrasion of various rocks and minerals; and (3) wind frequencies and speeds. For estimates appropriate to Mars, data for the first two parameters can be determined through lab and wind tunnel tests; data for the last two factors are available directly from the Viking Lander meteorology experiments for the two landing sites.

  1. An in-vitro investigation of the effects of variable operating parameters on alumina air-abrasion cutting characteristics.

    PubMed

    Paolinelis, George; Banerjee, Avijit; Watson, Timothy F

    2009-01-01

    Air-abrasion is a tooth preparation technology developed in the 1940s that is currently gaining popularity due to its compatibility with adhesive restorations. Variables, including propellant pressure, powder flow rate, nozzle angle and distance to the tooth surface abrasion time, can affect the cutting rate of the air-abrasion unit. A static setup and a more clinically realistic dynamic experimental setup have been used to assess the effect of these parameters of the cutting rate on an enamel analogue. By keeping each parameter fixed, its effect on the cutting rate was examined. The results showed that increasing the propellant pressure (20-100 PSI) caused an almost linear increase in the cutting rate in both setups. Increasing the powder flow rate (0.5 - 3 g/minute) concurrently increased the powder flow and caused an increase in the cutting rate but with a plateau differing for the different propellant pressures. The nozzle angles producing the highest cutting rates were 60 degrees and 75 degrees for static and dynamic cutting, respectively, with smaller and larger angles producing lower rates. Increasing abrasion time in static cutting and the nozzle advancement rate in dynamic cutting both caused an increase in the cutting rate. These findings are relevant for both clinicians, who might wish to alter the cutting rate of their instrument, and researchers, who should always control the numerous parameters in studies involving air-abrasion in order to control the variables, which can influence the end effect of air-abrasion.

  2. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  3. Flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G. (Inventor); Walthall, Harry G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely measuring and logging the flow rate of groundwater seepage into surface water bodies. As groundwater seeps into a cavity created by a bottomless housing, it displaces water through an inlet and into a waterproof sealed upper compartment, at which point, the water is collected by a collection bag, which is contained in a bag chamber. A magnet on the collection bag approaches a proximity switch as the collection bag fills, and eventually enables the proximity switch to activate a control circuit. The control circuit then rotates a three-way valve from the collection path to a discharge path, enables a data logger to record the time, and enables a pump, which discharges the water from the collection bag, through the three-way valve and pump, and into the sea. As the collection bag empties, the magnet leaves the proximity of the proximity switch, and the control circuit turns off the pump, resets the valve to provide a collection path, and restarts the collection cycle.

  4. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  5. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  6. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  7. CFD Based Erosion Modelling of Abrasive Waterjet Nozzle using Discrete Phase Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim Kamarudin, Naqib; Prasada Rao, A. K.; Azhari, Azmir

    2016-02-01

    In Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) machining, the nozzle is the most critical component that influences the performance, precision and economy. Exposure to a high speed jet and abrasives makes it susceptible to wear erosion which requires for frequent replacement. The present works attempts to simulate the erosion of the nozzle wall using computational fluid dynamics. The erosion rate of the nozzle was simulated under different operating conditions. The simulation was carried out in several steps which is flow modelling, particle tracking and erosion rate calculation. Discrete Phase Method (DPM) and K-ε turbulence model was used for the simulation. Result shows that different operating conditions affect the erosion rate as well as the flow interaction of water, air and abrasives. The simulation results correlates well with past work.

  8. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed.

  9. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  10. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  11. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannert, David A.; Horne, Roland N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether for gas/oil, gas/water, or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. The goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter.

  12. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  13. Abrasion resistance of linings in filament wound composite pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    Fiberglass filament wound composite pipe has numerous industrial applications including transportation of petroleum and natural gas. Its corrosion resistance is well known but it can be susceptible to abrasion and erosion when it is used to transport slurries or dry gas containing sand particles. However, composite pipe can be manufactured integrally with abrasion resistant linings which protect the pipe from abrasion and erosion and increase its life. Laboratory investigations were performed to determine the effect of abrasive flows through polyurea-lined and unlined glass-reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe, ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene (PE) pipe, and unlined steel pipe. Results are provided for the abrasion resistance, chemical resistance, adhesion strength, elongation, tensile strength, impact resistance and hardness of selected linings. The abrasion resistance of polyurea-lined composite pipe proved to be almost as resistant to abrasion and erosion as unlined steel pipe without the electrochemical corrosion associated with steel pipe.

  14. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  15. Measurements of the Coefficient of Restitution of Quartz Sand on Basalt: Implications for Abrasion Rates on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, M.; Bridges, N. T.; Benzit, M.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the rates at which rocks abrade from the impact of saltating sand provides important input into estimating the age and degree of modification of arid surfaces on Earth and Mars. Previous work has relied on measuring mass loss rates in the field and the laboratory. The susceptibility of rocks and other natural materials has been quantified on a relative scale from laboratory studies.

  16. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  17. Electromagnetic flow rate meter. [for liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A liquid metal, whose flow rate is to be determined, is directed through a chamber made of electrically-insulating material on which there is impressed a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field is made to increase in strength in a downstream direction of the flow of liquid metal. At least a pair of electrodes are disposed in the chamber traversely and perpendicular to the direction of flow and an ammeter is connected between the electrodes. Electrodes may be disposed in the top or the bottom of the chamber and each may be segmented. Oppositely disposed electrodes may be used with at least one dividing wall extending from each electrode to cause reversal of the direction of flow of the liquid metal. The magnetic field may be provided by electromagnets or permanent magnets such as shaded pole permanent magnets.

  18. Mass flow rate of granular material flowing from tilted bins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; Medina, Abraham; Torres Victoria, Ayax Hernando; Peralta Lopez, Salomon

    2015-11-01

    We report experiments performed to describe the behavior of the experimental mass flow rate of cohesionless granular material, Mβexpt', through circular orifices of diameter D made on sidewalls of tilted bins. In such experiments, the influence of the wall thickness of the bin, w, and the tilt angle respect to the vertical, β, were also regarded. The experimental measurements, using beach sand and granulated sugar, yield a linear correlation among Mβexpt' and a theoretical piecewise correlation of the mass flow rate, Mβ',which is valid for the overall range of values of β. Numerical simulation will be also a discussed.

  19. Rates of Flow: Some Useful Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, I. S.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a step-by-step approach to be used in solving different forms of physics problems, starting from familiar grounds and finding well known results on the way. Uses the rate of heat flow and the resulting changes of temperature with time of a copper block as an example. (GA)

  20. Controlling a wide range of flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Servo-operated valve and two flowmeters allow accurate control over 1,900:1 flow-rate range. It was developed as part of laboratory instrument for measuring properties of confined fluids under conditions analogous to those encountered in deep drilling operations.

  1. [The application of air abrasion in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Mandinić, Zoran; Vulićević, Zoran R; Beloica, Milos; Radović, Ivana; Mandić, Jelena; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip's size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist.

  2. Flow rate mismeasurement causes unneeded derating

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    A recent industry report-involving survey results from almost one-third of US nuclear power plants - declares that overestimation of feedwater flow rates because of flow-element fouling is the single most frequent cause for derating of pressurized water reactors. With an output loss of typically 2 percent, this results in major financial penalties to plant operators, it notes. At a utility rate of $0.05/kWh, a 2 percent power output reduction would cost about $20,000 per day in lost revenue for an 800-MWe unit. The total number of lost megawatts and thus lost revenues could be huge, considering the potential number of reactors involved, the report says. Fouling of flow elements was not reported at any of the boiling water reactors surveyed as part of the study. Possible reasons were that (1) the low number of BWRs involved in the survey constituted a small sample size that may not be a good representation (measurement changes from venturi fouling are harder to detect in BWRs because feedwater flow is part of the larger core flow), and (2) no venturi inspection was reported at those BWRs - and therefore venturi fouling could occur without being known.

  3. Mechanics of the pad-abrasive-wafer contact in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Dincer

    2009-12-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), a rigid wafer is forced on a rough, elastomeric polishing pad, while a slurry containing abrasive particles flows through the interface. The applied pressure on the wafer is carried partially by the 2-body pad-wafer contact (direct contact) and partially by the 3-body contact of pad, wafer and abrasive particles ( particle contact). The fraction of the applied pressure carried by particle contacts is an important factor affecting the material removal rate (MRR) as the majority of the material is removed by the abrasive particles trapped between the pad asperities and the wafer. In this thesis, the contact of a rough, deformable pad and a smooth, rigid wafer in the presence of rigid abrasive particles at the contact interface is investigated by using contact mechanics and finite element (FE) modeling. The interactions between the pad, the wafer and the abrasive particles are modeled at different scales of contact, starting from particle level interactions, and gradually expanding the contact scale to the multi-asperity contact of pad and wafer. The effect of surface forces consisting of van der Waals and electrical double layer forces acting between the wafer and the abrasive particles are also investigated in this work. The wear rate due to each abrasive particle is calculated based on the wafer-abrasive particle contact force, and by considering adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms. A passivated layer on the wafer surface with a hardness and thickness determined by the chemical effects is modeled, in order to characterize the effect of chemical reactions between slurry and wafer on the MRR. The model provides accurate predictions for the MRR as a function of pad related parameters; pad elastic modulus, pad porosity and pad topography, particle related parameters; particle size and concentration, and slurry related parameters; slurry pH, thickness and hardness of the passivated surface layer of wafer. A good qualitative

  4. Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain

    DOEpatents

    Plovnick, Ross; Celikkaya, Ahmet; Blake, Rodger D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.

  5. Flow rate measurement in aggressive conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Karcher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Two non-contact experimental methods of flow rate measurements for aggressive conductive liquids are described. The techniques are based on electromagnetic forces and Faraday's law: Lorentz force is induced inside moving conductive liquid under influence of variable magnetic field of permanent magnets. They are mounted along a liquid metal channel or (in case of the second method) inserted into rotated metal wheels. The force acts in the opposite of fluids' velocity direction and hence it is possible to measure reaction force of it that takes place according to Newton's law on magnetic field source - permanent magnets. And by knowing the force, which linearly depends on velocity, one can calculate mean flow rate of liquid. In addition experimental "dry" calibration and its results are described for one of the measurements' techniques.

  6. Relative flow rates of explosive powders

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, V.P.

    1988-05-31

    A study was performed to determine the relative flow rates of various explosive powders and evaluate their adaptability for use in automated dispensing systems. Results showed that PBX 9407, LX-15, RX-26-BH, and HNAB are potential candidates for use in these systems. It was also shown that powders with graphite and stearate additives generated the least amount of static and were the easiest to handle.

  7. The Piecewise Linear Reactive Flow Rate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2005-07-22

    Conclusions are: (1) Early calibrations of the Piece Wise Linear reactive flow model have shown that it allows for very accurate agreement with data for a broad range of detonation wave strengths. (2) The ability to vary the rate at specific pressures has shown that corner turning involves competition between the strong wave that travels roughly in a straight line and growth at low pressure of a new wave that turns corners sharply. (3) The inclusion of a low pressure de-sensitization rate is essential to preserving the dead zone at large times as is observed.

  8. Electromechanically Actuated Valve for Controlling Flow Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A proposed valve for controlling the rate of flow of a fluid would include an electric-motor-driven ball-screw mechanism for adjusting the seating element of the valve to any position between fully closed and fully open. The motor would be of a type that can be electronically controlled to rotate to a specified angular position and to rotate at a specified rate, and the ball screw would enable accurate linear positioning of the seating element as a function of angular position of the motor. Hence, the proposed valve would enable fine electronic control of the rate of flow and the rate of change of flow. The uniqueness of this valve lies in a high degree of integration of the actuation mechanism with the flow-control components into a single, relatively compact unit. A notable feature of this integration is that in addition to being a major part of the actuation mechanism, the ball screw would also be a flow-control component: the ball screw would be hollow so as to contain part of the main flow passage, and one end of the ball screw would be the main seating valve element. The relationships among the components of the valve are best understood by reference to the figure, which presents meridional cross sections of the valve in the fully closed and fully open positions. The motor would be supported by a bracket bolted to the valve body. By means of gears or pulleys and a timing belt, motor drive would be transmitted to a sleeve that would rotate on bearings in the valve body. A ball nut inside the sleeve would be made to rotate with the sleeve by use of a key. The ball screw would pass through and engage the ball nut. A key would prevent rotation of the ball screw in the valve body while allowing the ball screw to translate axially when driven by the ball nut. The outer surface of the ball screw would be threaded only in a mid-length region: the end regions of the outer surface of the ball screw would be polished so that they could act as dynamic sealing surfaces

  9. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  10. Rate of chaotic mixing in localized flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujlel, Jalila; Pigeonneau, Franck; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Jop, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the rate of chaotic mixing in viscoplastic fluids by using a rod-stirring protocol with a rotating vessel. Only a limited zone localized around the stirring rods is highly sheared at a given time. Using a dyed spot as the initial condition, we measure the decay of concentration fluctuations of dye as mixing proceeds. The mixing rate is found to be proportional to the volume of highly sheared fluid during a rotation period of the rods and inversely proportional to the number of rotations of the rods over a rotation of the vessel. Due to numerical simulations and experimental measurements, we relate the volume of highly sheared fluid to the parameters of the flow. We propose a quantitative two-zone model for the mixing rate, taking into account the geometry of the highly sheared zone as well as the rate at which fluid is renewed inside this zone. For all experiments, the model predicts correctly the scaling of the exponential mixing rates during a first rapid stage and a second slower one.

  11. Studies on parametric optimization for abrasive water jet machining of Al7075-TiB2 in-situ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavya, J. T.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Pradeep Kumar, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The study focuses on optimization and determination of significant process parameter for Abrasive Water Jet Machining of Al7075-TiB2metal matrix composite. Al-TiB2 metal matrix composite is synthesized by stir casting using in-situ technique. Optimization of machining parameters is done using Taguchi's L25orthogonal array for the experimental trials, with cutting speed, stand-off distance and Abrasive Flow rate as input parameters at five different levels. Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) method is used for identifying the effect of machining parameters on volumetric material removal rate, surface roughness and dimensional accuracy. Then the results are validated by conducting verification experiments.

  12. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  13. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  14. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  15. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  16. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin. PMID:24642975

  17. Adjustable flow rate controller for polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Kenneth M.

    1981-01-01

    An adjustable device for controlling the flow rate of polymer solutions which results in only little shearing of the polymer molecules, said device comprising an inlet manifold, an outlet manifold, a plurality of tubes capable of providing communication between said inlet and outlet manifolds, said tubes each having an internal diameter that is smaller than that of the inlet manifold and large enough to insure that viscosity of the polymer solution passing through each said tube will not be reduced more than about 25 percent, and a valve associated with each tube, said valve being capable of opening or closing communication in that tube between the inlet and outlet manifolds, each said valve when fully open having a diameter that is substantially at least as great as that of the tube with which it is associated.

  18. Universal scaling relations for pebble abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of abrasion of gravel in bed load transport results from particle-to-particle collisions, where the energy involved is sufficient to cause chipping and spallation but not fragmentation of parent grains. The removed rock material is not infinitesimal; daughter products as large as coarse sand can be produced. Although previous work has shown that lithology, grain shape, and energy of collision are contributing factors that control abrasion rates of river-bed material, little is known regarding the relationship between these factors and diminution rates. Here we explicitly isolate and investigate how these three factors influence rates of abrasion and the size distribution of daughter products, with laboratory experiments. The apparatus is a double pendulum (Newton's cradle) that produces well-controlled binary collisions. A high-speed camera precisely measures collision energy, while mass of parent rocks. and the size and shape distributions of daughter products, are measured periodically. We examined abrasion of initially square-cut 'rocks' as they underwent successive collisions in the binary collision apparatus. We have examined mass loss rate for varied lithologies, and observe a similar power-law relationship between impact energy and mass abraded. When normalized by sensible material properties, mass loss curves for all materials collapse onto a single curve, suggesting that the underlying mechanics of abrasion for different materials are the same. The relationship does not display the linear trend expected from pure energetics, and we suggest that this is a shape effect as protruding - and hence easily eroded - corners are worn away. Analysis of daughter-product particle size distributions for different lithology fragments - including natural rocks and also bricks - show the same functional form. Surprisingly, it is the power-law relation expected for brittle materials undergoing fragmentation. This suggests that brittle fracture theory also

  19. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  20. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  1. Quantitative Estimation of Tissue Blood Flow Rate.

    PubMed

    Tozer, Gillian M; Prise, Vivien E; Cunningham, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of blood flow through a tissue (F) is a critical parameter for assessing the functional efficiency of a blood vessel network following angiogenesis. This chapter aims to provide the principles behind the estimation of F, how F relates to other commonly used measures of tissue perfusion, and a practical approach for estimating F in laboratory animals, using small readily diffusible and metabolically inert radio-tracers. The methods described require relatively nonspecialized equipment. However, the analytical descriptions apply equally to complementary techniques involving more sophisticated noninvasive imaging.Two techniques are described for the quantitative estimation of F based on measuring the rate of tissue uptake following intravenous administration of radioactive iodo-antipyrine (or other suitable tracer). The Tissue Equilibration Technique is the classical approach and the Indicator Fractionation Technique, which is simpler to perform, is a practical alternative in many cases. The experimental procedures and analytical methods for both techniques are given, as well as guidelines for choosing the most appropriate method. PMID:27172960

  2. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7...

  3. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  6. Abrasion protection in process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, J.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

  7. Abrasion resistant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  8. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  9. Kerf modelling in abrasive waterjet milling using evolutionary computation and ANOVA techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberdi, A.; Rivero, A.; Carrascal, A.; Lamikiz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Many researchers demonstrated the capability of Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) technology for precision milling operations. However, the concurrence of several input parameters along with the stochastic nature of this technology leads to a complex process control, which requires a work focused in process modelling. This research work introduces a model to predict the kerf shape in AWJ slot milling in Aluminium 7075-T651 in terms of four important process parameters: the pressure, the abrasive flow rate, the stand-off distance and the traverse feed rate. A hybrid evolutionary approach was employed for kerf shape modelling. This technique allowed characterizing the profile through two parameters: the maximum cutting depth and the full width at half maximum. On the other hand, based on ANOVA and regression techniques, these two parameters were also modelled as a function of process parameters. Combination of both models resulted in an adequate strategy to predict the kerf shape for different machining conditions.

  10. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  11. Scaling of the magnetic reconnection rate with symmetric shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cassak, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2011-07-15

    The scaling of the reconnection rate during (fast) Hall magnetic reconnection in the presence of an oppositely directed bulk shear flow parallel to the reconnecting magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional numerical simulations of Hall reconnection with two different codes. Previous studies noted that the reconnection rate falls with increasing flow speed and shuts off entirely for super-Alfvenic flow, but no quantitative expression for the reconnection rate in sub-Alfvenic shear flows is known. An expression for the scaling of the reconnection rate is presented.

  12. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  13. In vitro effect of air-abrasion operating parameters on dynamic cutting characteristics of alumina and bio-active glass powders.

    PubMed

    Milly, H; Austin, R S; Thompson, I; Banerjee, A

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry advocates the maintenance of all repairable tooth structures during operative caries management in combination with remineralization strategies. This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion operating parameters on its cutting efficiency/pattern using bio-active glass (BAG) powder and alumina powder as a control in order to develop its use as a minimally invasive operative technique. The cutting efficiency/pattern assessment on an enamel analogue, Macor, was preceded by studying the powder flow rate (PFR) of two different commercial intraoral air-abrasion units with differing powder-air admix systems. The parameters tested included air pressure, powder flow rate, nozzle-substrate distance, nozzle angle, shrouding the air stream with a curtain of water, and the chemistry of abrasive powder. The abraded troughs were scanned and analyzed using confocal white light profilometry and MountainsMap surface analysis software. Data were analyzed statistically using one-way and repeated-measures analysis of variance tests (p=0.05). The air-abrasion unit using a vibration mechanism to admix the abrasive powder with the air stream exhibited a constant PFR regardless of the set air pressure. Significant differences in cutting efficiency were observed according to the tested parameters (p<0.05). Alumina powder removed significantly more material than did BAG powder. Using low air pressure and suitable consideration of the effect of air-abrasion parameters on cutting efficiency/patterns can improve the ultraconservative cutting characteristics of BAG air-abrasion, thereby allowing an introduction of this technology for the controlled cleaning/removal of enamel, where it is indicated clinically.

  14. Mineral/solution reaction rates in a mixed flow reactor: Wollastonite hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald; Dove, Patricia M.

    1986-11-01

    A newly developed mixed flow reactor was used to measure the rate of hydrolysis of wollastonite over the pH range of 3 to 8. This design avoids abrasion of the solid sample by confining it within a nylon mesh while the reacting solution is circulated over it by a stirrer. The rate of reaction was determined from the difference of the compositions of the input and output solutions following the methods used by chemical engineers for the analysis of mixed flow reactors, also called continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR). This apparatus, constructed from easily obtainable parts, avoids many of the problems inherent in studying mineral/solution reaction kinetics in batch reactors. The hydrolysis of wollastonite CaSiO3 + 2 H+ + H2O = Ca2+ + H4SiO4 can be fit to a rate law of the form: dnH+/ dt = kadKH+mH+/(1.0 + KH+mH+) where kad = 9.80 × 10 -8molm-2sec-1 and KH+ = 2.08 × 10 5. Over the pH range of 4 to 7, the data also may fit a simple linear form: dnH+/ dt = - Ak+( aH+) 0.40 where k+ = 3.80 × 10 -6 sec -1 at 25°C. The presence of calcium ion in the solution at concentrations up to 1.0 mol kg -1 produces only a minor reduction of the reaction rate. The activation energy for this reaction is 79.2 kJ mol -1. Examination of the surfaces of the reacted grains showed no evidence of incongruent reaction leading to a product layer but did show the extensive development of etch pits leading to a rapid increase in the specific surface area. At large extents of reaction at low pH, diffusion of ions into or from these deep etch pits may limit the reaction rate.

  15. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  16. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  17. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  18. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  19. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  20. Abrasive Wear Study of NiCrFeSiB Flame Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satpal

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, abrasive wear behavior of NiCrFeSiB alloy coating on carbon steel was investigated. The NiCrFeSiB coating powder was deposited by flame spraying process. The microstructure, porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. Elemental mapping was carried out in order to study the distribution of various elements in the coating. The abrasive wear behavior of these coatings was investigated under three normal loads (5, 10 and 15 N) and two abrasive grit sizes (120 and 320 grit). The abrasive wear rate was found to increase with the increase of load and abrasive size. The abrasive wear resistance of coating was found to be 2-3 times as compared to the substrate. Analysis of the scanning electron microscope images revealed cutting and plowing as the material removal mechanisms in these coatings under abrasive wear conditions used in this investigation.

  1. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  2. Abrasion-resistant antireflective coating for polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Following plasma-polymerization technique, treatment in oxygen glow discharge further enhances abrasion resistance and transmission. Improvement in abrasion resistance was shown by measuring percentage of haze resulting from abrasion. Coating samples were analyzed for abrasion using standard fresh rubber eraser. Other tests included spectra measurements and elemental analysis with spectrometers and spectrophotometers.

  3. Transparent, abrasion resistant coating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ashlock, L.T.; Mukamal, H.; White, W.H.

    1985-02-19

    There is disclosed transparent, abrasion resistant coating compositions comprising a colloidal dispersion of a water insoluble dispersant in a water-alcohol solution of the partial condensate of silanol wherein the dispersant comprises metals, alloys and salts thereof.

  4. Abrasives in snuff?

    PubMed

    Dahl, B L; Stølen, S O; Oilo, G

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and calculate the inorganic contents of four brands of snuff. Visual inspection of wet snuff showed fairly large, yellow crystal-like particles. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dispersive (EDX) analyses were used to study both wet snuff and ashes of snuff, whereas light emission spectrography was used to determine elements in the ashes. The crystal-like particles did not dissolve in distilled water or in ethanol heated to 60 degrees C. EDX analyses showed that most elements remained in the particles after washing. The total weight percentage of inorganic material in snuff was calculated after burning dried snuff until constant weight was obtained. The ashes of snuff did not contain any crystal-like particles but consisted of a small-grained amorphous mass. The following elements were detected: Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Si, Sr, Ti, Va, and Zr. Other elements such as rare earths were not searched for. The weight percentage of inorganic elements ranged between 12.35 +/- 0.69 and 20.95 +/- 0.81. Provided snuff is used in the same manner as chewing tobacco, and some people admit to doing so, there is a risk that its relatively high contents of inorganic material and heavily soluble salts may be conducive to excessive abrasion of teeth and restorations. PMID:2782061

  5. Effect of Flow Rate Controller on Liquid Steel Flow in Continuous Casting Mold using Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursoy, Kadir Ali; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    In continuous casting operation of steel, the flow through tundish to the mold can be controlled by different flow rate control systems including stopper rod and slide-gate. Ladle changes in continuous casting machines result in liquid steel level changes in tundishes. During this transient event of production, the flow rate controller opening is increased to reduce the pressure drop across the opening which helps to keep the mass flow rate at the desired level for the reduced liquid steel level in tundish. In the present study, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are developed to investigate the effect of flow rate controller on mold flow structure, and particularly to understand the effect of flow controller opening on meniscus flow. First, a detailed validation of the CFD models is conducted using available experimental data and the performances of different turbulence models are compared. Then, the constant throughput casting operations for different flow rate controller openings are simulated to quantify the opening effect on meniscus region. The results indicate that the meniscus velocities are significantly affected by the flow rate controller and its opening level. The steady state operations, specified as constant throughput casting, do not provide the same mold flow if the controller opening is altered. Thus, for quality and castability purposes, adjusting the flow controller opening to obtain the fixed mold flow structure is proposed. Supported by Middle East Technical University (METU) BAP (Scientific Research Projects) Coordination.

  6. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  7. Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic cutters: effects of duty cycle and cut rate

    PubMed Central

    Abulon, Dina Joy K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate effects of instrument settings on porcine vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic high-speed vitrectomy probes. Methods The CONSTELLATION® Vision System was tested with 250, 450, and 650 mmHg of vacuum using six ULTRAVIT® vitrectomy probes of each diameter (25+®, 25, 23, and 20 gauge) operated from 500 cuts per minute (cpm) up to 5,000 cpm. Duty cycle modes tested included biased open, 50/50, and biased closed. Flow rates were calculated by assessing the change in weight of porcine eyes during vitreous aspiration. Volumetric flow rate was measured with a computer-connected electronic scale. Results At lower cut rates, the biased open mode produced higher flow than did the 50/50 mode, which produced higher flow than did the biased closed mode. In the biased closed and 50/50 modes, vitreous flow rates tended to increase with increasing cut rate. Vitreous flow rates in the biased open duty cycle mode remained relatively constant across cut rates. Conclusion Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic vitrectomy probes could be manipulated by changing the duty cycle modes on the vitrectomy system. Differences in duty cycle behavior suggest that high-speed cut rates of 5,000 cpm may optimize vitreous aspiration. PMID:25709386

  8. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  9. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  10. Volumetric system calibrates meters for large flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Volumetric system calibrates meters used for large liquid flow rates. The system employs trip probes and equipment to time the flow of liquid from a tare vessel into a calibrated vessel. This calibration system is used in the petroleum and chemical industries.

  11. Determinants of peak flow rate among Hutterite farmers.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E; Parry, R R; Schlenker, E H

    1993-05-01

    Observations from respiratory studies of over 1000 Hutterites and 200 control subjects indicated that the percent predicted peak flow rate values were 20% lower among Hutterites than control subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine if the decreased peak flow rate values among male Hutterites were a function of decreased airway patency or decreased respiratory muscle strength. Peak flow rate, muscle and lung function and the prevalence of respiratory symptomatology and disease were evaluated in 27 males from two Hutterite colonies. In one group almost all members consistently used masks while performing farming tasks, while 41% of members from the other colony used masks intermittently. Results suggest that peak flow rate values are decreased predominantly due to decreased airway patency associated with a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and disease and are not limited by respiratory muscle strength. PMID:8516681

  12. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  13. Experimental Study of Bedrock Incision Processes by Both Suspended Load and Bedload Abrasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatanantavet, P.; Whipple, K. X.; Adams, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Channel incision into bedrock by both suspended load and bedload abrasions plays an important role in mountain landscape evolution. The study of erosion processes in both sediment transport regimes and their competition is therefore critical. Here we explored the dependence of experimental bedrock erosion rate on channel bed slope, water discharge, sediment flux, grain size, alluvial bed cover, and evolving channel morphology by slowly abrading weak concrete “bedrock.” In our flume, we are able to independently control bedload, suspended load, and water fluxes as well as channel slope. In the case of bedload, we also used a high-speed camera to track the saltation trajectories of coarse gravels on a smooth bed in another set of experiments and proposed new scaling relationships by including bed roughness and channel slope (separately from shear stress) for grain saltation velocity, height and length. In the case of bedload abrasion, we found that (1) all else held constant, erosion rate can (but not always) increase with channel slope in both smooth and rough bed conditions, (2) erosion rate increases with increasing grain size, and (3) erosion rate is insensitive to increasing water discharge. Thus shear stress is an inadequate metric for saltation dynamics and abrasion. In the case of suspended load abrasion, we found that (1) all else held constant, erosion occurred more in the planar bed condition than in the rough bed condition (deep grooves/slot canyons) because the erosion rate is strongly dependent on the near-bed flow (particle) velocity, (2) erosion rate increases with increasing sediment flux, and (3) perturbations (e.g., boulders) to the flow (thus creating turbulence/eddy) can greatly enhance the erosional efficiency. All else held constant (including bed morphology), the erosion rates by suspended load can account for 1.0 - 20 % (excluding the effect of flow perturbations) of those found in bedload erosion for the same sediment flux. Furthermore

  14. Studies on pressure losses and flow rate optimization in vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ao; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Premature voltage cut-off in the operation of the vanadium redox flow battery is largely associated with the rise in concentration overpotential at high state-of-charge (SOC) or state-of-discharge (SOD). The use of high constant volumetric flow rate will reduce concentration overpotential, although potentially at the cost of consuming excessive pumping energy which in turn lowers system efficiency. On the other hand, any improper reduction in flow rate will also limit the operating SOC and lead to deterioration in battery efficiency. Pressure drop losses are further exacerbated by the need to reduce shunt currents in flow battery stacks that requires the use of long, narrow channels and manifolds. In this paper, the concentration overpotential is modelled as a function of flow rate in an effort to determine an appropriate variable flow rate that can yield high system efficiency, along with the analysis of pressure losses and total pumping energy. Simulation results for a 40-cell stack under pre-set voltage cut-off limits have shown that variable flow rates are superior to constant flow rates for the given system design and the use of a flow factor of 7.5 with respect to the theoretical flow rate can reach overall high system efficiencies for different charge-discharge operations.

  15. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  16. Uncertainty analysis of flow rate measurement for multiphase flow using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Hyung; Jung, Uk-Hee; Kim, Sung; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Choi, Young-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The venturi meter has an advantage in its use, because it can measure flow without being much affected by the type of the measured fluid or flow conditions. Hence, it has excellent versatility and is being widely applied in many industries. The flow of a liquid containing air is a representative example of a multiphase flow and exhibits complex flow characteristics. In particular, the greater the gas volume fraction (GVF), the more inhomogeneous the flow becomes. As a result, using a venturi meter to measure the rate of a flow that has a high GVF generates an error. In this study, the cause of the error occurred in measuring the flow rate for the multiphase flow when using the venturi meter for analysis by CFD. To ensure the reliability of this study, the accuracy of the multiphase flow models for numerical analysis was verified through comparison between the calculated results of numerical analysis and the experimental data. As a result, the Grace model, which is a multiphase flow model established by an experiment with water and air, was confirmed to have the highest reliability. Finally, the characteristics of the internal flow field about the multiphase flow analysis result generated by applying the Grace model were analyzed to find the cause of the uncertainty occurring when measuring the flow rate of the multiphase flow using the venturi meter. A phase separation phenomenon occurred due to a density difference of water and air inside the venturi, and flow inhomogeneity happened according to the flow velocity difference of each phase. It was confirmed that this flow inhomogeneity increased as the GVF increased due to the uncertainty of the flow measurement.

  17. Prediction of critical grout parameters: critical flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Godsey, T.T.; Dodson, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Waste disposal is rapidly becoming one of the most important technological endeavors of our time and fixation of waste in cement-based materials is an important part of the endeavor. Investigations of given wastes are usually individually conducted and reported. In this study, data obtained from investigation of critical flow rates for three distinctly different wastes are correlated with apparent viscosity data via a single empirical equation. Critical flow rate, which is an important variable in waste grout work, is defined as the flow rate at which a grout must be pumped through a reference pipe to obtain turbulent flow. It is important that the grout flow be turbulent since laminar flow allows caking on pipe walls and causes eventual plugging. The three wastes used in this study can be characterized as containing: (1) high nitrate, carbonate, and sulfate; (2) high phosphate; and (3) high fluoride, ammonium, and suspended solids waste. The measurements of apparent viscosity (grouts are non-Newtonian fluids) and other measurements to obtain data to calculate the critical flow rates were made using a Fann-Direct Reading Viscometer, Model 35A.

  18. Estimating rates of debris flow entrainment from ground vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; Coe, J. A.; Coviello, V.; Smith, J. B.; McCoy, S. W.; Arattano, M.

    2015-08-01

    Debris flows generate seismic waves as they travel downslope and can become more dangerous as they entrain sediment along their path. We present field observations that show a systematic relation between the magnitude of seismic waves and the amount of erodible sediment beneath the flow. Specifically, we observe that a debris flow traveling along a channel filled initially with sediment 0.34 m thick generates about 2 orders of magnitude less spectral power than a similar-sized flow over the same channel without sediment fill. We adapt a model from fluvial seismology to explain this observation and then invert it to estimate the level of bed sediment (and rate of entrainment) beneath a passing series of surges. Our estimates compare favorably with previous direct measurements of entrainment rates at the site, suggesting the approach may be a new indirect way to obtain rare field constraints needed to test models of debris flow entrainment.

  19. Penetrometry and estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

    PubMed

    Zatloukal, Z; Sklubalová, Z

    2007-03-01

    In this work, penetrometry with a sphere was employed to study the flow properties of non-consolidated pharmaceutical powder excipients: sodium chloride, sodium citrate, boric acid, and sorbitol. In order to estimate flow rate, the pressure of penetration in Pascals was used. Penetrometry measurement with a sphere requires modification of the measurement container, in particular by decreasing the diameter of the container, to prevent undesirable movement of material in a direction opposite to that in which the sphere penetrates. Thus penetrometry by a sphere seems to be similar to indentation by the Brinell hardness tester. The pressure of penetration was determined from the depth of penetration by analogy with the Brinell hardness number and an equation for the inter conversion of the two variables is presented. The penetration pressure allowed direct estimation of the flow rate only for those powder excipients with a size fraction in the range of 0.250-0.630 mm. Using the ratio of penetration pressure to bulk density, a polynomial quadratic equation was generated from which the flow rates for the group of all tested powders could be estimated. Finally, if the inverse ratio of bulk density and penetration pressure was used as an independent variable, the flow rate could be estimated by linear regression with the coefficient of determination r2 = 0.9941. In conclusion, using sphere penetrometry, the flow properties of non-consolidated powder samples could be investigated by indentation. As a result, a linear regression in which the flow rate was directly proportional to the powder bulk density and inversely proportional to the penetration pressure could be best recommended for the estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

  20. Semiempirical method of determining flow coefficients for pitot rake mass flow rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Flow coefficients applicable to area-weighted pitot rake mass flow rate measurements are presented for fully developed, turbulent flow in an annulus. A turbulent velocity profile is generated semiempirically for a given annulus hub-to-tip radius ratio and integrated numerically to determine the ideal mass flow rate. The calculated velocities at each probe location are then summed, and the flow rate as indicated by the rake is obtained. The flow coefficient to be used with the particular rake geometry is subsequently obtained by dividing the ideal flow rate by the rake-indicated flow rate. Flow coefficients ranged from 0.903 for one probe placed at a radius dividing two equal areas to 0.984 for a 10-probe area-weighted rake. Flow coefficients were not a strong function of annulus hub-to-tip radius ratio for rakes with three or more probes. The semiempirical method used to generate the turbulent velocity profiles is described in detail.

  1. Granular flow through an aperture: pressure and flow rate are independent.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, María Alejandra; Grande, Juan Gabriel; Calvo, Adriana; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-01

    We simultaneously measure the flow rate and the normal force on the base, near the outlet, during the discharge through an orifice of a dense packing of monosized disks driven by a conveyor belt. We find that the normal force on the base decreases even when a constant flow rate is measured. In addition, we show, by changing the mass of the disks, that pressure can be changed while the flow rate remains constant. Conversely, we are able, by changing the belt velocity, to set different flow rates for the same pressure. The experiment confirms that, contrary to what has been implicitly assumed in numerous works, the flow rate through an aperture is not controlled by the pressure in the outlet region. PMID:21797356

  2. Mass Accretion Rate of Rotating Viscous Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-01

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim α disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczyński-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate \\dot{m} ≡ \\dot{M}/\\dot{M}_B, where \\dot{M} is the mass accretion rate and \\dot{M}_B is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05 ≲ \\dot{m} ≤ 1 when α = 0.01. We also find that the dimensionless mass accretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, \\dot{m} ≃ 9.0 α λ^{-1} when 0.1 ≲ \\dot{m} ≲ 1, where the dimensionless angular momentum measure λ ≡ l out/lB is the specific angular momentum of gas at

  3. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxrate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  4. First-order control of surface roughness at three scales: boundary layer dynamics, tracer dispersion and pebble abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Litwin, K. L.; Phillips, C. B.; Martin, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    In many situations it may be appropriate to treat surfaces as smooth and particles as spherical, however here we focus on scenarios in which the roughness of the surface exerts a first-order control on flow and transport dynamics. We describe three vignettes at three different scales: (1) roughness transitions and resulting sediment transport dynamics over ~10-km distance in a desert dune field; (2) reach-scale river bed roughness and its influence on dispersion of tracer particles in bed load; and (3) the control of particle surface roughness on the nature and rate of pebble abrasion. For (1), we show how the abrupt transition from a flat surface to a dune field may be treated as a step increase in the aerodynamic roughness parameter - so long as the spatial scale considered is significantly larger than that of an individual dune. This increase causes a spatial decline in the boundary stress downwind that may be understood using simple boundary layer theory, resulting in a factor of three decrease in the sand flux over a distance of kilometers. For (2), laboratory and field studies of tracer particles in bed load indicate that they undergo short flights separated by long rest periods having a power-law tail - even in steady flows. We hypothesize that for near-threshold transport - which predominates is coarse-grained rivers - particles become trapped in 'wells' produced by surface roughness, and their rest time is controlled by the time for the surface to scour down and release them. Laboratory observations support this hypothesis, while comparison to non-geophysical 'flows' indicates that these dynamics are generic to transport in disordered systems. Finally, for (3) we report laboratory experiments by our group and others showing how abrasion rate decreases with decreasing particle roughness. Geometric models quantitatively support the intuition that locations of high positive curvature on pebble surfaces are more susceptible to abrasion; as they are

  5. The effect of abrasion on corrosion of dental Co-Cr alloys. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    de Melo, J F; Gjerdet, N R; Erichsen, E S

    1985-05-01

    The effect of abrasion on corrosion of two dental Co-Cr alloys was investigated in vitro. The metals were abraded with a toothbrush and with a piece of tooth enamel. Changes in corrosion potentials and metal release due to the abrasion were measured. Abrasion by tooth enamel caused a persistent drop in corrosion potentials. The release of both chromium and, in particular, cobalt was higher than during brushing. The two alloys tested did not significantly differ with regard to mode and rate of corrosion. It was demonstrated that the corrosion behavior of electrochemically passive dental alloys was affected by abrasion of a magnitude normally encountered during clinical service. PMID:3863447

  6. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Melissa H X; Hill, Robert G; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38-80 μm) versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm) in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p < 0.05) despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine. PMID:26697067

  7. Comparing the Air Abrasion Cutting Efficacy of Dentine Using a Fluoride-Containing Bioactive Glass versus an Alumina Abrasive: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Melissa H. X.; Hill, Robert G.; Anderson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Air abrasion as a caries removal technique is less aggressive than conventional techniques and is compatible for use with adhesive restorative materials. Alumina, while being currently the most common abrasive used for cutting, has controversial health and safety issues and no remineralisation properties. The alternative, a bioactive glass, 45S5, has the advantage of promoting hard tissue remineralisation. However, 45S5 is slow as a cutting abrasive and lacks fluoride in its formulation. The aim of this study was to compare the cutting efficacy of dentine using a customised fluoride-containing bioactive glass Na0SR (38–80 μm) versus the conventional alumina abrasive (29 μm) in an air abrasion set-up. Fluoride was incorporated into Na0SR to enhance its remineralisation properties while strontium was included to increase its radiopacity. Powder outflow rate was recorded prior to the cutting tests. Principal air abrasion cutting tests were carried out on pristine ivory dentine. The abrasion depths were quantified and compared using X-ray microtomography. Na0SR was found to create deeper cavities than alumina (p < 0.05) despite its lower powder outflow rate and predictably reduced hardness. The sharper edges of the Na0SR glass particles might improve the cutting efficiency. In conclusion, Na0SR was more efficacious than alumina for air abrasion cutting of dentine. PMID:26697067

  8. Doppler-Based Flow Rate Sensing in Microfluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Liron; Bakal, Avraham; Tzur, Mor; Veinguer, Maya; Mazurski, Noa; Cohen, Nadav; Levy, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    We design, fabricate and experimentally demonstrate a novel generic method to detect flow rates and precise changes of flow velocity in microfluidic devices. Using our method we can measure flow rates of ∼2 mm/s with a resolution of 0.08 mm/s. The operation principle is based on the Doppler shifting of light diffracted from a self-generated periodic array of bubbles within the channel and using self-heterodyne detection to analyze the diffracted light. As such, the device is appealing for variety of “lab on chip” bio-applications where a simple and accurate speed measurement is needed, e.g., for flow-cytometry and cell sorting. PMID:25211195

  9. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates. PMID:26413663

  10. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates.

  11. Predicting Buoyant Shear Flows Using Anisotropic Dissipation Rate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhao, C. Y.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the modeling of two-dimensional homogeneous stratified turbulent shear flows using the Reynolds-stress and Reynolds-heat-flux equations. Several closure models have been investigated-, the emphasis is placed on assessing the effect of modeling the dissipation rate tensor in the Reynolds-stress equation. Three different approaches are considered: one is an isotropic approach while the other two are anisotropic approaches. The isotropic approach is based on Kolmogorov's hypothesis and a dissipation rate equation modified to account for vortex stretching. One of the anisotropic approaches is based on an algebraic representation of the dissipation rate tensor, while another relies on solving a modeled transport equation for this tensor. In addition, within the former anisotropic approach, two different algebraic representations are examined one is a function of the Reynolds-stress anisotropy tensor, and the other is a function of' the mean velocity gradients. The performance of these closure models is evaluated against experimental and direct numerical simulation data of pure shear flows. pure buoyant flows and buoyant shear flows. Calculations have been carried out over a range of Richardson numbers (Ri) and two different Prandtl numbers (Pr); thus the effect of Pr on the development of counter-gradient heat flux in a stratified shear flow can be assessed. At low Ri, the isotropic model performs well in the predictions of stratified shear flows; however, its performance deteriorates as Ri increases. At high Ri, the transport equation model for the dissipation rate tensor gives the best result. Furthermore, the results also lend credence to the algebraic dissipation rate model based on the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor. Finally, it is found that Pr has an effect on the development of counter-gradient heat flux. The calculations show that, under the action of shear, counter-gradient heat flux does not occur even at Ri = 1 in an air flow.

  12. Comparison of saturation flow rates at signalized intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, R.W.

    1988-11-01

    The intersection, being the focal point of conflicts and congestion in the roadway network, is a critical area in the efficient use of the urban street system. As a result, the capacity of the intersection, particularly the signalized intersection, has been the subject of much research in recent years. Procedures for estimating signalized intersection capacity are typically based on the use of an ideal, maximum traffic flow rate (saturation flow) that is adjusted to reflect site-specific conditions that may not be ideal. Regardless of the specific procedure used in signalized intersection capacity analyses, saturates flow is used as the base flow rate. Various capacity influencing factors are then used to modify this base flow value to reflect prevailing conditions. This article presents a brief review of studied conducted to estimate saturation flows at signalized intersections. Given the sensitivity of signalized intersection capacity analysis procedures to saturation flow values, the information presented here should be of interest to the practitioner, as well as the theorist.

  13. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  17. Low-Flow-Rate Dry-Powder Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Keith E.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus feeds small, precise flow of dry powder through laser beam of optical analyzer measuring patterns of light created by forward scattering (Fraunhofer diffraction) of laser beam from powder particles. From this optical measurement, statistical distribution of sizes of powder particles computed. Rates of flow optimized for measurement of particle-size distributions. Developed for analyzing particle-size distributions of solid-propellant powders. Also adapted to pharmaceutical industry, in manufacture of metal powder, and in other applications where particle-size distributions of materials used to control rates of chemical reactions and/or physical characteristics of processes.

  18. Controlling Surface Roughness to Enhance Mass Flow Rates in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Emerson, David; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A very active field of research in fluid mechanics and material science is predicting the behavior of Newtonian fluids flowing over porous media with different wettabilities. Opposite effects have been observed: some state that wall roughness always suppresses fluid-slip, whereas others show that for some cases roughness may reduce the surface friction. In this work, MD simulations were carried out to further investigate physical mechanisms for liquid slip, and factors affecting it. A rough wall was formed by either periodically spaced rectangular protrusions or was represented by a cosine wave. The MD simulations were conducted to study Poiseuille and Couette flow of liquid argon in a nanochannel with hydrophilic kryptonian walls. The effect of wall roughness and interface wettability on the streaming velocity, and the slip-length at the walls, is observed to be significant. Our results show a dependency of mass flow rate on the type of flow and topography of the channel walls. For a fixed magnitude of the driving force, an increase in the mass flow rate, compared to the smooth surface, was observed for the wavy roughness, whereas the opposite effect was observed for Couette flow where a higher slip was obtained for rectangular gaps. The study is funded in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  19. Shear-Rate-Independent Diffusion in Granular Flows.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2015-08-21

    We computationally study the behavior of the diffusion coefficient D in granular flows of monodisperse and bidisperse particles spanning regions of relatively high and low shear rate in open and closed laterally confined heaps. Measurements of D at various flow rates, streamwise positions, and depths collapse onto a single curve when plotted as a function of γd2, where d is the local mean particle diameter and γ is the local shear rate. When γ is large, D is proportional to γd2, as in previous studies. However, for γd2 below a critical value, D is independent of γd2. The acceleration due to gravity g and particle stiffness (or, equivalently, the binary collision time t(c)) together determine the transition in D between regimes. This suggests that while shear rate and particle size determine diffusion at relatively high shear rates in surface-driven flows, diffusion at low shear rates is an elastic phenomenon with time and length scales dependent on gravity (sqrt d/g) and particle stiffness (t(c)sqrt(dg), respectively.

  20. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  1. Unsteady flow past an airfoil pitched at constant rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourenco, L.; Vandommelen, L.; Shib, C.; Krothapalli, A.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil that is undertaking a constant-rate pitching up motion is investigated experimentally by the PIDV technique in a water towing tank. The Reynolds number is 5000, based upon the airfoil's chord and the free-stream velocity. The airfoil is pitching impulsively from 0 to 30 deg. with a dimensionless pitch rate alpha of 0.131. Instantaneous velocity and associated vorticity data have been acquired over the entire flow field. The primary vortex dominates the flow behavior after it separates from the leading edge of the airfoil. Complete stall emerges after this vortex detaches from the airfoil and triggers the shedding of a counter-rotating vortex near the trailing edge. A parallel computational study using the discrete vortex, random walk approximation has also been conducted. In general, the computational results agree very well with the experiment.

  2. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095 Section 23.1095 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... pounds per hour, of not less than 2.5 times the square root of the maximum continuous power of the...

  3. 93. TEMPERATURE AND FLOW RATE CONTROLS FOR SYSTEM 1 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. TEMPERATURE AND FLOW RATE CONTROLS FOR SYSTEM 1 AND SYSTEM 2, FACING WEST IN MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM (101), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095 Section 23.1095 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 23.1095...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is.... (b) The fluid must be introduced into the air induction system— (1) Close to, and upstream of, the carburetor; and (2) So that it is equally distributed over the entire cross section of the induction...

  6. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti.

  7. Theoretical Analysis of Maximum Flow Declination Rate versus Maximum Area Declination Rate in Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) in the glottis is known to correlate strongly with vocal intensity in voicing. This declination, or negative slope on the glottal airflow waveform, is in part attributable to the maximum area declination rate (MADR) and in part to the overall inertia of the air column of the vocal tract (lungs to…

  8. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and poly-disperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min−1 (NIOSH) and 2.7–3.3 l min−1 (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min−1). A flow rate of 3.4 l min−1 would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min−1 in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  9. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and polydisperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min(-1) (NIOSH) and 2.7-3.3 l min(-1) (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min(-1)). A flow rate of 3.4 l min(-1) would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min(-1) in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  10. Ultrasonic Enrichment of Flowing Blood Cells in Capillars: Influence of the Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, Pilar; Gonzalez, Itziar; Ahumada, Oscar

    Red blood cells subjected to standing waves collect at the pressure nodes during their flow motion. Blood is a non-newtonian fluid whose density and other properties are defined by its flow velocity. Their drift motion is governed by the radiation force together with hydrodynamic conditions. This work presents a study of the blood cell enrichment performed in a rectangular capillar at f=1 MHz as a function of their flow motion. The cells collect along the central axis of the capillary in very few seconds, with a clearance in other lateral areas. Optimal flow rates below 100uL/min were found in the experiments.

  11. Design parameters of a low flow rate sidestream capnograph.

    PubMed

    Fudge, Brian M

    2005-01-01

    The use of sidestream capnometers, with a sampling rate of 150-250 cc/min, as a means of measuring a patient's expired CO2 (ETCO2) and respiratory rate, has been a common practice for many years. However, in recent years, there has been a focus on lower flow rate sampling sidestream systems due to the benefits of less loss of tidal volume for patients, such as infants or neonates. When developing a sidestream system, four principle issues must be considered; 1) The signal fidelity of the gas sample must be sufficiently maintained from the sampling site to the measurement site. 2) Condensate from a patient's breath, as well as blood, mucus, or other contaminates often pose problems for sidestream systems and requires mitigation. 3) The mechanics of transporting a gas sample at a constant flow rate through the sampling system, regardless of atmospheric or clinical conditions must be developed. 4) The physics of handling CO2 gas throughout the transport process must be understood in order to ensure accurate readings. These issues lead to a complex web of interrelations that are explored in the development of a low flow rate sidestream capnometer. PMID:15850097

  12. Flow rate and flow equation of pharmaceutical free-flowable powder excipients.

    PubMed

    Sklubalová, Zdenka; Zatloukal, Zdenek

    2013-02-01

    Basic aspect of powder handling is powder flow which depends on mechanical properties of the solid material. This experimental work presents the results of flowability testing of the free-flowable particle size fraction of 0.0250-0.0315 cm of five powder excipients. The single-point determination of the mass flow rate from a cylindrical, flat-bottomed hopper was primarily influenced by the diameter of a circular orifice. The significant effect of the orifice height was also noted. Increasing the orifice height, the flow under gravity is directed resulting in the sudden acceleration of the flow rate. The critical zone relates to the orifice diameter. The multi-point determination of flowability employed the actual parameters of the flow equation which allows the prediction of the mass flow rate. The precision of the prediction was the basic criterion in optimization of the orifice geometry. Based on the results, the orifice height of 1.6 cm can be recommended for the correction of faster powder flow. For the slower powder flow, an orifice height of 0.2 cm can be used alternatively. In conclusion, the information about the orifice height used should be referred to whenever test the powder flowability and compare the results.

  13. Proposed method for measurement of flow rate in turbulent periodic pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werzner, E.; Ray, S.; Trimis, D.

    2011-12-01

    The present investigation deals with a previously proposed flow metering technique for laminar, fully-developed, time-periodic pipe flow. Employing knowledge of the pulsation frequency-dependent relationship between the mass flow rate and the pressure gradient, the method allows reconstruction of the instantaneous mass flow rate on the basis of a recorded pressure gradient time series. In order to explore if the procedure can be extended for turbulent flows, numerical simulations for turbulent, fully-developed, sinusoidally pulsating pipe flow with low pulse amplitude have been carried out using a ν2-f turbulence model. The study covers pulsation frequencies, ranging from the quasi-steady up to the inertia-dominated frequency regime, and three cycle-averaged Reynolds numbers of 4360, 9750 and 15400. After providing the theoretical background of the flow rate reconstruction principle, the numerical model and an experimental facility for the verification of simulations are explained. The obtained results, presented in time and frequency domain, show good agreement with each other and indicate a frequency dependence, similar to that used for the signal reconstruction for laminar flows. A modified dimensionless frequency definition has been introduced, which allows a generalised representation of the results considering the influence of Reynolds number.

  14. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  15. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Leslie L.; Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer C.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a polycrystalline material that has proven difficult to polish due to its grain structure. Bound abrasives are an effective means for polishing ALON, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices were created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load were studied. Metrology procedures were developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate grain boundary decoration. Strategies were developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  16. Grain decoration in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) from polishing on bound abrasive laps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Anne E.; Hayes, Jennifer; Gregg, Leslie L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (ALON) is a material with desirable qualities for a variety of applications that has proven difficult to polish because of its grain structure. Bound abrasives may prove to be an effective means of polishing it, and work is being done with them to obtain good surfaces on ALON, with reasonable removal rates. Laps consisting of abrasives bound in epoxy matrices have been created for polishing ALON. The effects of varying abrasive type, abrasive concentration, lap shape, coolant and load are being studied. Metrology procedures are being developed to monitor different aspects of the grain structure and numerically evaluate its decoration. Strategies have been developed to polish ALON at acceptable rates with reasonably good surface quality. Work is directed toward finding optimal bound abrasive lap formulations that can be fabricated into ring and/or contour tools for testing on CNC machining platforms.

  17. The Stochastic Flow Rule and Rate Sensitivity in Dense Granular Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamrin, Ken; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2007-03-01

    The Stochastic Flow Rule (SFR) is a constitutive law which, when used with limit-state Mohr-Coulomb plasticity for stresses, gives predictions for the mean velocity field in quasi-2D dense granular flows. It is based on a simple microscopic flow mechanism, where ``spots'' of free volume perform random walks along slip-lines, biased by stress imbalances upon local fluidization. The SFR has recently been shown to predict dense granular flows in diverse geometries--- e.g. draining silos, annular Couette cells, and plate-dragging experiments--- without the use of fitting parameters. However, a significant rheological change occurs in certain geometries--- e.g. inclined plane flow and gravity-free horizontal shear flow--- where the packing fraction is nearly uniform and a distinct stress/strain-rate relationship arises. In this talk, we review the SFR and propose a simple explanation of when and why rate sensitivity occurs, depending on the slip-line geometry. We also postulate how rate-dependent terms may be combined with the SFR to create a more universal theory of dense flows.

  18. A transport equation for reaction rate in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelnikov, V. A.; Lipatnikov, A. N.; Chakraborty, N.; Nishiki, S.; Hasegawa, T.

    2016-08-01

    New transport equations for chemical reaction rate and its mean value in turbulent flows have been derived and analyzed. Local perturbations of the reaction zone by turbulent eddies are shown to play a pivotal role even for weakly turbulent flows. The mean-reaction-rate transport equation is shown to involve two unclosed dominant terms and a joint closure relation for the sum of these two terms is developed. Obtained analytical results and, in particular, the closure relation are supported by processing two widely recognized sets of data obtained from earlier direct numerical simulations of statistically planar 1D premixed flames associated with both weak large-scale and intense small-scale turbulence.

  19. Momentum rate probe for use with two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, S. G.; Bennett, J. B.; Sojka, P. E.; Panchagnula, M. V.; Plesniak, M. W.

    1996-05-01

    An instrument for measuring the momentum rate of two-phase flows is described, and design and construction details are provided. The device utilizes a conelike body to turn the flow from the axial to the radial direction. The force resulting from the change in momentum rate of the turning flow is measured using a strain-gage-instrumented cantilevered beam. The instrument is applicable to a wide range of flows including nuclear reactor coolant streams, refrigerants in heating-ventilating air-conditioning equipment, impingement cooling of small scale electronic hardware (computer chips are one example), supercritical fuel injection (in Diesel engines, for instance), and consumer product sprays (such as hair-care product sprays produced using effervescent atomizers). The latter application is discussed here. Features of the instrument include sensitivity to a wide range of forces and the ability to damp oscillations of the deflection cone. Instrument sensitivity allows measurement of momentum rates considerably lower (below 0.01 N) than those that could be obtained using previous devices. This feature is a direct result of our use of precision strain gages, capable of sensing strains below 20 μm/m, and the damping of oscillations which can overwhelm the force measurements. Oscillation damping results from a viscous fluid damper whose resistance is easily varied by changing fluids. Data used to calibrate the instrument are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. As an example of the instrument's utility, momentum rate data obtained using it will be valuable in efforts to explain entrainment of surrounding air into effervescent atomizer-produced sprays and also to model the effervescent atomization process.

  20. Relationship between salivary flow rates and Candida albicans counts.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, M; Wood, G J; Brightman, V J

    1995-09-01

    Seventy-one persons (48 women, 23 men; mean age, 51.76 years) were evaluated for salivary flow rates and Candida albicans counts. Each person was seen on three different occasions. Samples of unstimulated whole, chewing-stimulated whole, acid-stimulated parotid, and candy-stimulated parotid saliva were collected under standardized conditions. An oral rinse was also obtained and evaluated for Candida albicans counts. Unstimulated and chewing-stimulated whole flow rates were negatively and significantly (p < 0.001) related to the Candida counts. Unstimulated whole saliva significantly (p < 0.05) differed in persons with Candida counts of 0 versus <500 versus < or = 500. Chewing-stimulated saliva was significantly (p < 0.05) different in persons with 0 counts compared with those with a > or = 500 count. Differences in stimulated parotid flow rates were not significant among different levels of Candida counts. The results of this study reveal that whole saliva is a better predictor than parotid saliva in identification of persons with high Candida albicans counts.

  1. Decrease in the etch rate of polymers in the oxygen afterglow with increasing gas flow rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the variation of the etch rate of polymers in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge in oxygen as a function of total flow rate in the range 2-10 cu cm (STP)/min. The measurements were made at ambient temperature with the O(P-3) concentration held essentially constant. Results are reported on three polymers: cis-polybutadiene, a polybutadiene with 33 percent 1,2 double bonds, and a polybutadiene with 40 percent 1,2 double bonds. It has been observed that the etch rate of these polymers decreases significantly with increasing flow rate, strongly suggesting that the vapor-phase products of polymer degradation contribute to the degradation process.

  2. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-01

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  3. Sensitivity of Flow and Sediment Transport in Meandering Rivers to Scale Effects and Flow Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Shams, Mehrzad; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2008-06-01

    Sensitivity of flow and sediment transport in a meandering river to variations in scaling and flow rate was studied. The FLUENT™ code was used for evaluating the river flow characteristics, including the mean velocity field and the Reynolds stress components, as well as for particle trajectory analysis. Particular attention was given to the sensitivity of the sedimentation patterns of different size particles in the river bend for various scales. Simulation studies were performed for both a model river and a physical river. The physical river was geometrically similar to the model river, with a scaling ratio of 1:100, but with identical Froude number. The flow and particle deposition patterns in the physical and model rivers were compared. It was shown that the mean flow quantities exhibit dynamic similarity, but the turbulence parameters and the particle sedimentation features in the physical river were different from the model. The secondary flows and particle transport patterns were also found to be sensitive to variation in the scale and flow rate.

  4. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  5. Annular flow entrainment rate experiment in a vertical pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Bertodano, M.A.; Jan, C.-S.; Beus, S.G.

    1996-06-01

    An air-water experiment has been performed to measure the entrainment rate in a small pipe. The current data extend the available database in the literature to higher gas and liquid flows and also to higher pressures. The ranges covered are 8.1 {times} 10{sup 2} kg/m{sup 2}s {lt} (gas flux rate) {lt} 4.5 {times} 10{sup 4} kg/m{sup 2}s, 5.5 kg/m{sup 2}s {lt} (liquid flux rate) {lt} 2.9 {times} 10{sup 2}s and 140 CPU {lt} PP {lt} 660 CPU. The test section has an internal diameter of 9.5 mm and an L/D ratio of 440. The measurements were made by extracting the liquid film at two locations establishing fully developed annular flow. The data were validated by visual observation and comparisons with the data of Cousins and Hewitt. A mechanism for the entrainment rate in terms of Taylor`s ripple instability is proposed. The theory is modified to include the effect of the inertia of the droplets in the gas stream. The model results in a dimensionless group that includes the Weber number based on the droplet concentration and the liquid film Reynolds number. Kataoka and Ishii`s correlation (1982) is modified in light of this model and the new correlation scales the present data and Cousins and Hewitt`s data very well. 19 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Episodic fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex: Timescale, geochemistry, flow rates, and fluid budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Down-hole geochemical anomalies encountered in active accretionary systems can be used to constrain the timing, rates, and localization of fluid flow. Here we combine a coupled flow and solute transport model with a kinetic model for smectite dehydration to better understand and quantify fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex offshore of Japan. Compaction of sediments and clay dehydration provide fluid sources which drive the model flow system. We explicitly include the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments in our calculations to evaluate the impact that variations in this unknown quantity have on pressure and chloride distribution. Sensitivity analysis of steady state pressure solutions constrains bulk and flow conduit permeabilities. Steady state simulations with 30% smectite in the incoming sedimentary sequence result in minimum chloride concentrations at site 808 of 550 mM, but measured chlorinity is as low as 447 mM. We simulate the transient effects of hydrofracture or a strain event by assuming an instantaneous permeability increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude along a flow conduit (in this case the de??collement), using steady state results as initial conditions. Transient results with an increase in de??collement permeability from 10-16 m2 to 10-13 m2 and 20% smectite reproduce the observed chloride profile at site 808 after 80-160 kyr. Modeled chloride concentrations are highly sensitive to the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments, such that rapid compaction of underthrust material leads to increased freshening. Pressures within the de??collement during transient simulations rise rapidly to a significant fraction of lithostatic and remain high for at least 160 kyr, providing a mechanism for maintaining high permeability. Flow rates at the deformation front for transient simulations are in good agreement with direct measurements, but steady state flow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than observed. Fluid budget calculations

  7. Computer Simulation of Stress-Strain State of Pipeline Section Affected by Abrasion Due to Mechanical Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P. V.; Afanas’ev, R. G.; Burkova, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the effect of abrasive wear of the pipeline section occurred due to mechanical impurities in the transported gas flow. The approaches to the detection of the maximum specific wear of the pipeline wall and the geometry of abrasion are the main problems of computer simulation described in this paper.

  8. Abrasive drill for resilient materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Resilient materials normally present problem in obtaining accurate and uniform hole size and position. Tool is fabricated from stiff metal rod such as tungsten or carbon steel that has diameter slightly smaller than required hole. Piercing/centering point is ground on one end of rod. Rod is then plasma-sprayed (flame-sprayed) with suitable hard abrasive coating. High-speed, slow-feed operation of tool is necessary for accurate holes, and this can be done with drill press, hard drill, or similar machines.

  9. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  10. Low-Flow-Rate Dry-Powder Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Keith E.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus feeds small, precise flow of dry powder through laser beam of optical analyzer, measuring patterns of light created by forward scattering (Fraunhofer diffraction) of laser beam from powder particles. From measurement, statistical distribution of sizes of powder particles computed. Developed for analyzing particle-size distributions of solid-propellant powders. Also adapted to use in pharmaceutical industry, in manufacture of metal powder, and in other applications in which particle-size distributions of materials used to control rates of chemical reactions and/or physical characteristics of processes.

  11. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  12. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-07-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  13. [Effects of carrier liquid and flow rate on the separation in gravitational field-flow fractionation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Zhu, Chenqi; Gao-Yang, Yaya; Qiu, Bailing; Wu, Di; Liang, Qihui; He, Jiayuan; Han, Nanyin

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation is the simplest field-flow fractionation technique in terms of principle and operation. The earth' s gravity is its external field. Different sized particles are injected into a thin channel and carried by carrier fluid. The different velocities of the carrier liquid in different places results in a size-based separation. A gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) instrument was designed and constructed. Two kinds of polystyrene (PS) particles with different sizes (20 µm and 6 µm) were chosen as model particles. In this work, the separation of the sample was achieved by changing the concentration of NaN3, the percentage of mixed surfactant in the carrier liquid and the flow rate of carrier liquid. Six levels were set for each factor. The effects of these three factors on the retention ratio (R) and plate height (H) of the PS particles were investigated. It was found that R increased and H decreased with increasing particle size. On the other hand, the R and H increased with increasing flow rate. The R and H also increased with increasing NaN3 concentration. The reason was that the electrostatic repulsive force between the particles and the glass channel wall increased. The force allowed the samples approach closer to the channel wall. The results showed that the resolution and retention time can be improved by adjusting the experimental conditions. These results can provide important values to the further applications of GrFFF technique. PMID:27382718

  14. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  15. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  16. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  17. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  18. compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Uli; Oswald, Sascha; Thullner, Martin; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    A conceptual computer model has been constructed to simulate the compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. The model accounts for flow and transport in the variably saturated porous medium as well as biogeochemical change reactions. The most concentrated contaminants such as BTEX, MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons and dissolved as well as mineral phase electron acceptors are considered. Also of major interest are reduced species with high oxygen demand such as ammonium. The influence of marsh plants on microbial activity, gas transport, water balance and contaminant fate in general is matter of current investigation. The constructed wetlands consist of a coarse sand or fine gravel porous medium. Marsh plants were introduced after installation, however, a number of control basins are operated unplanted. Water levels and through flow rates are adjusted to optimize the remediation efficiency. The system is likely to be neither reaction nor mixing limited, thus both, values of dispersivity and degradation kinetics may be crucial for remediation efficiency. Biogeochemical modelling is able to delineate in detail (i) the zonation of processes, (ii) temporal variation (breakthrough curves) and (iii) mass balance information. The contributions of biodegradation and volatilisation and the influence of plants (compartment transfer) can generally best be evaluated by the component's mass balance. More efficient mixing is expected in the wetlands with open water body which leads to both, more biodegradation and volatilisation. An important task is to quantify the role of plants and root systems for contaminant attenuation in constructed wetlands. The long term goal of investigation is to allow for predictions for the design of large scale compartment transfer wetlands that may be applied to remediate the site as a whole.

  19. Development of a flow rate monitoring method for the wearable ventricular assist device driver.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kentaro; Homma, Akihiko; Sumikura, Hirohito; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Toshihide; Mukaibayashi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Koichi; Katano, Kazuo; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    Our research institute has been working on the development of a compact wearable drive unit for an extracorporeal ventricular assist device (VAD) with a pneumatically driven pump. A method for checking the pump blood flow on the side of the drive unit without modifying the existing blood pump and impairing the portability of it will be useful. In this study, to calculate the pump flow rate indirectly from measuring the flow rate of the driving air of the VAD air chamber, we conducted experiments using a mock circuit to investigate the correlation between the air flow rate and the pump flow rate as well as its accuracy and error factors. The pump flow rate was measured using an ultrasonic flow meter at the inflow and outflow tube, and the air flow was measured using a thermal mass flow meter at the driveline. Similarity in the instantaneous waveform was confirmed between the air flow rate in the driveline and the pump flow rate. Some limitations of this technique were indicated by consideration of the error factors. A significant correlation was found between the average pump flow rate in the ejecting direction and the average air flow rate in the ejecting direction (R2 = 0.704-0.856), and the air flow rate in the filling direction (R2 = 0.947-0.971). It was demonstrated that the average pump flow rate was estimated exactly in a wide range of drive conditions using the air flow of the filling phase. PMID:25500948

  20. Cleaning power and abrasivity of European toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Wülknitz, P

    1997-11-01

    For 41 toothpastes available to European consumers in 1995, the cleaning efficacy was evaluated in comparison with abrasivity on dentin (RDA value). For cleaning power assessment, a modified pellicle cleaning ratio (PCR) measurement method was developed. The method is characterized by a five-day tea-staining procedure on bovine front teeth slabs on a rotating wheel, standardized brushing of the slabs in a V8 cross-brushing machine, and brightness measurement by a chromametric technique. All tested products were in accordance with the new DIN/ISO standard 11,609 for toothpastes in terms of dentin abrasivity. Not a single product exceeded an RDA value of 200. The majority of toothpastes (80%) had an RDA value below 100. Only three products surpassed the reference in cleaning power. Most products (73%) had a cleaning power (PCR value) between 20 and 80. The correlation between cleaning power and dentin abrasion was low (r = 0.66), which can be explained with the different influence on dentin and stains by factors like abrasive type, particle surface and size, as well as the chemical influence of other toothpaste ingredients. Some major trends could be shown on the basis of abrasive types. The ratio PCR to RDA was rather good in most silica-based toothpastes. A lower ratio was found in some products containing calcium carbonate or aluminum trihydrate as the only abrasive. The addition of other abrasives, such as polishing alumina, showed improved cleaning power. Some active ingredients, especially sequenstrants such as sodium tripolyphosphate or AHBP, also improve the PCR/RDA ratio by stain-dissolving action without being abrasive. The data for some special anti-stain products did not differ significantly from standard products. Compared with data measured in 1988, a general trend toward reduced abrasivity without loss of cleaning efficacy could be noticed on the European toothpaste market. This may be mostly due to the increased use of high-performance abrasives such

  1. Fluid flow meter for measuring the rate of fluid flow in a conduit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A tube fluid flow rate meter consists of a reservoir divided by flexible diaphragm into two separate isolated compartments. The incoming and outgoing tubes open into the compartments. The orifice is sized to allow maximum tube fluid flow. Opposing compression springs are secured within the two compartments on opposite sides of the orifice to maintain orifice position when the tube fluid pressure is zero. A tapered element is centered in, and extends through the orifice into the compartment, leaving an annular opening between the element and the perimeter of the oriface. The size varies as the diaphragm flexes with changes in the tube fluid pressure to change the fluid flow through the opening. The light source directs light upon the element which in turn scatters the light through the opening into the compartment. The light detector in the compartment senses the scattered light to generate a signal indicating the amount of fluid.

  2. Development of digital flow control system for multi-channel variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical step for variable-rate spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries. An automatic flow rate control system activated with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was developed to control flow rates...

  3. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K. )

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  4. High Resolution Laser Scanning Techniques for Rock Abrasion and Texture Analyses on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Razdan, A.; Greeley, R.; Laity, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Aeolian abrasion is operative in many arid locations on Earth and is probably the dominant rock erosion process in the current Martian environment. Therefore, understanding the controlling parameters and rates of aeolian abrasion provides 1) insight into the stability of rocks on planetary surfaces and the environments under which the rocks abrade, and 2) a link between ventifact (a rock abraded by windblown particles) morphology and: a) abrasion conditions, b) possible ancient environments under which the rocks were abraded, and c) rock properties. promising and we plan further investigations in the wind tunnel and field. Our intent here is to discuss the basic technique, initial results, and upcoming plans.

  5. Erosion, cavitation, and abrasion resistance of choke trim materials

    SciTech Connect

    Seger, F.O.; Maroofian, I.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the relative erosion, abrasion and cavitation resistance characteristics of selected materials. Testing was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions to simulate service conditions encountered in production and injection chokes. The testing effort is ongoing. The data accumulated allow informed material selection of conventional and novel trim for all chokes, valves, flow metering orifices, fixed beans and other devices used during drilling, completion and production of offshore and onshore oil and gas wells. Sintered silicon carbide, and tungsten carbide with minimum binder content were the most erosion and abrasion resistant of the materials tested. Cobalt base alloys bar and nickelchrome alloy 625 bar proved to be most cavitation resistant.

  6. Abrasive-waterjet machining of ceramic-coated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashish, M.; Whalen, J.

    1991-09-01

    This paper addresses an experimental investigation on the feasibility of using abrasive-waterjets (AWJs) for the precision drilling of small-diameter holes in advanced aircraft engine components. These components are sprayed with ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC), and the required holes are typically 0.025 inch in diameter, with a drilling angle of 25 deg. The parameters of the AWJ were varied to study their effects on both quantitative and qualitative hole drilling parameters. The unique techniques of assisting the abrasive feed process, ramping the waterjet pressure, during drilling, and varying the jet dwell time after piercing were effectively implemented to control hole quality and size. The results of the experiments indicate the accuracy and repeatability of the AWJ technique in meeting the air flow and hole size requirements. Production parts were drilled for prototype engine testing.

  7. Computational techniques for flows with finite-rate condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    A computational method to simulate the inviscid two-dimensional flow of a two-phase fluid was developed. This computational technique treats the gas phase and each of a prescribed number of particle sizes as separate fluids which are allowed to interact with one another. Thus, each particle-size class is allowed to move through the fluid at its own velocity at each point in the flow field. Mass, momentum, and energy are exchanged between each particle class and the gas phase. It is assumed that the particles do not collide with one another, so that there is no inter-particle exchange of momentum and energy. However, the particles are allowed to grow, and therefore, they may change from one size class to another. Appropriate rates of mass, momentum, and energy exchange between the gas and particle phases and between the different particle classes were developed. A numerical method was developed for use with this equation set. Several test cases were computed and show qualitative agreement with previous calculations.

  8. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  9. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  10. Controls on matrix flow, preferential flow and deep drainage rates in an alluvial Vertisol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Sven; Larsen, Joshua; Reading, Lucy; Finch, Warren; Bulovic, Nevenka; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Deep drainage is the process that describes water percolating from the land surface to a depth below the root zone where it may contribute to groundwater recharge. Quantitative estimation of deep drainage through Vertisols is challenging, largely due to the unknown relative contributions from: (i) flow through the soil matrix; and (ii) flow along preferential pathways in particular soil cracks, and how to model the transience of the relative contributions. The Condamine River Alluvium, a significant aquifer in semi-arid eastern Australia, is mostly covered by uniform dark cracking clays such as Black and Grey Vertisols. The aim of this study was to identify the environmental conditions (rainfall, antecedent soil moisture, etc) controlling matrix and preferential flow in selected Vertisol profiles at the time scale of individual rainfall events. Field experiments (including 16 probes recording soil moisture at one hour intervals across eight depths between 100 mm and 4000 mm) provide extensive soil moisture data, supplemented by weather station data collected at 15-minute intervals. In addition, laboratory experiments were used to infer the water retention curves. These data were used to (i) derive deep drainage rates using the zero-flux plane method, and (ii) calibrate a soil moisture balance model that represents both matrix and preferential flow. The model was used to estimate the parts of the vertical water flux attributed to soil matrix and preferential flow. High antecedent soil moisture was associated with low fluxes at shallow depths, however at deeper depths both low and high antecedent soil moisture were associated with larger fluxes. Further, both rainfall amount and intensity controlled the interplay between matrix and preferential flow. The results reveal new insights into deep drainage processes in Vertisols and provide the basis for developing a practical approach for deep drainage estimation.

  11. Comparison of deliverable and exhaustible pressurized air flow rates in laboratory gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate the maximum credible flow rates of pressurized air into Plutonium Process Support Laboratories gloveboxes. Classical equations for compressible fluids were used to estimate the flow rates. The calculated maxima were compared to another`s estimates of glovebox exhaust flow rates and corresponding glovebox internal pressures. No credible pressurized air flow rate will pressurize a glovebox beyond normal operating limits. Unrestricted use of the pressurized air supply is recommended.

  12. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  13. Characterization and dispersion of pollutant releases from the abrasive blasting of lead paint from steel bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Rana, B.

    1999-07-01

    The characterization of airborne and spent material for abrasive blasting of steel paint was performed as part of the Environmental Impact Statement for Lead Paint Removal Operations on New York City Department of Transportation Bridges1. Laboratory tests were performed on painted steel components of the Williamsburg Bridge, to determine the sizes of particles typically released into the air as aerosol and onto the ground as bulk material, as a result of accidental releases from abrasive blasting operations. Two of the most commonly used abrasives for paint removal on steel structures, recyclable steel grit and expendable abrasives were subjected to the laboratory tests. The results of the tests were used to determine the percentage of existing paint and abrasive which becomes airborne and the resultant particle size distributions, which were employed in the air quality concentration and deposition modeling for the EIS. Particle size distributions of the airborne material indicated that the profiles of airborne lead and particulate matter have a mean particle size between 15 and 21 microns. Spent abrasives and paint chips that settle on the floor are larger in size with a mean diameter greater than 259 microns, although up to 6% of this material has a mean diameter less than 50 microns. The percentage of paint and expendable abrasives that become airborne as a result of abrasive blasting were estimated to be as high as 9.0 and 12.4%, respectively. Potential release rates were derived for total accumulation (duration of the project), annual, quarterly, 24-hour, and 1-hour time averaging periods for abrasives, lead, and other metals. Pollutant releases were simulated as individual sources at multiple release heights with the Environment Protection Agency's ISC3ST model for six representative bridges near potential places of public exposure.

  14. 40 CFR 75.33 - Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SO2, NOX, and flow rate. 75.33 Section 75.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....33 Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate. (a) Following initial certification of the required SO2, NOX, and flow rate monitoring system(s) at a particular unit or stack...

  15. Temperature and flow rate effects on mass median diameters of thermally generated malathion and naled fogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, J R; Chew, V; Melson, R O

    1993-06-01

    The effects of temperature and flow rate on mass median diameters (mmds) of thermally generated aerosol clouds were studied. Number 2 fuel oil alone, undiluted and diluted malathion 91, and undiluted naled were examined. There was a significant flow rate x temperature interaction on the mmds of diluted malathion fogs: i.e., differences among flow rates depended on temperature and vice versa.

  16. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  17. Study of coolant activation and dose rates with flow rate and power perturbations in pool-type research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Ahmad, N. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a computer code using the multigroup diffusion theory based LEOPARD and ODMUG programs that has been developed to calculate the activity in the coolant leaving the core of a pool-type research reactor. Using this code, the dose rates at various locations along the coolant path with varying coolant flow rate and reactor power perturbations are determined. A flow rate decrease from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h is considered. The results indicate that a flow rate decrease leads to an increase in the coolant outlet temperature, which affects the neutron group constants and hence the group fluxes. The activity in the coolant leaving the core increases with flow rate decrease. However, at the inlet of the holdup tank, the total dose rate first increases, then passes through a maximum at {approximately} 500 m{sup 3}/h, and finally decreases with flow rate decrease. The activity at the outlet of the holdup tank is mainly due to {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn, and it increases by {approximately} 2% when the flow rate decreases from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h. In an accidental power rise at constant flow rate, the activity in the coolant increases, and the dose rates at all the points along the coolant path show a slight nonlinear rise as the reactor power density increases.

  18. The grain-size distribution of pyroclasts: Primary fragmentation, conduit sorting or abrasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Schauroth, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions expel a mixture of pyroclasts and lithics. Pyroclasts, fragments of the juvenile magma, record the state of the magma at fragmentation in terms of porosity and crystallinity. The grain size distribution of pyroclasts is generally considered to be a direct consequence of the conditions at magma fragmentation that is mainly driven by gas overpressure in bubbles, high shear rates, contact with external water or a combination of these factors. Stress exerted by any of these processes will lead to brittle fragmentation by overcoming the magma's relaxation timescale. As a consequence, most pyroclasts exhibit angular shapes. Upon magma fragmentation, the gas pyroclast mixture is accelerated upwards and eventually ejected from the vent. The total grain size distribution deposited is a function of fragmentation conditions and transport related sorting. Porous pyroclasts are very susceptible to abrasion by particle-particle or particle-conduit wall interaction. Accordingly, pyroclastic fall deposits with angular clasts should proof a low particle abrasion upon contact to other surfaces. In an attempt to constrain the degree of particle interaction during conduit flow, monomodal batches of washed pyroclasts have been accelerated upwards by rapid decompression and subsequently investigated for their grain size distribution. In our set-up, we used a vertical cylindrical tube without surface roughness as conduit. We varied grain size (0.125-0.25; 0.5-1; 1-2 mm), porosity (0; 10; 30 %), gas-particle ratio (10 and 40%), conduit length (10 and 28 cm) and conduit diameter (2.5 and 6 cm). All ejected particles were collected after settling at the base of a 3.3 m high tank and sieved at one sieve size below starting size (half-Φ). Grain size reduction showed a positive correlation with starting grain size, porosity and overpressure at the vent. Although milling in a volcanic conduit may take place, porous pyroclasts are very likely to be a primary product

  19. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  20. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  1. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  2. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  3. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  4. Method and apparatus for controlling the flow rate of mercury in a flow system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A method for increasing the mercury flow rate to a photochemical mercury enrichment utilizing an entrainment system comprises the steps of passing a carrier gas over a pool of mercury maintained at a first temperature T1, wherein the carrier gas entrains mercury vapor; passing said mercury vapor entrained carrier gas to a second temperature zone T2 having temperature less than T1 to condense said entrained mercury vapor, thereby producing a saturated Hg condition in the carrier gas; and passing said saturated Hg carrier gas to said photochemical enrichment reactor.

  5. Accuracy of flow convergence estimates of mitral regurgitant flow rates obtained by use of multiple color flow Doppler M-mode aliasing boundaries: an experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jones, M; Shandas, R; Valdes-Cruz, L M; Murillo, A; Yamada, I; Kang, S U; Weintraub, R G; Shiota, T; Sahn, D J

    1993-02-01

    The proximal flow convergence method of multiplying color Doppler aliasing velocity by flow convergence surface area has yielded a new means of quantifying flow rate by noninvasively derived measurements. Unlike previous methods of visualizing the turbulent jet of mitral regurgitation on color flow Doppler mapping, flow convergence methods are less influenced by machine factors because of the systematic structure of the laminar flow convergence region. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the flow rate calculated from the first aliasing boundary of color flow Doppler imaging is dependent on orifice size, flow rate, aliasing velocity and therefore on the distance from the orifice chosen for measurement. In this study we calculated the regurgitant flow rates acquired by use of multiple proximal aliasing boundaries on color Doppler M-mode traces and assessed the effect of distances of measurement and aliasing velocities on the calculated regurgitant flow rate. Six sheep with surgically induced mitral regurgitation were studied. The distances from the mitral valve leaflet M-mode line to the first, second, and third sequential aliasing boundaries on color Doppler M-mode traces were measured and converted to the regurgitant flow rates calculated by applying the hemispheric flow equation and averaging instantaneous flow rates throughout systole. The flow rates that were calculated from the first, second, and third aliasing boundaries correlated well with the actual regurgitant flow rates (r = 0.91 to 0.96). The mean percentage error from the actual flow rates were 151% for the first aliasing boundary, 7% for the second aliasing boundary, and -43% for the third aliasing boundary; and the association between aliasing velocities and calculated flow rates indicates an inverse relationship, which suggests that in this model, there were limited velocity-distance combinations that fit with a hemispheric assumption for flow convergence geometry. The second aliasing

  6. A study of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Kishimoto, K.; Aoki, S.

    1995-10-01

    Mechanisms of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion (differential-aeration-cell corrosion caused by differential flow rates) of cast iron in seawater were studied. Potential and current density distributions produced by the differential-flow-rate-cell were on actual pumps and a model test cell. Boundary element analysis was also performed on differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion occurred in the model test cell. These studies demonstrate that differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion has characteristics similar to those of galvanic corrosion, and thus can be treated in the same manner as galvanic corrosion.

  7. The Effect of Pleural Abrasion on the Treatment of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mo-yu; Cai, Shuang-qi; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural abrasion has been widely used to control the recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, controversy still exists regarding the advantages and disadvantages of pleural abrasion compared with other interventions in preventing the recurrence of PSP. Methods The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched up to December 15, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of pleural abrasion with those of other interventions in the treatment of PSP. The study outcomes included the PSP recurrence rate and the occurrence rate of adverse effects. Results Mechanical pleural abrasion and apical pleurectomy after thoracoscopic stapled bullectomy exhibited similarly persistent postoperative air leak occurrence rates (p = 0.978) and 1-year PSP recurrence rates (p = 0.821), whereas pleural abrasion led to reduced residual chest pain and discomfort (p = 0.001) and a smaller rate of hemothorax (p = 0.036) than did apical pleurectomy. However, the addition of minocycline pleurodesis to pleural abrasion did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with apical pleurectomy (3.8% for both procedures) but was associated with fewer complications. There was no statistical difference in the pneumothorax recurrence rate between mechanical pleural abrasion and chemical pleurodesis with minocycline on either an intention-to-treat basis (4 of 42 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.12; Fisher exact test) or after exclusions (2 of 40 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.24; Fisher exact test). Pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis also did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with pleural abrasion alone (p = 0.055). Moreover, pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis was associated with more intense acute chest pain. The postoperative overall recurrence rate in patients who underwent staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue was similar to that

  8. Flow rate decline of steam wells in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Decline curves are commonly used at The Geysers geothermal field to assess the generating capacity of a producing lease. It is generally assumed that wells will initially be drilled using 40-acre (400 m) spacing, with infill drilling used later to provide additional producing wells as needed. It is commonly believed that the final well spacing should not be less than 10 acres (200 m). Decline curves are used with this approach to estimate the number of make-up wells during a project lifetime (up to 30 years), as well as the appropriate plant size (MWe). A rather simple two-dimensional model was used to investigate the factors that control flow rate decline in steam wells. The effects of parameters such as fracture spacing and permeability are considered, as well as the effects of permeability, porosity and initial liquid saturation in the rock matrix. Also, the conventional P/z method that is commonly used in analyzing gas well production is investigated in terms of its applicability to fractured vapor dominated systems.

  9. A New Method for Flow Rate Measurement in Millimeter-Scale Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haifeng; Gao, Xuemin; Wang, Baoliang; Huang, Zhiyao; Li, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Combining the Capacitively Coupled Contactless Conductivity Detection (C4D) technique and the principle of cross correlation flow measurement, a new method for flow rate measurement in millimeter-scale pipes was proposed. The research work included two parts. First, a new five-electrode C4D sensor was developed. Second, with two conductivity signals obtained by the developed sensor, the flow rate measurement was implemented by using the principle of cross correlation flow measurement. The experimental results showed that the proposed flow rate measurement method was effective, the developed five-electrode C4D sensor was successful, and the measurement accuracy was satisfactory. In five millimeter-scale pipes with different inner diameters of 0.5, 0.8, 1.8, 3.0 and 3.9 mm respectively, the maximum relative difference of the flow rate measurement between the reference flow rate and the measured flow rate was less than 5%. PMID:23353139

  10. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  11. Influence of the Flow Rate of Oxidising Atmosphere on the Flame Spread Rate on the Surface of Organic Setlled Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinka, Jozef; Balog, Karol; Hrušovský, Ivan; Valentová, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    The presented paper deals with determining the influence of the flow rate of oxidising atmosphere on the flame spread along the surface of the organic settled dust layer. We determined the rate of the flame spread on the surface of the organic settled dust layer (whole grain rye and spelt flour) with absolute moisture of 10 % wt., for the flow rates of oxidising atmosphere 1, 3, 5 and 10 cm/s. Pure oxygen was used as an oxidising atmosphere. The obtained results suggest that there exists a power relationship of the flame spread rate along the surface of organic settled dust layer to the flow rate of the oxidising mixture. The method described is suitable for the relative comparison of the organic settled dust layer from the point of its ability to spread the flame and the influence of the air flow rate on this process.

  12. Patient preference: conventional rotary handpieces or air abrasion for cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Hans S; Chaves, Yvette; Moss, Mark E

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that patients should accept the use of the air abrasion technique over the conventional handpiece due to the reduced need for anesthesia. Technologies for both air abrasion and the conventional rotary handpiece have, in recent decades, seen major improvements, but there are no recent scientific publications that evaluate the patient's preference for these two technologies when performing a cavity preparation. This study determined the patient's preference for air abrasion or the rotary handpiece for removing occlusal fissure carious lesions in mandibular premolars. Ten healthy subjects 18 years of age or older were recruited from the General Dentistry Clinic of the University of Rochester Eastman Dental Center, with fissure caries at a DEJ depth of similar size (determined by radiographs and clinical examination) in any two mandibular premolars in opposite quadrants. Within each subject, the two methods of caries removal were randomly assigned. In one premolar, air abrasion was used for cavity preparation, and in the other premolar, a conventional rotary handpiece was used. At each visit prior to treatment, the patients were instructed to complete the Emotional Status (ES) questionnaire (SUNY University at Buffalo Craniofacial Pain Clinic) to assess differences in their emotional status between appointments. At each appointment, when the restorative treatment was completed, patients were instructed to rate their pain on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A technique preference questionnaire was given after the second appointment. The subjects rated the perception of pain as significantly lower (p < 0.05) when using air abrasion (6.0 mm versus 29.6 mm). All of the patients preferred air abrasion over conventional rotary handpieces. None of the patients required anesthesia and there was no indication that the emotional status influenced the result. Air abrasion was the preferred method of cavity preparation when removing fissural caries in

  13. Air abrasion: an old technology reborn.

    PubMed

    Berry, E A; Eakle, W S; Summitt, J B

    1999-08-01

    Recently, air abrasion has experienced a rebirth in restorative dentistry. Originally developed in the late 1940s, the principle of air abrasion is the imparting of kinetic energy to tiny aluminum oxide particles that are projected by a stream of compressed air or gas and expelled from a small nozzle. The force generated by the relatively hard particles striking a relatively hard surface is sufficient to cut into that surface. In the last decade, more than a dozen models of air abrasion units have been introduced into the marketplace and more are on the way. Manufacturers have developed air abrasion instruments that offer a broad range of features, from small table-top units to self-contained systems with compressors, vacuums, and curing lights. The costs range dramatically--from $1,000 to $20,000 or more--depending on the complexity of the features and attachments. Manufacturers make a variety of claims to support the value of this technology to the practicing dentist. A term often used to describe one of the benefits of air abrasion is microdentistry. The claim is that smaller, less invasive tooth preparations may be accomplished using air abrasion than with a traditional bur and air turbine. This may be true in some instances, but it would certainly depend on the operator's experience and ability to visually discern fine detail. Other claims about air abrasion are that it can be used to cut into tooth structure without local anesthesia and that it should be used on all stained grooves or fissures to determine if incipient carious lesions are present. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, the popularity of air abrasion continues to grow. To gain additional insight about these claims and to see what might be on the horizon for this technology, I spoke with three highly respected educators who are recognized for their expertise in air abrasion. What they said should give the reader a better understanding of how air abrasion might augment restorative

  14. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF HOURLY AND DAILY SEWAGE FLOW RATES IN FLORIDA PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOGARTY, WILLIAM J.; REEDER, MILTON E.

    A DETERMINATION OF THE HOURLY AND DAILY SEWAGE FLOW RATES IN FLORIDA PUBLIC SCHOOLS WAS MADE TO IDENTIFY THE FLOW CHARACTERISTICS AND TO PROVIDE A MORE PRECISE BASIS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR SEWAGE DISPOSAL FACILITIES IN SCHOOLS. WATER FLOW DATA WAS COLLECTED FOR 158 SCHOOLS AND SEWAGE FLOW DATA FROM 42 SCHOOLS. THE FINDINGS…

  15. A methodology to reduce uncertainties in the high-flow portion of a rating curve

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow monitoring at watershed scale relies on the establishment of a rating curve that describes the relationship between stage and flow and is developed from actual flow measurements at various stages. Measurement errors increase with out-of-bank flow conditions because of safety concerns and diffic...

  16. Occlusive Dressings and the Healing of Standardized Abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    Context: Acute skin trauma during sport participation, resulting in partial-thickness abrasions, is common. The limited investigations focusing on the acute wound environment and dressing techniques and the subsequent lack of evidence-based standards complicate clinical wound care decisions. Objective: To examine the effects of occlusive dressings on healing of standardized, partial-thickness abrasions. Design: Controlled, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy women (n  =  10) and men (n  =  6). Intervention(s): Four standardized, partial-thickness abrasions were inflicted. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings and no dressing (control) were applied. Participants returned on postwound days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 for digital imaging. Wound healing time was measured by change in wound contraction (cm2) and change in wound color (chromatic red) and luminance in red, green, and blue color values. Main Outcome Measure(s): Wound contraction, color (chromatic red), and luminance. Results: A day-by-dressing interaction was found for wound contraction, color, and luminance. Post hoc testing indicated that the film and hydrocolloid dressings produced greater wound contraction than the hydrogel and no dressing on days 7 and 10. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in greater wound contraction than the control on day 14. Hydrocolloid dressings produced smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance than no dressing on day 7. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance compared with no dressing on days 10 and 14. Conclusions: When compared with the control (no dressing), the film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings were associated with a faster healing rate of partial-thickness abrasions across time measured by wound contraction, color, and luminance

  17. Effect of flow rate on environmental variables and phytoplankton dynamics: results from field enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiping; Chen, Ruihong; Li, Feipeng; Chen, Ling

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of flow rate on phytoplankton dynamics and related environment variables, a set of enclosure experiments with different flow rates were conducted in an artificial lake. We monitored nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, turbidity, chlorophyll- a and phytoplankton levels. The lower biomass in all flowing enclosures showed that flow rate significantly inhibited the growth of phytoplankton. A critical flow rate occurred near 0.06 m/s, which was the lowest relative inhibitory rate. Changes in flow conditions affected algal competition for light, resulting in a dramatic shift in phytoplankton composition, from blue-green algae in still waters to green algae in flowing conditions. These findings indicate that critical flow rate can be useful in developing methods to reduce algal bloom occurrence. However, flow rate significantly enhanced the inter-relationships among environmental variables, in particular by inducing higher water turbidity and vegetative reproduction of periphyton ( Spirogyra). These changes were accompanied by a decrease in underwater light intensity, which consequently inhibited the photosynthetic intensity of phytoplankton. These results warn that a universal critical flow rate might not exist, because the effect of flow rate on phytoplankton is interlinked with many other environmental variables.

  18. Abrasion resistance of medical glove materials.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Donna L; Schwerin, Matthew R; Kisielewski, Richard W; Kotz, Richard M; Chaput, Maria P; Varney, George W; To, Theresa M

    2004-01-15

    Due to the increasing demand for nonlatex medical gloves in the health-care community, there is a need to assess the durability of alternative glove materials. This study examines durability characteristics of various glove materials by abrasion resistance testing. Natural rubber latex (latex), polyvinyl chloride (vinyl), acrylonitrile butadiene (nitrile), polychloroprene (neoprene), and a styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were tested. All test specimens, with the exception of the vinyl, were obtained from surgical gloves. Unaged out-of-the-box specimens as well as those subjected to various degrees of artificial aging were included in the study. After the abrasion sequence, the barrier integrity of the material was assessed through the use of a static leak test. Other traditional tests performed on these materials were viral penetration to validate the abrasion data and tear testing for comparative purposes. The results indicate that specific glove-material performance is dependent upon the particular test under consideration. Most notably, abrasion, even in controlled nonsevere conditions, may compromise to varying degrees the barrier integrity of latex, vinyl, SEBS, nitrile, and neoprene glove materials. However, as evidenced by the results of testing three brands of neoprene gloves, the abrasion resistance of any one glove material may be significantly affected by variations in production processes. PMID:14689500

  19. An electronic flow control system for a variable-rate tree sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precise modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical measure to achieve variable-rate spray applications. An electronic flow rate control system accommodating with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was designed to manipulate the output of spray nozzles inde...

  20. Numerical investigation and thermodynamic analysis of the effect of electrolyte flow rate on performance of all vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaeli, Ali; Vatani, Ali; Tahouni, Nassim; Panjeshahi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-10-01

    In flow batteries, electrolyte flow rate plays a crucial role on the minimizing mass transfer polarization which is at the compensation of higher pressure drop. In this work, a two-dimensional numerical method is applied to investigate the effect of electrolyte flow rate on cell voltage, maximum depth of discharge and pressure drop a six-cell stack of VRFB. The results show that during the discharge process, increasing electrolyte flow rate can raise the voltage of each cell up to 50 mV on average. Moreover, the maximum depth of discharge dramatically increases with electrolyte flow rate. On the other hand, the pressure drop also positively correlates with electrolyte flow rate. In order to investigate all these effects simultaneously, average energy and exergy efficiencies are introduced in this study for the transient process of VRFB. These efficiencies give insight into choosing an appropriate strategy for the electrolyte flow rate. Finally, the energy efficiency of electricity storage using VRFB is investigated and compared with other energy storage systems. The results illustrate that this kind of battery has at least 61% storage efficiency based on the second law of thermodynamics, which is considerably higher than that of their counterparts.

  1. Effect of different river flow rates on biomarker responses in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Lončarić, Zeljka; Hackenberger, Davorka K; Ečimović, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated effects of different river flow rates on basal activities of selected biomarkers and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Juvenile carp were exposed to different river flow rates (5-120 cm/s) by caging for 3 weeks. After this period, one half of the fish were sacrificed and used for analysis. The other half received a single intraperitoneal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and after 6 days were sacrificed and used for analysis. In order to investigate whether the physical activity of carp in the environment will influence the condition status of carp, following biomarkers were measured - activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT) and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and concentration of protein carbonyls (PC). The results showed that different flow rates significantly influenced biochemical biomarkers. The basal activity of GST did not change significantly after exposure to different river flow rates, whereas the activity of CAT increased with increasing river flow rates. The application of 3-MC caused significant increases in GST and CAT activities, but there were no difference between 3-MC control and 3-MC different flow rates. The occurrence of oxidative stress as a result of exposure to increased physical activity, i.e. increased river flow rates, was confirmed by measurement of PC levels - the level of PC increased with increasing river flow rates. Measurement of EROD basal activity showed that at lower river flow rates the EROD activity increased and at higher river flow rates decreased towards control levels demonstrating a close relationship between oxidative stress, PC levels and EROD activity. Obviously, biomarker responses in carp of different condition status can differ substantially. It can be concluded that flow rate may be an important factor in biomonitoring of rivers using biomarkers and since at different locations river water flow rate can vary

  2. Temperature and flow rate effects on mass median diameters of thermally generated malathion and naled fogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, J R; Chew, V; Melson, R O

    1993-06-01

    The effects of temperature and flow rate on mass median diameters (mmds) of thermally generated aerosol clouds were studied. Number 2 fuel oil alone, undiluted and diluted malathion 91, and undiluted naled were examined. There was a significant flow rate x temperature interaction on the mmds of diluted malathion fogs: i.e., differences among flow rates depended on temperature and vice versa. PMID:8350082

  3. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  4. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  5. Sliding-gate valve for use with abrasive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Jr., William J.; Carter, Charles R.; Griffith, Richard A.; Loomis, Richard B.; Notestein, John E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a flow and pressure-sealing valve for use with abrasive solids. The valve embodies special features which provide for long, reliable operating lifetimes in solids-handling service. The valve includes upper and lower transversely slidable gates, contained in separate chambers. The upper gate provides a solids-flow control function, whereas the lower gate provides a pressure-sealing function. The lower gate is supported by means for (a) lifting that gate into sealing engagement with its seat when the gate is in its open and closed positions and (b) lowering the gate out of contact with its seat to permit abrasion-free transit of the gate between its open and closed positions. When closed, the upper gate isolates the lower gate from the solids. Because of this shielding action, the sealing surface of the lower gate is not exposed to solids during transit or when it is being lifted or lowered. The chamber containing the lower gate normally is pressurized slightly, and a sweep gas is directed inwardly across the lower-gate sealing surface during the vertical translation of the gate.

  6. Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia (NH3) released from litter enhances its fertilizer value and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow var...

  7. Field measurements of incision rates following bedrock exposure: Implications for process controls on the long profiles of valleys cut by rivers and debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, Jonathan D.; Montgomery, David R.; Collins, Brian D.; Dietrich, William E.; Sklar, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, published rates of incision of bedrock valleys came from indirect dating of incised surfaces. A small but growing literature based on direct measurement reports short-term bedrock lowering at geologically unsustainable rates. We report observations of bedrock lowering from erosion pins monitored over 1–7 yr in 10 valleys that cut indurated volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Washington, Oregon, California, and Taiwan. Most of these channels have historically been stripped of sediment. Their bedrock is exposed to bed-load abrasion, plucking, and seasonal wetting and drying that comminutes hard, intact rock into plates or equant fragments that are removed by higher flows. Consequent incision rates are proportional to the square of rock tensile strength, in agreement with experimental results of others. Measured rates up to centimeters per year far exceed regional long-term erosion-rate estimates, even for apparently minor sediment-transport rates. Cultural artifacts on adjoining strath terraces in Washington and Taiwan indicate at least several decades of lowering at these extreme rates. Lacking sediment cover, lithologies at these sites lower at rates that far exceed long-term rock-uplift rates. This rate disparity makes it unlikely that the long profiles of these rivers are directly adjusted to either bedrock hardness or rock-uplift rate in the manner predicted by the stream power law, despite the observation that their profiles are well fit by power-law plots of drainage area vs. slope. We hypothesize that the threshold of motion of a thin sediment mantle, rather than bedrock hardness or rock-uplift rate, controls channel slope in weak bedrock lithologies with tensile strengths below ∼3–5 MPa. To illustrate this hypothesis and to provide an alternative interpretation for power-law plots of area vs. slope, we combine Shields' threshold transport concept with measured hydraulic relationships and downstream fining rates. In contrast to fluvial

  8. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  11. Gas, liquids flow rates hefty at Galveston Bay discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1998-01-19

    Extended flow tests indicate a large Vicksburg (Oligocene) gas, condensate, and oil field is about to be developed in western Galveston Bay. Internal estimates indicates that ultimate recovery from the fault block in which the discovery well was drilled could exceed 1 tcf of gas equivalent of proved, possible, and probable reserves. The paper discusses the test program for this field and other prospects in the Galveston Bay area.

  12. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J.; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  13. Understanding Characteristic of Abrasion of Refractory Lining Caused by Bath Oscillation in BOF Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, Zongshu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the refractory abrasion occurring widely inside basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. The mechanism of refractory abrasion is examined numerically referring to the bath oscillation with regard to flows, turbulence and wall shear stress inside a BOF. The simulation results reveal that the refractory abrasion tends to occur on the wall region between the slag/atmosphere and slag/metal interfaces due to the oscillation of the bath in the blowing process, which generally promotes slag-line erosion. The decreased nozzle angle, and either increased lance height or operation pressure can lead to more serious refractory erosion that occurs more likely during the slag-making period in the operation of BOF.

  14. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Calef, F. J.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Lanza, N. L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Pablo, M. A.; Kocurek, G. A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K. W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N. O.; Rice, M. S.; Richardson, M. E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R. S.; Wiens, R. C.; Yingst, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from "Bradbury Landing" to "Rocknest," they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  15. Passive flow-rate regulators using pressure-dependent autonomous deflection of parallel membrane valves.

    PubMed

    Doh, Il; Cho, Young-Ho

    2009-07-21

    We present passive flow-rate regulators using an autonomous deflection of parallel membrane valves, capable to maintain a constant flow-rate at varying inlet pressure supplied from micropumps. The previous passive flow-rate regulators are difficult to integrate with micropumps, not only because of the complex multi-layer structures, but also because of the high threshold inlet pressure required for flow-rate regulation. In this study, we present passive flow-rate regulators using parallel membrane valves, capable of achieving flow-rate regulation function at the minimum threshold inlet pressure as low as 15 kPa with simple structure formed by a single mask process. The parallel membranes in a flow-rate regulator are designed to deflect and adjust flow resistance autonomously according to the inlet pressure, thus maintaining a constant flow-rate independent of the inlet pressure variation. We designed the four different prototypes of W20, W30, W40, and W50, having parallel membrane widths of 20, 30, 40 and 50 microm, respectively. We estimated the flow-rate based on both analytical and numerical models. In an experimental study, we observed the deformation of parallel membranes and the flow-rate depending on the inlet pressure. The fabricated prototypes achieved the constant flow-rate of 6.09 +/- 0.32 microl s(-1) (W20 fabricated by 10 : 1 PDMS (PolyDiMethylSiloxane)) over an inlet pressure of 20 kPa. We also observed that prototypes fabricated by 20 : 1 PDMS, having lower Young's modulus than normal 10 : 1 PDMS, showed a lower threshold pressure and higher regulated flow-rate than prototypes fabricated by 10 : 1 PDMS. W40 fabricated by 20 : 1 PDMS showed a constant flow-rate of 14.53 +/- 0.51 microl s(-1) over inlet pressure of 15 kPa. The present passive flow-rate regulators have strong potential for applications in integrated microfluidic systems. PMID:19568677

  16. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  17. Investigation of the effect of wall friction on the flow rate in 2D and 3D Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Ramirez, Brenda; Pleau, Mollie; Easwar, Nalini; Birwa, Sumit; Shah, Neil; Tewari, Shubha

    We have measured the mass flow rate of spherical steel spheres under gravity in vertical, straight-walled 2 and 3-dimensional hoppers, where the flow velocity is controlled by the opening size. Our measurements focus on the role of friction and its placement along the walls of the hopper. In the 2D case, an increase in the coefficient of static friction from μ = 0.2 to 0.6 is seen to decrease the flow rate significantly. We have changed the placement of frictional boundaries/regions from the front and back walls of the 2D hopper to the side walls and floor to investigate the relative importance of the different regions in determining the flow rate. Fits to the Beverloo equation show significant departure from the expected exponent of 1.5 in the case of 2D flow. In contrast, 3D flow rates do not show much dependence on wall friction and its placement. We compare the experimental data to numerical simulations of gravity driven hopper granular flow with varying frictional walls constructed using LAMMPS*. *http://lammps.sandia.gov Supported by NSF MRSEC DMR 0820506.

  18. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  19. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (j) All employees using abrasive wheels shall be protected by eye protection equipment in accordance with the requirements of subpart I of this part except when adequate eye protection is afforded by eye shields which are permanently attached to the bench or floor stand....

  20. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  1. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  2. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  3. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  4. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  5. A Novel Microfluidic Flow Rate Detection Method Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Temperature Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shijie; Wang, Peng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhao, Tianze; Xu, Shanzhi; Guo, Mingjiang; Yu, Xinglong

    2016-01-01

    A novel microfluidic flow rate detection method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) temperature imaging is proposed. The measurement is performed by space-resolved SPR imaging of the flow induced temperature variations. Theoretical simulations and analysis were performed to demonstrate a proof of concept using this approach. Experiments were implemented and results showed that water flow rates within a wide range of tens to hundreds of μL/min could be detected. The flow rate sensor is resistant to disturbances and can be easily integrated into microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. PMID:27347960

  6. Comparison of whole saliva flow rates and mucin concentrations in healthy Caucasian young and aged adults.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, M; Mulligan, R A; Kipnis, V; Denny, P A; Denny, P C

    1992-06-01

    Unstimulated and chewing-stimulated whole saliva samples were obtained from 42 healthy Caucasians; 21 were between 18 and 35 years of age, and 21 between 65 and 83 years of age. The unstimulated salivary flow rate was significantly lower in the aged group, but the stimulated flow rate was significantly higher in the aged than in the young group. Both groups showed significantly increased flow during salivary stimulation. MG1 and MG2 concentrations in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples were significantly lower in the aged group. There were no significant correlations between salivary flow rates and MG1 and MG2 concentrations.

  7. Distributed measurement of flow rate in conduits using heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis

    2016-04-01

    In some cases flow varies along conduits, such as in irrigated land drainage pipes and channels, irrigation laterals and others. Detailed knowledge of flow rate along the conduit makes possible analytical evaluation of water distribution and collection systems performance. Flow rate can change continuously in some systems, like in drainage pipes and channels, or abruptly, like in conduits bifurcations or emitter insertions. A heat pulse along the conduit makes possible to get flow rate from continuity and heat balance equations. Due to the great value of specific heat of water, temperature changes along conduit are smaller than the noise that involves the measurement process. This work presents a methodology that, dealing with the noise of distributed temperature measurements, leads to flow rate determination along pressurized pipes or open channel flows.

  8. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The obje...

  9. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across the Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox usi...

  10. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  11. Experimental Investigation of Entrainment Rate by Debris Flows: from Shear Stress to Granular Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Longjas, A.; Moberly, D.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows - flows of boulders, gravel, sand, fine particles, and fluids - erode sediment from steep hillsides and deposit them at lower slopes. Current model frameworks for erosion by debris flow vary significantly and include those that consider macroscopic fields such as excess shear stresses, similar to traditional models of bedload transport, to those that consider the "granular" physics, from force chains (related to bed fabric) to granular temperatures (related to random kinetic energy of the flow). We perform experiments to investigate the underlying mechanics associated with entrainment of bed materials by overlying flows in an instrumented laboratory debris flow flume. In particular, we investigate how the erosion rate of a flowing mass impinging on an erodible bed of particles depends on boundary conditions, dynamics of the flow, and the state of the bed. Using high speed imaging to capture average and instantaneous particle dynamics simultaneously with bed stress measurements, we investigate the effectiveness of a variety of model frameworks for capturing the relationships between flow dynamics and erosion rates. We find no correlation between the bed shear stress associated with the mass of the flow and erosion rate. Similarly, we found no correlation between the erosion rate and a Reynolds stress, that is, the stress associated with correlations between downstream and vertical velocity fluctuations. On the other hand, we found that granular temperature is well-correlated with entrainment rate during particular phases of our experimental debris flow. In particular, we found the instantaneous entrainment rate ɛ is linearly dependent on the ratio of the granular temperature Tg to the kinetic energy associated with the average flow velocity u: ɛ ~ (Tg / ρm u2) where ρm is the local instantaneous density of the flow. We present these results and discuss how they vary with the state of the flow, boundary conditions, and particle mixtures.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels... Institute, B7.1-1970, Safety Code for the Use, Care and Protection of Abrasive Wheels, and paragraph (d)...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  17. Changing rates of reinforcement perturbs the flow of time.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L; Killeen, P R; Fetterman, J G

    1993-12-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that changes in rate of reinforcement affect the rate of an internal pacemaker as suggested by the Behavioral Theory of Timing (BeT: Killeen and Fetterman, 1988). Pigeons were trained to discriminate durations of 10 s and 20 s, and then exposed to higher or lower rates of freely delivered reinforcers. When returned to the discrimination task, judgments were reliably biased in the predicted directions: those returning from a richer context judged standard durations to be longer than did those returning from a poorer context. These results validate a key assumption of BeT, and provide an explanation of how changing tempos of life bias the perception of time.

  18. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Rate in Diabetic Rats: Disparity Between Techniques Due to Redistribution of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Leskova, Wendy; Watts, Megan N.; Carter, Patsy R.; Eshaq, Randa S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Reports of altered retinal blood flow in experimental models of type I diabetes have provided contrasting results, which leads to some confusion as to whether flow is increased or decreased. The purpose of our study was to evaluate early diabetes-induced changes in retinal blood flow in diabetic rats, using two distinctly different methods. Methods. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and retinal blood flow rate was measured under anesthesia by a microsphere infusion technique, or by an index of flow based on the mean circulation time between arterioles and venules. Measurements in STZ rats were compared to age-matched nondiabetic controls. In addition, the retinal distribution of fluorescently-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was viewed by confocal microscopy in excised flat mounts. Results. Retinal blood flow rate was found to decrease by approximately 33% in the STZ rats compared to controls (P < 0.001) as assessed by the microsphere technique. However, in striking contrast, the mean circulation time through the retina was found to be almost 3× faster in the STZ rats (P < 0.01). This contradiction could be explained by flow redistribution through the superficial vessels of the diabetic retina, with this possibility supported by our observation of significantly fewer RBCs flowing through the deeper capillaries. Conclusions. We conclude that retinal blood flow rate is reduced significantly in the diabetic rat, with a substantial decrease of flow through the capillaries due to shunting of blood through the superficial layer, allowing rapid transit from arterioles to venules. PMID:23572104

  19. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  20. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, Ivar H.

    1990-01-01

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  1. Drop-box Weir for Measuring Flow Rates Under Extreme Flow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment and large rocks often are transported in runoff during extreme events. The sediment can deposit in a runoff-measuring structure and give erroneous readings. The drop-box weir (DBW) is one of only a few flow-measuring devices capable of measuring sediment-laden flows. Recent studies have ...

  2. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  3. A Protocol for Improved Measurement of Arterial Flow Rate in Preclinical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, D. A.; Thomson, A. J. W.; Hadoke, P. W. F.; Anderson, T.; Moran, C. M.; Gray, G. A.; Hoskins, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a protocol for the measurement of blood flow rate in small animals and to compare flow rate measurements against measurements made using a transit time flowmeter. Materials and Methods: Measurements were made in rat and mice using a Visualsonics Vevo 770 scanner. The flow rate in carotid and femoral arteries was calculated from the time-average maximum velocity and vessel diameter. A correction factor was applied to correct for the overestimation of velocity arising from geometric spectral broadening. Invasive flow rate measurements were made using a Transonics system. Results: Measurements were achieved in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. Image quality in the mouse femoral artery was too poor to obtain diameter measurements. The applied correction factor in practice was 0.71–0.77. The diameter varied by 6–18% during the cardiac cycle. There was no overall difference in the flow rate measured using ultrasound and using transit-time flowmeters. The flow rates were comparable with those previously reported in the literature. There was wide variation in flow rates in the same artery in individual animals. Transit-time measurements were associated with changes of a factor of 10 during the typical 40 min measurement period, associated with probe movement, vessel spasm, vessel kinking and other effects. Conclusion: A protocol for the measurement of flow rate in arteries in small animals has been described and successfully used in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. The availability of a noninvasive procedure for flow rate measurement avoids the problems with changes in flow associated with an invasive procedure. PMID:27689153

  4. A Protocol for Improved Measurement of Arterial Flow Rate in Preclinical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, D. A.; Thomson, A. J. W.; Hadoke, P. W. F.; Anderson, T.; Moran, C. M.; Gray, G. A.; Hoskins, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a protocol for the measurement of blood flow rate in small animals and to compare flow rate measurements against measurements made using a transit time flowmeter. Materials and Methods: Measurements were made in rat and mice using a Visualsonics Vevo 770 scanner. The flow rate in carotid and femoral arteries was calculated from the time-average maximum velocity and vessel diameter. A correction factor was applied to correct for the overestimation of velocity arising from geometric spectral broadening. Invasive flow rate measurements were made using a Transonics system. Results: Measurements were achieved in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. Image quality in the mouse femoral artery was too poor to obtain diameter measurements. The applied correction factor in practice was 0.71–0.77. The diameter varied by 6–18% during the cardiac cycle. There was no overall difference in the flow rate measured using ultrasound and using transit-time flowmeters. The flow rates were comparable with those previously reported in the literature. There was wide variation in flow rates in the same artery in individual animals. Transit-time measurements were associated with changes of a factor of 10 during the typical 40 min measurement period, associated with probe movement, vessel spasm, vessel kinking and other effects. Conclusion: A protocol for the measurement of flow rate in arteries in small animals has been described and successfully used in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. The availability of a noninvasive procedure for flow rate measurement avoids the problems with changes in flow associated with an invasive procedure.

  5. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Gingival Depigmentation using Tetrafluoroethane Cryosurgery and Gingival Abrasion Technique: Two Years Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santhosh; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of the gingival depigmentation by using Tetrafluoroethane cryosurgery and the gingival abrasion technique – 2 years of follow up. Material and Methods: Ten systemically healthy patients who were aged 18 to 36 years were selected for the study. Tetrafluoroethane was used for the cryosurgical depigmentation and the gingival abrasion technique used a coarse flame shaped bur. The presence or absence of pigmentation was tabulated, based on the GPI (Gingival Pigmentation Index). For the statistical analysis, Freidman’s test was used. Results: The keratinization was completed within a week after the application of the cryogen and about 10 days after the gingival abrasion technique was done. The statistical analysis which was done after 90th, 180th days and 2 years. The p-value which was obtained (p<.001) showed the superiority of cryosurgery over the gingival abrasion. During the follow up period, no side effects were seen for both the techniques and the improved aesthetics was maintained upto 2 years. Conclusion: The use of cryogen Tetrafluoroethane is easy, practical and inexpensive as compared to gingival abrasion, due to its high rate of recurrence. Hence, it is more acceptable to the patients and the operator. Further studies are needed to assess the long term effectiveness of the cryosurgical method of depigmentation. PMID:23543863

  7. Assessment of the abrasion potential of pesticide-treated seeds using the Heubach test

    PubMed Central

    Zwertvaegher, Ingrid K. A.; Foqué, Dieter; Devarrewaere, Wouter; Verboven, Pieter; Nuyttens, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During sowing of pesticide-treated seeds, pesticide-laden dust and abraded seed particles may be emitted to the environment, possibly leading to environmental contamination and posing health risks. In many countries there is currently no legislation concerning the acceptable amount of dust of treated seeds. This study aimed to gain insight in the abrasion potential of available pesticide-treated seeds and its associated factors. The abrasion potential of 45 seed samples of 7 different species (viz. sugar beet, oat, barley, wheat, spelt, pea, and maize) was determined using the Heubach test and amounts of dust were expressed as g 100 kgseeds −1, g 100,000 seeds−1, and g ha−1. The abrasion potential fell generally within the boundaries of maximum permissible values adopted by different countries. Species, seed treatment company, number of active ingredient (AIs) and combination of AIs had significant effects on the abrasion potential, whereas little or no effect of agitation and conservation was found. However, species were situated differently with respect to each other depending on the unit in which the abrasion potential was expressed. A standard unit that takes into account the species’ seed rate is suggested to give the fairest assessment of dust drift risk and would allow international comparison. PMID:27812241

  8. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  9. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Conducted on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1998-01-01

    Sojourner rover showing Lewis' wheel abrasion experiment. The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft soft-landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. Among the many experiments on its small Sojourner rover are three technology experiments from the NASA Lewis Research Center, including the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The WAE was designed, built, delivered, and operated on Mars by a team of engineers and scientists from Lewis' Photovoltaics and Space Environments Branch. This experiment collected data to assess wheel surface wear on the Sojourner. It used a specially designed rover wheel, with thin films (200 to 1000 angstroms) of aluminum, nickel, and platinum deposited on black, anodized aluminum strips attached to the rover's right center wheel. As the wheel spun in the Martian soil, a photovoltaic sensor monitored changes in film reflectivity. These changes indicated abrasion of the metal films by Martian surface material. Rolling wear data were accumulated by the WAE. Also, at frequent intervals, all the rover wheels, except the WAE test wheel, were locked to hold the rover stationary while the test wheel alone was spun and dug into the Martian regolith. These tests created wear conditions more severe than simple rolling. The WAE will contribute substantially to our knowledge of Martian surface characteristics. Marked abrasion would indicate a surface composed of hard, possibly sharply edged grains, whereas lack of abrasion would suggest a somewhat softer surface. WAE results will be correlated with ground simulations to determine which terrestrial materials behave most like those on Mars. This knowledge will enable a deeper understanding of erosion processes on Mars and the role they play in Martian surface evolution. Preliminary results show that electrostatic charging of the rover wheels sometimes caused dust to accumulate on the WAE wheel, making interpretation of the reflectance data problematic. If electrostatic charging is the mechanism for dust attraction, this indicates

  10. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. PMID:26849309

  11. Abrasion-Resistant Technology and its Prospect for CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Li, Y. J.; Wang, L. J.; Liu, S. H.; Dou, Q. R.

    In recent years, CFB boilers (CFBB) have been widely used in the commercial power plants due to its environmental benefits, high combustion efficiency, wide coal flexibility, and some other advantages. At the same time, the abrasion problem, the greatest weakness of this kind of boiler, has been gradually exposed in its application process. The abrasion, particularly on key parts such as the heating surface of water-cooled wall, furnace corners, separator entrance, seriously restricts the long-period operation ability of the CFBB. This article discusses current development status for various abrasion resistant refractory materials used in a CFBB. Some comments are provided for developing new high-performance abrasion resistant refractory materials and rapid-repaired materials according to the abrasion principle and the abrasion on different parts, as well as the economical and environmental requirements for the material. The abrasion solution and operation period of CFBB can be better improved given realization.

  12. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Ameri, Hamideh; Eslami, Samaneh; Mirzaeepoor, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05). The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required. PMID:23349570

  13. Fixation of waste materials in grouts: Part 3, Equation for critical flow rate. [Velocity for turbulent flow in a pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Spence, R.D.; Godsey, T.T.; Dodson, K.E.

    1986-12-01

    Critical flow rate data for grouts prepared from three distinctly different nuclear waste materials have been correlated. The wastes include Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW) solution, Hanford Facility waste (HFW) solution, and cladding removal waste (CRW) slurry. Data for the three wastes have been correlated with a 0.96 coefficient of correlation by the following equation: log V/sub E/ = 0.289 + 0.707 log ..mu../sub E/, where V/sub E/ and ..mu../sub E/ denote critical flow rate in m/sup 3//min and apparent viscosity in Pa.s, respectively. The equation may be used to estimate critical flow rate for grouts prepared within the compositional range of the investigation. 5 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Abrasive wear: The efects of fibres size on oil palm empty fruit bunch polyester composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasolang, S.; Kalam, A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Suhadah, W. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to determine the effect of palm oil empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre size in dry sliding testing of polyester composite. These composite samples were produced by mixing raw OPEFB fibre with resin. The samples were prepared at different sizes of fibre (100, 125, 180 and 250μm). Abrasion Resistance Tester (TR-600) was used to carried out abrasive wear tests in dry sliding conditions. These tests were performed at room temperature for two different loads (10 and 30N) and at a constant sliding velocity of 1.4m/s. The specific wear rates of OPEFB polyester composites were obtained. The morphology of composite surface before and after tests was also examined using 3D microscope imaging. Preliminary work on thermal distribution at the abrasive wheel point was also conducted for selected samples.

  15. Quartz measurement in coal dust with high-flow rate samplers: laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Lee, Eun Gyung; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Kashon, Michael; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    A laboratory study was performed to measure quartz in coal dust using high-flow rate samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69 cyclone, and FSP10 cyclone) and low-flow rate samplers [10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell type (BGI4L) cyclones] and to determine whether an increased mass collection from high-flow rate samplers would affect the subsequent quartz measurement by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analytical procedures. Two different sizes of coal dusts, mass median aerodynamic diameter 4.48 μm (Coal Dust A) and 2.33 μm (Coal Dust B), were aerosolized in a calm air chamber. The mass of coal dust collected by the samplers was measured gravimetrically, while the mass of quartz collected by the samplers was determined by FTIR (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7603) and XRD (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7500) after one of two different indirect preparations. Comparisons between high-flow rate samplers and low-flow rate samplers were made by calculating mass concentration ratios of coal dusts, net mass ratios of coal dusts, and quartz net mass. Mass concentrations of coal dust from the FSP10 cyclone were significantly higher than those from other samplers and mass concentrations of coal dust from 10-mm nylon cyclone were significantly lower than those from other samplers, while the CIP10-R, GK2.69, and BGI4L samplers did not show significant difference in the comparison of mass concentration of coal dusts. The BGI4L cyclone showed larger mass concentration of ∼9% compared to the 10-mm nylon cyclone. All cyclones provided dust mass concentrations that can be used in complying with the International Standard Organization standard for the determination of respirable dust concentration. The amount of coal dust collected from the high-flow rate samplers was found to be higher with a factor of 2-8 compared to the low-flow rate samplers but not in direct proportion of increased flow rates. The high-flow rate samplers collected more quartz compared to

  16. [Discussion on testing of flow rate of infusion device about industry standard].

    PubMed

    Hua, Songhe

    2014-07-01

    Carried on the exploration testing of flow rate of infusion device about industry standard YY 0451-2010. Engaged in flow rate experiments adopting different method that are provided by new and old industry standard for samples of the same type. Compared with the result of the dangerous coefficient by calculating the test data, the old standard can be more sensitive to reflect the situation of product flow rate, so it can be applied to conventional control of the products. The method which provided by the new industry standard is suitable for evaluating periodicity the level of product contaminated. PMID:25330614

  17. Computation of transient flow rates in passive pumping micro-fluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Jane; Eckstein, Eugene C; Lindner, Erno

    2009-01-01

    Motion in micro-channels of passive flow micro-fluidic systems can be controlled by proper design and estimated by careful modeling. We report on methods to describe the flow rate as function of time in a passive pump driven micro-fluidic system. The model considers the surface energy present in small droplets, which prompts their shrinkage and induces flow. The droplet geometries are controlled by the micro-fluidic system geometry and hydrophilicity of the droplet channel contact area so that the chord of the droplet's cross section is restrained as the fluid is pumped. The model uses interfacial thermodynamics and the Hagen-Poiseuille equation for calculating the flow rate in micro-channels. Existing analyses consider the theoretical relationships among sample volume and induced flow rate, surface energy of the drops at the entrance and exit ports, and the resistance to flow. This model provides more specific information on the influence of the experimental conditions in computations of the flow rate. The model was validated in four sets of experiments. Passive pumps with 1.8 mm diameter, hydrophobic or hydrophilic entry ports, 5.0 or 10.0 mm channel length, and 2.5 or 3.3 mm diameter reservoir ports provided initial flow rates between 85 nL s(-1) and 196 nL s(-1).

  18. A novel approach to abrasion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.A.; Mohr, P.B.; Leider, H.R.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-03-01

    The high abrasion and impact loads characteristic of many technologies require frequent maintenance or special materials. Conventional approaches to protection have used either extremely hard coatings or complaint elastomeric coatings. The former are typically ceramic or ceramic-like surfaces produced by direct deposition or by in situ formation by oxidation, carburization or nitriding. Ceramic coatings are very good against abrasion, but are vulnerable to impact damage. Elastomeric coatings have excellent impact resistance and are capable of withstanding deformation; however, they are limited in thermal range and chemical resistance. It is possible to combine the desirable properties of both types by using ''hair,'' a structure in which an extremely hard material can be simultaneously elastic and compliant by virture of a very high L/D ratio. We have demonstrated the good performance of carbon fiber ''hair'' in resisting damage from impacting particles and have identified a probable failure mechanism. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. An efficient, explicit finite-rate algorithm to compute flows in chemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    An explicit finite-rate code was developed to compute hypersonic viscous chemically reacting flows about three-dimensional bodies. Equations describing the finite-rate chemical reactions were fully coupled to the gas dynamic equations using a new coupling technique. The new technique maintains stability in the explicit finite-rate formulation while permitting relatively large global time steps.

  20. Flow variability of an aerial variable-rate nozzle at constant pressures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable-rate ground application systems have been in use for the past 15 years, but due to high application speeds, flow requirements, and aerodynamic considerations, variable-rate aerial nozzles have not been available until now. In 2006, Spray Target, Inc. released the VeriRate™ variable-rate aer...

  1. Natural-Scale Lava Flow Experiments on Video: Variations with Temperature, Slope, and Effusion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Wysocki, R.; Edwards, B. R.; Lev, E.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of active basaltic lava flows and analog materials show that flow dynamics and final flow morphology are strongly determined by the rapidly evolving rheology of the lava crust which constrains the downslope advance of the lava flow. The non-dimensional factor Ψ (ratio of the time scale of crust formation to advective heat loss) provides a useful means of comparing different flows. The key parameters that control Ψ include the melt viscosity, temperature, effusion rate, and slope. Experimental lava flows, up to several meters long created in the Syracuse University Lava Project permit these variables to be investigated independently and in combination in volume-limited flows (<450 kg, 0.5 m3). Video results show lava is very sensitive to relatively small variations in these variables under experimental conditions. For example, experiments 1.1 Ga Keewenan basalt from the Mid-Continent Rift and 200 Ma basalt from the Palisades Sill show very different flow rates and flow morphologies for meter-scale flows on dry sand slopes between 5° and 20°, with all other variables held constant. Similar differences result from varying the effusion rate (~10-4m3s-1) or temperature (1050°-1250°C) on a constant slope. In addition, videos document the development of a wide range of reproducible lava flow structures found in natural lava flows including folds, shear zones, lava tubes, inflated lobes, break-outs, and bubbles (limu o'Pele), that provide additional information on lava crust development. New, continuous flow (cooling-limited) experiments show downslope variations under constant flow conditions.

  2. Indicators of Student Flow Rates in Honduras: An Assessment of an Alternative Methodology, with Two Methodologies for Estimating Student Flow Rates. BRIDGES Research Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadra, Ernesto; Crouch, Luis

    Student promotion, repetition, and dropout rates constitute the basic data needed to forecast future enrollment and new resources. Information on student flow is significantly related to policy formulation aimed at improving internal efficiency, because dropping out and grade repetition increase per pupil cost, block access to eligible school-age…

  3. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  4. Does water content or flow rate control colloid transport in unsaturated porous media?

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Flury, Markus; Mattson, Earl D; Harsh, James B

    2014-04-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (θ - θr)/(θs - θr)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  5. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  6. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  7. Effect of shrouding CH4 flow rate on flow field and stirring ability of coherent jet in steelmaking process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuhai; Sun, Dongbai; Zhu, Rong; Su, Rongfang; Wang, Xueyi

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of flow field and stirring ability of coherent jet with various shrouding CH4 flow rates on the molten bath were studied by combustion experiment and numerical simulation. The axial velocity and total temperature distributions of coherent jet under hot (1700 K) and cold (298 K) ambient condition were analyzed. The Eddy Dissipation Concept model was used in simulation with detail chemical kinetic mechanisms, and the numerical simulation results were agreed well with the combustion experiment in this research. Based on the simulation and experiment results, when the CH4 rate was 230, 207 and 184 Nm(3)/h, their disparity rate of average velocity and total temperature was small than 5 and 6 %, respectively, at high ambient temperature. Hence, the same stirring effect might be achieved by those three kinds of CH4 flow rates in EAF steelmaking process. According to the industrial application research, the best CH4 flow rate is 184 Nm(3)/h, which could stir molten bath well and reduce energy consumption in steelmaking process. PMID:27652186

  8. Effect of shrouding CH4 flow rate on flow field and stirring ability of coherent jet in steelmaking process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuhai; Sun, Dongbai; Zhu, Rong; Su, Rongfang; Wang, Xueyi

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of flow field and stirring ability of coherent jet with various shrouding CH4 flow rates on the molten bath were studied by combustion experiment and numerical simulation. The axial velocity and total temperature distributions of coherent jet under hot (1700 K) and cold (298 K) ambient condition were analyzed. The Eddy Dissipation Concept model was used in simulation with detail chemical kinetic mechanisms, and the numerical simulation results were agreed well with the combustion experiment in this research. Based on the simulation and experiment results, when the CH4 rate was 230, 207 and 184 Nm(3)/h, their disparity rate of average velocity and total temperature was small than 5 and 6 %, respectively, at high ambient temperature. Hence, the same stirring effect might be achieved by those three kinds of CH4 flow rates in EAF steelmaking process. According to the industrial application research, the best CH4 flow rate is 184 Nm(3)/h, which could stir molten bath well and reduce energy consumption in steelmaking process.

  9. Inspiratory flow rates during hard work when breathing through different respirator inhalation and exhalation resistances.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Karen; Caretti, David; Scott, William; Johnson, Arthur; Koh, Frank

    2006-09-01

    There has been a long-standing debate regarding the adequacy of airflow rates used in respirator certification testing and whether these test flow rates underestimate actual values. This study investigated breath by breath inspiratory peak flow rate, minute ventilation, and instantaneous flow rates of eight young, healthy volunteers walking on a treadmill at 80-85% of maximal aerobic capacity until exhaustion while wearing an air-purifying respirator with one of eight combinations of inhalation and exhalation resistance. An analysis of variance was performed to identify differences among the eight conditions. Scheffe's post hoc analysis indicated which means differed. The group of conditions with the highest average value for each parameter was identified and considered to represent a worst-case scenario. Data was reported for these conditions. A Gaussian distribution was fit to the data and the 99.9% probability levels determined. The 99.9% probability level for the peak and instantaneous flow rates were 374 L/min and 336 L/min, respectively. The minute ventilation distribution was not Gaussian. Less than 1% of the recorded minute ventilations exceeded 135 L/min. Instantaneous flow rates exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's respirator test standards of 64, 85, and 100 L/min constant flow 91%, 87%, and 82% of the time, respectively. The recorded minute ventilations exceeded the 40 L/min minute ventilation test standard (for tests with a sinusoidal flow pattern) 100% of the time. This study showed that young, healthy respirator wearers generated peak flow rates, minute ventilations, and instantaneous flow rates that consistently exceeded current test standards. Their flow rates should be higher than those of a respirator wearer performing occupational work and could be considered upper limits. Testing respirators and respirator cartridges using a sinusoidal breathing pattern with a minute ventilation of 135 L/min (peak flow rate

  10. Circular Signs of the Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's front hazard-avoidance camera, providing a circular sign of the success of the rover's first grinding of a rock. The round, shallow hole seen in this image is on a rock dubbed 'McKittrick,' located in the 'El Capitan' area of the larger outcrop near Opportunity's landing site.

    Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool to grind off a patch of rock 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter during the 30th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Feb. 23, 2004). The grinding exposed fresh rock for close inspection by the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers located on its robotic arm. The Honeybee Robotics team, which designed and operates the rock abrasion tool, determined the depth of the cut at 'McKittrick' to be 4.4 millimeters (0.17 inches) deep.

    On sol 34 (Feb. 27, 2004), the rover is scheduled to grind into its second target on the 'El Capitan' area, a rock dubbed 'Guadalupe' in the upper middle part of this image. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  11. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    DOEpatents

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert P.; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  13. The Effect of Electric Current and Strain Rate on Serrated Flow of Sheet Aluminum Alloy 5754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kunmin; Fan, Rong; Wang, Limin

    2016-03-01

    Electrically assisted tensile tests are carried out on sheet aluminum alloy AA5754 at electric current densities ranging from 0 to 30.4 A/mm2 and strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 10-1 s-1. The strain rate sensitivity and the serrated flow behavior are investigated in accordance with dynamic strain aging mechanism. The strain rate sensitivity changes from negative to positive and keeps increasing with current density. The tendency toward serrated flow is characterized by the onset of Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) instabilities, which are influenced by strain rate, temperature, and electric current. The evolutions of three types of serrated flow are observed and analyzed with respect to strain rate and current density. The magnitude of serration varies with strain rate and current density. The serrated flow can be suppressed by a high strain rate, a high temperature, or a strong electric current. The threshold values of these parameters are determined and discussed. Conventional oven-heated tensile tests are conducted to distinguish the electroplasticity. The flow stress reduces more in electrically assisted tension compared to oven-heated tension at the same temperature level. The electric current helps suppress the serrated flow at the similar temperature level of oven-heating.

  14. Macropore system characteristics controls on non-reactive solute transport at different flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John

    2014-05-01

    Preferential flow and transport in macroporous soils are important pathways for the leaching of agrochemicals through soils. Preferential solute transport in soil is to a large extent determined by the macropore system characteristics and the water flow conditions. The importance of different characteristics of the macropore system is likely to vary with the flow conditions. The objective of this study was to determine which properties of the macropore system that control the shape of non-reactive tracer solute breakthrough curves at different steady-state flow rates. We sampled five undisturbed columns (20 cm high, 20 cm diameter) from the soil surface of four soils with clay contents between 21 and 50 %. Solute transport experiments were carried out under unsaturated conditions at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mm h-1 flow rates. For each flow rate a pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the soil surface and the electrical conductivity was measured with high temporal resolution in the column effluent. We used the 5 % arrival time and the holdback factor to estimate the degree of preferential transport from the resulting breakthrough curves. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were measured at the soil surface of the columns using a tension disc infiltrometer. The macropore system was imaged by industrial X-ray computed tomography at a resolution of 125 μm in all directions. Measures of the macropore system characteristics including measures of pore continuity were calculated from these images using the ImageJ software. Results show that the degree of preferential transport is generally increasing with flow rate when larger pores become active in the transport. The degree of preferential flow was correlated to measures of macropore topology. This study show that conclusions drawn from experiments carried out at one flow rate should generally not be extrapolated to other flow rates.

  15. A pumpless perfusion cell culture cap with two parallel channel layers keeping the flow rate constant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Yi, Sang Hyun; Ku, Bosung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel pumpless perfusion cell culture cap, the gravity-driven flow rate of which is kept constant by the height difference of two parallel channel layers. Previous pumpless perfusion cell culture systems create a gravity-driven flow by means of the hydraulic head difference (Δh) between the source reservoir and the drain reservoir. As more media passes from the source reservoir to the drain reservoir, the source media level decreases and the drain media level increases. Thus, previous works based on a gravity-driven flow were unable to supply a constant flow rate for the perfusion cell culture. However, the proposed perfusion cell culture cap can supply a constant flow rate, because the media level remains unchanged as the media moves laterally through each channel having same media level. In experiments, using the different fluidic resistances, the perfusion cap generated constant flow rates of 871 ± 27 μL h(-1) and 446 ± 11 μL h(-1) . The 871 and 446 μL h(-1) flow rates replace the whole 20 mL medium in the petri dish with a fresh medium for days 1 and 2, respectively. In the perfusion cell (A549 cell line) culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate, the proposed cap can maintain a lactate concentration of about 2200 nmol mL(-1) and an ammonia concentration of about 3200 nmol mL(-1) . Moreover, although the static cell culture maintains cell viability for 5 days, the perfusion cell culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate can maintain cell viability for 9 days. PMID:22927366

  16. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Direct Measurement of Planar Flow Rate in Excised Canine Larynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Liran; Khosla, Sid; Dembinski, Doug; Ying, Jun; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2014-01-01

    Objective During phonation, skewing of the glottal flow waveform (Q) during phonation refers to a phenomenon that occurs when the flow decelerates more rapidly than it accelerates. This skewing is clinically important because it increases the glottal efficiency, which is defined by the acoustic intensity (units are sound pressure level or SPL) divided by the subglottal pressure. Current theoretical models predict that the only mechanism to cause skewing of Q involves changes in the vocal tract inertance. The purpose of the current work is to show that other factors at the vocal fold level can also cause skewing of Q and to determine if the acoustic intensity is correlated with MFDR. Study design Basic Science Methods Intraglottal geometry and velocity measurements were taken in five canine larynges at the mid-membranous plane using two-dimensional particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). The flow rate at the glottal exit was computed from the PIV measurements for low, medium, and high subglottal pressures. Results Vortices form in the superior aspect of the divergent glottis during closing. These vortices produce negative pressure that increases both the maximum value of Q and the rapid deceleration of the flow. The skewing of the flow rate is increased as the intraglottal vortices are increased by increasing the subglottal pressure. The increase in the acoustic intensity is highly correlated with certain properties of the flow rate waveform, such as maximum flow rate. Conclusion Flow skewing and the acoustic intensity can be increased by increasing the intraglottal vortices. PMID:25093928

  18. [Choice of optimal perfusion flow rate during surgical correction of combined acquired heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Len'kin, A I; Zakharov, V I; Smetkin, A A; Len'kin, P I; Kirov, M Iu

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac output during the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is defined by perfusion flow rate, which is calculated by multiplying the perfusion index (PI) on the body surface area. To date, there is no clear definition of an optimal PI and flow rate of perfusion. 60 patients operated with CPB were enrolled in the prospective study to determine the relations between different modes of perfusion and oxygen transport during surgical correction of combined valvular heart disease. Calculation of the CPB flow rate was based on PI 2.5 and 3.0 l/min/m2. Results of the study demonstrate that perfusion based on PI 2.5 l/min/m2 provides more stable oxygen transport parameters and reduces the time of ICU stay in comparison with the flow rate based on PI 3.0 l/min/m2.

  19. Effects of nitrogen flow rate on the properties of indium oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shinho; Kim, Moonhwan

    2013-11-01

    Indium oxide thin films are deposited on glass substrates at nitrogen flow rates of 0-50% by rf reactive magnetron sputtering and are characterized for their structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties. The experimental results showed that the control of nitrogen flow rate has a significant effect on the properties of the In2O3 thin films. The change in the preferred growth orientation from (222) to (400) planes is observed above a nitrogen flow rate of 10%. The average optical transmittance in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm is increased from 85.4% at 0% to 86.7% at 50%, where the smallest value of the optical band gap energy is obtained. In addition to the improvement in crystallinity of the films, the nitrogen flow rate plays a crucial role in the fabrication of high-quality indium oxide films and devices. PMID:24245335

  20. Phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, B; Watthanathon, J; Ruangjirachuporn, P

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the average phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate, as well as the relationship between each of these parameters during two conditions (normal and deep breaths). Researchers expect to use these averages in screening of voice disorders. One hundred and three subjects, 67 males and 36 females, were studied. The instruments were a 9 liter respirometer, a tape recorder and a stop watch. The results indicated that the parameters for males were significantly greater than those for females. In addition, the findings suggested that the values of mean phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate during deep breath were significantly greater than those during normal breath (p < 0.05). The phonation time was inversely related to the air flow rate. However, there was a positive relationship between phonation time and phonation volume, as well as between phonation volume and air flow rate. The findings supported our hypothesises.

  1. Measurement of cerebral blood flow rate and its relationship with brain function using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Dou, Shidan; Ma, Yushu; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Activity of brain neurons will lead to changes in local blood flow rate (BFR). Thus, it is important to measure the local BFR of cerebral cortex on research of neuron activity in vivo, such as rehabilitation evaluation after stroke, etc. Currently, laser Doppler flowmetry is commonly used for blood flow measurement, however, relatively low resolution limits its application. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful noninvasive 3D imaging modality with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, OCT can provide flow distribution image by calculating Doppler frequency shift which makes it possible for blood flow rate measurement. In this paper, we applied OCT to measure the blood flow rate of the primary motor cortex in rats. The animal was immobilized and anesthetized with isoflurane, an incision was made along the sagittal suture, and bone was exposed. A skull window was opened on the primary motor cortex. Then, blood flow rate changes in the primary motor cortex were monitored by our homemade spectral domain OCT with a stimulation of the passive movement of the front legs. Finally, we established the relationship between blood flow rate and the test design. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of OCT in the evaluation of cerebral cortex function.

  2. Salivary flow rate and pH during prolonged gum chewing in humans.

    PubMed

    Polland, K E; Higgins, F; Orchardson, R

    2003-09-01

    Gum chewing for 20 min causes an increase in salivary flow rate and salivary pH. Most people chew gum for longer than 20 min, and our aim was to determine how whole mouth salivary flow rate and pH might adapt during prolonged gum chewing. Resting saliva was collected over 5 min; gum-stimulated saliva was collected at intervals during 90 min, chewing a single pellet (1.5 g) of mint-flavoured, sugar-free gum (n = 19). Subjects chewed at their own preferred rate and style. Both salivary flow rate and pH were increased above resting levels for the entire 90 min. The salivary flow was significantly greater (anovaP < 0.05) than resting flows up to 55-min chewing. The saliva pH remained significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than the resting pH even after 90-min chewing. When the experiment was repeated with the gum pellets replaced at 30 and 60 min (n = 9), similar increases in salivary flow rate and pH were found. In the latter experiment, there was no evidence of any cumulative effects on flow or pH. The persistent increase in salivary pH in particular could be beneficial to oral and dental health. PMID:12950965

  3. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  4. Are gingival and periodontal conditions related to salivary gland flow rates in healthy individuals?

    PubMed

    Crow, H C; Ship, J A

    1995-11-01

    Some have suggested that gingival and periodontal health is related to salivary gland function; however, there are few data to support this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if correlations existed between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in people of different ages. The results suggest that there is no consistent relationship between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in healthy people. PMID:7499648

  5. Pressure difference-flow rate variation in a femoral artery branch casting of man for steady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    In-vitro, steady flow in a casting of the profunda femoris branch of the femoral artery of man was studied by measuring pressure differences in the main lumen and also in the branch over a large Reynolds number range from 200 to 1600. Effects of viscous and inviscid flows in this femoral artery branch were demonstrated quantitatively. The critical ratio of the flow rate in the branch to the upstream main lumen in this casting was found to be 0.4, above which the inviscid flow analysis indicated a pressure rise and below which it yielded a pressure drop in the main lumen across the branch junction. Pressure rises were experimentally found to occur both in the main lumen and in the branch for certain ranges of the aforementioned ratio.

  6. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels.

  7. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  8. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F J; Nam, Ahhyun S; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E; Padera, Timothy P; Vakoc, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  9. Flow rate dictates permeability enhancement during fluid pressure oscillations in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Seismic waves have been observed to increase the permeability in fractured aquifers. A detailed, predictive understanding of the process has been hampered by a lack of constraint on the primary physical controls. What aspect of the oscillatory forcing is most important in determining the magnitude of the permeability enhancement? Here we present laboratory results showing that flow rate is the primary control on permeability increases in the laboratory. We fractured Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses of tens of megapascals and applied dynamic fluid stresses via pore pressure oscillations. In each experiment, we varied either the amplitude or the frequency of the pressure changes. Amplitude and frequency each separately correlated with the resultant permeability increase. More importantly, the permeability changes correlate with the flow rate in each configuration, regardless of whether flow rate variations were driven by varying amplitude or frequency. We also track the permeability evolution during a single set of oscillations by measuring the phase lags (time delays) of successive oscillations. Interpreting the responses with a poroelastic model shows that 80% of the permeability enhancement is reached during the first oscillation and the final permeability enhancement scales exponentially with the imposed change in flow rate integrated over the rock volume. The establishment of flow rate as the primary control on permeability enhancement from seismic waves opens the door to quantitative studies of earthquake-hydrogeological coupling. The result also suggests that reservoir permeability could be engineered by imposing dynamic stresses and changes in flow rate.

  10. Flow rate dictates permeability enhancement during fluid pressure oscillations in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Elsworth, D.; Marone, C.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic waves have been observed to increase the permeability in fractured aquifers. A detailed, predictive understanding of the process has been hampered by a lack of constraint on the primary physical controls. What aspect of the oscillatory forcing is most important in determining the magnitude of the permeability enhancement? Here we present laboratory results showing that flow rate is the primary control on permeability increases in the laboratory. We fractured Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses of tens of megapascals, and applied dynamic fluid-stresses via pore pressure oscillations. In each experiment, we varied either the amplitude or the frequency of the pressure changes. Amplitude and frequency each separately correlated with the resultant permeability increase. More importantly, the permeability changes correlate with the flow rate in each configuration, regardless of whether flow rate variations were driven by varying amplitude or frequency. We also track the permeability evolution during a single set of oscillations by measuring the phase lags (time delays) of successive oscillations. Interpreting the responses with a poroelastic model shows that 80% of the permeability enhancement is reached during the first oscillation and the final permeability enhancement scales exponentially with the imposed change in flow rate integrated over the rock volume. The establishment of flow rate as the primary control on permeability enhancement from seismic waves opens the door to quantitative studies of earthquake-hydrogeological coupling. The result also suggests that reservoir permeability could be engineered by imposing dynamic stresses and changes in flow rate.

  11. Perfusion flow rate substantially contributes to the performance of the HepaRG-AMC-bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Nibourg, Geert A A; Boer, Justin D; van der Hoeven, Tessa V; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; van Gulik, Thomas M; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2012-12-01

    Bioartificial livers (BALs) are bioreactors containing liver cells that provide extracorporeal liver support to liver-failure patients. Theoretically, the plasma perfusion flow rate through a BAL is an important determinant of its functionality. Low flow rates can limit functionality due to limited substrate availability, and high flow rates can induce cell damage. This hypothesis was tested by perfusing the AMC-BAL loaded with the liver cell line HepaRG at four different medium flow rates (0.3, 1.5, 5, and 10 mL/min). Hepatic functions ammonia elimination, urea production, lactate consumption, and 6β-hydroxylation of testosterone showed 2-20-fold higher rates at 5 mL/min compared to 0.3 mL/min, while cell damage remained stable. However, at 10 mL/min cell damage was twofold higher, and maximal hepatic functionality was not changed, except for an increase in lactate elimination. On the other hand, only a low flow rate of 0.3 mL/min allowed for an accurate measurement of the ammonia and lactate mass balance across the bioreactor, which is useful for monitoring the BAL's condition during treatment. These results show that (1) the functionality of a BAL highly depends on the perfusion rate; (2) there is a universal optimal flow rate based on various function and cell damage parameters (5 mL/min for HepaRG-BAL); and (3) in the current set-up the mass balance of substrate, metabolite, or cell damage markers between in-and out-flow of the bioreactor can only be determined at a suboptimal, low, perfusion rate (0.3 mL/min for HepaRG-BAL).

  12. Multi-wave ultrasonic Doppler method for measuring high flow-rates using staggered pulse intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ei; Murakawa, Hideki; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Asano, Hitoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2016-02-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) can obtain a velocity profile along the path of an ultrasonic beam. However, the UDM measurement volume is relatively large and it is known that the measurement volume affects the measurement accuracy. In this study, the effect of the measurement volume on velocity and flow rate measurements is analytically and experimentally evaluated. The velocities measured using UDM are considered to be ensemble-averaged values over the measurement volume in order to analyze the velocity error due to the measurement volume, while the flow rates are calculated from the integration of the velocity profile across the pipe. The analytical results show that the channel width, i.e. the spatial resolution along the ultrasonic beam axis, rather than the ultrasonic beam diameter, strongly influences the flow rate measurement. To improve the accuracy of the flow rate, a novel method using a multi-wave ultrasonic transducer consisting of two piezo-electric elements with different basic frequencies is proposed to minimize the size of the measurement volume in the near-wall region of a pipe flow. The velocity profiles in the near-wall region are measured using an 8 MHz sensor with a small diameter, while those far from the transducer are measured using a hollow 2 MHz sensor in the multi-wave transducer. The applicability of the multi-wave transducer was experimentally investigated using the water flow-rate calibration facility at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). As a result, the errors in the flow rate were found to be below  -1%, while the multi-wave method is shown to be particularly effective for measuring higher flow rates in a large-diameter pipe.

  13. Effects of coil location and injection flow rate in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Apelian, D.; Farouk, B.

    1985-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed to investigate the effects of central carrier gas flow rate and coil location in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch. Solution algorithm is based on the primitive variable formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and includes a pseudo two-dimensional electromagnetic field model. Computational results have shown that with increasing carrier gas flow rate, the plasma plume is penetrated and the back flow due to the magnetic pumping effects is diminished. This facilitates the delivery of powder particles into the discharge region. However, the plasma plume is also disturbed significantly thus enhancing power loss.

  14. Signal processing circuit for a mass flow rate digital meter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Hameed, Kamal Hilal; Abdul-Karim, Majid A. H.

    1987-07-01

    This paper introduces the design of a signal processing circuit which can be used in conjunction with additional arrangement for measuring gas mass flow rate. Measurement is based on Bernoulli's equation for subsonic flow. Voltages representing gas static pressure, static temperature, and difference pressure generated across an orifice plate are supposed to be taken from appropriate transducers. These voltages are processed with this circuit in such a way as to produce a digital number representing the mass flow rate value. The circuit shows a good accuracy result with uncertainty of about ±0.1%.

  15. A measurement method of the flow rate in a pipe using a microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Beum; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2002-09-01

    A method of measuring the flow rate in a pipe is proposed. The method utilizes one-dimensional acoustic pressure signals that are generated by a loud speaker. A microphone array mounted flush with the inner pipe wall is used to measure the signals. A formula for the flow rate, which is a function of the change of wave number, is derived from a simple mathematical model of sound field in the pipe conveying a viscous fluid. The change of the wave number, which is one of the results caused by flow, is estimated from the recursive relation among the measured microphone array signals. Since measurement errors, due to extraneous measurement noise and mismatch of response characteristics between microphones, exist in the estimated flow rate, a method of compensating the errors is proposed. By using this measurement method, the flow rate can be obtained more accurately than that of our previous method. To verify applicability of the measurement method, numerical simulation and experiments are performed. The estimated flow rates are within 5% error bound. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  16. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recording at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. (4) Flow measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L.... (5) Valve or other means to restrict or reduce the sample flow rate to a value at least 10 percent below the design flow rate (16.67 L/min). If appropriate, the valve of the flow measurement adaptor...

  17. Flow rates and warming efficacy with Hotline and Ranger blood/fluid warmers.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Peter E; Delagarza, Miguel A; Pulaski, Jaime J; Smith, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    The heating capabilities of a water bath blood/fluid warmer, Hotline, have proven superior to those of other devices. The dry heat warmer Ranger has not previously been compared with the Hotline. We evaluated these devices in terms of flow rates and efficacy of warming. We delivered room temperature (21 degrees C) saline and 10 degrees C packed red blood cells (RBCs) by using 90 mm Hg (gravity equivalent) and 300 mm Hg bag pressure and various sizes of IV catheters. The outflow from each device was connected to an inline thermistor, and simultaneous measurements of outflow temperature and flow volume per minute were recorded. Additional data points were obtained with a roller pump that delivered flows of 1-6 L/h through each device. We calculated the effect of these flow rates and outflow temperatures on the mean body temperature (MBT) of a 70-kg patient. The Hotline and Ranger had similar flow rates at 90 and 300 mm Hg pressure infusion when studied with various sizes of IV catheters. Hotline was able to deliver warmer RBCs and saline at slower flow rates (1-4 L/h), but because changes in MBT were almost identical, there was no clinically important advantage, and almost no heat was transferred at these slower flow rates. At more rapid flow rates (>4 L/h), the Ranger warmed RBCs and saline better and produced smaller decreases in MBT than the Hotline. The use of the Hotline for rapid infusions, especially of cold RBCs, is not recommended because of low outflow temperatures and decreases in MBT that were three times larger than those seen with the Ranger. PMID:15333412

  18. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use. PMID:20582212

  19. Effect of Various Sugary Beverages on Salivary pH, Flow Rate, and Oral Clearance Rate amongst Adults.

    PubMed

    Hans, Rinki; Thomas, Susan; Garla, Bharat; Dagli, Rushabh J; Hans, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diet is a major aetiological factor for dental caries and enamel erosion. This study was undertaken with the aim of assessing the effect of selected locally available beverages on salivary pH, flow rate, and oral clearance rate amongst adults. Materials and Method. This clinical trial comprised 120 subjects. Test beverages undertaken were pepsi, fruit drink, coffee, and sweetened milk. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test were applied in the statistical tests. Results. It was found that salivary pH decreased for all the beverages immediately after consumption and the salivary flow rate increased after their consumption. The oral clearance rate of sweetened milk was found to be the least at 6.5 minutes and that of pepsi was found to be 13 minutes. However, the oral clearance rates of fruit drink and coffee were found to be equal at 15 minutes. Conclusion. Although it was found out that liquids cleared rapidly from the oral cavity, they had a significant cariogenic and erosive potential. Hence, it is always advised to minimise the consumption of beverages, especially amongst children and young adults to maintain a good oral health.

  20. Effect of Various Sugary Beverages on Salivary pH, Flow Rate, and Oral Clearance Rate amongst Adults.

    PubMed

    Hans, Rinki; Thomas, Susan; Garla, Bharat; Dagli, Rushabh J; Hans, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diet is a major aetiological factor for dental caries and enamel erosion. This study was undertaken with the aim of assessing the effect of selected locally available beverages on salivary pH, flow rate, and oral clearance rate amongst adults. Materials and Method. This clinical trial comprised 120 subjects. Test beverages undertaken were pepsi, fruit drink, coffee, and sweetened milk. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test were applied in the statistical tests. Results. It was found that salivary pH decreased for all the beverages immediately after consumption and the salivary flow rate increased after their consumption. The oral clearance rate of sweetened milk was found to be the least at 6.5 minutes and that of pepsi was found to be 13 minutes. However, the oral clearance rates of fruit drink and coffee were found to be equal at 15 minutes. Conclusion. Although it was found out that liquids cleared rapidly from the oral cavity, they had a significant cariogenic and erosive potential. Hence, it is always advised to minimise the consumption of beverages, especially amongst children and young adults to maintain a good oral health. PMID:27051556

  1. Effect of Various Sugary Beverages on Salivary pH, Flow Rate, and Oral Clearance Rate amongst Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Rinki; Thomas, Susan; Garla, Bharat; Dagli, Rushabh J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diet is a major aetiological factor for dental caries and enamel erosion. This study was undertaken with the aim of assessing the effect of selected locally available beverages on salivary pH, flow rate, and oral clearance rate amongst adults. Materials and Method. This clinical trial comprised 120 subjects. Test beverages undertaken were pepsi, fruit drink, coffee, and sweetened milk. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test were applied in the statistical tests. Results. It was found that salivary pH decreased for all the beverages immediately after consumption and the salivary flow rate increased after their consumption. The oral clearance rate of sweetened milk was found to be the least at 6.5 minutes and that of pepsi was found to be 13 minutes. However, the oral clearance rates of fruit drink and coffee were found to be equal at 15 minutes. Conclusion. Although it was found out that liquids cleared rapidly from the oral cavity, they had a significant cariogenic and erosive potential. Hence, it is always advised to minimise the consumption of beverages, especially amongst children and young adults to maintain a good oral health. PMID:27051556

  2. Improving Flow Response of a Variable-rate Aerial Application System by Interactive Refinement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate response of a variable-rate aerial application controller to changing flow rates and to improve its response at correspondingly varying system pressures. System improvements have been made by refinement of the control algorithms over time in collaboration with ...

  3. Preparation of monodisperse polystyrene/silica core-shell nano-composite abrasive with controllable size and its chemical mechanical polishing performance on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Zefang; Qin, Fei; Liu, Weili; Song, Zhitang

    2011-11-01

    Monodisperse silica-coated polystyrene (PS) nano-composite abrasives with controllable size were prepared via a two-step process. Monodisperse positively charged PS colloids were synthesized via polymerization of styrene by using a cationic initiator. In the subsequent coating process, silica formed shell on the surfaces of core PS particles via the ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane. Neither centrifugation/water wash/redispersion cycle process nor surface modification or addition surfactant was needed in the whole process. The morphology of the abrasives was characterized by scanning electron microscope. Transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis results indicated that silica layer was successfully coated onto the surfaces of PS particles. Composite abrasive has a core-shell structure and smooth surface. The chemical mechanical polishing performances of the composite abrasive and conventional colloidal silica abrasive on blanket copper wafers were investigated. The root mean square roughness decreases from 4.27 nm to 0.56 nm using composite abrasive. The PS/SiO2 core-shell composite abrasives exhibited little higher material removal rate than silica abrasives.

  4. Influence of flow rate on aerosol particle size distributions from pressurized and breath-actuated inhalers.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Chan, H K; Brown, K F

    1998-01-01

    Particle size distribution of delivered aerosols and the total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler are important determinants of pulmonary deposition and response to inhalation therapy. Inhalation flow rate may vary between patients and from dose to dose. The Andersen Sampler (AS) cascade impactor operated at flow rates of 30 and 55 L/min and the Marple-Miller Impactor (MMI) operated at flow rates of 30, 55, and 80 L/min were used in this study to investigate the influence of airflow rate on the particle size distributions of inhalation products. Total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler, fine particle mass, fine particle fraction, percentage of nonrespirable particles, and amount of formulation retained within the inhaler were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry for several commercial bronchodilator products purchased in the marketplace, including a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), breath-actuated pressurized inhaler (BAMDI), and three dry powder inhalers (DPIs), two containing salbutamol sulphate and the other containing terbutaline sulphate. Varying the flow rate through the cascade impactor produced no significant change in performance of the pressurized inhalers. Increasing the flow rate produced a greater mass of drug delivered and an increase in respirable particle mass and fraction from all DPIs tested. PMID:10346666

  5. Silica Measurement with High Flow Rate Respirable Size Selective Samplers: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Kashon, Michael; Lee, Larry A; Healy, Catherine B; Coggins, Marie A; Susi, Pam; O'Brien, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    High and low flow rate respirable size selective samplers including the CIP10-R (10 l min(-1)), FSP10 (11.2 l min(-1)), GK2.69 (4.4 l min(-1)), 10-mm nylon (1.7 l min(-1)), and Higgins-Dewell type (2.2 l min(-1)) were compared via side-by-side sampling in workplaces for respirable crystalline silica measurement. Sampling was conducted at eight different occupational sites in the USA and five different stonemasonry sites in Ireland. A total of 536 (268 pairs) personal samples and 55 area samples were collected. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine respirable dust mass and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine quartz mass. Ratios of respirable dust mass concentration, quartz mass concentration, respirable dust mass, and quartz mass from high and low flow rate samplers were compared. In general, samplers did not show significant differences greater than 30% in respirable dust mass concentration and quartz mass concentration when outliers (ratio <0.3 or >3.0) were removed from the analysis. The frequency of samples above the limit of detection and limit of quantification of quartz was significantly higher for the CIP10-R and FSP10 samplers compared to low flow rate samplers, while the GK2.69 cyclone did not show significant difference from low flow rate samplers. High flow rate samplers collected significantly more respirable dust and quartz than low flow rate samplers as expected indicating that utilizing high flow rate samplers might improve precision in quartz measurement. Although the samplers did not show significant differences in respirable dust and quartz concentrations, other practical attributes might make them more or less suitable for personal sampling.

  6. Individual and synergistic effects of sniffing frequency and flow rate on olfactory bulb activity.

    PubMed

    Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Hegoburu, Chloé; Litaudon, Philippe; Garcia, Samuel; Fourcaud-Trocmé, Nicolas; Buonviso, Nathalie

    2011-12-01

    Is faster or stronger sniffing important for the olfactory system? Odorant molecules are captured by sniffing. The features of sniffing constrain both the temporality and intensity of the input to the olfactory structures. In this context, it is clear that variations in both the sniff frequency and flow rate have a major impact on the activation of olfactory structures. However, the question of how frequency and flow rate individually or synergistically impact bulbar output has not been answered. We have addressed this question using multiple experimental approaches. In double-tracheotomized, anesthetized rats, we recorded both the bulbar local field potential (LFP) and mitral/tufted cells' activities when the sampling flow rate and frequency were controlled independently. We found that a tradeoff between the sampling frequency and the flow rate could maintain olfactory bulb sampling-related rhythmicity and that only an increase in flow rate could induce a faster, odor-evoked response. LFP and sniffing were recorded in awake rats. We found that sampling-related rhythmicity was maintained during high-frequency sniffing. Furthermore, we observed that the covariation between the frequency and flow rate, which was necessary for the tradeoff seen in the anesthetized preparations, also occurred in awake animals. Our study shows that the sampling frequency and flow rate can act either independently or synergistically on bulbar output to shape the neuronal message. The system likely takes advantage of this flexibility to adapt sniffing strategies to animal behavior. Our study provides additional support for the idea that sniffing and olfaction function in an integrated manner.

  7. Silica Measurement with High Flow Rate Respirable Size Selective Samplers: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Kashon, Michael; Lee, Larry A.; Healy, Catherine B.; Coggins, Marie A.; Susi, Pam; O’Brien, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    High and low flow rate respirable size selective samplers including the CIP10-R (10 l min−1), FSP10 (11.2 l min−1), GK2.69 (4.4 l min−1), 10-mm nylon (1.7 l min−1), and Higgins-Dewell type (2.2 l min−1) were compared via side-by-side sampling in workplaces for respirable crystalline silica measurement. Sampling was conducted at eight different occupational sites in the USA and five different stonemasonry sites in Ireland. A total of 536 (268 pairs) personal samples and 55 area samples were collected. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine respirable dust mass and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine quartz mass. Ratios of respirable dust mass concentration, quartz mass concentration, respirable dust mass, and quartz mass from high and low flow rate samplers were compared. In general, samplers did not show significant differences greater than 30% in respirable dust mass concentration and quartz mass concentration when outliers (ratio <0.3 or >3.0) were removed from the analysis. The frequency of samples above the limit of detection and limit of quantification of quartz was significantly higher for the CIP10-R and FSP10 samplers compared to low flow rate samplers, while the GK2.69 cyclone did not show significant difference from low flow rate samplers. High flow rate samplers collected significantly more respirable dust and quartz than low flow rate samplers as expected indicating that utilizing high flow rate samplers might improve precision in quartz measurement. Although the samplers did not show significant differences in respirable dust and quartz concentrations, other practical attributes might make them more or less suitable for personal sampling. PMID:26608952

  8. Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings

    DOEpatents

    Ellingson, William A.; Forster, George A.

    1999-11-02

    Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

  9. Colloidal asphaltene deposition in laminar pipe flow: Flow rate and parametric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, S. M.; Loewenberg, M.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2015-08-01

    Deposition from a suspended phase onto a surface can aversely affect everyday transport processes on a variety of scales, from mineral scale corrosion of household plumbing systems to asphaltene deposition in large-scale pipelines in the petroleum industry. While petroleum may be a single fluid phase under reservoir conditions, depressurization upon production often induces a phase transition in the fluid, resulting in the precipitation of asphaltene material which readily aggregates to the colloidal scale and deposits on metallic surfaces. Colloidal asphaltene deposition in wellbores and pipelines can be especially problematic for industrial purposes, where cleanup processes necessitate costly operational shutdowns. In order to better understand the parametric dependence of deposition which leads to flow blockages, we carry out lab-scale experiments under a variety of material and flow conditions. We develop a parametric scaling model to understand the fluid dynamics and transport considerations governing deposition. The lab-scale experiments are performed by injecting precipitating petroleum fluid mixtures into a small metal pipe, which results in deposition and clogging, assessed by measuring the pressure drop across the pipe. Parametric scaling arguments suggest that the clogging behavior is determined by a combination of the Peclet number, volume fraction of depositing material, and the volume of the injection itself.

  10. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  11. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial..., the water consumption flow rate of commercial prerinse spray valves. (b) Testing and Calculations. The test procedure to determine the water consumption flow rate for prerinse spray valves, expressed...

  12. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial..., the water consumption flow rate of commercial prerinse spray valves. (b) Testing and Calculations. The test procedure to determine the water consumption flow rate for prerinse spray valves, expressed...

  13. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  14. Milk Flow Rates From Bottle Nipples Used for Feeding Infants Who Are Hospitalized

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M.; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W. Brant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study tested the milk flow rates and variability in flow of currently available nipples used for bottle-feeding infants who are hospitalized. Method Clinicians in 3 countries were surveyed regarding nipples available to them for feeding infants who are hospitalized. Twenty-nine nipple types were identified, and 10 nipples of each type were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in 1 min using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation were used to compare nipples within brand and within category (i.e., Slow, Standard, Premature). Results Flow rates varied widely between nipples, ranging from 2.10 mL/min for the Enfamil Cross-Cut to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown's Y-Cut Standard Neck. Variability of flow rates among nipples of the same type ranged from a coefficient of variation of 0.05 for Dr. Brown's Level 1 Standard- and Wide-Neck to 0.42 for the Enfamil Cross-Cut. Mean coefficient of variation by brand ranged from 0.08 for Dr. Brown's to 0.36 for Bionix. Conclusions Milk flow is an easily manipulated variable that may contribute to the degree of physiologic instability experienced by infants who are medically fragile during oral feeding. This study provides clinicians with information to guide appropriate selection of bottle nipples for feeding infants who are hospitalized. PMID:26172340

  15. Mechanism for measurement of flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid in hydrocephalus shunts.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Kovar, Spencer; Qu, Peng; Inwald, David; Williams, Evan; Qu, Hongwei; Zakalik, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or existence of CSF flow inside the shunt tube after shunt implant have been reported as tedious process for both patients and doctors; this paper outlines a potential in vitro flow rate measurement method for CSF in the hydrocephalus shunt. The use of implantable titanium elements in the shunt has been proposed to allow for an accurate temperature measurement along the shunt for prediction of CSF flow rate. The CSF flow velocity can be deduced by decoupling the thermal transfer in the measured differential time at a pair of measurement spots of the titanium elements. Finite element analyses on the fluidic and thermal behaviors of the shunt system have been conducted. Preliminary bench-top measurements on a simulated system have been carried out. The measured flow rates, ranging from 0.5 mm/sec to 1.0 mm/sec, which is clinically practical, demonstrate good agreements with the simulation results.

  16. Mechanism for measurement of flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid in hydrocephalus shunts.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Kovar, Spencer; Qu, Peng; Inwald, David; Williams, Evan; Qu, Hongwei; Zakalik, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or existence of CSF flow inside the shunt tube after shunt implant have been reported as tedious process for both patients and doctors; this paper outlines a potential in vitro flow rate measurement method for CSF in the hydrocephalus shunt. The use of implantable titanium elements in the shunt has been proposed to allow for an accurate temperature measurement along the shunt for prediction of CSF flow rate. The CSF flow velocity can be deduced by decoupling the thermal transfer in the measured differential time at a pair of measurement spots of the titanium elements. Finite element analyses on the fluidic and thermal behaviors of the shunt system have been conducted. Preliminary bench-top measurements on a simulated system have been carried out. The measured flow rates, ranging from 0.5 mm/sec to 1.0 mm/sec, which is clinically practical, demonstrate good agreements with the simulation results. PMID:25570411

  17. On rating curve variability in presence of movable bed and unsteady flow. Applications to Tuscan rivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minatti, Lorenzo; Nicoletta De Cicco, Pina; Paris, Enio

    2014-05-01

    In common engineering practice, rating curves are obtained from direct stage-discharge measurements or, more often, from stage measurements coupled with flow simulations. The present work mainly focuses on the latter technique, where stage-measuring gauges are usually installed on bridges with flow conditions likely to be influenced by local geometry constraints. In such cases, backwater flow and flow transition to supercritical state may occur, influencing sediment transport capacity and triggering more intense changes in river morphology. The unsteadiness of the flow hydrograph may play an important role too, according to the velocity of its rising and falling limbs. Nevertheless, the simulations conducted to build a rating curve are often carried out with steady flow and fixed bed conditions where the afore-mentioned effects are not taken into account at all. Numerical simulations with mobile bed and different unsteady flow conditions have been conducted on some real case studies in the rivers of Tuscany (Italy), in order to assess how rating curves change with respect to the "standard" one (that is, the classical steady flow rating curve). A 1D finite volume numerical model (REMo, River Evolution Modeler) has been employed for the simulations. The model solves the 1D Shallow Water equations coupled with the sediments continuity equation in composite channels, where the overbanks are treated with fixed bed conditions while the main channel can either aggrade or be scoured. The model employs an explicit scheme with 2nd order accuracy in both space and time: this allows the correct handling of moderately stiff source terms via a local corrector step. Such capability is very important for the applications of the present work as it allows the modelling of abrupt contractions and jumps in bed bottom elevations which often occur near bridges. The outcomes of the simulations are critically analyzed in order to provide a first insight on the conditions inducing

  18. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  19. The effect on human salivary flow rate of the temperature of a gustatory stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dawes, C; O'Connor, A M; Aspen, J M

    2000-11-01

    In the first study, whole saliva was collected from ten adults during stimulation with sour, carbonated, sweet and water stimuli in the form of 5-ml of ice at about -10 degrees C or of liquids at 0, 8, 20 or 37 degrees C. Parotid saliva was also collected in response to ice or infusion into the mouth of the liquids at different temperatures. Another group of ten adults also collected whole saliva in response to water at 20 degrees C, with or without the presence in the mouth of an acrylic cube of dimensions similar to those of the ice. In a second study, 20 adults collected whole saliva in response to stimulation with 5 ml of water and of an astringent stimulus at 0, 8, 37 and 70 degrees C. In the first study, flow rates fell in the order sour, carbonated, sweet and water and flow rates in response to stimuli in the form of ice were very significantly higher than in response to the corresponding liquids at the four different temperatures. With the sour stimulus, liquids at 0 and 8 degrees C elicited higher flow rates than liquids at 20 or 37 degrees C. Although the presence in the mouth of the acrylic block increased the flow rate of whole saliva, the increase was only about 30% of that achieved with ice. In the second study, the astringent stimulus was a more effective salivary stimulus than water; flow rates were significantly higher in response to liquids at 0 and 8 degrees C than at the higher temperatures and flow rates in response to liquids at 37 degrees C were significantly lower than with the other temperatures. In summary, stimuli in the form of ice were the most effective and liquids at 37 degrees C were least effective in stimulating salivary flow. PMID:11000382

  20. Fluid bed dryer efficient with abrasive copper concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Marczeski, C.D.; Hodel, A.E.

    1985-11-01

    Thermally efficient dryers were needed to remove 11-12% moisture from very fine (70%, -325 mesh), copper concentrate at Asarco, Inc., in Hayden, AZ. More than 128 t/hr of the wet, dust-like material produced by the copper mine's grinders had to be made bone dry (0.1% moisture) before being fed to a flash smelting furnace. Two 12 ft diam fluidized bed dryers, each with a capacity of 64 wet t/hr, were installed to dry the copper concentrate. Each dryer's push/pull air system employs a 1250 hp fluidizing air fan to provide air at 80 in (wc) static pressure. A natural gas fired heater raises the air temperature to 600/sup 0/F to dry the dense (100 lb/cu ft bulk density) ore. The dense, wet copper concentrate is fed to the dryer from the top, countercurrent to the flow of the light, dry product. Drying begins when the wet feed reaches the fluidized bed of gravel rock. Lighter, dried material is conveyed by the air back to the top of the dryer and out through a duct to the baghouse. The throughput of the dryer is determined by the wetness of the concentrate and the temperature of the fluidizing air. Asarco, Inc. has found the fluid bed drying system simple and efficient to operate. Fuel gas consumption of the dryer is on the order of 1000 cu ft/ton of wet feed. The abrasion resistant lining provided in the dryer (a hard brick lining in the rock bed zone; castable refractory in the top and in the ducting) and ceramic tiles at the inlet of the dust collector have been effective in long term operation with the highly abrasive product.

  1. An in vivo assessment of the influence of needle gauges on endodontic irrigation flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Gopikrishna, Velayutham; Sibi, Swamy; Archana, Durvasulu; Pradeep Kumar, Angabakkam Rajasekaran; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to assess the influence of irrigation needle gauge on endodontic irrigation flow rates. Settings and Design: In vivo assessment. Materials and Methods: Five specialist endodontists performed intracanal irrigation procedures on 50 mesiobuccal canal of mandibular first molars using three different irrigation needle gauges. Data of time taken for irrigation was recorded by an irrigation testing system and analyzed using independent sample “T” test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Statistical Analysis Used: The following tests were used for the statistical analysis: Independent sample “T” test, one-way ANOVA test, and post hoc multiple comparison was carried out using Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 for Windows. Results: The average flow rate of 26 gauge was 0.27 mLs−1, of 27 gauge was 0.19 mLs−1, and of 30 gauge was 0.09 mls−1. There was statistical significance among the gauges (P < 0.001). 26 gauge had highest flow rate when compared with other groups followed by 27 gauge and 30 gauge respectively. The operator variability for flow rate of three endodontic irrigation needle gauges (26 gauge, 27 gauge, and 30 gauge) was found to be not significant. Conclusions: Needle gauge has significant influence on endodontic irrigation flow rate. PMID:27099430

  2. Skeletal blood flow, iliac histomorphometry, and strontium kinetics in osteoporosis: a relationship between blood flow and corrected apposition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, J.; Arlot, M.; Wootton, R.; Edouard, C.; Tellez, M.; Hesp, R.; Green, J.R.; Meunier, P.J.

    1988-06-01

    In 20 untreated patients with idiopathic or postmenopausal osteoporosis, kinetic studies of skeletal blood flow (using /sup 18/F) and bone turnover (using /sup 85/Sr) were combined with dynamic histomorphometry performed on transiliac biopsies taken within 6 weeks of each other. In 8 patients the combined studies were repeated after treatment. A further 5 patients were studied only while receiving treatment. As expected, skeletal blood flow measured by /sup 18/F correlated with an index of /sup 85/Sr uptake into the exchangeable pools of bone. Additionally and independently, skeletal blood flow correlated with an index of the work rate of the osteoblasts in each multicellular unit of bone (the corrected apposition rate of Parfitt). These correlations were statistically significant in both the untreated patients (P less than 0.05) and the whole group (P less than 0.001). Further indices related to bone turnover at the level of the skeleton as a whole were significantly associated with skeletal blood flow only in the combined group.

  3. Effects of shear rate, confinement, and particle parameters on margination in blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N.; Aidun, Cyrus K.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of flow and particle properties on margination of particles in red blood cell (RBC) suspensions is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cellar blood flow. We focus on margination of particles in the flow of moderately dense suspensions of RBCs. We hypothesize that margination rate in nondilute suspensions is mainly driven by the RBC-enhanced diffusion of marginating particles in the RBC-filled region. We derive a scaling law for margination length in a straight channel. Margination length increases cubically with channel height and is independent of shear rate. We verify this scaling law for margination length by DNS of flowing RBCs and marginating particles. We also show that rigidity and size both lead to particle margination with rigidity having a more significant effect compared to size within the range of parameters in this study.

  4. Turbulent transport measurements in a cold model of GT-burner at realistic flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobyzov, Oleg; Chikishev, Leonid; Lobasov, Alexey; Sharaborin, Dmitriy; Dulin, Vladimir; Bilsky, Artur; Tsatiashvili, Vakhtang; Avgustinovich, Valery; Markovich, Dmitriy

    2016-03-01

    In the present work simultaneous velocity field and passive admixture concentration field measurements at realistic flow-rates conditions in a non-reacting flow in a model of combustion chamber with an industrial mixing device are reported. In the experiments for safety reasons the real fuel (natural gas) was replaced with neon gas to simulate stratification in a strongly swirling flow. Measurements were performed by means of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry technique (PIV) at Reynolds number, based on the mean flow rate and nozzle diameter, ≈300 000. Details on experimental technique, features of the experimental setup, images and data preprocessing procedures and results of performed measurements are given in the paper. In addition to the raw velocity and admixture concentration data in-depth evaluation approaches aimed for estimation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) components, assessment of turbulent Schmidt number and analysis of the gradient closure hypothesis from experimental data are presented in the paper.

  5. Effects of shear rate, confinement, and particle parameters on margination in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N; Aidun, Cyrus K

    2016-02-01

    The effects of flow and particle properties on margination of particles in red blood cell (RBC) suspensions is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cellar blood flow. We focus on margination of particles in the flow of moderately dense suspensions of RBCs. We hypothesize that margination rate in nondilute suspensions is mainly driven by the RBC-enhanced diffusion of marginating particles in the RBC-filled region. We derive a scaling law for margination length in a straight channel. Margination length increases cubically with channel height and is independent of shear rate. We verify this scaling law for margination length by DNS of flowing RBCs and marginating particles. We also show that rigidity and size both lead to particle margination with rigidity having a more significant effect compared to size within the range of parameters in this study. PMID:26986415

  6. Studies with sample conductivity, insertion rates, and particle deflection in a continuous flow electrophoresis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous flow electrophoresis system makes electrophoresis possible in a free-flowing film of aqueous electrolyte medium. The sample continuously enters the electrolyte at the top of the chamber and is subjected to the action of a lateral dc field. This divides the sample into fractions since each component has a distinctive electrophoretic mobility. Tests were made using monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres to determine optimum sample conductivity, insertion rates and optimum electric field applications as baseline data for future STS flight experiments. Optimum sample flow rates for the selected samples were determined to be approximately 26 micro-liters/min. Experiments with samples in deionized water yielded best results and voltages in the 20 V/cm to 30 V/cm range were optimum. Deflections of formaldehyde fixed turkey and bovine erythrocytes were determined using the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The effects of particle interactions on sample resolution and migration in the chamber was also evaluated.

  7. Model for charge/discharge-rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic flow is an important mechanism for relaxing stresses that develop due to swelling/shrinkage during charging/discharging of battery materials. Amorphous high-storage-capacity Li-Si has lower flow stresses than crystalline materials but there is evidence that the plastic flow stress depends on the conditions of charging and discharging, indicating important non-equilibrium aspects to the flow behavior. Here, a mechanistically-based constitutive model for rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous materials, such as LixSi alloys, during charging and discharging is developed based on two physical concepts: (i) excess energy is stored in the material during electrochemical charging and discharging due to the inability of the amorphous material to fully relax during the charging/discharging process and (ii) this excess energy reduces the barriers for plastic flow processes and thus reduces the applied stresses necessary to cause plastic flow. The plastic flow stress is thus a competition between the time scales of charging/discharging and the time scales of glassy relaxation. The two concepts, as well as other aspects of the model, are validated using molecular simulations on a model Li-Si system. The model is applied to examine the plastic flow behavior of typical specimen geometries due to combined charging/discharging and stress history, and the results generally rationalize experimental observations.

  8. Acute effects of black currant consumption on salivary flow rate and secretion rate of salivary immunoglobulin a in healthy smokers.

    PubMed

    Konić-Ristić, Aleksandra; Šavikin, Katarina; Zdunić, Gordana; Besu, Irina; Menković, Nebojša; Glibetić, Marija; Srdić-Rajić, Tatjana

    2015-04-01

    The role of saliva in maintaining oral health and homeostasis is based on its physicochemical properties and biological activities of its components, including salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA). Both salivary rates and immunological status of saliva are found to be compromised in smokers. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute time-dependent effect of smoking and black currant consumption on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and salivary IgA secretion rate (sIgA SR) in healthy smokers. SFR, sIgA levels in saliva, and sIgA SRs were determined in healthy smokers (n=8) at eight times of assessment within three consecutive interventions: at the baseline; 5, 30, and 60 min after smoking; 5, 30, and 60 min after black currant consumption (100 g), followed by smoking; and 5 min after black currant consumption. Smoking induced a significant delayed effect on SFR measured 60 min after smoking (P=.03), while black currant consumption preceding smoking prevented that effect. Salivary IgA concentrations and sIgA flow rates were not acutely influenced by smoking. Black currant consumption preceding smoking induced a significant decrease in sIgA concentrations 5 min after the intervention compared with the baseline (P=.046), with a further increasing trend, statistically significant, 60 min after the intervention (P=.025). Although smoking cessation is the most important strategy in the prevention of chronic diseases, the obtained results suggest that the influence of black currant consumption on negative effects of tobacco smoke on salivary flow and immunological status of saliva could partly reduce the smoking-associated risk on oral health.

  9. The influence of orifice height on flow rate of powder excipients.

    PubMed

    Zatloukal, Z; Sklubalová, Z

    2011-12-01

    The influence of the orifice height of a cylindrical, flat-bottomed hopper on the mass flow rate of the free-flowable size fractions of sodium chloride and boric acid was investigated. It was observed that a zone of sudden acceleration of the mass flow under gravity occurred when a critical orifice height had been achieved. Based on the results, an orifice diameter equal to 12 mm with a height of between 8-16 mm is recommended for the faster flow of sodium chloride while an orifice diameter equal to 8 mm with a height of less than 8mm is appropriate for the slower flow of boric acid. In summary, the orifice height should be taken into consideration as an important parameter of a cylindrical test hopper in order to obtain a reproducible and comparable mass flow as the single-point characteristic of powder flowability.

  10. Three-dimensional flow structure along simultaneously pitching and rotating wings: effect of pitch rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, M.; Rockwell, D.

    2015-04-01

    The flow structure along a simultaneously pitching and rotating wing is investigated using quantitative flow visualization. Imaging is performed for a range of pitch rates, with emphasis on the three-dimensional structure during start-up and relaxation. Surfaces of transparent iso- Q and helicity are employed to interpret the flow physics. The onset and development of the components of the vortex system, i.e., the leading-edge, tip, and trailing-edge vortices, are strongly influenced by the value of pitch rate relative to the rotation rate. Comparisons at the same angle of attack indicate that the formation of vortical structures is delayed with increasing pitch rate. However, comparisons at the same rotation angle for different values of pitch rate reveal similar flow structures, thereby indicating predominance of rotation effects. Extreme values of pitch rate can lead to radically different sequences of development of the components of the three-dimensional vortex system. Nevertheless, consistently positive vorticity flux is maintained through these components and the coherence of the vortex system is maintained.

  11. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-15

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  12. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min-1, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min-1, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l-1), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l-1 up to 4 l min-1 and 98 mV min l-1 from 4 l min-1 up to 10 l min-1). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  13. Force and vortical flow development on pitching wings at high rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Luis; Yu, Huai-Te; Ol, Michael; Granlund, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Recent experimental results of pitching flat plate wings are presented. High pitch-rate perching maneuvers are frequently used by birds for feeding and landing. Insects use very fast rotation rates at the end of each flapping stroke, which results in high thrust and precise flight. These wing motions are also of interest for engineered micro air vehicles to achieve semi-autonomous landing by unskilled operators. The wing motion considered is a constant rotation rate pitch motion from 0 to 45 degrees of an aspect-ratio-4 flat-plate wing. The goal is to gain a better understanding of force generation mechanisms and their relationship to two- and three-dimensional vortical flow structures. Leading edge, trailing edge, and tip vortices form with large separated flow regions over the wing, however comparison with linear potential flow theory gives good agreement. The evolution of the leading edge vortex is delayed for pivot axes locations downstream of the leading edge. Large forces at the end of the motion slowly return to the steady state value over more than 30 convective times. The flow in the near wake shows a brief period of vortex shedding and strong three dimensional effects. Two different three-dimensional flow features are observed: A rapid development of three-dimensionality in the core of the leading and trailing edge vortices and a swirl motion in the near wake. However the impact of these three-dimensional flow features on force development is small.

  14. The relationship between drained angle and flow rate of size fractions of powder excipients.

    PubMed

    Sklubalová, Z; Zatloukal, Z

    2009-12-01

    The influence of powder size of chosen pharmaceutical powder excipients on drained angle as well as the correlation between drained angle and the mass flow rate of certain powder size fractions were investigated in this work. A method of the indirect estimation of the three-dimensional drained angle from the mass of the residual powder was used experimentally to study the influence of powder size fractions in range of 0.200-0.630 mm for sodium chloride, sodium citrate, potassium chloride, and potassium citrate. Failures of flow significantly increased the drained angles for powder size fraction of 0.200-0.250 mm. For the uniformly flowable powder size fraction of 0.400-0.500 mm, the faster the flow rate, the smaller drained angles were observed for excipients investigated. To estimate parameters of the flow equation, the measurement of material flow rates from the hopper of different orifice sizes is needed, while the estimation of drained angle is much easier needing only one hopper. Finally, the increase of the hopper wall angle of the standard conical hopper to 70 degrees could be recommended to achieve uniform mass flow and to reduce the adverse effect of powder gliding along the hopper walls.

  15. Does Urinary Bladder Shape Affect Urinary Flow Rate in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Ateşçi, Yusuf Ziya; Aydoğdu, Özgü; Karaköse, Ayhan; Karal, Ömer; Şentürk, Utku

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of urinary bladder shape which may potentially change with advancing age, increased waist circumference, pelvic ischemia, and loosening of the urachus on bladder emptying and UFR. We retrospectively investigated the medical records of 76 men. The patients were divided into two groups according to bladder shapes in MRI scan (cone and spheric shapes). There was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of IPSS, Qmax, Qave, and waist circumference. A positive correlation has been demonstrated between mean peak urinary flow rate measured with UFM and mean flow rate calculated using the CP. There was a significant difference between mean urinary flow rates calculated with CP of cone and sphere bladder shapes. The change in the bladder shape might be a possible factor for LUTS in men and LUTS may be improved if modifiable factors including increased waist circumference and loosening of the urachus are corrected. PMID:24511301

  16. Major salivary gland flow rates in young and old, generally healthy African Americans and whites.

    PubMed

    Jones, R E; Ship, J A

    1995-02-01

    Saliva is essential to maintain and preserve oral health. Previous studies of primarily white populations demonstrated that salivary gland flow rates are age-stable in healthy adults, but there are little data on African Americans of different ages. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between age, gender, and race in unstimulated and stimulated parotid and submandibular salivary gland flow rates and to evaluate subjective responses to questions regarding salivary dysfunction. Sixty generally healthy, middle socioeconomic class African Americans and whites between the ages of 20 to 40 and 60 to 80 years were evaluated. The results indicate, in general, that objective and subjective measurements of major salivary gland flow rates are independent of age, gender, and race. Further studies are required using larger populations. These results suggest that signs and symptoms of dry mouth in the elderly regardless of race or gender should not be considered a normal sequela of aging. PMID:7897685

  17. Debris-flow deposits and watershed erosion rates near southern Death Valley, CA, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, K.M.; Menges, C.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows from the steep, granitic hillslopes of the Kingston Range, CA are commensurate in age with nearby fluvial deposits. Quaternary chronostratigraphic differentiation of debris-flow deposits is based upon time-dependent characteristics such as relative boulder strength, derived from Schmidt Hammer measurements, degree of surface desert varnish, pedogenesis, and vertical separation. Rock strength is highest for Holocene-aged boulders and decreases for Pleistocene-aged boulders weathering to grus. Volumes of age-stratified debris-flow deposits, constrained by deposit thickness above bedrock, GPS surveys, and geologic mapping, are greatest for Pleistocene deposits. Shallow landslide susceptibility, derived from a topographically based GIS model, in conjunction with deposit volumes produces watershed-scale erosion rates of ???2-47 mm ka-1, with time-averaged Holocene rates exceeding Pleistocene rates. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  18. Flow rate and humidification effects on a PEM fuel cell performance and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvelioglu, Galip H.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    A new algorithm is presented to integrate component balances along polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) channels to obtain three-dimensional results from a detailed two-dimensional finite element model. The analysis studies the cell performance at various hydrogen flow rates, air flow rates and humidification levels. This analysis shows that hydrogen and air flow rates and their relative humidity are critical to current density, membrane dry-out, and electrode flooding. Uniform current densities along the channels are known to be critical for thermal management and fuel cell life. This approach, of integrating a detailed two-dimensional across-the-channel model, is a promising method for fuel cell design due to its low computational cost compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, its applicability to a wide range of fuel cell designs, and its ease of extending to fuel cell stack models.

  19. Unsteady flows in milli- and microsystems: analysis of wall shear rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchet, F.; Legentilhomme, P.; Legrand, J.; Montillet, A.; Comiti, J.

    2011-09-01

    The particular benefits of microfluidic systems, in terms of heat and mass transfer enhancement, require conducting local flow diagnostics, especially when unsteady properties of the microflow can play a critical role at the reaction interface, as currently observed in the fields of bioengineering and chemical engineering. The present paper focuses on unsteady confined flows within microsystems characterized by various geometries of crossing channels and exhibiting high surface-to-volume ratios. An experimental analysis of the signal measured at microsensors embedded to the wall of microsystems is discussed. In the objective of performing flow diagnostics, including regime identification and wall flow structure recognition, two methods for electrochemical signal processing are investigated and compared within an experimental network of crossing minichannels. One method is based on the use of a transfer function, while the other, the so-called Sobolik solution (Sobolik et al . in Coll Czech Chem Commun 52:913-928, 1987), consists of finding a direct solution to the mass balance equation. Sobolik's method has been selected given its ability to provide a description, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (317 < Re < 3,535), for all wall shear rate fluctuations, as well as for the associated mixing scales in the power spectra density (PSD). This technique is then applied to flow within micromixers composed of two crossing microchannels in order to study highly unsteady and inhomogeneous microflows. The hydraulic diameters of the studied channels are 500 and 833 μm, respectively. Two flow patterns are investigated herein: the crossing-flow type and the impinging flow (or so called co-flow) for a Reynolds number range between 173 and 3,356. The PSD of wall shear rate fluctuations reveals various flow characteristics depending on the microchannel aspect ratio.

  20. Oral sensorial complaints, salivary flow rate and mucosal lesions in the institutionalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Glazar, I; Urek, M M; Brumini, G; Pezelj-Ribaric, S

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of oral sensorial complaints, salivary flow rate and oral mucosal lesions in the institutionalized and non-institutionalized elderly. The study included 280 institutionalized and 61 non- institutionalized elderly people. Dry mouth, burning mouth sensations, taste disturbances, salivary flow rate and oral mucosal lesions were assessed and compared between groups. A greater number of the institutionalized elderly had dry mouth (P = 0.001) and taste disturbance (P = 0.035) compared to non-institutionalized elderly. The institutionalized elderly also had significantly lower salivary flow rate (P < 0.0001). Positive correlation was found between salivary flow rate and perception of dry mouth in the institutionalized elderly (r(s) = 0.26; P < 0.05), as well as in the non-institutionalized elderly (r(s) = 0.35; P < 0.05). Moreover, positive correlation was observed between salivary flow rate and the sensation of burning mouth in the institutionalized elderly (r(s) = 0.13; P < 0.05) and non-institutionalized elderly (r(s) = 0.31; P < 0.05). The number of institutionalized elderly people with oral mucosal diseases was higher compared with non-institutionalized ones (P = 0.01). The most common oral mucosal lesions in both groups were related to wearing dentures. It can be concluded that the institutionalized elderly are significantly affected with oral sensorial complaints, including dry mouth and taste disturbance, as well as decreased salivary flow rate and oral mucosal diseases compared with the non-institutionalized elderly.

  1. Research and realization of ultrasonic gas flow rate measurement based on ultrasonic exponential model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dandan; Hou, Huirang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    For ultrasonic gas flow rate measurement based on ultrasonic exponential model, when the noise frequency is close to that of the desired signals (called similar-frequency noise) or the received signal amplitude is small and unstable at big flow rate, local convergence of the algorithm genetic-ant colony optimization-3cycles may appear, and measurement accuracy may be affected. Therefore, an improved method energy genetic-ant colony optimization-3cycles (EGACO-3cycles) is proposed to solve this problem. By judging the maximum energy position of signal, the initial parameter range of exponential model can be narrowed and then the local convergence can be avoided. Moreover, a DN100 flow rate measurement system with EGACO-3cycles method is established based on NI PCI-6110 and personal computer. A series of experiments are carried out for testing the new method and the measurement system. It is shown that local convergence doesn't appear with EGACO-3cycles method when similar-frequency noises exist and flow rate is big. Then correct time of flight can be obtained. Furthermore, through flow calibration on this system, the measurement range ratio is achieved 500:1, and the measurement accuracy is 0.5% with a low transition velocity 0.3 m/s.

  2. Unconventional Shale-Gas Resource Systems and Processes Affecting Gas Generation, Retention, Storage, and Flow Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvie, D. M.; Philp, R. P.; Jarvie, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    Geochemical and petrophysical characterization of various shale-gas systems in the U.S. indicates a variety of unconventional shale-gas system types. The most basic distinction is gas type: biogenic and thermogenic, although there can also be mixtures of the two gas types. Thermogenic shale-gas systems are further segregated into various sub-types depending on geochemistry and geology. The shale-gas system categories are: (1) high thermal maturity shale; (2) low thermal maturity shales; (3) mixed lithology intra-formational systems containing shale, sands, and silts; (4) inter-formational systems where gas is generated in a mature shale and stored in a less mature shale, and (5) mixed systems. A key difference among these shale-gas systems are initial gas flow rates. High thermal maturity systems tend to have much higher gas flow rates than low maturity systems because of gas charge and storage mechanisms. Certainly other non-geochemical factors, such as shale mineralogy, are extremely important in being able to stimulate these shales to flow gas. Geochemical comparison of the Antrim Shale (Michigan Basin), New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin), and Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin) are used to illustrate these different systems as well as other systems. These systems show significant differences in gas type, organic richness, thermal maturity, and gas flow rates. Gas flow rates are then dependent upon the amount of gas stored (or generated) and the ability to release gas from adsorption sites as well as connecting to micro-reservoir compartments.

  3. Quantifying the flow rate of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo Well oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilli, R.; Bowen, A.; Yoerger, D. R.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Techet, A. H.; Reddy, C. M.; Sylva, S.; Seewald, J.; di Iorio, D.; Whoi Flow Rate Measurement Group

    2010-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Mississippi Canyon block 252 of the Gulf of Mexico created the largest recorded offshore oil spill. The well outflow’s multiple leak sources, turbulent multiphase flow, tendency for hydrate formation, and extreme source depth of 1500 m below the sea surface complicated the quantitative estimation of oil and gas leakage rates. We present methods and results from a U.S. Coast Guard sponsored flow assessment study of the Deepwater Horizon’s damaged blow out preventer and riser. This study utilized a remotely operated vehicle equipped with in-situ acoustic sensors (a Doppler sonar and an imaging multibeam sonar) and isobaric gas-tight fluid samplers to measure directly outflow from the damaged well. Findings from this study indicate oil release rates and total release volume estimates that corroborate estimates made by the federal government’s Flow Rate Technical Group using non-acoustic techniques. The acoustic survey methods reported here provides a means for estimating fluid flow rates in subsurface environments, and are potentially useful for a diverse range of oceanographic applications. Photograph of the Discoverer Enterprise burning natural gas collected from the Macondo well blowout preventer during flow measurement operations. Copyright Wood Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  4. Research and realization of ultrasonic gas flow rate measurement based on ultrasonic exponential model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dandan; Hou, Huirang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    For ultrasonic gas flow rate measurement based on ultrasonic exponential model, when the noise frequency is close to that of the desired signals (called similar-frequency noise) or the received signal amplitude is small and unstable at big flow rate, local convergence of the algorithm genetic-ant colony optimization-3cycles may appear, and measurement accuracy may be affected. Therefore, an improved method energy genetic-ant colony optimization-3cycles (EGACO-3cycles) is proposed to solve this problem. By judging the maximum energy position of signal, the initial parameter range of exponential model can be narrowed and then the local convergence can be avoided. Moreover, a DN100 flow rate measurement system with EGACO-3cycles method is established based on NI PCI-6110 and personal computer. A series of experiments are carried out for testing the new method and the measurement system. It is shown that local convergence doesn't appear with EGACO-3cycles method when similar-frequency noises exist and flow rate is big. Then correct time of flight can be obtained. Furthermore, through flow calibration on this system, the measurement range ratio is achieved 500:1, and the measurement accuracy is 0.5% with a low transition velocity 0.3 m/s. PMID:26821309

  5. Viscous slip coefficients for binary gas mixtures measured from mass flow rates through a single microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Takamori, K.; Perrier, P.; Graur, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Niimi, T.

    2016-09-01

    The viscous slip coefficient for helium-argon binary gas mixture is extracted from the experimental values of the mass flow rate through a microtube. The mass flow rate is measured by the constant-volume method. The viscous slip coefficient was obtained by identifying the measured mass flow rate through a microtube with the corresponding analytical expression, which is a function of the Knudsen number. The measurements were carried out in the slip flow regime where the first-order slip boundary condition can be applied. The measured viscous slip coefficients of binary gas mixtures exhibit a concave function of the molar ratio of the mixture, showing a similar profile with numerical results. However, from the detailed comparison between the measured and numerical values with the complete and incomplete accommodation at a surface, it is inappropriate to estimate the viscous slip coefficient for the mixture numerically by employing separately measured tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for each component. The time variation of the molar ratio in the downstream chamber was measured by sampling the gas from the chamber using the quadrupole mass spectrometer. In our measurements, it is indicated that the volume flow rate of argon is larger than that of helium because of the difference in the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient.

  6. Predicting enhanced mass flow rates in gas microchannels using nonkinetic models.

    PubMed

    Dadzie, S Kokou; Brenner, Howard

    2012-09-01

    Different nonkinetic approaches are adopted in this paper towards theoretically predicting the experimentally observed phenomenon of enhanced mass flow rates accompanying pressure-driven rarefied gas flows through microchannels. Our analysis utilizes a full set of mechanically consistent volume-diffusion hydrodynamic equations, allowing complete, closed-form, analytical solutions to this class of problems. As an integral part of the analysis, existing experimental data pertaining to the subatmospheric pressure dependence of viscosity were analyzed. The several nonkinetic approaches investigated were (1) pressure-dependent viscosity exponent model, (2) slip-velocity models, and (3) volume diffusion model. We explored the ability to predict the gas's mass flow rate over the full range of Knudsen numbers, including furnishing a physically sound interpretation of the well-known Knudsen minimum observed in the mass flow rate. Matching of a pressure-dependent viscosity model, one that follows the standard temperature-viscosity power law and its supporting single momentum diffusion mechanism, did not allow an accurate interpretation of the data. Rather, matching of this model with the flow rate was found to mismatch the experimental pressure dependence of the viscosity. An additional transport mechanism model, one based on volume diffusion, offered a comprehensive understanding of the Knudsen minimum, while also resulting in excellent agreement with experimental data well into the transition regime (up to a Knudsen number of 5).

  7. The cooling rates of pahoehoe flows: The importance of lava porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alun C.

    1993-01-01

    Many theoretical models have been put forward to account for the cooling history of a lava flow; however, only limited detailed field data exist to validate these models. To accurately model the cooling of lava flows, data are required, not only on the heat loss mechanisms, but also on the surface skin development and the causes of differing cooling rates. This paper argues that the cause of such variations in the cooling rates are attributed, primarily, to the vesicle content and degassing history of the lava.

  8. The rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of Cu and 1100 Al

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, D.L.; Tonks, D.L.; Wallace, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The strain-rate dependence of the saturation flow stress of OFHC Cu and 1100 Al from 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} to nearly to 10{sup 12}s{sup {minus}1} is examined. The flow stress above 10{sup 9}s{sup {minus}1} is estimated using Wallace's theory of overdriven shocks in metals. A transition to the power-law behavior {Psi} {approximately} {tau}{sub s}{sup 5} occurs at a strain rate of order 10{sup 5}s{sup {minus}1}. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Method of measuring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D.

    1978-04-11

    This invention relates to an improved method of monitoring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream. The method very basically consists of heating equal sections of the fluid stream above and below the point of entry of the substance to be monitored, and measuring and comparing the resulting change in temperature of the sections. Advantage is taken of the difference in thermal characteristics of the fluid and the substance to be measured to correlate temperature differences in the sections above and below the substance feed point for providing an indication of the mass flow rate of the substance.

  10. Mass on a spring map for the dripping faucet at low flow rates.

    PubMed

    Renna, L

    2001-10-01

    An improved discrete map for the mass-on-a-spring model for the dripping faucet is used to reproduce the evolution of experimental dripping spectra at low flow rates. If an inverse dependence of drop mass on flow rate is supposed, a repeated evolution from period 1 to chaos is obtained. A comparison between discrete relaxation oscillator attractors and dissipative type-web map attractors is carried out. It is found that a dissipative web map accounts for some characteristics of the relaxation oscillator map, thus giving further tools for investigation.

  11. Mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three-dimensional micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianzheng; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    An effective method to predict the mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three dimensional micro-channels with different cross-section shapes has been proposed. For rectangular cross sections often employed in experiment, the present solutions versus measured data of Zohar et al. (2002) show that the side walls significantly affect the mass flow rates as the aspect ratio is smaller than 10, whereas the non-dimensional pressure distributions, mainly determined by the inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio, are insensitive to the aspect ratio.

  12. Using stream sediment lithology to explore the roles of abrasion and channel network structure in shaping downstream sediment yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Smith, M. E.; Pitlick, J.

    2012-12-01

    Both the flux and characteristics of stream sediment evolve downstream in response to variations in sediment supply, abrasion rate, and channel network structure. We use a simple erosion-abrasion mass balance to model the downstream evolution of sediment flux in two adjacent watersheds draining differing mixtures of soft and resistant rock types in the northern Rocky Mountains. Measurements of bed sediment grain size and lithology are used in conjunction with measured bed load and suspended load sediment fluxes to constrain the model. The results show that the downstream evolution in bed load flux and composition can be strongly influenced by subtle differences in underlying geology, which shapes both the abrasion characteristics and travel path lengths of individual rock types. In the Big Wood basin, abrasion rapidly reduces the size of soft sedimentary and volcanic rocks exposed in headwater areas, concentrating resistant granitic rocks in the stream bed and depressing bed load in favor of suspended load. Alternatively, in the North Fork Big Lost basin, volcanic and sedimentary lithologies are exposed throughout the catchment, and the bed material becomes dominated by erodible but resistant quartzitic sandstones. The result is a much higher bed load flux best modeled with modest abrasion rates. In both cases, the best-fit model can reproduce within 5% the composition of the stream bed substrate using realistic erosion and abrasion parameters. The results also demonstrate a strong linkage between modern hillslopes and channel systems even in these formerly glaciated landscapes, as the sediment signature of the primary streams reflects the systematic tapping of distinct source areas. While this work shows promise, measurement of the spatial patterns in the size and composition of bed and suspended load fluxes at locations throughout a channel network would better elucidate that relative importance of supply, sorting, and abrasion processes.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.215 Abrasive wheel machinery. (a) General requirements—(1) Machine guarding. Abrasive wheels shall be used only on machines provided with... omitted; and (ii) The spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as...

  14. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    PubMed Central

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  15. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303...

  18. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  19. Contribution of breathing frequency and inhalation flow rate on performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Bahloul, Ali; Haghighat, Fariborz; Ostiguy, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of particle penetration through filtering facepiece respirators under cyclic flows is very necessary because cyclic flows represent actual breathing flow patterns. This article reports the development of a procedure to investigate the individual impact of breathing frequency and flow rate on the performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators. Experiments were performed for two peak inhalation flows (PIFs; 135 and 360 l min(-1)) and two breathing frequencies [24 and 42 breaths per minute (BPM)] for a total of four cyclic flows (Flow A: 135 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; Flow B: 135 l min(-1) and 42 BPM; Flow C: 360 l min(-1) and 24 BPM; and Flow D: 360 l min(-1) and 42 BPM). Each experiment was performed using two different set-ups: the first set-up included both inhalations and exhalations through the filter media and test chamber, while with the second set-up, only inhalation flows were considered. The results showed that, for the most penetrating particle size range, an increase in both PIF and breathing frequency could potentially enhance the penetration with both set-ups; however, the effect of PIF was observed to be much more pronounced than that of frequency. The results indicated that with both set-ups, when the PIF was increased from 135 to 360 l min(-1) (for the given frequency: 24 or 42 BPM), an increase of up to 139-152% in penetration was observed. On the other hand, only a 10-16% increase in penetration occurred when the frequency was changed from 24 to 42 BPM (for a given PIF: 135 or 360 l min(-1)). This suggests that, from low to high respiratory efforts, a huge portion of penetration enhancement is due to PIF variations and only a small portion is contributed by frequency variations. PMID:24148765

  20. Evaporation rate from square capillaries limited by corner flow viscous losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogland, F.; Lehmann, P.; Yiotis, A.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    High evaporation rates from soil surfaces are sustained by capillary flows drawing water from the receding drying front along liquid pathways in crevices of the pore space. With increasing depth of the drying front viscous losses add to growing gravitational head and at a certain depth overcome capillary drive and disrupt liquid pathways. Viscous losses are significant in fine textured media resulting in earlier capillary failure than predicted by gravity-capillary force balance. To reproduce limitations of viscous corner flow on evaporation rates from angular pores (capillaries) we imaged drying dynamics from a square shaped glass capillary using a high speed camera, to provide for detailed record on receding menisci and thickness of liquid corner films including detachment dynamics at the top of the capillary. Additionally, deposition patterns of dye delineated regions of high rates of phase change (evaporation) showing a decrease in drying rate with recession of menisci and films into the capillary due to increasing diffusive path and reduced gradients. Effects of viscous losses on evaporation dynamics were systematically evaluated by varying ratio of viscous, gravity and capillary forces using different liquids (water, ethanol and octane), capillary geometry (0.5 and 1.0 mm width), and flow rate and direction with respect to gravity (horizontal and vertical arrangement). Experimental results were compared with analytical solutions for corner flow considering viscous losses. Preliminary results indicate that the maximum (main) meniscus depth supporting corner flow is not only dependent on the effective conductivity behind the interfaces, but also on interfacial processes taking place at the very top of the capillary. The pore scale findings will be incorporated into macroscopic models for determining viscous losses from soils and for estimating elapsed times for transition from high capillary-sustained evaporation rates to diffusion limited rates.

  1. Reaction and internal energy relaxation rates in viscous thermochemically non-equilibrium gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, E. V.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2015-01-15

    In the present paper, reaction and energy relaxation rates as well as the normal stress are studied for viscous gas flows with vibrational and chemical non-equilibrium. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, multi-temperature models based on the Treanor and Boltzmann vibrational distributions are developed for the general case taking into account all kinds of vibrational energy transitions, exchange reactions, dissociation, and recombination. Integral equations specifying the first-order corrections to the normal mean stress and reaction rates are derived, as well as approximate systems of linear equations for their numerical computation. Generalized thermodynamic driving forces associated with all non-equilibrium processes are introduced. It is shown that normal stresses and rates of non-equilibrium processes can be expressed in terms of the same driving forces; the symmetry of kinetic coefficients in these expressions is proven. The developed general model is applied to a particular case of a pure N{sub 2} viscous flow with slow VT relaxation. Normal stress and rates of vibrational relaxation are studied for various ratios of vibrational and translational temperatures. The cross effects between different vibrational transitions in viscous flows are evaluated, along with the influence of anharmonicity and flow compressibility on the first-order corrections to the relaxation rate. Limits of validity for the widely used Landau–Teller model of vibrational relaxation are indicated.

  2. A non-contact optical procedure for precise measurement of respiration rate and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria

    2010-04-01

    The use of standard instrumentation for the assessment of the respiration rate as of flow is an important goal in medicine. Spirometers, textile-based capacitive sensors or photopletismography are standard contact instrumentations used for such aim; the main drawback in the use of such instrumentations is the necessity to have a direct contact of the instrument with the patient. In this paper, we present an optical no-contact method for monitoring of both the respiration rate and flow. This method is based on the measurement of external chest wall movement by a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurement procedure has already been demonstrated to be extremely well performing for what concern the monitoring of the cardiac activity. The proposed method can be operated at a distance of 1.5 m, on different point of the patient thoracic and abdominal area. We have monitored respiration rate and flow on 8 patients with a spirometer and simultaneously with the proposed noncontact measurement procedure. Bland-Altman analysis of the respiration rate measured with both instruments demonstrate a mean error on the determination of the respiration rate of < 1% and of the < 4% for the instantaneous flow. We also report a study on the optimal position on the thoracic area based on quality of the signal measured on the same population of subject.

  3. Pāhoehoe flow cooling, discharge, and coverage rates from thermal image chronometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dehn, Jonathan; Hamilton, Christopher M.; Harris, A. J. L.; Herd, Richard A.; James, M.R.; Lodato, Luigi; Steffke, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Theoretically- and empirically-derived cooling rates for active pāhoehoe lava flows show that surface cooling is controlled by conductive heat loss through a crust that is thickening with the square root of time. The model is based on a linear relationship that links log(time) with surface cooling. This predictable cooling behavior can be used assess the age of recently emplaced sheet flows from their surface temperatures. Using a single thermal image, or image mosaic, this allows quantification of the variation in areal coverage rates and lava discharge rates over 48 hour periods prior to image capture. For pāhoehoe sheet flow at Kīlauea (Hawai`i) this gives coverage rates of 1–5 m2/min at discharge rates of 0.01–0.05 m3/s, increasing to ∼40 m2/min at 0.4–0.5 m3/s. Our thermal chronometry approach represents a quick and easy method of tracking flow advance over a three-day period using a single, thermal snap-shot.

  4. Reaction and internal energy relaxation rates in viscous thermochemically non-equilibrium gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E. V.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, reaction and energy relaxation rates as well as the normal stress are studied for viscous gas flows with vibrational and chemical non-equilibrium. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, multi-temperature models based on the Treanor and Boltzmann vibrational distributions are developed for the general case taking into account all kinds of vibrational energy transitions, exchange reactions, dissociation, and recombination. Integral equations specifying the first-order corrections to the normal mean stress and reaction rates are derived, as well as approximate systems of linear equations for their numerical computation. Generalized thermodynamic driving forces associated with all non-equilibrium processes are introduced. It is shown that normal stresses and rates of non-equilibrium processes can be expressed in terms of the same driving forces; the symmetry of kinetic coefficients in these expressions is proven. The developed general model is applied to a particular case of a pure N2 viscous flow with slow VT relaxation. Normal stress and rates of vibrational relaxation are studied for various ratios of vibrational and translational temperatures. The cross effects between different vibrational transitions in viscous flows are evaluated, along with the influence of anharmonicity and flow compressibility on the first-order corrections to the relaxation rate. Limits of validity for the widely used Landau-Teller model of vibrational relaxation are indicated.

  5. Flow rate of some pharmaceutical diluents through die-orifices relevant to mini-tableting.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, K; Petrides, M; Malamataris, S

    2005-10-13

    The effects of cylindrical orifice length and diameter on the flow rate of three commonly used pharmaceutical direct compression diluents (lactose, dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate and pregelatinised starch) were investigated, besides the powder particle characteristics (particle size, aspect ratio, roundness and convexity) and the packing properties (true, bulk and tapped density). Flow rate was determined for three different sieve fractions through a series of miniature tableting dies of different orifice diameter (0.4, 0.3 and 0.2 cm) and thickness (1.5, 1.0 and 0.5 cm). It was found that flow rate decreased with the increase of the orifice length for the small diameter (0.2 cm) but for the large diameter (0.4 cm) was increased with the orifice length (die thickness). Flow rate changes with the orifice length are attributed to the flow regime (transitional arch formation) and possible alterations in the position of the free flowing zone caused by pressure gradients arising from the flow of self-entrained air, both above the entrance in the die orifice and across it. Modelling by the conventional Jones-Pilpel non-linear equation and by two machine learning algorithms (lazy learning, LL, and feed-forward back-propagation, FBP) was applied and predictive performance of the fitted models was compared. It was found that both FBP and LL algorithms have significantly higher predictive performance than the Jones-Pilpel non-linear equation, because they account both dimensions of the cylindrical die opening (diameter and length). The automatic relevance determination for FBP revealed that orifice length is the third most influential variable after the orifice diameter and particle size, followed by the bulk density, the difference between bulk and tapped densities and the particle convexity.

  6. High frame rate synthetic aperture vector flow imaging for transthoracic echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagómez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Bechsgaard, Thor; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the first in vivo results of 2-D high frame rate vector velocity imaging for transthoracic cardiac imaging. Measurements are made on a healthy volunteer using the SARUS experimental ultrasound scanner connected to an intercostal phased-array probe. Two parasternal long-axis view (PLAX) are obtained, one centred at the aortic valve and another centred at the left ventricle. The acquisition sequence was composed of 3 diverging waves for high frame rate synthetic aperture flow imaging. For verification a phantom measurement is performed on a transverse straight 5 mm diameter vessel at a depth of 100 mm in a tissue-mimicking phantom. A flow pump produced a 2 ml/s constant flow with a peak velocity of 0.2 m/s. The average estimated flow angle in the ROI was 86.22° +/- 6.66° with a true flow angle of 90°. A relative velocity bias of -39% with a standard deviation of 13% was found. In-vivo acquisitions show complex flow patterns in the heart. In the aortic valve view, blood is seen exiting the left ventricle cavity through the aortic valve into the aorta during the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle. In the left ventricle view, blood flow is seen entering the left ventricle cavity through the mitral valve and splitting in two ways when approximating the left ventricle wall. The work presents 2-D velocity estimates on the heart from a non-invasive transthoracic scan. The ability of the method detecting flow regardless of the beam angle could potentially reveal a more complete view of the flow patterns presented on the heart.

  7. Continuous flow micro-bioreactors for the production of biopharmaceuticals: the effect of geometry, surface texture, and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Lucía D; García-López, Erika; Camacho-León, Sergio; Del Refugio Rocha-Pizaña, María; López-Pacheco, Felipe; López-Meza, Julián; Araiz-Hernández, Diana; Tapia-Mejía, Eduardo J; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rodríguez-González, Ciro A; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-04-01

    We used continuous flow micro-devices as bioreactors for the production of a glycosylated pharmaceutical product (a monoclonal antibody). We cultured CHO cells on the surface of PMMA/PDMS micro-channels that had been textured by micromachining and coated with fibronectin. Three different micro-channel geometries (a wavy channel, a zigzag channel, and a series of donut-shape reservoirs) were tested in a continuous flow regime in the range of 3 to 6 μL min(-1). Both the geometry of the micro-device and the flow rate had a significant effect on cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and monoclonal antibody production. The most efficient configuration was a series of donut-shaped reservoirs, which yielded mAb concentrations of 7.2 mg L(-1) at residence times lower than one minute and steady-state productivities above 9 mg mL(-1) min(-1). These rates are at about 3 orders of magnitude higher than those observed in suspended-cell stirred tank fed-batch bioreactors.

  8. Variability in venom volume, flow rate and duration in defensive stings of five scorpion species.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Arie; Coelho, Pedro; Rasko, Mykola

    2015-06-15

    Scorpions have been shown to control their venom usage in defensive encounters, depending on the perceived threat. Potentially, the venom amount that is injected could be controlled by reducing the flow speed, the flow duration, or both. We here investigated these variables by allowing scorpions to sting into an oil-filled chamber, and recording the accreting venom droplets with high-speed video. The size of the spherical droplets on the video can then be used to calculate their volume. We recorded defensive stings of 20 specimens representing 5 species. Significant differences in the flow rate and total expelled volume were found between species. These differences are likely due to differences in overall size between the species. Large variation in both venom flow speed and duration are described between stinging events of single individuals. Both venom flow rate and flow duration correlate highly with the total expelled volume, indicating that scorpions may control both variables in order to achieve a desired end volume of venom during a sting.

  9. Cooling rate of an active Hawaiian lava flow from nighttime spectroradiometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    1992-09-01

    A narrow-band spectroradiometer has been used to make nighttime measurements of the Phase 50 eruption of Pu'u O'o, on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. On February 19, 1992, a GER spectroradiometer was used to determine the cooling rate of an active lava flow. This instrument collects 12-bit data between 0.35 to 3.0 microns at a spectral resolution of 1-5 nm. Thirteen spectra of a single area on a pahoehoe flow field were collected over a 59 minute period (21:27-22:26 HST) from which the cooling of the lava surface has been investigated. A two-component thermal mixing model (Flynn, 1992) applied to data for the flow immediately on emplacement gave a best-fit crustal temperature of 768 C, a hot component at 1150 C, and a hot radiating area of 3.6 percent of the total area. Over a 52-minute period (within the time interval between flow resurfacings) the lava flow crust cooled by 358 to 410 C at a rate that was as high as 15 C/min. The observations have significance both for satellite observations of active volcanoes and for numerical models of the cooling of lava flows during their emplacement.

  10. Variability in venom volume, flow rate and duration in defensive stings of five scorpion species.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Arie; Coelho, Pedro; Rasko, Mykola

    2015-06-15

    Scorpions have been shown to control their venom usage in defensive encounters, depending on the perceived threat. Potentially, the venom amount that is injected could be controlled by reducing the flow speed, the flow duration, or both. We here investigated these variables by allowing scorpions to sting into an oil-filled chamber, and recording the accreting venom droplets with high-speed video. The size of the spherical droplets on the video can then be used to calculate their volume. We recorded defensive stings of 20 specimens representing 5 species. Significant differences in the flow rate and total expelled volume were found between species. These differences are likely due to differences in overall size between the species. Large variation in both venom flow speed and duration are described between stinging events of single individuals. Both venom flow rate and flow duration correlate highly with the total expelled volume, indicating that scorpions may control both variables in order to achieve a desired end volume of venom during a sting. PMID:25911958

  11. Cooling rate of an active Hawaiian lava flow from nighttime spectroradiometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    A narrow-band spectroradiometer has been used to make nighttime measurements of the Phase 50 eruption of Pu'u O'o, on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. On February 19, 1992, a GER spectroradiometer was used to determine the cooling rate of an active lava flow. This instrument collects 12-bit data between 0.35 to 3.0 microns at a spectral resolution of 1-5 nm. Thirteen spectra of a single area on a pahoehoe flow field were collected over a 59 minute period (21:27-22:26 HST) from which the cooling of the lava surface has been investigated. A two-component thermal mixing model (Flynn, 1992) applied to data for the flow immediately on emplacement gave a best-fit crustal temperature of 768 C, a hot component at 1150 C, and a hot radiating area of 3.6 percent of the total area. Over a 52-minute period (within the time interval between flow resurfacings) the lava flow crust cooled by 358 to 410 C at a rate that was as high as 15 C/min. The observations have significance both for satellite observations of active volcanoes and for numerical models of the cooling of lava flows during their emplacement.

  12. Sandwich mixer-reactor: influence of the diffusion coefficient and flow rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-02-01

    A sandwich mixer consists of mixing two solutions in a channel, one central laminar flow being sandwiched between two outer flow solutions. The present numerical study considers the convection-diffusion of two reacting species A and B, provided respectively by the two incoming solutions. The simulations show how the diffusion coefficient, flow rate and species concentration ratios influence, via the transversal diffusion length and reaction kinetics, the reaction extent at the end of the sandwich mixer. First, this extent can be enhanced up to 60% if the species with the lowest diffusion coefficient is located in the outer solutions where the flow velocity is small compared to that of the central part (higher residence time). Secondly, decreasing the outer flow rates (to confine the reaction close to the walls) and increasing the local concentration to keep the same flux ratio improve the extent by 300%. Comparison with a bi-lamination passive mixer, with an ideal mixer and an electro-osmotic driven flow mixer is presented. These conclusions are also demonstrated for consecutive reactions, showing an amplification of the effects described above. The results are also presented versus the residence time in the mixer-reactor to show the time window for which the gain is appreciable.

  13. Expanding the range for predicting critical flow rates of gas wells producing from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, E.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The critical flow rate of a gas well is the minimum flow rate required to prevent accumulation of liquids in the tubing. Theoretical models currently available for estimating critical flow rates are restricted to wells with water/gas ratios less than 150bbl/MMcf (0.84 X 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/). For wells producing at higher water/gas ratios from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs, a method of estimating critical flow rates is derived through use of an empirical multiphase-flow correlation.

  14. Weathering rates as a function of flow through an alpine soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Drever, J.I.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of flow on release rates of solutes from soil in a 39-m2 alpine catchment in the Colorado Rockies was measured during the summers of 1990-1994. Flow rates through the soil were varied by augmenting natural rainfall with deionized irrigation water. Daily water inputs averaged between 96 and 216 1 day-1 during the five field seasons, and mean discharge (inputs minus evapotranspiration) varied from 35 to 175 1 day-1. Volume-weighted mean concentrations of base cations and silica decreased only moderately in response to the increased water inputs. Input fluxes of solutes in precipitation were similar in each of the study seasons, but output fluxes of base cations and silica in surface outflow increased substantially in conjunction with the average water input rate for the season. Weathering rates calculated from the chemical fluxes increased substantially in response to increases in water input rates. The increases appear to be largely attributable to enhanced transport of solutes from the soil matrix under high flow conditions. At high flow, physical flushing of micropores presumably occurs to a greater extent than during low-flow periods because of greater soil wetness and higher hydrologic head. Increased flushing would also cause an increased rate of diffusion of solutes from microcracks in mineral surfaces and constricted pore spaces in response to an increased concentration gradient between those regions and adjacent areas in the soil matrix. Another consequence of the increased flushing that occurs during periods of high flow is that concentrations throughout the soil matrix tend to be lower, which might increase chemical weathering rates of some silicate minerals such as microcline, which are relatively close to saturation. Decreased Si concentrations under high-flow conditions appear to promote dissolution of amorphous aluminosilicates or desorption of Si from mineral surfaces, buffering Si concentrations in the soil solutions. Thus, both physical

  15. Evaluation of reaction rates in streambed sediments with seepage flow: a novel code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, Fulvio; De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai

    2015-04-01

    Streambed interfaces represent hotspots for nutrient transformations because they host different microbial species which perform many heterotrophic and autotrophic reactions. The evaluation of these reaction rates is crucial to assess the fate of nutrients in riverine environments, and it is often performed through the analysis of concentrations from water samples collected along vertical profiles. The most commonly employed evaluation tool is the Profile code developed by Berg et al. (1998), which determines reaction rates by fitting observed concentrations to a diffusion-reaction equation that neglects the presence of water flow within sediments. However, hyporheic flow is extremely common in streambeds, where solute transport is often controlled by advection rather than diffusion. There is hence a pressing need to develop new methods that can be applied even to advection-dominated sediments. This contribution fills this gap by presenting a novel approach that extends the method proposed by Berg et al. (1998). This new approach includes the influence of vertical solute transport by upwelling or downwelling water, and it is this suited to the typical flow conditions of stream sediments. The code is applied to vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen from a laboratory flume designed to mimic the complex flow conditions of real streams. The results show that it is fundamental to consider water flow to obtain reliable estimates of reaction rates in streambeds. Berg, P., N. Risgaard-Petersen, and S. Rysgaard, 1998, Interpretation of measured concentration profiles in the sediment porewater, Limnology and Oceanography, 43:1500-1510.

  16. Drawdown changes affected by flow rate and location of pumping wells near a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Shu, L. C.

    2016-08-01

    Riverside groundwater exploitation is one of the main means of utilizing groundwater resources. This paper describes the impact of drawdown conditions with changes in the river flow and pumping well locations, and analyzes the interaction between the groundwater and surface water. Based on long-term hydrological gauging data, abundant hydrogeological test data, and the numerical simulation results for a typical well field of the Qinbei Power Plant, this paper presents three different cases of pumping well locations and four different cases of river flow rates. Finally, the abovementioned cases are integrated into 12 extraction groups and the drawdown conditions are calculated for each group. The results show that, for a given set of flow rate conditions, a location set in a recharge zone exhibited the maximum drawdown, while a location in a transition zone had the second-largest drawdown, and a location in a discharge zone had the minimum drawdown. In addition, assuming the same locations for the pumping wells, the drawdown change from small to large corresponded to 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the original flow. This paper provides a foundation for future study of the calculation of riverside groundwater exploration with changes in the flow rate and well locations.

  17. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  18. Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia Lavas, Mars: Source Vents, Flow Rates, Edifice Styles and Water Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia regions have been suggested as some of the youngest martian surfaces since the Viking mission, although there was doubt whether the origins were predominantly volcanic or fluvial. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey Missions have shown that the region is certainly young in terms of the topographic preservation and the youthful crater counts (e.g. in the tens to a few hundred million yrs.). Numerous authors have shown that fluvial and volcanic features share common flow paths and vent systems, and that there is evidence for some interaction between the lava flows and underlying volatiles as well as the use by lavas and water of the same vent system. Given the youthful age and possible water-volcanism interaction environment, we'd like constraints on water and volcanic flux rates and interactions. Here, we model ranges of volcanic flow rates where we can well-constrain them, and consider the modest flow rate results results in context with local eruption styles, and track vent locations, edifice volumes, and flow sources and data.

  19. A methodology to reduce uncertainties in the high-flow portion of the rating curve for Goodwater Creek Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow monitoring at watershed scale relies on the establishment of a rating curve that describes the relationship between stage and flow and is developed from actual flow measurements at various stages. Measurement errors increase with out-of-bank flow conditions because of safety concerns and diffic...

  20. Evaluation of planarization performance for a novel alkaline copper slurry under a low abrasive concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengting, Jiang; Yuling, Liu; Haobo, Yuan; Guodong, Chen; Weijuan, Liu

    2014-11-01

    A novel alkaline copper slurry that possesses a relatively high planarization performance is investigated under a low abrasive concentration. Based on the action mechanism of CMP, the feasibility of using one type of slurry in copper bulk elimination process and residual copper elimination process, with different process parameters, was analyzed. In addition, we investigated the regular change of abrasive concentration effect on copper and tantalum removal rate and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) in CMP process. When the abrasive concentration is 3 wt%, in bulk elimination process, the copper removal rate achieves 6125 Å/min, while WIWNU is 3.5%, simultaneously. In residual copper elimination process, the copper removal rate is approximately 2700 Å/min, while WIWNU is 2.8%. Nevertheless, the tantalum removal rate is 0 Å/min, which indicates that barrier layer isn't eliminated in residual copper elimination process. The planarization experimental results show that an excellent planarization performance is obtained with a relatively high copper removal rate in bulk elimination process. Meanwhile, after residual copper elimination process, the dishing value increased inconspicuously, in a controllable range, and the wafer surface roughness is only 0.326 nm (sq < 1 nm) after polishing. By comparison, the planarization performance and surface quality of alkaline slurry show almost no major differences with two kinds of commercial acid slurries after polishing. All experimental results are conducive to research and improvement of alkaline slurry in the future.

  1. Review of flow rate estimates of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Camilli, Rich; Crone, Timothy J.; Guthrie, George D.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Savas, Omer; Shaffer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The unprecedented nature of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill required the application of research methods to estimate the rate at which oil was escaping from the well in the deep sea, its disposition after it entered the ocean, and total reservoir depletion. Here, we review what advances were made in scientific understanding of quantification of flow rates during deep sea oil well blowouts. We assess the degree to which a consensus was reached on the flow rate of the well by comparing in situ observations of the leaking well with a time-dependent flow rate model derived from pressure readings taken after the Macondo well was shut in for the well integrity test. Model simulations also proved valuable for predicting the effect of partial deployment of the blowout preventer rams on flow rate. Taken together, the scientific analyses support flow rates in the range of ~50,000–70,000 barrels/d, perhaps modestly decreasing over the duration of the oil spill, for a total release of ~5.0 million barrels of oil, not accounting for BP's collection effort. By quantifying the amount of oil at different locations (wellhead, ocean surface, and atmosphere), we conclude that just over 2 million barrels of oil (after accounting for containment) and all of the released methane remained in the deep sea. By better understanding the fate of the hydrocarbons, the total discharge can be partitioned into separate components that pose threats to deep sea vs. coastal ecosystems, allowing responders in future events to scale their actions accordingly.

  2. Relationship of medical status, medications, and salivary flow rates in adults of different ages.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, M; Brightman, V J; Pogoda, J M

    1996-02-01

    Multiple systemic disorders and medications have been reported to cause xerostomia or salivary gland hypofunction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship among systemic disorders, medications, and salivary flow rates. Sixty-three ambulatory dental patients aged 23 to 82 years were randomly selected. The nature, duration, and number of systemic disorders and medications were documented. Repeated measurements of unstimulated whole, chewing-stimulated whole, acid-stimulated parotid, and candy-stimulated parotid salivary flow rates were obtained. Data were analyzed with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test. For persons with systemic disorders who were taking medication, all salivary flow rates were significantly (p = 0.03 - 0.001) lower than the flow rates in healthy persons. Among persons with at least one systemic disorder who were taking medication, those who had been taking medication for longer than 2 years had significantly lower unstimulated whole saliva (p = 0.002), chewing-stimulated whole saliva (p = 0.0004), and candy-stimulated parotid saliva (p = 0.02) flow rates than those who had been taking medication for 1 to 2 years. The number of systemic disorders significantly (p = 0.02) and negatively affected the acid-stimulated parotid salivary rates. The prevalence of salivary hypofunction determined on the basis of unstimulated whole saliva and acid-stimulated parotid saliva was significantly higher (p = < 0.001, p = 0.007) in the those persons with systemic disorders and taking medications. The results suggest that salivary secretion is affected by the number of systemic disorders and duration of the potentially xerogenic medications.

  3. Review of flow rate estimates of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Camilli, Rich; Crone, Timothy J.; Guthrie, George D.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Savas, Omer; Shaffer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The unprecedented nature of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill required the application of research methods to estimate the rate at which oil was escaping from the well in the deep sea, its disposition after it entered the ocean, and total reservoir depletion. Here, we review what advances were made in scientific understanding of quantification of flow rates during deep sea oil well blowouts. We assess the degree to which a consensus was reached on the flow rate of the well by comparing in situ observations of the leaking well with a time-dependent flow rate model derived from pressure readings taken after the Macondo well was shut in for the well integrity test. Model simulations also proved valuable for predicting the effect of partial deployment of the blowout preventer rams on flow rate. Taken together, the scientific analyses support flow rates in the range of ∼50,000–70,000 barrels/d, perhaps modestly decreasing over the duration of the oil spill, for a total release of ∼5.0 million barrels of oil, not accounting for BP's collection effort. By quantifying the amount of oil at different locations (wellhead, ocean surface, and atmosphere), we conclude that just over 2 million barrels of oil (after accounting for containment) and all of the released methane remained in the deep sea. By better understanding the fate of the hydrocarbons, the total discharge can be partitioned into separate components that pose threats to deep sea vs. coastal ecosystems, allowing responders in future events to scale their actions accordingly. PMID:22187459

  4. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  5. The Impact of RELAP5 Pipe Break Flow Rates Associated With Reverse Flow Limiter Removal for Steam Generator Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Zheng; Jarvis, Julie M.; Vieira, Allen T.

    2006-07-01

    Pipe break flow rates are calculated for a main feedwater line break (FWLB) in the main steam valve vault (MSVV) for a PWR Steam Generator Replacement (SGR). A reverse flow limiter is installed in the original steam generator (OSG) feedwater nozzle to limit the blowdown flowrate in the event of a postulated FWLB. This feature is not incorporated in the replacement steam generator (RSG) design. The change in RSG nozzle design in conjunction with new operating conditions results in increased FWLB mass and energy releases which can impact environmental temperatures and pressures and flooding levels. In the United States, benchmarking for safety related analyses is necessary in consideration of 10CFR50.59 requirements. RELAP5/MOD3 is used to model the pipe break flowrates for a FWLB at different break locations. The benchmark FWLB blowdown releases are larger than the OSG design basis blowdown releases due to differences in RELAP5/MOD3 versions which are found to have different algorithms for subcooled choked flow. The SGR FWLB blowdown release rates are determined to have minimal impact on the compartment temperature and pressure response. However, the flooding levels and associated equipment qualification are potentially impacted. Modeling techniques used to minimize the impact of the SGR blowdown releases on MSVV flooding levels include modeling flashing effects, more realistic RSG temperature distribution, inventory depletion and Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) flow initiation time, and considering loss of offsite power scenarios. A detailed flooding hazard evaluation is needed, which considers the actual main feedwater isolation times to ensure that environmentally qualified safety related components, required to mitigate the effects of a FWLB inside the MSVV, can perform their safety function prior to being submerged. (authors)

  6. Velocity and flow rate measurement of liquid metal by contactless electromagnetic Lorentz force technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, N.; Karcher, C.; Kolesnikov, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Providing flow analysis in case of aggressive and hot liquids is a complicated task, especially when liquid's composition and, hence, its physical properties, are unknown. Contactless techniques are the most promising methods for liquid metal flow rate control and some of these methods are based on electromagnetic induction of breaking force acting on an electrically conductive fluid which is moving through a magnetic field. One of the techniques is time-of-flight Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV). By using the method one can estimate volumetric flow rate without knowing of electrical conductivity, magnitude of magnetic field or characteristic dimension. The most important and crucial challenge within the technique is detection of small fluctuations of Lorentz force value. In this article we will focus on application and investigation of time-of-flight LFV.

  7. Design of an impact abrasion testing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Beeley, P. R.; Baker, A. J.

    1994-04-01

    By using a cam-flat follower-impact shaft with a crank-flat rotating anvil system, the machine to be described can create various impact abrasion conditions to simulate a large range of industrial situations encountered in this field. The main features of the machine are the long working life of the flat rotating anvil, which works in the same way as that of the disk in a pin-on-disk wear tester, and the accurate control of both the impact energy delivered to the specimen and the total sliding distance of the specimen on the anvil. Statistical analysis of test results on the machine with EN24 steel and cast high manganese steel shows that the uncertainty of the population mean is within +/- 4.7% of the sample mean under a 95% confidence level of student distribution, which indicates a very good accuracy of test.

  8. Effects of Concentration and Sniff Flow Rate on the Rat Electroolfactogram

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Acevedo, Humberto P.; Sherrill, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports using the electroolfactogram (EOG) to study the spatial and temporal aspects of response in the rodent olfactory epithelium had focused on high odorant concentrations that gave large responses. This investigation has used lower concentrations to test the difference between responses in the rat dorsomedial and lateral recesses with a range of nasal flow rates and a range of chemical properties. The responses to a highly polar, more hydrophilic odorant changed more steeply with flow rate than responses to a very non-polar, hydrophobic odorant. With low flow rates there was a response delay in the lateral recess, which is consistent with the models indicating lower flow rates in that region. We observed significant volume conduction effects in which large responses in the dorsomedial region obscured smaller initial portions of the lateral responses. These effects could be removed by destroying the dorsomedial response with a high concentration of a low molecular weight ester. We caution that investigators of EOG recordings from the intact epithelium must attend to the possible presence of volume conduction, which can be assessed by attention to the selectivity of odorant response, response waveform, and response latency. PMID:16740644

  9. 30 CFR 75.1101-19 - Nozzles; flow rate and direction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nozzles; flow rate and direction. 75.1101-19 Section 75.1101-19 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-19...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1101-19 - Nozzles; flow rate and direction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nozzles; flow rate and direction. 75.1101-19 Section 75.1101-19 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-19...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1101-19 - Nozzles; flow rate and direction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nozzles; flow rate and direction. 75.1101-19 Section 75.1101-19 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-19...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101-19 - Nozzles; flow rate and direction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nozzles; flow rate and direction. 75.1101-19 Section 75.1101-19 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-19...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1101-19 - Nozzles; flow rate and direction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nozzles; flow rate and direction. 75.1101-19 Section 75.1101-19 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1101-19...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.642 - SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations. 1065.642 Section 1065.642 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.642...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.642 - SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations. 1065.642 Section 1065.642 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.642...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.642 - SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations. 1065.642 Section 1065.642 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.642...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.642 - SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false SSV, CFV, and PDP molar flow rate calculations. 1065.642 Section 1065.642 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.642...

  18. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  19. Circadian rhythmic hepatic biliary flow, constituents, concentrations and excretory rates in patients after cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Ho, K J

    1994-01-01

    Twelve adult patients with indwelling common bile duct T-tube were selected for the study of circadian fluctuation of biliary excretion. From the 10th postoperative day on when the enterohepatic circulation was well reestablished a 5 ml bile sample was collected at the end of each 4-h interval for 3 to 4 days for determination of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. This was followed by measurement of bile flow rate by collecting the bile continuously through the T-tube at 4-h intervals for another 3 to 4 days. One quarter of the twelve patients showed no persistent daily fluctuation of all the variables studied. A circadian rhythm was demonstrated by single cosinor rhythmometry in the biliary concentrations of bile acid, cholesterol, phospholipid, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the remaining nine patients. Among them six also showed a circadian fluctuation of hepatic bile flow. The lack of synchronization of the rhythm of the concentrations of various biliary constituents with the bile flow rate resulted in undetectability of a circadian rhythm for their excretory rate in the great majority of patients. Those few patients in whom a rhythm remained to be detectable had a much reduced amplitude but the same acrophase. We concluded that bile flow rate played a major role in the circadian rhythm of biliary excretion and might coordinate the fluctuation of the concentrations of various biliary constituents. However, a true circadian rhythm for their concentrations also existed at least in certain subjects.

  20. 40 CFR 75.33 - Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate. 75.33 Section 75.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Missing Data Substitution Procedures §...

  1. 40 CFR 75.33 - Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate. 75.33 Section 75.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Missing Data Substitution Procedures §...

  2. Lava Tube Flow Models at Alba Patera, Mars: Topographic Constraints on Eruption Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, S. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Bradley, B. A.; DeWet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Alba Patera has some of the longest lava tubes over some of the shallowest slopes on Mars. We use Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography to model eruption rates for several Alba Patera lava tubes and compare them within Alba and with flows from other martian volcanic regions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Flow, aeration, and carbon dioxide transfer rates for airlifts used in recirculating aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlift pumping systems reduce the electrical costs of moving water in a recirculating aquaculture system and can be concurrently designed to aerate water and remove carbon dioxide. This study determined the water flow, oxygen transfer, and CO2 removal rates for water using airlift technology in a 1...

  4. Forecasting Student Entrants, Flows and Success Rates. Technical Report. Studies in Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Stjepan; And Others

    This document is concerned with an information system to study the internal dynamics of student flows, choice of subjects and success rates, taking into account different regional affiliations and the socioeconomic backgrounds of students. Among the external factors to be considered will be the demographic dimension in terms of changes in the…

  5. URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOW MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION: HIGH-RATE TREATMENT APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    fThis presentation is on high-rate disinfection of wet-weather flow (WWF) and pretreatment processes of suspended solids to enhance the disinfection. A discussion of pretreatment processes and of the newest disinfection technologies used for WWF is included, along with the feasib...

  6. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Prasetyaningrum, A. Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  7. Effect of flow rate and lead/copper pipe sequence on lead release from service lines.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Clément; Arnold, Roger B; Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Prévost, Michèle; Edwards, Marc

    2012-09-01

    A pilot experiment examined lead leaching from four representative configurations of service lines including: (1) 100% lead (Pb), (2) 100% copper (Cu), (3) 50% Pb upstream of 50% Cu, and (4) 50% Pb-downstream of 50% Cu using a range of flow rates. The cumulative mass of lead release indicated that a typical partial replacement configuration (50% lead downstream of copper) did not provide a net reduction in lead when compared to 100% lead pipe (85 mg for 50% Pb-downstream versus 83 mg for 100%-Pb) due to galvanic and deposition corrosion. The partially replaced service line configuration also had a much greater likelihood of producing water with "spikes" of lead particulates at higher flow rates, while tending to produce lower levels of lead at very low flow rates. After the first 214 days the galvanic current between copper and lead was only reduced by 34%, proving that galvanic impacts can be highly persistent even in water with optimized corrosion control by dosing of zinc orthophosphate. Finally, this experiment raises concern about the low flow rates used during some prior home sampling events, which may underestimate exposure to lead during normal water use, especially when galvanic Pb:Cu connections are present.

  8. Effect of reference conditions on flow rate, modifier fraction and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Shoykhet Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2016-08-12

    When using compressible mobile phases such as fluidic CO2, the density, the volumetric flow rates and volumetric fractions are pressure dependent. The pressure and temperature definition of these volumetric parameters (referred to as the reference conditions) may alter between systems, manufacturers and operating conditions. A supercritical fluid chromatography system was modified to operate in two modes with different definition of the eluent delivery parameters, referred to as fixed and variable mode. For the variable mode, the volumetric parameters are defined with reference to the pump operating pressure and actual pump head temperature. These conditions may vary when, e.g. changing the column length, permeability, flow rate, etc. and are thus variable reference conditions. For the fixed mode, the reference conditions were set at 150bar and 30°C, resulting in a mass flow rate and mass fraction of modifier definition which is independent of the operation conditions. For the variable mode, the mass flow rate of carbon dioxide increases with system pump operating pressure, decreasing the fraction of modifier. Comparing the void times and retention factor shows that the deviation between the two modes is almost independent of modifier percentage, but depends on the operating pressure. Recalculating the set volumetric fraction of modifier to the mass fraction results in the same retention behaviour for both modes. This shows that retention in SFC can be best modelled using the mass fraction of modifier. The fixed mode also simplifies method scaling as it only requires matching average column pressure. PMID:27401813

  9. Quantifying temperature and flow rate effects on the performance of a fixed-bed chromatographic reactor.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tien D; Seidel-Morgenstern, A

    2011-11-01

    Chromatographic reactors are based on coupling chemical reactions with chromatographic separation in fixed-beds. Temperature and flow rate are important parameters for the performance of such reactors. Temperature affects mainly adsorption, chemical equilibria, mass transfer and reaction kinetics, whereas flow rate influences residence time and dispersion. In order to evaluate the mentioned effects, the hydrolysis reactions of methyl formate (MF) and methyl acetate (MA) were chosen as case studies. These reactions were performed experimentally in a lab-scale fixed-bed chromatographic reactor packed with a strong acidic ion exchange resin. The chosen reactions can be considered to represent a relative fast (MF) and a relative slow (MA) reaction. The processes which take place inside the reactor were described and simulated using an isothermal equilibrium dispersive model. The essential model parameters were determined experimentally at different temperatures and flow rates. The performance of the chromatographic reactor was evaluated at several discrete constant temperature levels by quantifying product purity, productivity and yield. The work provides insight regarding the influence of temperature and flow rate on values of the model parameters and the performance criteria.

  10. Effect of flow rate and lead/copper pipe sequence on lead release from service lines.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Clément; Arnold, Roger B; Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Prévost, Michèle; Edwards, Marc

    2012-09-01

    A pilot experiment examined lead leaching from four representative configurations of service lines including: (1) 100% lead (Pb), (2) 100% copper (Cu), (3) 50% Pb upstream of 50% Cu, and (4) 50% Pb-downstream of 50% Cu using a range of flow rates. The cumulative mass of lead release indicated that a typical partial replacement configuration (50% lead downstream of copper) did not provide a net reduction in lead when compared to 100% lead pipe (85 mg for 50% Pb-downstream versus 83 mg for 100%-Pb) due to galvanic and deposition corrosion. The partially replaced service line configuration also had a much greater likelihood of producing water with "spikes" of lead particulates at higher flow rates, while tending to produce lower levels of lead at very low flow rates. After the first 214 days the galvanic current between copper and lead was only reduced by 34%, proving that galvanic impacts can be highly persistent even in water with optimized corrosion control by dosing of zinc orthophosphate. Finally, this experiment raises concern about the low flow rates used during some prior home sampling events, which may underestimate exposure to lead during normal water use, especially when galvanic Pb:Cu connections are present. PMID:22677500

  11. Effects of concentration and sniff flow rate on the rat electroolfactogram.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Acevedo, Humberto P; Sherrill, Lisa

    2006-07-01

    Previous reports using the electroolfactogram (EOG) to study the spatial and temporal aspects of response in the rodent olfactory epithelium had focused on high odorant concentrations that gave large responses. This investigation has used lower concentrations to test the difference between responses in the rat dorsomedial and lateral recesses with a range of nasal flow rates and a range of chemical properties. The responses to a highly polar, more hydrophilic odorant changed more steeply with flow rate than responses to a very nonpolar, hydrophobic odorant. With low flow rates there was a response delay in the lateral recess, which is consistent with the models indicating lower flow rates in that region. We observed significant volume conduction effects in which large responses in the dorsomedial region obscured smaller initial portions of the lateral responses. These effects could be removed by destroying the dorsomedial response with a high concentration of a low molecular weight ester. We caution that investigators of EOG recordings from the intact epithelium must attend to the possible presence of volume conduction, which can be assessed by attention to the selectivity of odorant response, response waveform, and response latency.

  12. Observation of Oil Flow Characteristics in Rolling Piston Rotary Compressor for Reducing Oil Circulation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. j.; Noh, K. Y.; Min, B. C.; Yang, J. S.; Choi, G. M.; Kim, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The oil circulation rate (OCR) of the rolling piston rotary compressor is a significant factor which affects the performance of refrigeration system. The increase of oil discharge causes decreasing of the heat transfer efficiency in the heat exchanger, pressure drop and lack of oil in lubricate part in compressor. In this study, the internal flow of compressor was visualized to figure out the oil droplet flow characteristics. The experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in various frequency of compressor to observe the effect of operation frequency on oil droplet flow characteristics for reducing OCR. In situ, measurement of oil droplet diameter and velocity were conducted by using high speed image visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow paths were dominated by copper wire parts driving the motor which was inserted in compressor. In order to verify the reliability of CFD simulation, the tendency of oil flow characteristics in each flow path and the compressor operating conditions were applied in CFD simulation. For reducing OCR, the structure such as vane, disk and ring is installed in the compressor to restrict the main flow path of oil particle. The effect of additional structure for reducing OCR was evaluated using CFD simulation and the results were discussed in detail.

  13. Hydro-abrasive erosion: Problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, K.

    2014-03-01

    The number of hydro power plants with hydro-abrasive erosion is increasing worldwide. An overall approach is needed to minimize the impact of this phenomenon. Already at the start of the planning phase an evaluation should be done to quantify the erosion and the impact on the operation. For this, the influencing parameters and their impact on the erosion have to be known. The necessary information for the evaluation comprises among others the future design, the particle parameters of the water, which will pass the turbine, and the power plant owner's framework for the future operation like availability or maximum allowable efficiency loss, before an overhaul needs to be done. Based on this evaluation of the erosion, an optimised solution can then be found, by analysing all measures in relation to investments, energy production and maintenance costs as decision parameters. Often a more erosion-resistant design, instead of choosing the turbine design with the highest efficiency, will lead to higher revenue. The paper will discuss the influencing parameters on hydro-abrasive erosion and the problems to acquire this information. There are different optimisation possibilities, which will be shown in different case studies. One key aspect to reduce the erosion and prolong the operation time of the components is to coat all relevant parts. But it is very important that this decision is taken early in the design stage, as the design has to be adapted to the requirements of the coating process. The quality of coatings and their impact on the operation will be discussed in detail in the paper as due to the non-availability of standards many questions arise in projects.

  14. Beat-rate dependent mitral flow patterns for in vitro hemodynamic applications.

    PubMed

    Vismara, Riccardo; Fiore, Gianfranco B

    2010-12-01

    The conservative surgery approach for restoring the functionality of heart valves has predominated during the last two decades, particularly for the mitral valve. In vitro pulsatile testing is a key methodology for the investigation of heart valve hemodynamics, and particularly for the ideation, validation and optimization of novel techniques in heart valve surgery. Traditionally, however, pulsatile mock loops have been developed for the study of aortic valve substitutes, and scarce attention has been paid in replicating the mitral flow patterns with due hemodynamic fidelity. In this work we provide detailed analytical expressions to produce beat-rate dependent, physiologic-like mitral flow patterns for in vitro applications. The approach we propose is based on a biomechanical analysis of the factors which govern hemodynamic changes in the mitral flow pattern, namely in terms of E and A wave contours and E/A peaks ratio, when switching from rest to mild exercise conditions. The patterns from the model we obtained were in good agreement with clinical literature data in terms of i) gradual superimposition of the E and A wave, which yielded a single peak at 96 bpm; ii) decrease in the E/A ratio with increasing heart rate; iii) amount of flow delivered by each of the two waves. The proposed method provides a physiologically representative, beat-rate dependent analytical expression of the mitral flow pattern, which can be used in in vitro hydrodynamic investigations to accurately replicate the changes that the flow waves experience when the heart rate shifts from rest to mild exercise conditions.

  15. Patterns and rates of ground-water flow on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Modica, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Increased ground-water contamination from human activities on Long Island has prompted studies to define the pattern and rate of ground-water movement. A two-dimensional, fine-mesh, finite-element model consisting of 11,969 nodes and 22,880 elements was constructed to represent ground-water flow along a north-south section through central Long Island. The model represents average hydrologic conditions within a corridor approximately 15 miles wide. The model solves discrete approximations of both the potential and stream functions. The resulting flownet depicts flow paths and defines the vertical distribution of flow within the section. Ground-water flow rates decrease with depth. Sixty-two percent of the water flows no deeper than the upper glacial (water-table) aquifer, 38 percent enters the underlying Magothy aquifer, and only 3.1 percent enters the Lloyd aquifer. The limiting streamlines for flow to the Magothy and Lloyd aquifers indicate that aquifer recharge areas are narrow east-west bands through the center of the island. The recharge area of the Magothy aquifer is only 5.4 miles wide; that of the Lloyd aquifer is less than 0.5 miles. The distribution of ground-water traveltime and a flownet are calculated from model results; both are useful in the investigation of contaminant transport or the chemical evolution of ground water within the flow system. A major discontinuity in traveltime occurs across the streamline which separates the flow subsystems of the two confined aquifers. Water that reaches the Lloyd aquifer attains traveltimes as high as 10,000 years, whereas water that has not penetrated deeper than the Magothy aquifer attains traveltimes of only 2,000 years. The finite-element approach used in this study is particularly suited to ground-water systems that have complex hydrostratigraphy and cross-sectional symmetry.

  16. Saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, and pH of autistic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bassoukou, Ivy Haralambos; Nicolau, José; dos Santos, Maria Teresa

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, pH levels, and dental caries experience (DCE) in autistic individuals, comparing the results with a control group (CG). The study was performed on 25 noninstitutionalized autistic boys, divided in two groups. G1 composed of ten children, ages 3-8. G2 composed of 15 adolescents ages 9-13. The CG was composed of 25 healthy boys, randomly selected and also divided in two groups: CG3 composed of 14 children ages 4-8, and CG4 composed of 11 adolescents ages 9-14. Whole saliva was collected under slight suction, and pH and buffer capacity were determined using a digital pHmeter. Buffer capacity was measured by titration using 0.01 N HCl, and the flow rate expressed in ml/min, and the DCE was expressed by decayed, missing, and filled teeth (permanent dentition [DMFT] and primary dentition [dmft]). Data were plotted and submitted to nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis) and parametric (Student's t test) statistical tests with a significance level less than 0.05. When comparing G1 and CG3, groups did not differ in flow rate, pH levels, buffer capacity, or DMFT. Groups G2 and CG4 differ significantly in pH (p = 0.007) and pHi = 7.0 (p = 0.001), with lower scores for G2. In autistic individuals aged 3-8 and 9-13, medicated or not, there was no significant statistical difference in flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. The comparison of DCE among autistic children and CG children with deciduous (dmft) and mixed/permanent decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) did not show statistical difference (p = 0.743). Data suggest that autistic individuals have neither a higher flow rate nor a better buffer capacity. Similar DCE was observed in both groups studied. PMID:18594879

  17. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  18. Evaluation of Xerostomia and salivary flow rate in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Shirzad, Nooshin; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most common causes of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto´s Thyroiditis (HT). Early detection of dry mouth is critical in preserving and promoting systemic and oral health. In this study we have assessed, for the first time, salivary function and xerostomia in HT patients who have not been involved with Sjögren´s syndrome. Material and Methods HT was diagnosed in 40 patients based on clinical findings and positive anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Controls, matched by sex, age and body mass index (BMI), and with no history of thyroid disease, were selected. A questionnaire was used for diagnosis of xerostomia. Saliva samples were taken between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m., and at least 2 hours after the last intake of food or drink. The flow rate was calculated in milliliters per minute. Results Xerostomia was significantly higher in patients with HT. Unstimulated salivary flow rate was significantly lower in the HT group. Stimulated salivary flow rate was lower in HT group, but the difference was not significant. Conclusions The patients with HT experienced xerostomia, and their salivary flow rate was diminished. Spitting the saliva then assessing salivary flow rate based on milliliter per minute is non-invasive, fast, and simple for chair-side diagnosis of dry mouth. Autoimmune diseases can be accompanied by salivary gland dysfunction. This may be due to the effect of cytokines in the autoimmune process or because of thyroid hormone dysfunctions. Key words:Thyroid, salivary gland, xerostomia. PMID:26595829

  19. Property-process relations in simulated clinical abrasive adjusting of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on property-process correlations in simulated clinical abrasive adjusting of a wide range of dental restorative ceramics using a dental handpiece and diamond burs. The seven materials studied included four mica-containing glass ceramics, a feldspathic porcelain, a glass-infiltrated alumina, and a yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia. The abrasive adjusting process was conducted under simulated clinical conditions using diamond burs and a clinical dental handpiece. An attempt was made to establish correlations between process characteristics in terms of removal rate, chipping damage, and surface finish and material mechanical properties of hardness, fracture toughness and Young's modulus. The results show that the removal rate is mainly a function of hardness, which decreases nonlinearly with hardness. No correlations were noted between the removal rates and the complex relations of hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness. Surface roughness was primarily a linear function of diamond grit size and was relatively independent of materials. Chipping damage in terms of the average chipping width decreased with fracture toughness except for glass-infiltrated alumina. It also had higher linear correlations with critical strain energy release rates (R²=0.66) and brittleness (R²=0.62) and a lower linear correlation with indices of brittleness (R²=0.32). Implications of these results can provide guidance for the microstructural design of dental ceramics, optimize performance, and guide the proper selection of technical parameters in clinical abrasive adjusting conducted by dental practitioners.

  20. Pressure drop and heat transfer rates in forced convection rotating square duct flows at high rotation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallares, J.; Grau, F. X.; Davidson, L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses numerical simulations of forced convection heat transfer in a rotating square duct at high rotation rates. The mean pressure gradient has been kept constant in the simulations that were conducted with a second order finite volume code with a dynamical localized subgrid scale model. The rotation number based on the bulk velocity (Ro=2ΩD/U¯b) was varied from 0.12 to 6.6 and consequently the Reynolds number (Re=U¯bD/ν) ranged from 3900 to 1810 according to the fact that rotation tends to increase the pressure drop in the duct. A model for estimating the velocities and the corresponding friction coefficient has been developed by analytically solving simplified versions of the momentum budgets within the Ekman layers occurring near the opposite two walls of the duct perpendicular to the rotation axis. The model reproduces accurately the velocity profiles of the numerical simulation at high rotation rates and predicts that the boundary layer quantities scale as Ek1/2 (Ek=ν/ΩD2). At Ro >1 the Ekman layers are responsible for most of the pressure drop of the flow while the maximum heat transfer rates are found on the wall where the stratification of the x-momentum is unstable with respect to the Coriolis force. Rotation enhances the differences between the contributions of the local friction coefficients and local Nusselt numbers of the four walls of the duct and considerably increases, in comparison with the non-rotating case, the pressure drop of the flow and the Nusselt number. The overall friction coefficient of the measurements and the simulations existing in the literature, as well as the present numerical predictions, are well correlated with the equation 1.09(Cf/Ek1/2)1.25=Ro in the range Ro ⩾1 for Re ⩽104.

  1. Prediction of FV520B Steel Flow Stresses at High Temperature and Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaolan; Zhao, Shengdun; Zhang, Chenyang; Fan, Shuqin; Xu, Fan

    2015-10-01

    In order to develop reliable constitutive equations for the simulation, the hot deformation behavior of FV520B steel was investigated through isothermal compression tests in a wide range of temperatures from 900 °C to 1100 °C at an interval of 50 °C and strain rate from 0.01 to 10 s-1 on Gleeble-1500D simulator. The effects of temperature and strain rate on deformation behavior were represented by Zener-Holloman parameter in an exponent-type equation of Arrhenius constitutive. The influence of strain was incorporated in the constitutive analysis by material constants expressed as a polynomial function of strain. The constitutive equation (considering the compensation of strain) could precisely predict the flow stress only at strain rate 0.01 s-1 except at the temperatures of 900 °C and 1000 °C, whereas the flow stress predicted by a modified equation (incorporating both the strain and strain rate) demonstrated a well agreement with the experimental data throughout the entire range of temperatures and strain rates. Correlation coefficient (R) of 0.988 and average absolute relative error (AARE) of 5.7% verified the validity of developed equation from statistical analysis, which further confirmed that the modified constitutive equation could accurately predict the flow stress of FV520B steel.

  2. Effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-04-15

    The present paper examines the effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A theoretical model is developed incorporating the charging rate of the carbon nanotube, kinetics of all the plasma species, and the growth rate of the CNTs because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. The three different carrier gases, i.e., argon (Ar), ammonia, and nitrogen, are considered in the present investigation, and flow rates of all the three carrier gases are varied individually (keeping the flow rates of hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas constant) to investigate the variations in the number densities of hydrocarbon and hydrogen ions in the plasma and their consequent effects on the height and radius of CNT. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that Ar favors the formation of CNTs with larger height and radius whereas ammonia contributes to better height of CNT but decreases the radius of CNT, and nitrogen impedes both the height and radius of CNT. The present work can serve to the better understanding of process parameters during growth of CNTs by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  3. Use of Flow Cytometry to Measure Biogeochemical Rates and Processes in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, Michael W.; Bronk, Deborah A.; van den Engh, Ger

    2011-01-01

    An important goal of marine biogeochemists is to quantify the rates at which elements cycle through the ocean's diverse microbial assemblage, as well as to determine how these rates vary in time and space. The traditional view that phytoplankton are producers and bacteria are consumers has been found to be overly simplistic, and environmental metagenomics is discovering new and important microbial metabolisms at an accelerating rate. Many nutritional strategies previously attributed to one microorganism or functional group are also or instead carried out by other groups. To tease apart which organism is doing what will require new analytical approaches. Flow cytometry, when combined with other techniques, has great potential for expanding our understanding of microbial interactions because groups can be distinguished optically, sorted, and then collected for subsequent analyses. Herein, we review the advances in our understanding of marine biogeochemistry that have arisen from the use of flow cytometry.

  4. Influence of peak inspiratory flow rates and pressure drops on inhalation performance of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ichihashi, Mika; Mizutani, Ayano; Ishizeki, Kazunori; Okada, Toyoko; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the relationship between human inspiratory flow patterns and the concomitant drops in pressure in different inhalation devices, and the influence of the devices on inhalation performance. As a model formulation for inhalers, a physically mixed dry powder composed of salbutamol sulfate and coarse lactose monohydrate was selected. The drops in pressure at 28.3 L/min of three inhalation devices, Single-type, Dual-type, and Reverse-type, was 1.0, 5.1, and 8.7 kPa, respectively. Measurements of human inspiratory patterns revealed that although the least resistant device (Single) had large inter- and intra-individual variation of peak flow rate (PFR), the coefficients of variation of PFR of the three devices were almost the same. In tests with a human inspiratory flow simulator in vitro, inhalation performance was higher, but the variation in inhalation performance in the range of human flow patterns was wider, for the more resistant device. To minimize the intra- and inter-individual variation in inhalation performance for the model formulation in this study, a formulation design that allows active pharmaceutical ingredient to detach from the carrier with a lower inhalation flow rate is needed.

  5. Grain-size-independent plastic flow at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Park, H-S; Rudd, R E; Cavallo, R M; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Belof, J L; Blobaum, K J M; El-dasher, B S; Florando, J N; Huntington, C M; Maddox, B R; May, M J; Plechaty, C; Prisbrey, S T; Remington, B A; Wallace, R J; Wehrenberg, C E; Wilson, M J; Comley, A J; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Farrell, M; Randall, G; Gray, G T

    2015-02-13

    A basic tenet of material science is that the flow stress of a metal increases as its grain size decreases, an effect described by the Hall-Petch relation. This relation is used extensively in material design to optimize the hardness, durability, survivability, and ductility of structural metals. This Letter reports experimental results in a new regime of high pressures and strain rates that challenge this basic tenet of mechanical metallurgy. We report measurements of the plastic flow of the model body-centered-cubic metal tantalum made under conditions of high pressure (>100  GPa) and strain rate (∼10(7)  s(-1)) achieved by using the Omega laser. Under these unique plastic deformation ("flow") conditions, the effect of grain size is found to be negligible for grain sizes >0.25  μm sizes. A multiscale model of the plastic flow suggests that pressure and strain rate hardening dominate over the grain-size effects. Theoretical estimates, based on grain compatibility and geometrically necessary dislocations, corroborate this conclusion. PMID:25723227

  6. On the relationship between the rate of salivary flow and salivary fluoride clearance.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Ralph M; Jones, S

    2015-01-01

    The amount of fluoride retained in the mouth following the application of dentifrices, mouthwashes, etc. may be important in determining their anticaries efficacy. In this study we investigated the relationship between the salivary flow rate and salivary fluoride clearance. Ten adults tested six mouthrinses, consisting of aqueous sodium fluoride solutions (0.013, 0.026 mol/l) with and without added sodium chloride (1.28 mol/l) or sucrose (0.44 mol/l), in a randomised order. Prior to each test, subjects swallowed, rinsed for 2 min with 2 ml water and then expectorated into a preweighed container to obtain a measure of initial saliva flow rate. Next, the procedure was repeated using one of the test rinses. Finally, samples of unstimulated whole saliva were collected for up to 3 h after each mouthrinse application and analysed for fluoride. Salivary fluoride concentrations were significantly lower after application of mouthrinses that contained either sucrose or NaCl, both of which compounds markedly enhanced salivary flow, than after the use of corresponding mouthrinses without any additive. Area under the salivary fluoride clearance curve (AUC) values were inversely correlated with salivary flow rate on an individual basis (p < 0.01). The observed behaviour could not be completely attributed to treatment dilution by saliva at the time of application. PMID:25634162

  7. Effect of flow rate and concentration difference on reverse electrodialysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kilsugn; Han, Jaesuk; Kim, Daejoong

    2013-11-01

    Various energy conversion technologies have been developed to reduce dependency on limited fossil fuels, including wind power, solar power, hydropower, ocean power, and geothermal power. Among them, reverse electrodialysis (RED), which is one type of salinity gradient power (SGP), has received much attention due to high reliability and simplicity without moving parts. Here, we experimentally evaluated the RED performance with several parameters like flow rate of concentrated and dilute solution, concentration difference, and temperature. RED was composed of endplates, electrodes, spacers, anion exchange membrane, and cation exchange membrane. Endplates are made by a polypropylene. It included the electrodes, flow field for the electrode rinse solution, and path to supply a concentrated and dilute solution. Titanium coated by iridium and ruthenium was used as the electrode. The electrode rinse solution based on hexacyanoferrate system is used to reduce the power loss generated by conversion process form ionic current to electric current. Maximum power monotonously increases as increasing flow rate and concentration difference. Net power has optimal point because pumping power consumption increases with flow rate. This work was supported by Basic Science Research Program (Grat No. NRF-2011-0009993) through the National Research Foundation of Korea.

  8. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  9. Grain-size-independent plastic flow at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Park, H-S; Rudd, R E; Cavallo, R M; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Belof, J L; Blobaum, K J M; El-dasher, B S; Florando, J N; Huntington, C M; Maddox, B R; May, M J; Plechaty, C; Prisbrey, S T; Remington, B A; Wallace, R J; Wehrenberg, C E; Wilson, M J; Comley, A J; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Farrell, M; Randall, G; Gray, G T

    2015-02-13

    A basic tenet of material science is that the flow stress of a metal increases as its grain size decreases, an effect described by the Hall-Petch relation. This relation is used extensively in material design to optimize the hardness, durability, survivability, and ductility of structural metals. This Letter reports experimental results in a new regime of high pressures and strain rates that challenge this basic tenet of mechanical metallurgy. We report measurements of the plastic flow of the model body-centered-cubic metal tantalum made under conditions of high pressure (>100  GPa) and strain rate (∼10(7)  s(-1)) achieved by using the Omega laser. Under these unique plastic deformation ("flow") conditions, the effect of grain size is found to be negligible for grain sizes >0.25  μm sizes. A multiscale model of the plastic flow suggests that pressure and strain rate hardening dominate over the grain-size effects. Theoretical estimates, based on grain compatibility and geometrically necessary dislocations, corroborate this conclusion.

  10. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-01-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework. PMID:26987587

  11. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-01-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework. PMID:26987587

  12. Flow Rate Driven by Peristaltic Movement in Plasmodial Tube of Physarum Polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2008-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of protoplasmic streaming driven by peristaltic movement in an elastic tube of an amoeba-like organism. The Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, a true slime mold, is a large amoeboid organism that adopts a sheet-like form with a tubular network. The network extends throughout the Plasmodium and enables the transport and circulation of chemical signals and nutrients. This tubular flow is driven by periodically propagating waves of active contraction of the tube cortex, a process known as peristaltic movement. We derive the relationship between the phase velocity of the contraction wave and the flow rate, and we discuss the physiological implications of this relationship.

  13. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  14. Non-contact flow gauging for the extension and development of rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew; Large, Andy; Russell, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Accurate measurement of river discharge is fundamental to understanding hydrological processes, associated hazards and ecological responses within fluvial systems. Established protocols for determining river discharge are partial, predominantly invasive and logistically difficult during high flows. There is demand for new methods for accurate quantification of flow velocity under high-flow/flood conditions to in turn enable better post-event reconstruction of peak discharge. As a consequence considerable effort has been devoted to the development of innovative technologies for the representation of flow in open channels. Remotely operated fixed and mobile systems capable of providing quantitative estimates of instantaneous and time-averaged flow characteristics using non-contact methods has been a major development. Amongst the new approaches for stand-alone continuous monitoring of surface flows is Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Here we adapt the LSPIV concept, to provide continuous discharge measurements in non-uniform channels with complex flow conditions. High Definition videos (1080p; 30fps) of the water surface are acquired at 5 minute intervals. The image is rectified to correct for perspective distortion using a new, open source tool which minimises errors resulting from oblique image capture. Naturally occurring artefacts on the water surface (e.g. bubbles, debris, etc.) are tracked with the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) algorithm. The data generated is in the form of a complex surface water velocity field which can be interrogated to extract a range of hydrological information such as the streamwise velocity at a cross-section of interest, or even allow the interrogation of hydrodynamic flow structures. Here we demonstrate that this approach is capable of generating river discharge data comparable to concurrent measurements made using existing, accepted technologies (e.g. ADCP). The outcome is better constraint and extension of rating curves

  15. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  16. The dispersion behaviour of dry powder inhalation formulations cannot be assessed at a single inhalation flow rate.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-04-25

    The dispersion performances of inhalation powders are often tested at only one inhalation flow rate in mechanistic formulation studies. This limited approach is challenged by studies showing that interactions exist between inhalation flow rate and the effects on dispersion performance of several formulation variables. In this note we explain that such interactions with inhalation flow rate are, in fact, always to be expected. Because these interactions may greatly affect conclusions concerning the effects of formulation variables and their underlying mechanisms, the utility of future dry powder inhalation formulation studies may benefit from an approach in which dispersion performance is by default tested over a range of inhalation flow rates.

  17. Improved determination of vascular blood-flow shear rate using Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farison, James B.; Begeman, Garett A.; Salles-Cunha, Sergio X.; Beebe, Hugh G.

    1997-05-01

    Shear rate has been linked to endothelial and smooth muscle cell function, neointimal hyperplasia, poststenotic dilation and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. In vivo studies of shear rate have been limited in humans due to the lack of a truly accurate noninvasive method of measuring blood flow. In clinical vascular laboratories, the primary method of wall shear rate estimation is the scaled ratio between the center line systolic velocity and the local arterial radius. The present study compares this method with the shear rate calculated directly from data collected using a Doppler ultrasound scanner. Blood flow in the superficial femoral artery of 20 subjects was measured during three stages of distal resistance. Analysis and display programs were written for use with the MATLAB image processing software package. The experimental values of shear rate were calculated using the formal definition and then compared to the standard estimate. In all three states of distal resistance, the experimental values were significantly higher than the estimated values by a factor of approximately 1.57. These results led to the conclusion that the direct method of measuring shear rate is more precise and should replace the estimation model in the clinical laboratory.

  18. Primary standard for liquid flow rates between 30 and 1500 nl/min based on volume expansion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Ahrens, Martin; Geršl, Jan; Sparreboom, Wouter; Lötters, Joost

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of microfluidic systems operate at flow rates below 1 μl/min. Applications include (implanted) micropumps for drug delivery, liquid chromatography, and microreactors. For the applications where the absolute accuracy is important, a proper calibration is required. However, with standard calibration facilities, flow rate calibrations below ~1 μl/min are not feasible because of a too large calibration uncertainty. In the current research, a traceable flow rate using a certain temperature increase rate is proposed. When the fluid properties, starting mass, and temperature increase rate are known, this principle yields a direct link to SI units, which makes it a primary standard. In this article, it will be shown that this principle enables flow rate uncertainties in the order of 2-3% for flow rates from 30 to 1500 nl/min. PMID:26352350

  19. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  20. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  1. Maximum two-phase flow rates of subcooled nitrogen through a sharp-edged orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented of an experiment in which subcooled liquid nitrogen was discharged through a sharp-edged orifice at flow rates near the maximum. The data covered a range of inlet stagnation pressures from slightly above saturation to twice the thermodynamic critical pressure. The data were taken along five separate inlet stagnation isotherms ranging from 0.75 to 1.035 times the thermodynamic critical temperature. The results indicate that subcooled liquids do not choke or approach maximum flow in an asymptotic manner even though the back pressure is well below saturation; and orifice flow coefficients are not constant as is frequently assumed. A metastable jet appears to exist which breaks down if the difference between back pressure and saturation pressure is large enough.

  2. Autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate in the pregnant rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Hall, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors purpose was to determine whether renal autoregulatory capability is retained in pregnancy despite the marked renal vasodilation that occurs at this time. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured in anesthetized pregnant (22-27 days gestation) and nonpregnant rabbits during step reductions in renal perfusion pressure from control (100 +/- 3 mmHg) to 50 mmHg. Control renal blood flow and GFR were significantly higher in pregnant animals. Filtration fraction was also significantly elevated in pregnant animals. During step reductions in renal perfusion pressure, renal blood flow was well autoregulated down to approx.70 mmHg in both nonpregnant and pregnant animals. Likewise, GFR was also well autoregulated, falling by 10 +/- 2 and 8 +/- 3% in nonpregnant and pregnant animals, respectively, when perfusion pressure was reduced from 90 to 70 mmHg. These results suggest that renal autoregulation is preserved in pregnancy despite the fact that the renal circulation is already markedly vasodilated.

  3. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  4. Improving power plant efficiency and safety through better knowledge of flow-rates: The EDF approach

    SciTech Connect

    Piguet, M.

    1998-07-01

    The flow-rate is an important parameter in power plant operation for both performance and safety purposes. As an example, in nuclear and fossil power plants, the uncertainty concerning thermal and electrical powers is directly connected to the uncertainty of the feedwater flow. In real conditions, the flow-rate is often incorrectly determined due to various phenomena among which are incorrect installation conditions, wrong calibrations and drift, erosion or fouling of the flowmeters. These phenomena may lead to systematic errors which can represent several percents of the measured value and which can induce a critical loss of profit. This paper presents the strategy and means of EDF's R and D Division to improve actual accuracy of flowmeters used in power plants. The experimental approach has always been an efficient way to investigate and make a diagnosis of real situations. The EVEREST loop is a dedicated rig within EDF for the study of liquid flow metering problems. It enables to calibrate industrial flowmeters, evaluate prototypes and study the specific installation conditions of flowmeters. It is often noticed that flowmeters do not respect the standards in terms of straight lengths upstream from the meter. A practical example (1,300 MW unit feedwater flow) illustrates the possibility the EVEREST loop offers to reproduce the geometry of the hydraulic circuit and flow conditions. The impact of the actual installation conditions on the flowmeter accuracy can be thus determined and the flowmeter can be possibly recalibrated in order to reduce or correct a systematic bias. The EDF tool is presented with examples of accuracy and experimental and numerical modeling.

  5. Field and laboratory experiments on high dissolution rates of limestone in stream flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattanji, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Mariko; Song, Wonsuh; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Takaya, Yasuhiko; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2014-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were performed to examine dissolution rates of limestone in stream flow. Field experiments were conducted in three stream sites (A-C) with different lithological or hydrological settings around a limestone plateau in the Abukuma Mts., Japan. Sites A and B are allogenic streams, which flow from non-limestone sources into dolines, and site C has a karst spring source. Tablets made of limestone from the same plateau with a diameter of 3.5 cm and a thickness of 1 cm were placed in the streams for 3 years (2008-2011) where alkalinity, pH and major cation concentrations were measured periodically. The saturation indices of calcite (SIc) of stream water were - 2.8 ± 0.4 at site A, - 2.5 ± 0.4 at site B and - 0.5 ± 0.4 at site C. Annual weight loss ratios for tablets were extremely high at site A (0.11-0.14 mg cm- 2 d- 1), high at site B (0.05 mg cm- 2 d- 1), and low at site C (0.005 mg cm- 2 d- 1). The contrasting rates of weight loss are mainly explained by chemical conditions of stream water. In addition, laboratory experiments for dissolution of limestone tablets using a flow-through apparatus revealed that flow conditions around the limestone tablet is another important factor for dissolution in the stream environment. These results revealed that limestone dissolves at a rapid rate where water unsaturated to calcite continuously flows, such as in an allogenic stream.

  6. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate.

    PubMed

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2016-02-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min(-1)) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its adverse effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min(-1) flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L(-1) initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated. PMID:26344148

  7. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate.

    PubMed

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2016-02-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min(-1)) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its adverse effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min(-1) flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L(-1) initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated.

  8. Definition of hydraulic stability of KVGM-100 hot-water boiler and minimum water flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. A.; Ozerov, A. N.; Usikov, N. V.; Shkondin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    In domestic power engineering, the methods of quantitative and qualitative-quantitative adjusting the load of the heat supply systems are widely distributed; furthermore, during the greater part of the heating period, the actual discharge of network water is less than estimated values when changing to quantitative adjustment. Hence, the hydraulic circuits of hot-water boilers should ensure the water velocities, minimizing the scale formation and excluding the formation of stagnant zones. The results of the calculations of hot-water KVGM-100 boiler and minimum water flow rate for the basic and peak modes at the fulfillment of condition of the lack of surface boil are presented in the article. The minimal flow rates of water at its underheating to the saturation state and the thermal flows in the furnace chamber were defined. The boiler hydraulic calculation was performed using the "Hydraulic" program, and the analysis of permissible and actual velocities of the water movement in the pipes of the heating surfaces was carried out. Based on the thermal calculations of furnace chamber and thermal- hydraulic calculations of heating surfaces, the following conclusions were drawn: the minimum velocity of water movement (by condition of boiling surface) at lifting movement of environment increases from 0.64 to 0.79 m/s; it increases from 1.14 to 1.38 m/s at down movement of environmental; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the basic mode (by condition of the surface boiling) increased from 887 t/h at the load of 20% up to 1074 t/h at the load of 100%. The minimum flow rate is 1074 t/h at nominal load and is achieved at the pressure at the boiler outlet equal to 1.1 MPa; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the peak mode by condition of surface boiling increases from 1669 t/h at the load of 20% up to 2021 t/h at the load of 100%.

  9. Granular-flow rheology: Role of shear-rate number in transition regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the rationale behind the semiempirical formulation of a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in the light of the Reiner-Rivlin constitutive theory and the viscoplastic theory, thereby identifying the parameters that control the rheology of granular flow. The shear-rate number (N) proves to be among the most significant parameters identified from the GVF model. As N ??? 0 and N ??? ???, the GVF model can reduce asymptotically to the theoretical stress versus shear-rate relations in the macroviscous and graininertia regimes, respectively, where the grain concentration (C) also plays a major role in the rheology of granular flow. Using available data obtained from the rotating-cylinder experiments of neutrally buoyant solid spheres dispersing in an interstitial fluid, the shear stress for granular flow in transition between the two regimes proves dependent on N and C in addition to some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution. The insufficiency of data on rotating-cylinder experiments cannot presently allow the GVF model to predict how a granular flow may behave in the entire range of N; however, the analyzed data provide an insight on the interrelation among the relevant dimensionless parameters.

  10. A study of the critical nozzle for flow rate measurement of high-pressure hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. D.; Lee, J. H.; Park, K. A.; Setoguchi, T.; Matsuo, S.

    2007-03-01

    The mass flow rate measurement using a critical nozzle shows the validity of the inviscid theory, indicating that the discharge coefficient increases and approaches unity as the Reynolds number increases under the ideal gas law. However, when the critical nozzle measures the mass flow rate of a real gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of hundreds bar, the discharge coefficient exceeds unity, and the real gas effects should be taken into account. The present study aims at investigating the flow features of the critical nozzle using high-pressured hydrogen gas. The axisymmetric, compressible Navier-Stokes computation is employed to simulate the critical nozzle flow, and a fully implicit finite volume method is used to discretize the governing equation system. The real gas effects are simulated to consider the intermolecular forces, which account for the possibility of liquefying hydrogen gas. The computational results are compared with past experimental data. It has been found that the coefficient of discharge for real gas can be corrected properly below unity adopting the real gas assumption.

  11. The dynamic behavior of articulated pipes conveying fluid with periodic flow rate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, M. P.; Herrmann, G.

    1973-01-01

    The plane motion of two rigid, straight articulated pipes conveying fluid is examined. In contrast to previous work, the flow rate is not taken as constant, but is allowed to have small periodic oscillations about a mean value, as would be expected in a pump-driven system. It is shown that in the presence of such disturbances, both parametric and combination resonances are possible. When the system can also admit loss of stability by static buckling or by flutter, it is found that the presence of small periodic disturbances constitutes a destabilizing effect. Floquet theory and converging infinite determinant expansions are used to illustrate a basic difference between systems which lose stability by divergence and those that lose stability by flutter. An algebraic criterion is obtained for the minimum amplitude of flow-rate oscillation required for the system to be affected by the presence of small disturbances.

  12. Assessment of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Spino, M.; Chai, R.P.; Isles, A.F.; Balfe, J.W.; Brown, R.G.; Thiessen, J.J.; MacLeod, S.M.

    1985-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine renal function in 10 healthy control subjects and eight patients with cystic fibrosis in stable condition. Sequential bolus injections of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA and /sup 125/I-OIH were administered to assess glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow, respectively. Blood was subsequently collected for 3 hours, and urine for 24 hours. Renal clearances of both radioisotope markers were virtually identical in patients and controls. Inasmuch as neither glomerular filtration rate nor effective renal plasma flow was enhanced in patients with cystic fibrosis, increased clearance of drugs in these patients is unlikely to be the result of enhanced glomerular filtration or tubular secretion.

  13. Design and optimization of a large flow rate booster pump in SWRO energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z. N.; Wu, P.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is a high energy-consumption industry, so energy efficiency is an important issue. Energy recovery systems, which contain a pressure exchanger and a booster pump, are widely used in SWRO plants. As a key part of energy recovery system, the difficulty of designing booster pumps lies in high inlet pressure, high medium causticity and large flow rate. High inlet pressure adds difficulties to seal design, and large flow rate and high efficiency requirement bring high demand for hydraulic design. In this paper, a 625 m3/h booster pump is designed and optimized according to the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results. The impeller and volute is well designed, a new type of high pressure mechanical seal is applied and axial force is well balanced. After optimization based on blade redesign, the efficiency of the pump was improved. The best efficiency reaches more than 85% at design point according to the CFD simulation result.

  14. Noise-induced convergence of the low flow rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Minoru; Nakaiwa, Masaru; Akiya, Takaji; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    The effect of noise on the low flow-rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was studied. The chaos was simulated using the three-variable model of Györgyi and Field. Gaussian white noise was imposed on the flow-rate of the reactant solutions fed into CSTR to simulate the so-called type P noise. The range of average noise amplitudes was chosen between 0.01% and 1% related to the inverse residence time. The calculated time series were analyzed on the basis of their Fourier spectra, maximum Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov entropies, return maps and invariant density. We found that the noise induces partial order of the period-3-like oscillations in the low flowrate chaos.

  15. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  16. Measurement of gas yields and flow rates using a custom flowmeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.C.; Stern, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    A simple gas collection apparatus based on the principles of a Torricelli tube has been designed and built to measure gas volume yields and flow rates. This instrument is routinely used to monitor and collect methane gas released during methane hydrate dissociation experiments. It is easily and inexpensively built, operates at ambient pressures and temperatures, and measures gas volumes of up to 7 L to a precision of about 15 ml (about 0.0025 mol). It is capable of measuring gas flow rates varying from more than 103 to less than 10-1 ml/min during gas evolution events that span minutes to several days. We have obtained a highly reproducible hydrate number of n=5.891 with a propagated uncertainty of ??0.020 for synthetic methane hydrate. ?? 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Estimation of inlet flow rates for image-based aneurysm CFD models: where and how to begin?

    PubMed

    Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Piccinelli, Marina; KrishnankuttyRema, Resmi; Steinman, David A

    2015-06-01

    Patient-specific flow rates are rarely available for image-based computational fluid dynamics models. Instead, flow rates are often assumed to scale according to the diameters of the arteries of interest. Our goal was to determine how choice of inlet location and scaling law affect such model-based estimation of inflow rates. We focused on 37 internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm cases from the Aneurisk cohort. An average ICA flow rate of 245 mL min(-1) was assumed from the literature, and then rescaled for each case according to its inlet diameter squared (assuming a fixed velocity) or cubed (assuming a fixed wall shear stress). Scaling was based on diameters measured at various consistent anatomical locations along the models. Choice of location introduced a modest 17% average uncertainty in model-based flow rate, but within individual cases estimated flow rates could vary by >100 mL min(-1). A square law was found to be more consistent with physiological flow rates than a cube law. Although impact of parent artery truncation on downstream flow patterns is well studied, our study highlights a more insidious and potentially equal impact of truncation site and scaling law on the uncertainty of assumed inlet flow rates and thus, potentially, downstream flow patterns.

  18. Gusev crater: direction of active winds derived from the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, R.; Gorevan, S.; Thompson, S. D.; Whelley, P.; Squyres, S.; Arvidson, R.

    2004-05-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) are not instrumented to measure winds directly, but might be able to give insight into wind directions using other techniques. The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) on the Mars rover, Spirit, was used to remove dust and cut into a basaltic rock named Adirondack in Gusev crater on Sol 34 of mission operations. The rock abrasion operation occurred between about 1223 hr and 1518 hr in the afternoon (local solar time) and left a cavity 2.68 mm deep. An image taken after the abrasion operation showed that the rock cuttings were asymmetrically distributed around the cavity and over the rock in a direction suggesting that the cuttings were transported away from the cavity by winds. The distribution pattern (and the inferred wind) is being compared with results from wind tunnel simulations conducted prior to the mission to assess the wind-flow patterns as a function of rock, rover, and IDD positions with respect to the wind. The wind direction inferred from the RAT cuttings are also being compared with wind directions suggested by aeolian bedforms and albedo patterns seen from MER and from orbit, and with directions predicted by a model of the atmosphere for winds at mid-day in Gusev crater.

  19. Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. ); Wright, E.K. )

    1992-06-01

    The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

  20. Atomistic Origin of Rate-Dependent Serrated Plastic Flow in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Dai, L. H.; Yao, Y. G.

    2008-12-01

    Nanoindentation simulations on a binary metallic glass were performed under various strain rates by using molecular dynamics. The rate-dependent serrated plastic flow was clearly observed, and the spatiotemporal behavior of its underlying irreversible atomic rearrangement was probed. Our findings clearly validate that the serration is a temporally inhomogeneous characteristic of such rearrangements and not directly dependent on the resultant shear-banding spatiality. The unique spatiotemporal distribution of shear banding during nanoindentation is highlighted in terms of the potential energy landscape (PEL) theory.

  1. Estimating Rock Strength Parameters from Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) Grinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Cohen, J.; Hurowitz, J.; Lennon, A.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed an empirical correlation between rock abrasion tool (RAT) grind energy and compressive strength. This correlation can be used to infer the physical properties of rocks ground by the MER rovers on Mars.

  2. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... excessive restorative materials, such as gold, and to smooth rough surfaces from oral restorations, such...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... excessive restorative materials, such as gold, and to smooth rough surfaces from oral restorations, such...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... excessive restorative materials, such as gold, and to smooth rough surfaces from oral restorations, such...

  5. Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on Basalt Weathering Rates under Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C. I.; Chorover, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Rock weathering is an important aspect of soil formation that is tightly coupled to the progressive colonization of grain surfaces by microorganisms and plant tissue, both of which are associated with the exudation of complexing ligands and reducing equivalents that are incorporated into dissolved organic matter. As part of a larger hillslope experimental study being designed for Biosphere 2 (Oracle, AZ), we seek to determine how the presence and concentration of dissolved organic matter affects the incongruent dissolution rates of basaltic tuff. Saturated flow column experiments are being conducted using plant-derived soluble organic matter solutions of variable concentrations, and comparisons are being made to experiments conducted with malic acid, a low-molecular weight organic acid commonly exuded into the rhizosphere. Dissolved organic matter was extracted from Ponderosa Pine forest floor and was characterized for aqueous geochemical parameters (pH, EC, ion balance, DOC/TN) and also for DOC composition (UV-Vis, FTIR spectroscopy). Column effluents are being analyzed for major and trace cations, anions, silica and organic solutes. Dissolution rates of primary minerals and precipitation rates of secondary phases will be estimated by fitting the data to a numerical reactive transport model, CrunchFlow2007. At the end of the fluid flow experiment, column materials will be analyzed for biogeochemical composition to detect preferential dissolution of specific phases, the precipitation of new ones, and to monitor the associated formation of biofilms. The influence of organic solutions on weathering patterns of basalt will be discussed.

  6. The role of silane gas flow rate on PECVD-assisted fabrication of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidinezhad, Habib; Ashkarran, Ali Akbar; Abdul-Malek, Zulkurnain

    2016-03-01

    Silicon (Si) core-shell nanowires (NWs) were successfully prepared by very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique, and the effect of silane (SiH4) gas flow rates on physicochemical properties of silicon NWs was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize SiNWs. Structural properties and morphology of NWs were studied as a function of SiH4 gas flow rate. Microscopic analysis revealed the formation of SiNWs with average tip and stem diameters ranging from 18 to 30 and 21 to 67 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the average length of Si NWs calculated based on the FESEM images was about 300-1800 nm. We have found that the growth of SiNWs increased with increasing in SiH4 gas flow rate. XRD, Raman spectra in addition to high-resolution TEM, verified the formation of crystalline SiNWs. A possible growth mechanism was suggested based on our observations.

  7. Measurements of Flow Rate and Trajectory of Aircraft Tire-Generated Water Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure the flow rate and trajectory of water spray generated by an aircraft tire operating on a flooded runway. Tests were conducted in the Hydrodynamics Research Facility and made use of a partial airframe and a nose tire from a general aviation aircraft. Nose tires from a commercial transport aircraft were also used. The effects of forward speed, tire load, and water depth on water spray patterns were evaluated by measuring the amount and location of water captured by an array of tubes mounted behind the test tire. Water ejected from the side of the tire footprint had the most significant potential for ingestion into engine inlets. A lateral wake created on the water surface by the rolling tire can dominate the shape of the spray pattern as the distance aft of the tire is increased. Forward speed increased flow rates and moved the spray pattern inboard. Increased tire load caused the spray to become less dense. Near the tire, increased water depths caused flow rates to increase. Tests using a fuselage and partial wing along with the nose gear showed that for certain configurations, wing aerodynamics can cause a concentration of spray above the wing.

  8. Transport of ferrihydrite nanoparticles in saturated porous media: role of ionic strength and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Tiziana; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2012-04-01

    The use of nanoscale ferrihydrite particles, which are known to effectively enhance microbial degradation of a wide range of contaminants, represents a promising technology for in situ remediation of contaminated aquifers. Thanks to their small size, ferrihydrite nanoparticles can be dispersed in water and directly injected into the subsurface to create reactive zones where contaminant biodegradation is promoted. Field applications would require a detailed knowledge of ferrihydrite transport mechanisms in the subsurface, but such studies are lacking in the literature. The present study is intended to fill this gap, focusing in particular on the influence of flow rate and ionic strength on particle mobility. Column tests were performed under constant or transient ionic strength, including injection of ferrihydrite colloidal dispersions, followed by flushing with particle-free electrolyte solutions. Particle mobility was greatly affected by the salt concentration, and particle retention was almost irreversible under typical salt content in groundwater. Experimental results indicate that, for usual ionic strength in European aquifers (2 to 5 mM), under natural flow condition ferrihydrite nanoparticles are likely to be transported for 5 to 30 m. For higher ionic strength, corresponding to contaminated aquifers, (e.g., 10 mM) the travel distance decreases to few meters. A simple relationship is proposed for the estimation of travel distance with changing flow rate and ionic strength. For future applications to aquifer remediation, ionic strength and injection rate can be used as tuning parameters to control ferrihydrite mobility in the subsurface and therefore the radius of influence during field injections.

  9. Salivary flow rates among women diagnosed with benign and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Napeñas, Joel J; Miles, Leslie; Guajardo-Streckfus, Cynthia; Streckfus, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare salivary flow rates (SWS) among patients diagnosed with benign and varying malignant solid tumors with the comparison group, prior to the initiation of any treatment. An evaluation of the results found that mean baseline SWS flow rates were higher for healthy patients (1.55 ml/min) when compared to patients diagnosed with benign tumors (1.13 ml/min), breast cancer (1.09 ml/min), and reproductive carcinomas (0.94 ml/min). The overall model (F = 7.76; p < .001) and the Dunnett's post hoc analyses were statistically significant at the p < .001 level. Additionally, medications, race, and season of the year had significant effects on mean SWS flow rates. The results suggest that salivary secretion is lower among both benign and malignant tumor subjects prior to the initiation of treatment. Salivary evaluations of subjects prior to treatment may be useful in identifying individuals at risk for oral complications during chemotherapy.

  10. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  11. Effect of wall shear rate on biofilm deposition and grazing in drinking water flow chambers.

    PubMed

    Paris, Tony; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine; Block, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-15

    The effect of four-wall shear rates (34.9, 74.8, 142.5, and 194.5 s(-1)) on bacterial deposition on glass slides in drinking water flow chambers was studied. Biofilm image acquisition was performed over a 50-day period. Bacterial accumulation and surface coverage curves were obtained. Microscopic observations allowed us to obtain information about the dynamics and spatial distribution of the biofilm. During the first stage of biofilm formation (210-518 h), bacterial accumulation was a function of the wall shear rate: the higher the wall shear rate, the faster the bacterial deposition (1.1 and 1.9 x 10(4) bacterial cells . cm(-2) for wall shear rates of 34.9 and 142.5 s(-1), respectively). A new similarity relationship characteristic of a non-dimensional time and function of the wall shear rate was proposed to describe initial bacterial deposition. After 50 days of exposure to drinking water, surface coverage was more or less identical under the entire wall shear rates (7.44 +/- 0.9%), suggesting that biofilm bacterial density cannot be controlled using hydrodynamics. However, the spatial distribution of the biofilm was clearly different. Under low wall shear rate, aggregates were composed of bacterial cells able to "vibrate" independently on the surface, whereas, under a high wall shear rate, aggregates were more cohesive. Therefore, susceptibility to the hydraulic discontinuities occurring in drinking water system may not be similar. In all the flow chambers, significant decreases in bacterial biomass (up to 77%) were associated with the presence of amoebae. This grazing preferentially targeted small, isolated cells.

  12. Powder flow studies III: tensile strength, consolidation ratio, flow rate, and capsule-filling-weight variation relationships.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, Z T; Yang, I C

    1981-08-01

    The tensile strength of consolidated powder beds was studied by applying a series of loads to the surface of the powder beds in a tensile tester. The results were plotted as tensile strength versus consolidation pressure. The linearity of these plots suggests a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation pressure. The following plots gave linear relationships: (1) tensile strength versus consolidation ratio, (b) tensile strength versus coefficient of variation of the filled weight of the capsules, and (c) logarithm of the tensile strength versus logarithm of the flow rate. These results suggest a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation ratio and their usefulness in studying powder flow. The physical significance of the empirical equation used in consolidation studies was explored. A comparison of the empirical equation with a theoretically derived equation, under certain assumptions, suggests that the consolidation ratio is a function of the ratio of the initial volume to the net volume and a function of the coefficient of Rankine. The coefficient of Rankine is a function of the angle of internal friction in the static powder bed.

  13. Method of protecting surfaces from abrasion and abrasion resistant articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-06-09

    Surfaces of fabricated structures are protected from damage by impacting particulates by a coating of hard material formed as a mass of thin flexible filaments having root ends secured to the surface and free portions which can flex and overlap to form a resilient cushioning mat which resembles hair or fur. The filamentary coating covers the underlying surface with hard abrasion resistance material while also being compliant and capable of local accommodation to particle impacts. The coating can also function as thermal and/or acoustical insulation and has a friction reducing effect. 11 figs.

  14. [Dependence of the dentinal abrasion of human teeth on their microhardness].

    PubMed

    Remizov, S M; Pruzhanskiĭ, L Iu

    1989-01-01

    The dentin resistance against abrasion was studied as related to its microhardness. Sections of 15 intact teeth were investigated (central upper incisors). Water suspensions (40% weight-to weight) of dicalcium phosphate (DCP, FRG; and DKF-1 and DKF-2, USSR) were used as abrasives. Dentin microhardness was measured with a PMT-3 device, and abrasion assessed with profilographic technique. Dentin abrasion was related to its microhardness and to the kind of abrasive used. Dentin abrasion increased as its microhardness decreased. DCF showed minimal abrasive effect, DKF-2 had maximal effect with DKF-1 keeping the intermediate position.

  15. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  16. Influence of paleo-heat flow variations on estimates of exhumation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hagke, Christoph; Luijendijk, Elco

    2016-04-01

    Deriving exhumation estimates from thermochronological data requires assumptions on the paleo-thermal field of the Earth's crust. Existing thermal models take into account heat transfer by diffusion and advection caused by the movement of the crust and erosion as well as changes in geothermal gradient over time caused by changes in structure or thermal properties of the crust, surface temperature and elevation. However, temperature field of mountain belts and basins may vary not only due to tectonic activity or landscape evolution. We present a high-resolution thermochronology data set from the foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the European Alps that shows substantial variation of cooling rates probably caused by hydrothermal flow in the subsurface in the past. Tectonic blocks with uniform exhumation history show variations in cooling of up to 50°C. In addition, changes in cooling between two different fault blocks show opposite trend than expected by models of their tectonic history. The observed historic changes in paleo-geothermal gradients are equal in magnitude to a present-day thermal anomaly caused by the upward flow of warm fluids in the distal part of the foreland basin. The strong variations in geothermal gradients by fluid flow imply that straightforward interpretation of landscape evolution rates using thermochronology is not possible, unless the thermal effects of fluid flow are taken into account. This is of particular importance to studies where the amount of thermochronology data is limited and local hydrothermal anomalies could easily be interpreted as regional exhumation signals. On the other hand, our findings suggest that thermochronology offers new opportunities to constrain magnitude and timing of paleo-heat flow variations in the upper crust.

  17. Mass flow rate measurements in gas-liquid flows by means of a venturi or orifice plate coupled to a void fraction sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Jorge Luiz Goes; Passos, Julio Cesar

    2009-01-15

    Two-phase flow measurements were carried out using a resistive void fraction meter coupled to a venturi or orifice plate. The measurement system used to estimate the liquid and gas mass flow rates was evaluated using an air-water experimental facility. Experiments included upward vertical and horizontal flow, annular, bubbly, churn and slug patterns, void fraction ranging from 2% to 85%, water flow rate up to 4000 kg/h, air flow rate up to 50 kg/h, and quality up to almost 10%. The fractional root mean square (RMS) deviation of the two-phase mass flow rate in upward vertical flow through a venturi plate is 6.8% using the correlation of Chisholm (D. Chisholm, Pressure gradients during the flow of incompressible two-phase mixtures through pipes, venturis and orifice plates, British Chemical Engineering 12 (9) (1967) 454-457). For the orifice plate, the RMS deviation of the vertical flow is 5.5% using the correlation of Zhang et al. (H.J. Zhang, W.T. Yue, Z.Y. Huang, Investigation of oil-air two-phase mass flow rate measurement using venturi and void fraction sensor, Journal of Zhejiang University Science 6A (6) (2005) 601-606). The results show that the flow direction has no significant influence on the meters in relation to the pressure drop in the experimental operation range. Quality and slip ratio analyses were also performed. The results show a mean slip ratio lower than 1.1, when bubbly and slug flow patterns are encountered for mean void fractions lower than 70%. (author)

  18. Effect of radiation cross-linking on the abrasive wear behaviour of polyethylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rizwan M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2014-06-01

    This study explores the differences in the dry abrasive wear behavior of different polyethylenes, and compares the effect of radiation cross-linking on the wear behavior. Four different types of polyethylenes: LDPE, LLDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE were studied. Cross-linking was carried out by high energy electron beam with radiation dose of 200 kGy. The results show that in unirradiated state UHMWPE has excellent wear resistance, with HDPE showing comparable wear properties; both LDPE and LLDPE exhibit high wear rate. Cross-linking improves wear rate of LDPE and UHMWPE, however, the wear rate of HDPE and LLDPE increases with cross-linking.

  19. The measurements of water flow rates in the straight microchannel based on the scanning micro-PIV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. L.; Han, W.; Xu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Measurement of the water flow rate in microchannel has been one of the hottest points in the applications of microfluidics, medical, biological, chemical analyses and so on. In this study, the scanning microscale particle image velocimetry (scanning micro-PIV) technique is used for the measurements of water flow rates in a straight microchannel of 200μm width and 60μm depth under the standard flow rates ranging from 2.481μL/min to 8.269μL/min. The main effort of this measurement technique is to obtain three-dimensional velocity distribution on the cross sections of microchannel by measuring velocities of the different fluid layers along the out-of-plane direction in the microchannel, so the water flow rates can be evaluated from the discrete surface integral of velocities on the cross section. At the same time, the three-dimensional velocity fields in the measured microchannel are simulated numerically using the FLUENT software in order to verify the velocity accuracy of measurement results. The results show that the experimental values of flow rates are well consistent to the standard flow rates input by the syringe pump and the compared results between numerical simulation and experiment are consistent fundamentally. This study indicates that the micro-flow rate evaluated from three-dimensional velocity by the scanning micro-PIV technique is a promising method for the micro-flow rate research.

  20. Bedform genesis in bedrock substrates: Insights into formative processes from a new experimental approach and the importance of suspension-dominated abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Daowei; Peakall, Jeff; Parsons, Dan; Chen, Zhongyuan; Averill, Heather Macdonald; Wignall, Paul; Best, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Bedrock channels are common in the natural environment, and bedrock channel erosion sets the pace of denudation in many river catchments. However, in comparison to the large number of studies concerning the formation of alluvial bedforms, relatively few investigations have concerned bedrock bedform genesis. Field-based analysis of sculptured forms within bedrock channels has been restricted notably by the slow rate of bedform development in such environments. Furthermore, only a limited number of flume-scale experiments have been conducted that attempt to simulate the genesis of sculpted bedforms in bedrock channels. This study demonstrates that optimisation of clay beds through analysis of clay strength enables the development of features analogous to bedrock river channel bedforms - even at a scale that is orders of magnitude smaller than some natural examples. Three sets of suspended sediment-laden experiments were carried out using hard, medium, and soft clay bed substrates. A suite of erosive bedforms (including potholes, flutes, and furrows) developed on all experimental beds. All observed erosional features have clear equivalents to those observed in natural bedrock rivers. Bed shear strength was found to be a significant factor for the genesis of different types of simulated bedrock bedforms in our experiments with other factors, such as flow velocity, bed slope, and flow depth held approximately constant. Importantly, in a subset of experiments performed with an absence of suspended sediment, fluid flow did not result in the erosion and development of bedforms in the clay bed. Hence, this work illustrates that abrasion by suspended sediments is the key process required for the formation of these simulated bedrock bedforms in our experiments, in the absence of bedload abrasion; other processes such as plucking, cavitation, and dissolution will have been negligible.

  1. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}, and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 {plus minus} 0.23 ml O{sub 2}{center dot}100 g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1} during normothermia (39{degree}C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35{degree}C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced.

  2. Measurement of proton transfer reaction rates in a microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, George M., IV

    The reaction rate coefficients between the hydronium ion and the molecules ethene (C2H4), propene (C 3H6), 1-butene (C4H8) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured at 296 K. The measured reaction rates were compared to collision rates calculated using average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. Reaction efficiency depends primarily upon the proton affinity of the molecules. All the measurements were obtained using the newly developed microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow (MCD-FA) apparatus. This device uses an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge ion source that is spatially separated from the flow tube, eliminating many of the problems inherent with the original FA devices. In addition to measuring reaction rate coefficients, the MCD-FA was shown to be an effective tool for measuring trace compounds in atmospheric air. This method has many advantages over current detection techniques since compounds can be detected in almost real time, large mass ranges can be scanned quickly, and repeated calibration is not required. Preliminary measurements were made of car exhaust and exhaled alveolar air. Car exhaust showed the presence of numerous hydrocarbons, such as butene, benzene and toluene while the exhaled alveolar air showed the presence of various volatile organic compounds such as methanol and acetone.

  3. Reynolds-stress and dissipation-rate budgets in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1988-01-01

    The budgets for the Reynolds stresses and for the dissipation rate of the turbulence kinetic energy are computed using direct simulation data of a turbulent channel flow. The budget data reveal that all the terms in the budget become important close to the wall. For inhomogeneous pressure boundary conditions, the pressure-strain term is split into a return term, a rapid term, and a Stokes term. The Stokes term is important close to the wall. The rapid and return terms play different roles depending on the component of the term. A split of the velocity pressure-gradient term into a redistributive term and a diffusion term is proposed, which should be simpler to model. The budget data is used to test existing closure models for the pressure-strain term, the dissipation rate, and the transport rate. In general, further work is needed to improve the models.

  4. Reynolds-stress and dissipation rate budgets in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1987-01-01

    The budgets for the Reynolds stresses and for the dissipation rate of the turbulence kinetic energy are computed using direct simulation data of a turbulent channel flow. The budget data reveal that all the terms in the budget become important close to the wall. For inhomogeneous pressure boundary conditions, the pressure-strain term is split into a return term, a rapid term, and a Stokes term. The Stokes term is important close to the wall. The rapid and return terms play different roles depending on the component of the term. A split of the velocity pressure-gradient term into a redistributive term and a diffusion term is proposed, which should be simpler to model. The budget data is used to test existing closure models for the pressure-strain term, the dissipation rate, and the transport rate. In general, further work is needed to improve the models.

  5. The effect of chewing gum's flavor on salivary flow rate and pH

    PubMed Central

    Karami-Nogourani, Maryam; Kowsari-Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini-Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chewing sugar-free gums is a convenient way to increase salivary flow. Salivary flow increases in response to both gustatory (taste) and mechanical (chewing) stimuli, and chewing gum can provide both of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of five different flavors of sugar-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH. Materials and Methods: Fifteen dental students volunteered at the same time on six consecutive days, to collect one minute unstimulated saliva. After five minutes, while some volunteers continued to collect only unstimulated saliva, the others asked to start chewing one of the five flavored gums randomly. The flavors were spearmint, cinnamon, watermelon, strawberry, and apple. The whole saliva was collected over time periods of 0 – 1, 1 – 3, and 3 – 6 minutes, and the SFR and pH were also measured. The data were subjected to pair t-test, repeated-measures analysis of variance, and Duncan tests. Results: Compared to the unstimulated rate, all five different flavored gums significantly increased the SFR within six minutes. Although the flow rate peaked during the first minute of stimulation with all five products, it reduced gradually, but still remained above the unstimulated saliva, after six minutes. In the first minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest weight, yet, it only induced a significantly higher SFR compared to the cinnamon-flavored gums. During one to three minutes, strawberry and apple-flavored gums showed significantly higher SFR, respectively, compared to cinnamon-flavored gums. There were no significant differences in the flow rates elicited by each flavored gum through the three-to-six minute interval, although the spearmint-flavored gums induced slightly higher SFR. Only the spearmint and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased the salivary pH. Conclusion: Gum flavor can affect the SFR and special flavors may be advised for different individuals according to

  6. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyze and improve the mass flow rate in urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Patrick; Geron, Marco

    2009-08-01

    The urinary catheter is a thin plastic tube that has been designed to empty the bladder artificially, effortlessly, and with minimum discomfort. The current CH14 male catheter design was examined with a view to optimizing the mass flow rate. The literature imposed constraints to the analysis of the urinary catheter to ensure that a compromise between optimal flow, patient comfort, and everyday practicality from manufacture to use was achieved in the new design. As a result a total of six design characteristics were examined. The input variables in question were the length and width of eyelets 1 and 2 (four variables), the distance between the eyelets, and the angle of rotation between the eyelets. Due to the high number of possible input combinations a structured approach to the analysis of data was necessary. A combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and design of experiments (DOE) has been used to evaluate the "optimal configuration." The use of CFD couple with DOE is a novel concept, which harnesses the computational power of CFD in the most efficient manner for prediction of the mass flow rate in the catheter. PMID:19604024

  7. On a sparse pressure-flow rate condensation of rigid circulation models.

    PubMed

    Schiavazzi, D E; Hsia, T Y; Marsden, A L

    2016-07-26

    Cardiovascular simulation has shown potential value in clinical decision-making, providing a framework to assess changes in hemodynamics produced by physiological and surgical alterations. State-of-the-art predictions are provided by deterministic multiscale numerical approaches coupling 3D finite element Navier Stokes simulations to lumped parameter circulation models governed by ODEs. Development of next-generation stochastic multiscale models whose parameters can be learned from available clinical data under uncertainty constitutes a research challenge made more difficult by the high computational cost typically associated with the solution of these models. We present a methodology for constructing reduced representations that condense the behavior of 3D anatomical models using outlet pressure-flow polynomial surrogates, based on multiscale model solutions spanning several heart cycles. Relevance vector machine regression is compared with maximum likelihood estimation, showing that sparse pressure/flow rate approximations offer superior performance in producing working surrogate models to be included in lumped circulation networks. Sensitivities of outlets flow rates are also quantified through a Sobol׳ decomposition of their total variance encoded in the orthogonal polynomial expansion. Finally, we show that augmented lumped parameter models including the proposed surrogates accurately reproduce the response of multiscale models they were derived from. In particular, results are presented for models of the coronary circulation with closed loop boundary conditions and the abdominal aorta with open loop boundary conditions. PMID:26671219

  8. Effects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wu, Q. J.; Wu, L.; Ritsema, C. J.; Dekker, L. W.; Feyen, J.

    2000-05-01

    Laboratory infiltration experiments were carried out to quantify the effects of soil water-repellency on infiltration rate and the wetting front instability. A two-dimensional transparent chamber (41.5 cm wide, 50 cm high and 2.8 cm thick) was constructed for infiltration experiments using three water-repellent Ouddorp sands (The Netherlands) and a wettable silicon sand. The results showed that if the water-ponding depth ( h0) at the soil surface was lower than the water-entry value ( hwe) of repellent sands, infiltration would not start until the water drop penetration time (WDPT) is exceeded; and contrary to infiltration in wettable soils, the infiltration rate increased with time. However, infiltration could immediately start at any time when h0> hwe. The wetting front was unconditionally unstable for h0< hwe, resulting in fingered flow. However, the flow was conditionally stable for h0> hwe if the soil was not layered in a fine-over-coarse or wettable-over-repellent configuration, and if soil air was not compressed during infiltration. The occurrence of stable and unstable flow in repellent soils was consistent with the prediction based on a linear instability analysis. The findings can be used to improve irrigation efficiencies in water repellent soils, e.g. using high-ponding irrigation methods.

  9. Application of a SAW device for measuring rate of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the program is the development of a compact, high performance flow meter that will meet the specifications developed by the Gas Research Institute for the next generation of residential gas meters. A solid-state flow meter based on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is considered for the application. Attractive features of SAW sensors include high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, direct digital output, small size, and low cost. In the exploratory research phase, a theoretical analysis of the operation of the SAW flow sensor was performed. This was then used to design a SAW device for the proposed application. Experimental measurements confirm that a single device can measure flow rates over the entire operating range of 118 ml/min. to 95 l/min. The accuracy of the sensor is better than the requirements by at least a factor of 10. Further work that needs to be done in order to reduce power consumption, improve speed of response, and reduce sensitivity to ambient temperature changes is discussed. Work done to date indicates that the SAW technique has good promise for realizing the next generation of residential gas meters.

  10. Shear flow of angular grains: Acoustic effects and nonmonotonic rate dependence of volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Langer, J. S.; Carlson, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Naturally occurring granular materials often consist of angular particles whose shape and frictional characteristics may have important implications on macroscopic flow rheology. In this paper, we provide a theoretical account for the peculiar phenomenon of autoacoustic compaction—nonmonotonic variation of shear band volume with shear rate in angular particles—recently observed in experiments. Our approach is based on the notion that the volume of a granular material is determined by an effective-disorder temperature known as the compactivity. Noise sources in a driven granular material couple its various degrees of freedom and the environment, causing the flow of entropy between them. The grain-scale dynamics is described by the shear-transformation-zone theory of granular flow, which accounts for irreversible plastic deformation in terms of localized flow defects whose density is governed by the state of configurational disorder. To model the effects of grain shape and frictional characteristics, we propose an Ising-like internal variable to account for nearest-neighbor grain interlocking and geometric frustration and interpret the effect of friction as an acoustic noise strength. We show quantitative agreement between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and propose additional experiments that provide stringent tests on the new theoretical elements.

  11. Influence of air flow rate and backwashing on the hydraulic behaviour of a submerged filter.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Becerra, Yazmin Lucero; González-Martínez, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate backwashing effects on the apparent porosity of the filter media and on the hydraulic behaviour of a pilot scale submerged filter, prior to biofilm colonization, under different hydraulic retention times, and different air flow rates. Tracer curves were analysed with two mathematical models for ideal and non-ideal flow (axial dispersion and Wolf and Resnick models). The filter media was lava stones sieved to 4.5 mm. Backwashing causes attrition of media particles, decreasing the void volume of the filter media and, consequently, the tracer flow is more uniform. The eroded media presented lower dead volumes (79% for the filter with aeration and 8% for the filter without aeration) compared with the new media (83% for the filter with aeration and 22% for the filter without aeration). The flow patterns of eroded and new media were different because the more regular shape of the particles decreases the void volume of the filter media. The dead volume is attributed, in the case of the filter with aeration, to the turbulence caused by the air bubbles that generate preferential channelling of the bulk liquid along the filter media, creating large zones of stagnant liquid and, for the filter without aeration, to the channels formed due to the irregular shaped media.

  12. Habitat availability vs. flow rate for the Pecos River, Part 1 : Depth and velocity availability.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Scott Carlton; Schaub, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2004-02-01

    The waters of the Pecos River in New Mexico must be delivered to three primary users: (1) The Pecos River Compact: each year a percentage of water from natural river flow must be delivered to Texas; (2) Agriculture: Carlsbad Irrigation District has a storage and diversion right and Fort Sumner Irrigation District has a direct flow diversion right; and, (3) Endangered Species Act: an as yet unspecified amount of water is to support Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat within and along the Pecos River. Currently, the United States Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation, the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, and the United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service are studying the Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat preference. Preliminary work by Fish and Wildlife personnel in the critical habitat suggest that water depth and water velocity are key parameters defining minnow habitat preference. However, river flows that provide adequate preferred habitat to support this species have yet to be determined. Because there is a limited amount of water in the Pecos River and its reservoirs, it is critical to allocate water efficiently such that habitat is maintained, while honoring commitments to agriculture and to the Pecos River Compact. This study identifies the relationship between Pecos River flow rates in cubic feet per second (cfs) and water depth and water velocity.

  13. Competitive kinetics versus stopped flow method for determining the degradation rate constants of steroids by ozonation.

    PubMed

    López-López, Alberto; Flores-Payán, Valentín; León-Becerril, Elizabeth; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; Vallejo-Rodríguez, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Steroids are classified as endocrine disrupting chemicals; they are persistent with low biodegradability and are hardly degraded by conventional methods. Ozonation process has been effective for steroids degradation and the determination of the kinetics is a fundamental aspect for the design and operation of the reactor. This study assessed two methods: competitive kinetics and stopped flow, for determining the degradation kinetics of two steroids, estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) in spiked water. Experiments were performed at pH 6, 21 °C, and using tertbutyl alcohol as scavenger of hydroxyl radicals; competitive kinetics method used sodium phenolate as reference compound. For the stopped flow, the experiments were performed in a BioLogic SFM-3000/S equipment. For both methods, the second order rate constants were in the order of 10(6) and 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for E2 and EE2 respectively. The competitive kinetics can be applied with assurance and reliability but needing an additional analysis method to measure the residual concentrations. Stopped flow method allows the evaluation of the degradation kinetics in milliseconds and avoids the use of additional analytical methodologies; this method allows determining the reaction times on line. The methods are applicable for degradation of other emerging contaminants or other steroids and could be applied in water treatment at industrial level. Finally, it is important to consider the resources available to implement the most appropriate method, either competitive kinetics or the stopped-flow method. PMID:27478722

  14. Determination of rapid chlorination rate constants by a stopped-flow spectrophotometric competition kinetics method.

    PubMed

    Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-15

    Free chlorine is extensively used for water and wastewater disinfection nowadays. However, it still remains a big challenge to determine the rate constants of rapid chlorination reactions although competition kinetics and stopped-flow spectrophotometric (SFS) methods have been employed individually to investigate fast reaction kinetics. In this work, we proposed an SFS competition kinetics method to determine the rapid chlorination rate constants by using a common colorimetric reagent, N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD), as a reference probe. A kinetic equation was first derived to estimate the reaction rate constant of DPD towards chlorine under a given pH and temperature condition. Then, on that basis, an SFS competition kinetics method was proposed to determine directly the chlorination rate constants of several representative compounds including tetracycline, ammonia, and four α-amino acids. Although Cl2O is more reactive than HOCl, its contribution to the overall chlorination kinetics of the test compounds could be neglected in this study. Finally, the developed method was validated through comparing the experimentally measured chlorination rate constants of the selected compounds with those obtained or calculated from literature and analyzing with Taft's correlation as well. This study demonstrates that the SFS competition kinetics method can measure the chlorination rate constants of a test compound rapidly and accurately.

  15. Slow plastic strain rate compressive flow in binary CoAl intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Constant-velocity elevated temperature compression tests have been conducted on a series of binary CoAl intermetallics produced by hot extrusion of blended prealloyed powders. The as-extruded materials were polycrystalline, and they retained their nominal 10-micron grain size after being tested between 1100 and 1400 K at strain rates ranging from 2 x 10 to the -4th to 2 x 10 to the -7th per sec. Significant plastic flow was obtained in all cases; while cracking was observed, much of this could be due to failure at matrix-oxide interfaces along extrusion stringers rather than to solely intergranular fracture. A maximum in flow strength occurs at an aluminum-to-cobalt ratio of 0.975, and the stress exponent appears to be constant for aluminum-to-cobalt ratios of 0.85 or more. It is likely that very aluminum-deficient materials deform by a different mechanism than do other compositions.

  16. Evaluation of the optimal carrier gas flow rate for the carbon nanotubes growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurenya, A. G.; Gorodetskiy, D. V.; Arkhipov, V. E.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized in a gas-phase flow reactor by thermal decomposition of reaction mixture (2% solution of ferrocene in toluene) on the surface of silicon substrates heated to 800°C. Variation of the height of the CNT array as a function of position of the substrate in the reactor and carrier gas flow rate was registered. The difference in the obtained dependences and temperature distribution in the reactor points to the necessity of taking into account the change in the concentration of the active carbon component in the gas mixture. An expression associating the parameters of synthesis and thickness of the CNT array being formed on the substrate is offered.

  17. Narrow-linewidth megahertz-rate pulse-burst laser for high-speed flow diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Brian; Jiang, Naibo; Samimy, Mo; Lempert, Walter

    2004-09-10

    A second-generation pulse-burst laser system for high-speed flow diagnostics is described in detail. The laser can produce a burst of high-energy pulses (of the order of hundreds of millijoules per pulse) with individual pulse durations of less than 10 ns and pulse separations as short as 1 micros. A key improvement is the addition of a phase-conjugate mirror, which effectively isolates the high-intensity, short-duration pulses from the low-intensity, long-duration background illumination. It allows for more-efficient amplification and harmonic generation, with efficiencies exceeding 50% for second-harmonic and 40% for third-harmonic generation. Characteristics of the laser system, including gain narrowing, pulse-burst energy distribution, pulse narrowing, and overall pulse-burst energy, are described. In addition, the applicability of the laser for spectroscopic-based flow diagnostics is demonstrated through the presentation of megahertz-rate planar Doppler velocimetry results.

  18. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  19. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  20. Electron-Ion Recombination Rate Coefficient Measurements in a Flowing Afterglow Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gougousi, Theodosia; Golde, Michael F.; Johnsen, Rainer

    1996-01-01

    The flowing-afterglow technique in conjunction with computer modeling of the flowing plasma has been used to determine accurate dissociative-recombination rate coefficients alpha for the ions O2(+), HCO(+), CH5(+), C2H5(+), H3O(+), CO2(+), HCO2(+), HN2O(+), and N2O(+) at 295 K. We find that the simple form of data analysis that was employed in earlier experiments was adequate and we largely confirm earlier results. In the case of HCO(+) ions, published coefficients range from 1.1 X 10(exp -7) to 2.8 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S, while our measurements give a value of 1.9 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S.