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Sample records for abrasive jet machining

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation of Flow in Abrasive Water Jet Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, S.; Sathish, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Gopalakrishnan, T.

    2017-03-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting is one of the most recently developed non-traditional manufacturing technologies. In this machining, the abrasives are mixed with suspended liquid to form semi liquid mixture. The general nature of flow through the machining, results in fleeting wear of the nozzle which decrease the cutting performance. The inlet pressure of the abrasive water suspension has main effect on the major destruction characteristics of the inner surface of the nozzle. The aim of the project is to analyze the effect of inlet pressure on wall shear and exit kinetic energy. The analysis could be carried out by changing the taper angle of the nozzle, so as to obtain optimized process parameters for minimum nozzle wear. The two phase flow analysis would be carried by using computational fluid dynamics tool CFX. It is also used to analyze the flow characteristics of abrasive water jet machining on the inner surface of the nozzle. The availability of optimized process parameters of abrasive water jet machining (AWJM) is limited to water and experimental test can be cost prohibitive. In this case, Computational fluid dynamics analysis would provide better results.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Nozzle in Abrasive Water Jet Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, S.; Chandresekaran, M.; Muthuraman, V.; Sathish, S.

    2017-03-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting is one of the most recently developed non-traditional manufacturing technologies. The general nature of flow through the machining, results in rapid wear of the nozzle which decrease the cutting performance. It is well known that the inlet pressure of the abrasive water suspension has main effect on the erosion characteristics of the inner surface of the nozzle. The objective of the project is to analyze the effect of inlet pressure on wall shear and exit kinetic energy. The analysis would be carried out by varying the inlet pressure of the nozzle, so as to obtain optimized process parameters for minimum nozzle wear. The two phase flow analysis would be carried by using computational fluid dynamics tool CFX. The availability of minimized process parameters such as of abrasive water jet machining (AWJM) is limited to water and experimental test can be cost prohibitive.

  3. A modeling of elementary passes taking into account the firing angle in abrasive water jet machining of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Van-Hung; Gilles, Patrick; Cohen, Guillaume; Rubio, Walter

    2018-05-01

    The use of titanium alloys in the aeronautical and high technology domains is widespread. The high strength and the low mass are two outstanding characteristics of titanium alloys which permit to produce parts for these domains. As other hard materials, it is challenging to generate 3D surfaces (e.g. pockets) when using conventional cutting methods. The development of Abrasive Water Jet Machining (AWJM) technology shows the capability to cut any kind of materials and it seems to be a good solution for such titanium materials with low specific force, low deformation of parts and low thermal shocks. Applying this technology for generating 3D surfaces requires to adopt a modelling approach. However, a general methodology results in complex models due to a lot of parameters of the machining process and based on numerous experiments. This study introduces an extended geometry model of an elementary pass when changing the firing angle during machining Ti-6AL-4V titanium alloy with a given machine configuration. Several experiments are conducted to observe the influence of major kinematic operating parameters, i.e. jet inclination angle (α) (perpendicular to the feed direction) and traverse speed (Vf). The material exposure time and the erosion capability of abrasives particles are affected directly by a variation of the traverse speed (Vf) and firing angle (α). These variations lead to different erosion rates along the kerf profile characterized by the depth and width of cut. A comparison demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed model for depth and width of elementary passes. Based on knowledge of the influence of both firing angle and traverse speed on the elementary pass shape, the proposed model allows to develop the simulation of AWJM process and paves a way for milling flat bottom pockets and 3D complex shapes.

  4. Design of a new abrasive slurry jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Shi, L. L.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    With the advantages of a low system working pressure, good jet convergence and high cutting quality, abrasive slurry jet (ASJ) has broad application prospects in material cutting and equipment cleaning. Considering that the generator plays a crucial role in ASJ system, the paper designed a new type ASJ generator using an electric oil pump, a separate plunger cylinder, and a spring energized seal. According to the determining of structure shape, size and seal type, a new ASJ generator has been manufactured out and tested by a series of experiments. The new generator separates the abrasive slurry from the dynamic hydraulic oil, which can improve the service life of the ASJ system. And the new ASJ system can reach 40 MPa and has good performance in jet convergence, which deserves to popularization and application in materials machining.

  5. Robotic edge machining using elastic abrasive tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, A. V.; Semyonov, E. N.; Belomestnykh, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes a robotic center designed for automation of finishing operations, and analyzes technological aspects of an elastic abrasive tool applied for edge machining. Based on the experimental studies, practical recommendations on the application of the robotic center for finishing operations were developed.

  6. Optimization of Profile and Material of Abrasive Water Jet Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand Bala Selwin, K. P.; Ramachandran, S.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this work is to study the behaviour of the abrasive water jet nozzle with different profiles and materials. Taguchi-Grey relational analysis optimization technique is used to optimize the value with different material and different profiles. Initially the 3D models of the nozzle are modelled with different profiles by changing the tapered inlet angle of the nozzle. The different profile models are analysed with different materials and the results are optimized. The optimized results would give the better result taking wear and machining behaviour of the nozzle.

  7. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  8. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  9. Casing window milling with abrasive fluid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Vestavik, O.M.; Fidtje, T.H.; Faure, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for through tubing re-entry drilling of multilateral wells has a large potential for increasing hydrocarbon production and total recovery. One of the bottle-necks of this technology is initiation of the side-track by milling a window in the casing downhole. A new approach to this problem has been investigated in a joint industry project. An experimental set-up has been built for milling a 4 inch window in a 7 inch steel casing at surface in the laboratory. A specially designed bit developed at RIF using abrasive jet cutting technology has been used for the window milling. The bit has anmore » abrasive jet beam which is always directed in the desired side-track direction, even if the bit is rotating uniformly. The bit performs the milling with a combined mechanical and hydraulic jet action. The method has been successfully demonstrated. The experiments has shown that the window milling can be performed with very low WOB and torque, and that only small side forces are required to perform the operation. Casing milling has been performed without a whipstock, a cement plug has been the only support for the tool. The tests indicate that milling operations can be performed more efficiently with less time and costs than what is required with conventional techniques. However, the method still needs some development of the downhole motor for coiled tubing applications. The method can be used both for milling and drilling giving the advantage of improved rate of penetration, improved bit life and increased horizontal reach. The method is planned to be demonstrated downhole in the near future.« less

  10. Performance Analysis of Abrasive Waterjet Machining Process at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, M.; Gebremariam, MA; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.

    2018-03-01

    Normally, a commercial waterjet cutting machine can generate water pressure up to 600 MPa. This range of pressure is used to machine a wide variety of materials. Hence, the price of waterjet cutting machine is expensive. Therefore, there is a need to develop a low cost waterjet machine in order to make the technology more accessible for the masses. Due to its low cost, such machines may only be able to generate water pressure at a much reduced rate. The present study attempts to investigate the performance of abrasive water jet machining process at low cutting pressure using self-developed low cost waterjet machine. It aims to study the feasibility of machining various materials at low pressure which later can aid in further development of an effective low cost water jet machine. A total of three different materials were machined at a low pressure of 34 MPa. The materials are mild steel, aluminium alloy 6061 and plastics Delrin®. Furthermore, a traverse rate was varied between 1 to 3 mm/min. The study on cutting performance at low pressure for different materials was conducted in terms of depth penetration, kerf taper ratio and surface roughness. It was found that all samples were able to be machined at low cutting pressure with varied qualities. Also, the depth of penetration decreases with an increase in the traverse rate. Meanwhile, the surface roughness and kerf taper ratio increase with an increase in the traverse rate. It can be concluded that a low cost waterjet machine with a much reduced rate of water pressure can be successfully used for machining certain materials with acceptable qualities.

  11. Feasibility Study on Cutting HTPB Propellants with Abrasive Water Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dayong; Bai, Yun

    2018-01-01

    Abrasive water jet is used to carry out the experiment research on cutting HTPB propellants with three components, which will provide technical support for the engineering treatment of waste rocket motor. Based on the reliability theory and related scientific research results, the safety and efficiency of cutting sensitive HTPB propellants by abrasive water jet were experimentally studied. The results show that the safety reliability is not less than 99.52% at 90% confidence level, so the safety is adequately ensured. The cooling and anti-friction effect of high-speed water jet is the decisive factor to suppress the detonation of HTPB propellant. Compared with pure water jet, cutting efficiency was increased by 5% - 87%. The study shows that abrasive water jets meet the practical use for cutting HTPB propellants.

  12. A Review on Parametric Analysis of Magnetic Abrasive Machining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattri, Krishna; Choudhary, Gulshan; Bhuyan, B. K.; Selokar, Ashish

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic abrasive machining (MAM) process is a highly developed unconventional machining process. It is frequently used in manufacturing industries for nanometer range surface finishing of workpiece with the help of Magnetic abrasive particles (MAPs) and magnetic force applied in the machining zone. It is precise and faster than conventional methods and able to produce defect free finished components. This paper provides a comprehensive review on the recent advancement of MAM process carried out by different researcher till date. The effect of different input parameters such as rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage, magnetic flux density, abrasive particles size and working gap on the performances of Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) have been discussed. On the basis of review, it is observed that the rotational speed of electromagnet, voltage and mesh size of abrasive particles have significant impact on MAM process.

  13. Development of underwater cutting system by abrasive water-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi

    1993-09-01

    The technology to cut objects in the ocean's depths with abrasive water jets was examined for possible application in view of the greater water depths and sophistication involved in work on the ocean floor today. A test model was developed to study this technology's safety and practicability. The test model was designed for use at great water depths and has functions and a configuration that are unlike equipment used on land. A continuous, stable supply of abrasive is a distinctive design feature. In land applications, there had been problems with plugged tubes and an uneven supply. For this reason, the abrasive was converted to slurry form, and a continuous pressurized tube pump system was adopted for supply to the nozzle head. Also, a hydraulic motor that does not employ oil or electric power was used to provide an underwater drive that is environment-friendly. The report outlines the technology's general design concept including its distinctive functions and its configuration for use at great depths, and the report provides great detail on the equipment.

  14. Abrasive slurry jet cutting model based on fuzzy relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, C. H.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    The cutting process of pre-mixed abrasive slurry or suspension jet (ASJ) is a complex process affected by many factors, and there is a highly nonlinear relationship between the cutting parameters and cutting quality. In this paper, guided by fuzzy theory, the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ was developed. In the modeling of surface roughness, the upper surface roughness prediction model and the lower surface roughness prediction model were established respectively. The adaptive fuzzy inference system combines the learning mechanism of neural networks and the linguistic reasoning ability of the fuzzy system, membership functions, and fuzzy rules are obtained by adaptive adjustment. Therefore, the modeling process is fast and effective. In this paper, the ANFIS module of MATLAB fuzzy logic toolbox was used to establish the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ, which is found to be quite instrumental to ASJ cutting applications.

  15. Optimization and application of influence function in abrasive jet polishing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoze; Li, Shengyi; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang

    2010-05-20

    We analyze the material removal mechanism of abrasive jet polishing (AJP) technology, based on the fluid impact dynamics theory. Combined with the computational fluid dynamics simulation and process experiments, influence functions at different impingement angles are obtained, which are not of a regular Gaussian shape and are unfit for the corrective figuring of optics. The influence function is then optimized to obtain an ideal Gaussian shape by rotating the oblique nozzle, and its stability is validated through a line scanning experiment. The fluctuation of the influence function can be controlled within +/-5%. Based on this, we build a computed numerically controlled experimental system for AJP, and one flat BK7 optical glass with a diameter of 20mm is polished. After two iterations of polishing, the peak-to-valley value decreases from 1.43lambda (lambda=632.8nm in this paper) to 0.294lambda, and the rms value decreases from 0.195lambda to 0.029lambda. The roughness of this polished surface is within 2nm. The experimental result indicates that the optimized influence function is suitable for precision optics figuring and polishing.

  16. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  17. Process Monitoring Evaluation and Implementation for the Wood Abrasive Machining Process

    PubMed Central

    Saloni, Daniel E.; Lemaster, Richard L.; Jackson, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading. PMID:22163477

  18. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  19. A study on practical use of underwater abrasive water jet cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Demura, Kenji

    1993-09-01

    The practicality of underwater abrasive water jet cutting technology was studied in experiments. A study of abrasives in slurried form showed that optimum polymer concentration can be selected to suit underwater conditions. For the long-distance transport of slurry from the ocean surface to the ocean floor, a direct supply system by hose proved to be practical. This system takes advantage of the insolubility of the slurry in water due to a difference in specific gravity. For cutting thick steel plate at great ocean depths, a simulation with a pressurized container revealed the requirements for actual cutting. Confirmation of remote cutting operations will become the most important technology in field applications. Underwater sound vibration characteristics were found to change significantly in direct response to modifications in cutting conditions. This will be important basic data to develop an effective sensoring method.

  20. A profilometry-based dentifrice abrasion Method for V8 brushing machines. Part I: Introduction to RDA-PE.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen; St John, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and standardization of a profilometry-based method for assessment of dentifrice abrasivity called Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity - Profilometry Equivalent (RDA-PE). Human dentine substrates are mounted in acrylic blocks of precise standardized dimensions, permitting mounting and brushing in V8 brushing machines. Dentin blocks are masked to create an area of "contact brushing." Brushing is carried out in V8 brushing machines and dentifrices are tested as slurries. An abrasive standard is prepared by diluting the ISO 11609 abrasivity reference calcium pyrophosphate abrasive into carboxymethyl cellulose/glycerin, just as in the RDA method. Following brushing, masked areas are removed and profilometric analysis is carried out on treated specimens. Assessments of average abrasion depth (contact or optical profilometry) are made. Inclusion of standard calcium pyrophosphate abrasive permits a direct RDA equivalent assessment of abrasion, which is characterized with profilometry as Depth test/Depth control x 100. Within the test, the maximum abrasivity standard of 250 can be created in situ simply by including a treatment group of standard abrasive with 2.5x number of brushing strokes. RDA-PE is enabled in large part by the availability of easy-to-use and well-standardized modern profilometers, but its use in V8 brushing machines is enabled by the unique specific conditions described herein. RDA-PE permits the evaluation of dentifrice abrasivity to dentin without the requirement of irradiated teeth and infrastructure for handling them. In direct comparisons, the RDA-PE method provides dentifrice abrasivity assessments comparable to the gold industry standard RDA technique.

  1. Removal of single point diamond-turning marks by abrasive jet polishing.

    PubMed

    Li, Z Z; Wang, J M; Peng, X Q; Ho, L T; Yin, Z Q; Li, S Y; Cheung, C F

    2011-06-01

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) is highly controllable and versatile in producing axially symmetric forms, non-axially-symmetric forms, microstructured surfaces, and free forms. However, the fine SPDT marks left in the surface limit its performance, and they are difficult to reduce or eliminate. It is unpractical for traditional methods to remove the fine marks without destroying their forms, especially for the aspheres and free forms. This paper introduces abrasive jet polishing (AJP) for the posttreatment of diamond-turned surfaces to remove the periodic microstructures. Samples of diamond-turned electroless nickel plated plano mirror were used in the experiments. One sample with an original surface roughness of more than 400 nm decreased to 4 nm after two iterations abrasive jet polishing; the surface roughness of another sample went from 3.7 nm to 1.4 nm after polishing. The periodic signatures on both of the samples were removed entirely after polishing. Contrastive experimental research was carried out on electroless nickel mirror with magnetorheological finishing, computer controlled optical surfacing, and AJP. The experimental results indicate that AJP is more appropriate in removing the periodic SPDT marks. Also, a figure maintaining experiment was carried out with the AJP process; the uniform polishing process shows that the AJP process can remove the periodic turning marks without destroying the original form.

  2. Novel jet observables from machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kaustuv; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility and applicability of machine learning techniques to jet physics. In this paper, we construct new observables for the discrimination of jets from different originating particles exclusively from information identified by the machine. The approach we propose is to first organize information in the jet by resolved phase space and determine the effective N -body phase space at which discrimination power saturates. This then allows for the construction of a discrimination observable from the N -body phase space coordinates. A general form of this observable can be expressed with numerous parameters that are chosen so that the observable maximizes the signal vs. background likelihood. Here, we illustrate this technique applied to discrimination of H\\to b\\overline{b} decays from massive g\\to b\\overline{b} splittings. We show that for a simple parametrization, we can construct an observable that has discrimination power comparable to, or better than, widely-used observables motivated from theory considerations. For the case of jets on which modified mass-drop tagger grooming is applied, the observable that the machine learns is essentially the angle of the dominant gluon emission off of the b\\overline{b} pair.

  3. Application of Abrasive-Waterjets for Machining Fatigue-Critical Aircraft Aluminum Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H T; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E

    2010-08-19

    Current specifications require AWJ-cut aluminum parts for fatigue critical aerospace structures to go through subsequent processing due to concerns of degradation in fatigue performance. The requirement of secondary process for AWJ-machined parts greatly negates the cost effectiveness of waterjet technology. Some cost savings are envisioned if it can be shown that AWJ net cut parts have comparable durability properties as those conventionally machined. To revisit and upgrade the specifications for AWJ machining of aircraft aluminum, “Dog-bone” specimens, with and without secondary processes, were prepared for independent fatigue tests at Boeing and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Test results show thatmore » the fatigue life is proportional to quality levels of machined edges or inversely proportional to the surface roughness Ra . Even at highest quality level, the average fatigue life of AWJ-machined parts is about 30% shorter than those of conventionally machined counterparts. Between two secondary processes, dry-grit blasting with aluminum oxide abrasives until the striation is removed visually yields excellent result. It actually prolongs the fatigue life of parts at least three times higher than that achievable with conventional machining. Dry-grit blasting is relatively simple and inexpensive to administrate and, equally important, alleviates the concerns of garnet embedment.« less

  4. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of abrasive-waterjet- (AWJ-) machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results of the titanium specimens not only confirmed our previous findings in aluminum dog-bone specimens but in comparison also further enhanced the fatigue performance of the titanium.more » In addition, titanium is known to be difficult to cut, particularly for thick parts, however AWJs cut the material 34% faster han stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred ombination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.« less

  5. Effect of abrasive water jet on the structure of the surface layer of Al-Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Gudnev, N. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy methods, and X-ray diffraction analysis have been used to study the changes in the structure and the microhardness in the surface layer of the Al-Mg (5.8-6.8 wt %) alloy after water jet cutting. The dislocation density, the sizes of coherent scattering regions, and microdistortions have been determined. The transformation of the fine structure has been revealed in the displacement from the alloy volume to the abrasive-waterjet cutting surface.

  6. Analysis of acoustic emission during abrasive waterjet machining of sheet metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Nazrin; Gebremariam, MA; Zohari, H.; Azhari, Azmir

    2018-04-01

    The present paper reports on the analysis of acoustic emission (AE) produced during abrasive waterjet (AWJ) machining process. This paper focuses on the relationship of AE and surface quality of sheet metals. The changes in acoustic emission signals recorded by the mean of power spectral density (PSD) via covariance method in relation to the surface quality of the cut are discussed. The test was made using two materials for comparison namely aluminium 6061 and stainless steel 304 with five different feed rates. The acoustic emission data were captured by Labview and later processed using MATLAB software. The results show that the AE spectrums correlated with different feed rates and surface qualities. It can be concluded that the AE is capable of monitoring the changes of feed rate and surface quality.

  7. Abrasives and Grinding Machines; Machine Shop Work--Advanced: 9557.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to assist the instructor in systematically planning and presenting a variety of meaningful lessons to facilitate the necessary training for the machine shop student. The material contained in the outline is designed to enable the student to learn the manipulative skills and related knowledge…

  8. CNC water-jet machining and cutting center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. C.

    1991-09-01

    Computer Numerical Control (CNC) water-jet machining was investigated to determine the potential applications and cost-effectiveness that would result by establishing this capability in the engineering shops of Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Both conductive and nonconductive samples were machined at KCD on conventional machining equipment (a three-axis conversational programmed mill and a wire electrical discharge machine) and on two current-technology water-jet machines at outside vendors. These samples were then inspected, photographed, and evaluated. The current-technology water-jet machines were not as accurate as the conventional equipment. The resolution of the water-jet equipment was only +/- 0.005 inch, as compared to +/- 0.0002 inch for the conventional equipment. The principal use for CNC water-jet machining would be as follows: Contouring to near finished shape those items made from 300 and 400 series stainless steels, titanium, Inconel, aluminum, glass, or any material whose fabrication tolerance is less than the machine resolution of +/- 0.005 inch; and contouring to finished shape those items made from Kevlar, rubber, fiberglass, foam, aluminum, or any material whose fabrication specifications allow the use of a machine with +/- 0.005 inch tolerance. Additional applications are possible because there is minimal force generated on the material being cut and because the water-jet cuts without generating dust.

  9. Testing of Alternative Abrasives for Water-Jet Cutting at C Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Krogstad, Eirik J.

    2013-08-01

    Legacy waste from defense-related activities at the Hanford Site has predominantly been stored in underground tanks, some of which have leaked; others may be at risk to do so. The U.S. Department of Energy’s goal is to empty the tanks and transform their contents into more stable waste forms. To do so requires breaking up, and creating a slurry from, solid wastes in the bottoms of the tanks. A technology developed for this purpose is the Mobile Arm Retrieval System. This system is being used at some of the older single shell tanks at C tank farm. As originally planned,more » access ports for the Mobile Arm Retrieval System were to be cut using a high- pressure water-jet cutter. However, water alone was found to be insufficient to allow effective cutting of the steel-reinforced tank lids, especially when cutting the steel reinforcing bar (“rebar”). The abrasive added in cutting the hole in Tank C-107 was garnet, a complex natural aluminosilicate. The hardness of garnet (Mohs hardness ranging from H 6.5 to 7.5) exceeds that of solids currently in the tanks, and was regarded to be a threat to Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant systems. Olivine, an iron-magnesium silicate that is nearly as hard as garnet (H 6.5 to 7), has been proposed as an alternative to garnet. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposed to test pyrite (FeS2), whose hardness is slightly less (H 6 to 6.5) for 1) cutting effectiveness, and 2) propensity to dissolve (or disintegrate by chemical reaction) in chemical conditions similar to those of tank waste solutions. Cutting experiments were conducted using an air abrader system and a National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material (SRM 1767 Low Alloy Steel), which was used as a surrogate for rebar. The cutting efficacy of pyrite was compared with that of garnet and olivine in identical size fractions. Garnet was found to be most effective in removing steel from the target; olivine and pyrite were

  10. Comparative study for surface topography of bone drilling using conventional drilling and loose abrasive machining.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet; Jain, Vivek; Gupta, Dheeraj

    2015-03-01

    Drilling through the bone is a complicated process in orthopaedic surgery. It involves human as a part of the work so it needs better perfection and quality which leads to the sustainability. Different studies were carried out on this curious topic and some interesting results were obtained, which help the orthopaedic surgeon on the operation table. Major problems faced during bone drilling were crack initiation, thermal necrosis and burr formation. The surface topography of the bone is an indirect indication for the sustainability of bone joint. In this study, a comparison is made between conventional and a loose abrasive unconventional drilling technique for the surface characterization of the bone. The attempt has been made to show the feasibility of bone drilling with non-conventional technique and its aftereffect on the bone structure. The burr formation during conventional bone drilling was found to be more which leads to problems such as crack initiation and thermal necrosis. Scanning electrode microscope and surface roughness tester were used to characterize the surface of the fine drilled bone specimen and the results testified quite better surface finish and least crack formation while drilling with loose abrasive unconventional technique. © IMechE 2015.

  11. Effect of Abrasive Machining on the Electrical Properties Cu86Mn12Ni2 Alloy Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Misti, Siti Nabilah; Bell, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of abrasive trimming on the electrical properties of Cu86Mn12Ni2 Manganin alloy shunt resistors. A precision abrasive trimming system for fine tuning the resistance tolerance of high current Manganin shunt resistors is proposed. The system is shown to be capable of reducing the resistance tolerance of 100 μΩ shunts from their standard value of ±5% to <±1% by removing controlled amounts of Manganin material using a square cut trim geometry. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), high current, and high temperature performance of the trimmed shunts was compared to that of untrimmed parts to determine if trimming had any detrimental effect on these key electrical performance parameters of the device. It was shown that the TCR value was reduced following trimming with typical results of +106 ppm/°C and +93 ppm/°C for untrimmed and trimmed parts respectively. When subjected to a high current of 200 A the trimmed parts showed a slight increase in temperature rise to 203 °C, as compared to 194 °C for the untrimmed parts, but both had significant temporary increases in resistance of up to 1.3 μΩ. The results for resistance change following high temperature storage at 200 °C for 168 h were also significant for both untrimmed and trimmed parts with shifts of 1.85% and 2.29% respectively and these results were related to surface oxidation of the Manganin alloy which was accelerated for the freshly exposed surfaces of the trimmed part. PMID:28773236

  12. Effect of Abrasive Machining on the Electrical Properties Cu86Mn12Ni₂ Alloy Shunts.

    PubMed

    Misti, Siti Nabilah; Birkett, Martin; Penlington, Roger; Bell, David

    2017-07-29

    This paper studies the effect of abrasive trimming on the electrical properties of Cu 86 Mn 12 Ni₂ Manganin alloy shunt resistors. A precision abrasive trimming system for fine tuning the resistance tolerance of high current Manganin shunt resistors is proposed. The system is shown to be capable of reducing the resistance tolerance of 100 μΩ shunts from their standard value of ±5% to <±1% by removing controlled amounts of Manganin material using a square cut trim geometry. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), high current, and high temperature performance of the trimmed shunts was compared to that of untrimmed parts to determine if trimming had any detrimental effect on these key electrical performance parameters of the device. It was shown that the TCR value was reduced following trimming with typical results of +106 ppm/°C and +93 ppm/°C for untrimmed and trimmed parts respectively. When subjected to a high current of 200 A the trimmed parts showed a slight increase in temperature rise to 203 °C, as compared to 194 °C for the untrimmed parts, but both had significant temporary increases in resistance of up to 1.3 μΩ. The results for resistance change following high temperature storage at 200 °C for 168 h were also significant for both untrimmed and trimmed parts with shifts of 1.85% and 2.29% respectively and these results were related to surface oxidation of the Manganin alloy which was accelerated for the freshly exposed surfaces of the trimmed part.

  13. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2010-10-04

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of AWJ-machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results not only confirmed the findings of the aluminum dog-bone specimens but also further enhance the fatigue performance. In addition, titanium is known to be notoriously difficult to cutmore » with contact tools while AWJs cut it 34% faster than stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred combination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.« less

  14. The Research into the Quality of Rock Surfaces Obtained by Abrasive Water Jet Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młynarczuk, Mariusz; Skiba, Marta; Sitek, Libor; Hlaváček, Petr; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, water jet cutting technology has been being used more and more often, in various domains of human activity. Its numerous applications include cutting different materials - among them, rock materials. The present paper discusses the results of the research that aimed at determining - in a quantitative manner - the way in which the water jet cutting parameters (such as the traverse speed of the head, and the distance between the high-pressure inlet of the water jet and the cut material) influence the quality of the processed surface. Additionally, the impact of these parameters on the surface of various materials was investigated. The materials used were three granites differing with respect to the size of grains. In the course of the research, the standard parameters defined by the ISO norms were analyzed. It was also proposed that variograms be used to analyze the quality of the cut surface. Technologia cięcia strumieniem wodnym staje się w ostatnich latach coraz intensywniej wykorzystywana w różnych dziedzinach działalności człowieka. Jest ona wykorzystywana do obróbki różnorodnych materiałów, również materiałów skalnych. W ramach badań analizowano trzy granity różniące się m.in. wielkościami ziarn, które były przecinane przy różnych prędkościach przesuwu głowicy z wlotem strumienia wodnego. Analizowano standardowe parametry zdefiniowane w normach ISO jak również zaproponowano wykorzystanie wariogramów do analizy jakości wyciętej powierzchni. W pracy opisano w sposób ilościowy zmiany jakości powierzchni skał ciętych strumieniem wodnym ze ścierniwem w zależności od prędkości przesuwu głowicy, jak również w zależności od odległości przecinanego fragmentu powierzchni od wlotu strumienia wodnego do materiału. Wyniki uzyskane w pomiarach wskazują też na wpływ wielkości uziarnienia skały na jakość otrzymanej powierzchni. Jest to szczególnie widoczne dla najmniej optymalnych parametrów ci

  15. A Profilometry-Based Dentifrice Abrasion Method for V8 Brushing Machines Part III: Multi-Laboratory Validation Testing of RDA-PE.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen L; White, Donald J; Schemehorn, Bruce; Ganovsky, Tara; Haider, Amir; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Morrow, Brian R; Srimaneepong, Viritpon; Chumprasert, Sujin

    2017-09-01

    We have previously reported on progress toward the refinement of profilometry-based abrasivity testing of dentifrices using a V8 brushing machine and tactile or optical measurement of dentin wear. The general application of this technique may be advanced by demonstration of successful inter-laboratory confirmation of the method. The objective of this study was to explore the capability of different laboratories in the assessment of dentifrice abrasivity using a profilometry-based evaluation technique developed in our Mason laboratories. In addition, we wanted to assess the interchangeability of human and bovine specimens. Participating laboratories were instructed in methods associated with Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity-Profilometry Equivalent (RDA-PE) evaluation, including site visits to discuss critical elements of specimen preparation, masking, profilometry scanning, and procedures. Laboratories were likewise instructed on the requirement for demonstration of proportional linearity as a key condition for validation of the technique. Laboratories were provided with four test dentifrices, blinded for testing, with a broad range of abrasivity. In each laboratory, a calibration curve was developed for varying V8 brushing strokes (0, 4,000, and 10,000 strokes) with the ISO abrasive standard. Proportional linearity was determined as the ratio of standard abrasion mean depths created with 4,000 and 10,000 strokes (2.5 fold differences). Criteria for successful calibration within the method (established in our Mason laboratory) was set at proportional linearity = 2.5 ± 0.3. RDA-PE was compared to Radiotracer RDA for the four test dentifrices, with the latter obtained by averages from three independent Radiotracer RDA sites. Individual laboratories and their results were compared by 1) proportional linearity and 2) acquired RDA-PE values for test pastes. Five sites participated in the study. One site did not pass proportional linearity objectives. Data for this site are

  16. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... the doctor looks at the eye under a light that is filtered cobalt blue. The fluorescein causes the abrasion to glow bright green under the light. The doctor also might do a standard ophthalmic ...

  17. Effect of microstructure on the breakage of tin bronze machining chips during pulverization via jet milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Elham; Ghambari, Mohammad; Farhangi, Hasan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, jet milling was used to recycle tin bronze machining chips into powder. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the microstructure of tin bronze machining chips on their breakage behavior. An experimental target jet mill was used to pulverize machining chips of three different tin bronze alloys containing 7wt%, 10wt%, and 12wt% of tin. Optical and electron microscopy, as well as sieve analysis, were used to follow the trend of pulverization. Each alloy exhibited a distinct rate of size reduction, particle size distribution, and fracture surface appearance. The results showed that the degree of pulverization substantially increased with increasing tin content. This behavior was attributed to the higher number of machining cracks as well as the increased volume fraction of brittle δ phase in the alloys with higher tin contents. The δ phase was observed to strongly influence the creation of machining cracks as well as the nucleation and propagation of cracks during jet milling. In addition, a direct relationship was observed between the mean δ-phase spacing and the mean size of the jet-milled product; i.e., a decrease in the δ-phase spacing resulted in smaller particles.

  18. Abrasion of acrylic veneers by simulated toothbrushing.

    PubMed

    Xu, H C; Söremark, R; Wiktorsson, G; Wang, T; Liu, W Y

    1984-12-01

    The abrasion responses were tested on four acrylic veneer materials, K + B Plus, K + B 75, Isosit, and Ivocron. The studies were performed in two independent research laboratories. Two different brushing machines were used with an abrasive slurry. The results were used for comparing the degree of abrasion for the resin materials. Three analytical methods of measuring the degree of abrasive wear were used: surface profile measurement, microscopic evaluation, and measurement of loss of volume. Isosit showed the best abrasion resistance of the four materials tested.

  19. Study of energy parameters of machine parts of water-ice jet cleaning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezhbilov, A. N.; Burnashov, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The reader will achieve a benchmark understanding of the essence of cleaning for the removal of contaminants from machine elements by means of cryo jet/water-ice jet with particles prepared beforehand. This paper represents the classification of the most common contaminants appearing on the surfaces of machine elements after a long-term service. The conceptual contribution of the paper is to represent a thermo-physical model of contaminant removal by means of a water ice jet. In conclusion, it is evident that this study has shown the dependencies between the friction force of an ice particle with an obstacle (contamination), a dimensional change of an ice particle in the cleaning process and the quantity of heat transmitted to an ice particle.

  20. Simulating Astrophysical Jets with Inertial Confinement Fusion Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Brent

    2005-10-01

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as `jets', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, theoretical analysis might not capture all the relevant physics and numerical simulations have limited resolution and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Recent advances in high energy density physics using large inertial confinement fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance to astrophysics. This talk will present an overview of these facilities as well as results from current laboratory astrophysics experiments designed to study hydrodynamic jets and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  1. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  2. A Profilometry-Based Dentifrice Abrasion Method for V8 Brushing Machines Part II: Comparison of RDA-PE and Radiotracer RDA Measures.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Eva; Colón, Ellen; White, Donald J; St John, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the abrasivity of commercial dentifrices by two techniques: the conventional gold standard radiotracer-based Radioactive Dentin Abrasivity (RDA) method; and a newly validated technique based on V8 brushing that included a profilometry-based evaluation of dentin wear. This profilometry-based method is referred to as RDA-Profilometry Equivalent, or RDA-PE. A total of 36 dentifrices were sourced from four global dentifrice markets (Asia Pacific [including China], Europe, Latin America, and North America) and tested blindly using both the standard radiotracer (RDA) method and the new profilometry method (RDA-PE), taking care to follow specific details related to specimen preparation and treatment. Commercial dentifrices tested exhibited a wide range of abrasivity, with virtually all falling well under the industry accepted upper limit of 250; that is, 2.5 times the level of abrasion measured using an ISO 11609 abrasivity reference calcium pyrophosphate as the reference control. RDA and RDA-PE comparisons were linear across the entire range of abrasivity (r2 = 0.7102) and both measures exhibited similar reproducibility with replicate assessments. RDA-PE assessments were not just linearly correlated, but were also proportional to conventional RDA measures. The linearity and proportionality of the results of the current study support that both methods (RDA or RDA-PE) provide similar results and justify a rationale for making the upper abrasivity limit of 250 apply to both RDA and RDA-PE.

  3. Cellulase finishing of woven, cotton fabrics in jet and winch machines.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J M; Ellis, J; Bishop, D P

    2001-08-23

    Some authors have reported that as the applied agitation rate increases, the apparent activity of the endoglucanases from Trichoderma reesei towards cotton cellulose increases more markedly than does the apparent activity of the cellobiohydrolases. This suggests that the quality of cellulase finishing effects on cellulosic textiles may be machine-type dependent. The present work using total crude, endoglucanase-rich and cellobiohydrolase-rich cellulases from T. reesei confirmed that the final properties of woven, cotton fabrics treated under realistic processing conditions in a jet machine, were measurably and perceivably different from those of the same fabrics, treated using the same processing conditions of temperature, time, pH, enzyme concentration and fabric to liquor ratio, but in a winch machine. The results are interpreted in terms of the effects of agitation rate on the adsorption-desorption behaviour of the T. reesei endoglucanases and cellobiohydrolases.

  4. Achieving Small Structures in Thin NiTi Sheets for Medical Applications with Water Jet and Micro Machining: A Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frotscher, M.; Kahleyss, F.; Simon, T.; Biermann, D.; Eggeler, G.

    2011-07-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) are used for a variety of applications including medical implants and tools as well as actuators, making use of their unique properties. However, due to the hardness and strength, in combination with the high elasticity of the material, the machining of components can be challenging. The most common machining techniques used today are laser cutting and electrical discharge machining (EDM). In this study, we report on the machining of small structures into binary NiTi sheets, applying alternative processing methods being well-established for other metallic materials. Our results indicate that water jet machining and micro milling can be used to machine delicate structures, even in very thin NiTi sheets. Further work is required to optimize the cut quality and the machining speed in order to increase the cost-effectiveness and to make both methods more competitive.

  5. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of Automatic Transmission Fluid Jets with Implications for Electric Machine Thermal Management: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, Kevin; Moreno, Gilberto

    2015-09-29

    Thermal management for electric machines (motors/ generators) is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. Cooling of the electric machine(s) in some electric vehicle traction drive applications is accomplished by impinging automatic transmission fluid (ATF) jets onto the machine's copper windings. In this study, we provide the results of experiments characterizing the thermal performance of ATF jets on surfaces representative of windings, using Ford's Mercon LV ATF. Experiments were carried out at various ATF temperatures and jet velocities to quantify the influence of these parameters on heat transfer coefficients. Fluid temperatures weremore » varied from 50 degrees C to 90 degrees C to encompass potential operating temperatures within an automotive transaxle environment. The jet nozzle velocities were varied from 0.5 to 10 m/s. The experimental ATF heat transfer coefficient results provided in this report are a useful resource for understanding factors that influence the performance of ATF-based cooling systems for electric machines.« less

  6. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  7. LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition in a rapid compression machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Toulson, Elisa; Jaberi, Farhad; CFD; Engine Research Labs, Michigan State University Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for initiating and controlling combustion in combustion systems, e.g. internal combustion engines. It enables combustion in ultra-lean mixtures by utilizing hot product turbulent jets emerging from a pre-chamber combustor as the ignition source for the main combustion chamber. Here, we study the TJI-assisted ignition and combustion of lean methane-air mixtures in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) for various flow/combustion conditions with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) computational model. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity, while the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (species mass fraction and temperature) field. The LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion in RCM. The results show the very complex behavior of the reacting flow and the flame structure in the pre-chamber and RCM.

  8. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  9. Precision machining of advanced materials with waterjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in abrasive waterjet technology have elevated to the state that it often competes on equal footing with lasers and EDM for precision machining. Under the support of a National Science Foundation SBIR Phase II grant, OMAX has developed and commercialized micro abrasive water technology that is incorporated into a MicroMAX® JetMa- chining® Center. Waterjet technology, combined both abrasive waterjet and micro abrasive waterjet technology, is capable of machining most materials from macro to micro scales for a wide range of part size and thickness. Waterjet technology has technological and manufacturing merits that cannot be matched by most existing tools. As a cold cutting tool that creates no heat-affected zone, for example, waterjet cuts much faster than wire EDM and laser when measures to minimize a heat-affected zone are taken into account. In addition, waterjet is material independent; it cuts materials that cannot be cut or are difficult to cut otherwise. The versatility of waterjet has also demonstrated machining simulated nanomaterials with large gradients of material properties from metal, nonmetal, to anything in between. This paper presents waterjet-machined samples made of a wide range of advanced materials from macro to micro scales.

  10. Machines employing a hot gas jet to cut metals and nonmetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polyaev, V.M.; Aleksandrenkov, V.P.

    1995-07-01

    The flame-cutting of metals is a basic materials-processing operation performed in the course of machine-building and, in some sectors (shipbuilding, aircraft construction, petrochemicals) it is the most important operation. In addition, this method of cutting remains the main operation performed in the processing of scrap metal. The importance of it has occasioned the development of a wide range of cutting tools within just the last decade. Not surprisingly, VNIIavtogen-mash (the All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Machinery for the Gas Welding and Cutting of Metals) is the leading designer of metal-cutting tools in this country. The problem of efficiently cutting metalsmore » is gaining in importance and will continue to do so in coming years in connection with the conversion of military hardware to other uses, the decommissioning of old and obsolete equipment, and utilization of the enormous reserves of scrap in this country. There will thus be a significant increase in the amounts of existing high-alloy steels, nonferrous metals and their alloys, and composites that require cutting. A wide range of cutters is available for the gas-flame cutting of metals, Liquid fuels based on petroleum products are promising from the viewpoint of energy efficiency and performance. The operation of a new generation of cutters, referred to as thermo-gas jet cutters, is based on the principle of the destructive action of a hot, fast-moving, chemically active jet on the material to be cut.« less

  11. Performance analysis of cutting graphite-epoxy composite using a 90,000psi abrasive waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choppali, Aiswarya

    Graphite-epoxy composites are being widely used in many aerospace and structural applications because of their properties: which include lighter weight, higher strength to weight ratio and a greater flexibility in design. However, the inherent anisotropy of these composites makes it difficult to machine them using conventional methods. To overcome the major issues that develop with conventional machining such as fiber pull out, delamination, heat generation and high tooling costs, an effort is herein made to study abrasive waterjet machining of composites. An abrasive waterjet is used to cut 1" thick graphite epoxy composites based on baseline data obtained from the cutting of ¼" thick material. The objective of this project is to study the surface roughness of the cut surface with a focus on demonstrating the benefits of using higher pressures for cutting composites. The effects of major cutting parameters: jet pressure, traverse speed, abrasive feed rate and cutting head size are studied at different levels. Statistical analysis of the experimental data provides an understanding of the effect of the process parameters on surface roughness. Additionally, the effect of these parameters on the taper angle of the cut is studied. The data is analyzed to obtain a set of process parameters that optimize the cutting of 1" thick graphite-epoxy composite. The statistical analysis is used to validate the experimental data. Costs involved in the cutting process are investigated in term of abrasive consumed to better understand and illustrate the practical benefits of using higher pressures. It is demonstrated that, as pressure increased, ultra-high pressure waterjets produced a better surface quality at a faster traverse rate with lower costs.

  12. The Laser MicroJet (LMJ): a multi-solution technology for high quality micro-machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Tuan Anh; Richerzhagen, Bernold; Snowdon, Paul C.; Wood, David; Maropoulos, Paul G.

    2007-02-01

    The field of laser micromachining is highly diverse. There are many different types of lasers available in the market. Due to their differences in irradiating wavelength, output power and pulse characteristic they can be selected for different applications depending on material and feature size [1]. The main issues by using these lasers are heat damages, contamination and low ablation rates. This report examines on the application of the Laser MicroJet(R) (LMJ), a unique combination of a laser beam with a hair-thin water jet as a universal tool for micro-machining of MEMS substrates, as well as ferrous and non-ferrous materials. The materials include gallium arsenide (GaAs) & silicon wafers, steel, tantalum and alumina ceramic. A Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm (infra red) and frequency doubled 532 nm (green) were employed for the micro-machining of these materials.

  13. Cost minimizing of cutting process for CNC thermal and water-jet machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavaeva, Anastasia; Kurennov, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with optimization problem of cutting process for CNC thermal and water-jet machines. The accuracy of objective function parameters calculation for optimization problem is investigated. This paper shows that working tool path speed is not constant value. One depends on some parameters that are described in this paper. The relations of working tool path speed depending on the numbers of NC programs frames, length of straight cut, configuration part are presented. Based on received results the correction coefficients for working tool speed are defined. Additionally the optimization problem may be solved by using mathematical model. Model takes into account the additional restrictions of thermal cutting (choice of piercing and output tool point, precedence condition, thermal deformations). At the second part of paper the non-standard cutting techniques are considered. Ones may lead to minimizing of cutting cost and time compared with standard cutting techniques. This paper considers the effectiveness of non-standard cutting techniques application. At the end of the paper the future research works are indicated.

  14. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain the spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines..., nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as portable saws. (c) Use of abrasive wheels...

  17. Hierarchical representation and machine learning from faulty jet engine behavioral examples to detect real time abnormal conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, U. K.; Ali, M.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical basis and operation of LEBEX, a machine-learning system for jet-engine performance monitoring, are described. The behavior of the engine is modeled in terms of four parameters (the rotational speeds of the high- and low-speed sections and the exhaust and combustion temperatures), and parameter variations indicating malfunction are transformed into structural representations involving instances and events. LEBEX extracts descriptors from a set of training data on normal and faulty engines, represents them hierarchically in a knowledge base, and uses them to diagnose and predict faults on a real-time basis. Diagrams of the system architecture and printouts of typical results are shown.

  18. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  19. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  20. Study on design of light-weight super-abrasive wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohara, K.; Yanagihara, K.; Ogawa, M.

    2018-01-01

    Fixed-abrasive tool, also called a grinding wheel, is produced by furnacing abrasive compound which contains abrasive grains and binding powder such as vitrified materials or resins. Fixed-abrasive tool is installed on spindle of grinding machine. And it is given 1,800-2,000 min-1 of spindle rotation for the usage. The centrifugal fracture of the compound of fixed- abrasive tool is one of the careful respects in designing. In recent years, however, super-abrasive wheel as a fixed-abrasive tool has been developed and applied widely. One of the most characteristic respects is that metal is applied for the body of grinding-wheel. The strength to hold abrasive grain and the rigidity of wheel become stronger than those of general grinding wheel, also the lifespan of fixed-abrasive tool becomes longer. The weight of fixed-abrasive tool, however, becomes heavier. Therefore, when the super-abrasive wheel is used, the power consumption of spindle motor becomes larger. It also becomes difficult for the grinding-wheel to respond to sudden acceleration or deceleration. Thus, in order to reduce power consumption in grinding and to obtain quicker frequency response of super-abrasive wheel, the new wheel design is proposed. The design accomplishes 46% weight reduction. Acceleration that is one second quicker than that of conventional grinding wheel is obtained.

  1. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  2. Double-charming Higgs boson identification using machine-learning assisted jet shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Alexander; Spannowsky, Michael; Tetlalmatzi-Xolocotzi, Gilberto

    2018-01-01

    We study the possibility of identifying a boosted resonance that decays into a charm pair against different sources of background using QCD event shapes, which are promoted to jet shapes. Using a set of jet shapes as input to a boosted decision tree, we find that observables utilizing the simultaneous presence of two charm quarks can access complementary information compared to approaches relying on two independent charm tags. Focusing on Higgs associated production with subsequent H →c c ¯ decay and on a C P -odd scalar A with mA≤10 GeV we obtain the limits B r (H →c c ¯ )≤6.48 % and B r (H →A (→c c ¯ )Z )≤0.01 % at 95% C.L.

  3. Lubricity of well-characterized jet and broad-cut fuels by ball-on-cylinder machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Kim, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    A ball-on-cylinder machine (BOCM) was used to measure the lubricity of fuels. The fuels tested were well-characterized fuels available from other programs at the NASA Lewis Research Center plus some in-house mildly hydroprocessed shale fuels from other programs included Jet-A, ERBS fuel, ERBS blends, and blend stock. The BOCM tests were made before and after clay treatment of some of these fuels with both humidified air and dry nitrogen as the preconditioning and cover gas. As expected, clay treatment always reduced fuel lubricity. Using nitrogen preconditioning and cover gas always resulted in a smaller wear scar diameter than when humidified air was used. Also observed was an indication of lower lubricity with lower boiling range fuels and lower aromatic fuels. Gas chromatographic analysis indicted changes in BOCM-stressed fuels.

  4. Study of Effect of Impacting Direction on Abrasive Nanometric Cutting Process with Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junye; Meng, Wenqing; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Xinming; Zhao, Weihong

    2018-01-01

    Abrasive flow polishing plays an important part in modern ultra-precision machining. Ultrafine particles suspended in the medium of abrasive flow removes the material in nanoscale. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effect of impacting direction on abrasive cutting process during abrasive flow polishing. The molecular dynamics simulation software Lammps was used to simulate the cutting of single crystal copper with SiC abrasive grains at different cutting angles (0o-45o). At a constant friction coefficient, we found a direct relation between cutting angle and cutting force, which ultimately increases the number of dislocation during abrasive flow machining. Our theoretical study reveal that a small cutting angle is beneficial for improving surface quality and reducing internal defects in the workpiece. However, there is no obvious relationship between cutting angle and friction coefficient.

  5. Study of Effect of Impacting Direction on Abrasive Nanometric Cutting Process with Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Junye; Meng, Wenqing; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Xinming; Zhao, Weihong

    2018-01-11

    Abrasive flow polishing plays an important part in modern ultra-precision machining. Ultrafine particles suspended in the medium of abrasive flow removes the material in nanoscale. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effect of impacting direction on abrasive cutting process during abrasive flow polishing. The molecular dynamics simulation software Lammps was used to simulate the cutting of single crystal copper with SiC abrasive grains at different cutting angles (0 o -45 o ). At a constant friction coefficient, we found a direct relation between cutting angle and cutting force, which ultimately increases the number of dislocation during abrasive flow machining. Our theoretical study reveal that a small cutting angle is beneficial for improving surface quality and reducing internal defects in the workpiece. However, there is no obvious relationship between cutting angle and friction coefficient.

  6. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  7. Abrasion resistant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to themore » metal matrix.« less

  8. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Electrical Engineering Department, Padova University, via Gradenigo 6-A, 35131 Padova; Boboc, A.

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements formore » a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.« less

  9. Effect of nanofillers' size on surface properties after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Larissa M; Masouras, Konstantinos; Watts, David C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Silikas, Nick

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of filler-particle size of experimental and commercial resin composites, undergoing toothbrush abrasion, on three surface properties: surface roughness (SR), surface gloss (G) and color stability (CS). Four model (Ivoclar/Vivadent) and one commercial resin composite (Tokuyama) with varying filler-size from 100-1000 nm were examined. Six discs (10 mm x 2 mm) from each product were prepared and mechanically polished. The samples were then submitted to 20,000 brushing strokes in a toothbrush abrasion machine. SR parameters (Ra, Rt and RSm), G, and CS were measured before and after toothbrush abrasion. Changes in SR and G were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, with Bonferroni post hoc test. CS values were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Initial G values ranged between 73-87 gloss units (GU) and were reduced after toothbrush abrasion to a range of 8-64 GU. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in significant modifications in SR and G amongst the materials tested, attributed to filler sizes. There was statistically significant difference in color (delta E* ranged from 0.38-0.88). Filler size did not affect color stability. Toothbrush abrasion resulted in rougher and matte surfaces for all materials tested. Although the individual differences in surface roughness among filler sizes were not always significant, the correlation showed a trend that larger filler sizes resulted in higher surface roughness after abrasion for the SR parameters Ra and Rt (r = 0.95; r = 0.93, respectively). RSm showed an increase after toothbrush abrasion for all resin composites, however no significant correlation was detected (r = 0.21).There was a significant correlation between G and Ra ratios (r = - 0.95).

  10. Dentifrice fluoride and abrasivity interplay on artificial caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Hani M; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    Incipient caries lesions on smooth surfaces may be subjected to toothbrushing, potentially leading to remineralization and/or abrasive wear. The interplay of dentifrice abrasivity and fluoride on this process is largely unknown and was investigated on three artificially created lesions with different mineral content/distribution. 120 bovine enamel specimens were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n = 10), resulting from the association of (1) lesion type [methylcellulose acid gel (MeC); carboxymethylcellulose solution (CMC); hydroxyethylcellulose gel (HEC)], (2) slurry abrasive level [low (REA 4/ RDA 69); high (REA 7/RDA 208)], and (3) fluoride concentration [0/275 ppm (14.5 mM) F as NaF]. After lesion creation, specimens were brushed in an automated brushing machine with the test slurries (50 strokes 2×/day). Specimens were kept in artificial saliva in between brushings and overnight. Enamel surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry after lesion creation, 1, 3 and 5 days. Two enamel sections (from baseline and post-brushing areas) were obtained and analyzed microradiographically. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 5%). Brushing with high-abrasive slurry caused more SL than brushing with low-abrasive slurry. For MeC and CMC lesions, fluoride had a protective effect on SL from day 3 on. Furthermore, for MeC and CMC, there was a significant mineral gain in the remaining lesions except when brushed with high-abrasive slurries and 0 ppm F. For HEC, a significant mineral gain took place when low-abrasive slurry was used with fluoride. The tested lesions responded differently to the toothbrushing procedures. Both slurry fluoride content and abrasivity directly impacted SL and mineral gain of enamel caries lesions.

  11. Effect of air abrasion and polishing on primary molar fissures.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T L; Menezes, L B R; Soares, F Z M; Rocha, R O

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of air abrasion and polishing on primary molar fissures under light microscopy. 15 exfoliated primary second molars were longitudinally sectioned and photographed under a stereomicroscope (40×; baseline evaluation). Sections were then randomly allocated into one of the two groups (n = 15) and treated by either air abrasion (aluminium oxide jet) or air polishing (sodium bicarbonate jet) for 30 s. After treatment, sections were washed with an air/water spray, dried with absorbent paper, and photographed as previously described (final evaluation). Baseline and final morphology were compared by two blinded examiners who evaluated changes in the width and depth of fissures. The percentage of changed fissures was analysed, and the two treatments were compared using the Mann-Whitney test (α = 0.01). Both air systems resulted in fissure changes in most (93.3 %) of the sections. No significant differences in fissure width changes were found between treatments, but when changes in fissure depth were evaluated, air polishing was found to be less damaging than air abrasion (p < 0.01). Air abrasion and polishing cause changes to the anatomical configuration of occlusal fissures of primary molars.

  12. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During recent soil-brushing experiments, the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became covered with dust, as shown here. An abundance of iron oxide minerals in the dust gave the device a reddish-brown veneer. Investigators were using the rock abrasion tool to uncover successive layers of soil in an attempt to reveal near-surface stratigraphy. Afterward, remnant dirt clods were visible on both the bit and the brush of the tool. Designers of the rock abrasion tool at Honeybee Robotics and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a plan to run the brush on the rock abrasion tool in reverse to dislodge the dirt and return the tool to normal operation. Subsequent communications with the rover revealed that the procedure is working and the rock abrasion tool remains healthy.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 893rd sol, or Martian day (July 8, 2006). The image combines exposures taken through three of the camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 430 nanometers.

  13. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  14. Classification of jet fuel properties by near-infrared spectroscopy using fuzzy rule-building expert systems and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhanfeng; Bunker, Christopher E; Harrington, Peter de B

    2010-11-01

    Monitoring the changes of jet fuel physical properties is important because fuel used in high-performance aircraft must meet rigorous specifications. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a fast method to characterize fuels. Because of the complexity of NIR spectral data, chemometric techniques are used to extract relevant information from spectral data to accurately classify physical properties of complex fuel samples. In this work, discrimination of fuel types and classification of flash point, freezing point, boiling point (10%, v/v), boiling point (50%, v/v), and boiling point (90%, v/v) of jet fuels (JP-5, JP-8, Jet A, and Jet A1) were investigated. Each physical property was divided into three classes, low, medium, and high ranges, using two evaluations with different class boundary definitions. The class boundaries function as the threshold to alarm when the fuel properties change. Optimal partial least squares discriminant analysis (oPLS-DA), fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES), and support vector machines (SVM) were used to build the calibration models between the NIR spectra and classes of physical property of jet fuels. OPLS-DA, FuRES, and SVM were compared with respect to prediction accuracy. The validation of the calibration model was conducted by applying bootstrap Latin partition (BLP), which gives a measure of precision. Prediction accuracy of 97 ± 2% of the flash point, 94 ± 2% of freezing point, 99 ± 1% of the boiling point (10%, v/v), 98 ± 2% of the boiling point (50%, v/v), and 96 ± 1% of the boiling point (90%, v/v) were obtained by FuRES in one boundaries definition. Both FuRES and SVM obtained statistically better prediction accuracy over those obtained by oPLS-DA. The results indicate that combined with chemometric classifiers NIR spectroscopy could be a fast method to monitor the changes of jet fuel physical properties.

  15. Experimental Rock-on-Rock Abrasive Wear Under Aqueous Conditions: its Role in Subglacial Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, E. H.; Lee, A. G.

    2003-12-01

    We have determined experimentally the rate of abrasive wear of rock on rock for a range of rock types as a function of normal stress and shear displacement. Unlike abrasive wear in fault zones, where wear products accumulate as a thickening gouge zone, in our experiments wear particles were removed by flowing water. The experiments are thus directly pertinent to one of the most important processes in subglacial erosion, and to some extent in river incision. Wear was produced between rotating discs machined from rock samples and measured from the progressive approach of the disc axes towards each other under various levels of normal load. Shear displacements of several km were produced. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the worn rock surfaces, and particle size distributions in wear products were characterized using a laser particle size analyzer. Rock types studied were sandstones of various porosities and cement characteristics, schists and a granite. In all cases abrasion rate decreased logarithmically with displacement by up to 2 orders of magnitude until a steady state was approached, but only after at least 1 km displacement. The more porous, less-well cemented rocks wore fastest. Amount of abrasion could be characterized quantitatively using an exponentially decaying plus a steady-state term. Wear rate increased non-linearly with normal contact stress, apparently to an asymptote defined by the unconfined compressive strength. Microstructural study showed that the well-cemented and/or lowest porosity rocks wore by progressive abrasion of grains without plucking, whereas whole grains were plucked out of weakly-cemented and/or more porous rocks. This difference in behavior was reflected in wear-product particle size distributions. Where whole-grain plucking was possible, wear products were dominated by particles of the original grain size rather than finer rock flour. Comparison of our results to glacier basal abrasive wear estimated

  16. Physics of loose abrasive microgrinding.

    PubMed

    Golini, D; Jacobs, S D

    1991-07-01

    This study examined the physics of loose abrasive microgrinding (grinding with micron and submicron sized abrasives). More specifically, it focused on the transition from brittle to ductile mode grinding which occurs in this region of abrasive sizes. Process dependency on slurry chemistry was the primary area of emphasis and was studied for diamond abrasives varying in size from 3.0 to 0.75 microm on both ULE and Zerodur, with emphasis on ULE. Ductile mode grinding was achieved with smaller abrasives, as expected, however two significant discoveries were made. The first observation was that by simply changing slurry chemistry, it was possible to induce the transition from brittle fracture to ductile mode grinding in ULE. This transition point could be intentionally moved about for diamonds 3.0-0.75 microm in diameter. For any given abrasive size within these limits, either brittle fracture or ductile removal may be achieved, depending on the slurry used to suspend the diamonds. Several slurries were studied, including water, a series of homologous n-alcohols, and other solvents chosen for properties varying from molecular size to dielectric constant and zeta potential. The study revealed that this slurry dependency is primarily a Rebinder effect. The second finding was that a tremendous amount of surface stress is introduced in loose abrasive ductile mode grinding. This stress was observed when the Twyman Effect in ULE plates increased by a factor of 4 in the transition from the brittle to the ductile mode. An assessment of the cause of this stress is discussed.

  17. Research on operation mode of abrasive grain during grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, T. N.; Dement’ev, V. B.; Nikitina, O. V.

    2018-03-01

    The processing of materials by cutting with an abrasive tool is carried out by means of thousands of grains bonded together as a single whole. The quality of the abrasive tool is defined by cutting properties of abrasive grains and depends on features of spreading the temperature field in time and in the abrasive grain volume. Grains are exposed to heating and cooling during work. It leads to undesired effects such as a decrease of durability of grain retention in the binder, hardness, intensification of diffusion and oxidation processes between the binder and the grain, the occurrence of considerable temperature stresses in the grain itself. The obtained equation which allows calculation of temperature field of grain for one rotation of grinding wheel shows that the temperature of the wheel depends on grinding modes and thermophysical properties of abrasive material. Thus, as the time of contact of grain with processed material increases, the temperature in the cutting area rises. As thermophysical properties increase, the temperature in cutting area decreases. Thermal working conditions are determined to be different from each other depending on contact time of the grain and the material. For example, in case of creep-feed grinding, the peak value of temperature is higher than during multistep grinding; the depth of expansion is greater. While the speed of the thermal process in creep-feed grinding is 2-3 times lower than in multistep grinding, the gradient reduces 3-4 times. The analysis of machining methods shows that creep-feed grinding ensures greater depth of grain heating, a smaller heating rate and a reduced velocity gradient. It causes a decrease of probable allotropic modifications and prevents from occurring of heat strokes - cracking of grains due to high temperature falls. Consequently, it is necessary to employ creep-feed grinding to increase the efficiency of abrasive tool employing. Three operation modes of grinding wheel including blunting, full

  18. Investigation into the mechanisms of closed three-body abrasive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer-Joyce, R. S.; Sayles, R. S.; Ioannides, E.

    1994-06-01

    Contacting components frequently fail by abrasion caused by solid contaminants in the lubricant. This process can be classified as a closed three-body abrasive wear process. The mechanisms by which trapped particles cause material removal are not fully understood. This paper describes tests using model elastohydrodynamic contacts to study these mechanisms. An optical elastohydrodynamic lubrication rig has been used to study the deformation and fracture of ductile and brittle lubricant-borne debris. A ball-on-disk machine was used to study the behavior of the particles in partially sliding contacts. Small diamond particles were used as abrasives since these were thought not to break down in the contact; wear could then be directly related to particles of a known size. The particles were found to embed in the softer surface and to scratch the harder. The mass of material worn from the ball surface was approximately proportional to the particle sliding distance and abrasive concentration. Small particles tumbled through the contact, while larger particles ploughed. Mass loss was found to increase with abrasive particle size. Individual abrasion scratches have been measured and related to the abrading particle. A simple model of the abrasive process has been developed and compared with experimental data. The discrepancies are thought to be the result of the uncertainty about the entrainment of particles into the contact.

  19. Air-Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Periimplantitis.

    PubMed

    Quintero, David George; Taylor, Robert Bonnie; Miller, Matthew Braden; Merchant, Keith Roshanali; Pasieta, Scott Anthony

    2017-06-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the ability of air-powder abrasion to decontaminate dental implants. Twenty-six implants were inoculated with a Streptococcus sanguinis biofilm media in a novel periimplantitis defect model. Six implants served as controls, and 20 implants were disinfected with either the Cavitron JET Plus or the AIR-FLOW PERIO air-powder abrasion units. Residual bacteria were cultured, and colony forming units (CFUs) were totaled at 24 hours. As expected, negative control implant cultures showed no evidence of viable bacteria. Bacterial growth was observed on all positive control cultures, whereas only 15% of the experimental cultures displayed evidence of viable bacteria. The average CFU per streak for the positive control was 104 compared with a maximum of 10 and 4 CFUs for the Cavitron JET Plus and AIR-FLOW PERIO, respectively. There was a 99.9% reduction in bacteria for both air-powder abrasion instruments. Air-powder abrasion is an effective technique for the decontamination of dental implants, and the Cavitron JET Plus and AIR-FLOW PERIO are equally successful at eliminating viable bacteria from implant surfaces.

  20. Phenolic cutter for machining foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, T. A.; Miller, A. C.; Price, B. W.; Stiles, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Pre-pregged fiber glass is an efficient abrasive for machining polystyrene and polyurethane foams. It bonds easily to any cutter base made of aluminum, steel, or phenolic, is inexpensive, and is readily available.

  1. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  2. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  3. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the currentmore » work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.« less

  4. METHODS OF TREATMENT OF COMPLEX SURFACES ON METAL CUTTING MACHINES (CHAPTERS 1 AND 12),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FORGING, MOLDINGS, MANDRELS, MARINE PROPELLERS, AERIAL PROPELLERS, TURBINE BLADES, ABRASIVES, IMPELLERS, AIRCRAFT PANELS, METAL PLATES, CAMS, ELECTROEROSIVE MACHINING, CHEMICAL MILLING, MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ELEMENTS, USSR.

  5. Machining and characterization of self-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, A.; Padmanabhan, K.; Kuppan, P.

    2017-11-01

    This Paper focuses on obtaining the mechanical properties and the effect of the different machining techniques on self-reinforced composites sample and to derive the best machining method with remarkable properties. Each sample was tested by the Tensile and Flexural tests, fabricated using hot compaction test and those loads were calculated. These composites are machined using conventional methods because of lack of advanced machinery in most of the industries. The advanced non-conventional methods like Abrasive water jet machining were used. These machining techniques are used to get the better output for the composite materials with good mechanical properties compared to conventional methods. But the use of non-conventional methods causes the changes in the work piece, tool properties and more economical compared to the conventional methods. Finding out the best method ideal for the designing of these Self Reinforced Composites with and without defects and the use of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis for the comparing the microstructure of the PP and PE samples concludes our process.

  6. Invited Article: A novel calibration method for the JET real-time far infrared polarimeter and integration of polarimetry-based line-integrated density measurements for machine protection of a fusion plant.

    PubMed

    Boboc, A; Bieg, B; Felton, R; Dalley, S; Kravtsov, Yu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present the work in the implementation of a new calibration for the JET real-time polarimeter based on the complex amplitude ratio technique and a new self-validation mechanism of data. This allowed easy integration of the polarimetry measurements into the JET plasma density control (gas feedback control) and as well as machine protection systems (neutral beam injection heating safety interlocks). The new addition was used successfully during 2014 JET Campaign and is envisaged that will operate routinely from 2015 campaign onwards in any plasma condition (including ITER relevant scenarios). This mode of operation elevated the importance of the polarimetry as a diagnostic tool in the view of future fusion experiments.

  7. Invited Article: A novel calibration method for the JET real-time far infrared polarimeter and integration of polarimetry-based line-integrated density measurements for machine protection of a fusion plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boboc, A., E-mail: Alexandru.Boboc@ccfe.ac.uk; Felton, R.; Dalley, S.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we present the work in the implementation of a new calibration for the JET real-time polarimeter based on the complex amplitude ratio technique and a new self-validation mechanism of data. This allowed easy integration of the polarimetry measurements into the JET plasma density control (gas feedback control) and as well as machine protection systems (neutral beam injection heating safety interlocks). The new addition was used successfully during 2014 JET Campaign and is envisaged that will operate routinely from 2015 campaign onwards in any plasma condition (including ITER relevant scenarios). This mode of operation elevated the importance ofmore » the polarimetry as a diagnostic tool in the view of future fusion experiments.« less

  8. The abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded enamel.

    PubMed

    Mosquim, Victor; Martines Souza, Beatriz; Foratori Junior, Gerson Aparecido; Wang, Linda; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the in vitro abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded bovine enamel samples in respect to erosive tooth wear. 72 bovine crowns were embedded, polished and subjected to the baseline profile analysis. The samples were then protected in 2/3 of the enamel surface and were randomly assigned to six groups (n= 12/group): G1: Oral-B 3D White, G2: Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White, G3: Sorriso Xtreme White 4D, G4: Colgate Luminous White, G5: Crest (conventional toothpaste), G6:erosion only (control). All samples were submitted to an erosive pH cycling (4 x 90 seconds in 0.1% citric acid, pH 2.5, per day) and abrasive challenges (2 x 15 seconds, per day) for 7 days. After the first and the last daily cycles, the samples were subjected to abrasive challenges, using a toothbrushing machine, soft toothbrushes and slurry of the tested toothpastes (1.5 N). Between the challenges, the samples were immersed in artificial saliva. The final profile was obtained and overlaid to the baseline profile for the calculation of the erosive tooth wear (μm). The data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (P< 0.05). G1 promoted the highest enamel wear (3.68±1.06 μm), similarly to G3 (3.17± 0.80 μm) and G4 (3.44± 1.29 μm). G3 and G4 performed similarly between them and compared with G5 (2.35± 1.44 μm). G2 (1.51± 0.95 μm) and G6 (0.85± 0.36 μm) showed the lowest enamel wear, which did not differ between them and from G5. Oral-B 3D White showed the highest abrasive potential while Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White showed the lowest abrasive potential on eroded enamel in vitro. This study showed that some commercial whitening toothpastes, especially those containing pyrophosphate associated with hydrated silica, enhanced enamel erosive wear.

  9. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  10. [The application of air abrasion in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Mandinić, Zoran; Vulićević, Zoran R; Beloica, Milos; Radović, Ivana; Mandić, Jelena; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip's size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist.

  11. The change in retentive force of magnetic attachment by abrasion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanjin; Tawada, Yasuyuki; Hata, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Fumihiko

    2008-07-01

    Magnets are frequently applied to removable dentures as retentive attachments. A magnet-retained removable overdenture might be slightly shifted from side to side by eccentric movement in the mouth, and the surface of magnetic attachment may be worn as a result. However, the relationship between the retentive force of magnetic attachment and its surface abrasion has not been reported. The purpose of this research is to investigate this relationship. Ten Mgfit DX 400 magnetic attachments for natural tooth roots were used for this experiment. The magnetic attachments were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, and ten pairs of specimens were fabricated. A 5-mm repeated gliding motion was applied on each pair of specimens until 30 000, 50 000, or 90 000 cycles had been achieved. The abrasion machine was under 5 kg loading, and the slide speed was 60 times/min. The retentive force of magnetic attachment was measured with a tension gauge at (1) before gliding; (2) after 30 000 gliding cycles; (3)after 50 000 gliding cycles; or (4) after 90 000 gliding cycles. The average change of retentive force of ten magnetic attachments after 30 000, 50 000, and 90 000 gliding cycles was 0.016 N, 0.003 N, and -0.008 N, respectively. The change was statistically analyzed using a paired-sample t test, which showed that the number of gliding cycles did not affect the retentive force of magnetic attachment significantly. The surface of magnetic attachment after gliding was observed by a microscope, and the abrasion of this attachment surface is clearly seen.

  12. The effect of microstructure on abrasive wear of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kešner, A.; Chotëborský, R.; Linda, M.

    2017-09-01

    Abrasive wear of agricultural tools is one of the biggest problems in currently being. The amount of abrasive wear, depending on the microstructure, has been investigated in this work. Steels 25CrMo4 and 51CrV4 were used in this work to determine the effect of the microstructure on the abrasive wear. These steels are commonly used for components that have to withstand abrasive wear.SEM analysis was used to detect the microstructure. The standardized ASTM G65 method was used to compare the abrasive wear of steels. The results show that the abrasive wear depends on the microstructure of steels.

  13. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  14. Mars Pathfinder: The Wheel Abrasion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE) will measure the amount of wear on wheel surfaces of the Mars Pathfinder rover. WAE uses thin films of Al, Ni, and Pt (ranging in thickness from 200 to 1000 angstroms) deposited on black, anodized Al strips attached to the rover wheel. As the wheel moves across the martian surface, changes in film reflectivity will be monitored by reflected sunlight. These changes, measured as output from a special photodetector mounted on the rover chassis, will be due to abrasion of the metal films by martian surface sand, dust, and clay.

  15. Abrasion of eroded and sound enamel by a dentifrice containing diamond abrasive particles

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J.; Hoegger, Vanessa G. M.; Attin, Thomas

    2017-07-24

    Eroded enamel is more susceptible to abrasive wear than sound enamel. New toothpastes utilizing diamond particles as abrasives have been developed. The present study investigated the abrasive wear of eroded enamel by three commercially available toothpastes (one containing diamond particles) and compared it to the respective wear of sound enamel caused by these toothpastes. Seventy-two bovine enamel samples were randomly allocated to six groups (S1–S3 and E1–E3; n=12). Samples were submitted to an abrasive (S1–S3) or erosion plus abrasion (E1–E3) cycling. Per cycle, all samples were brushed (abrasion; 20 brushing stokes) with the following toothpastes: S1/E1: Signal WHITE SYSTEM, S2/E2: elmex KARIESSCHUTZ and S3-E3: Candida WHITE DIAMOND (diamond particles). Groups E1–E3 were additionally eroded with HCl (pH 3.0) for 2 min before each brushing procedure. After 30, 60 and 90 cycles enamel wear was measured by surface profilometry. Within the same toothpaste and same number of cycles, enamel wear due to erosion plus abrasion was significantly higher than due to mere abrasion. After 30, 60 and 90 cycles, no significant difference in the wear in groups S1 and S2 was observed while the wear in group E1 was significantly (p<0.05, ANOVA, Scheffecyc) lower than that in group E2. After 90 cycles, wear in group S3 was about 5 times higher than that in group S2, while wear in group E3 was about 1.3 times higher than that in group E2. As compared to the other two investigated toothpastes, the dentifrice containing diamond particles caused slightly higher abrasive wear of eroded enamel and distinctly higher wear of sound enamel compared to the conventional toothpastes under investigation.

  16. Framework for assessing key variable dependencies in loose-abrasive grinding and polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Aikens, D.M.; Brown, N.J.

    1995-12-01

    This memo describes a framework for identifying all key variables that determine the figuring performance of loose-abrasive lapping and polishing machines. This framework is intended as a tool for prioritizing R&D issues, assessing the completeness of process models and experimental data, and for providing a mechanism to identify any assumptions in analytical models or experimental procedures. Future plans for preparing analytical models or performing experiments can refer to this framework in establishing the context of the work.

  17. Brushing force of manual and sonic toothbrushes affects dental hard tissue abrasion.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Annette; Burkhard, John Patrik Matthias; Eggmann, Florin; Attin, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the brushing forces applied during in vivo toothbrushing with manual and sonic toothbrushes and to analyse the effect of these brushing forces on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel and dentin in vitro. Brushing forces of a manual and two sonic toothbrushes (low and high frequency mode) were measured in 27 adults before and after instruction of the respective brushing technique and statistically analysed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). In the in vitro experiment, sound and eroded enamel and dentin specimens (each subgroup n = 12) were brushed in an automatic brushing machine with the respective brushing forces using a fluoridated toothpaste slurry. Abrasion was determined by profilometry and statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA. Average brushing force of the manual toothbrush (1.6 ± 0.3 N) was significantly higher than for the sonic toothbrushes (0.9 ± 0.2 N), which were not significantly different from each other. Brushing force prior and after instruction of the brushing technique was not significantly different. The manual toothbrush caused highest abrasion of sound and eroded dentin, but lowest on sound enamel. No significant differences were detected on eroded enamel. Brushing forces of manual and sonic toothbrushes are different and affect their abrasive capacity. Patients with severe tooth wear and exposed and/or eroded dentin surfaces should use sonic toothbrushes to reduce abrasion, while patients without tooth wear or with erosive lesions confining only to enamel do not benefit from sonic toothbrushes with regard to abrasion.

  18. Impact of brushing force on abrasion of acid-softened and sound enamel.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, A; Köwing, L; Attin, T

    2007-11-01

    The study aimed to analyse the effects of different brushing loads on abrasion of acid-softened and sound enamel surfaces. Sound and acid-softened surfaces of each 10 human enamel samples were submitted to brushing abrasion in an automatic brushing machine at 1.5 N (A), 2.5 N (B), 3.5 N (C) or 4.5 N (D) brushing load. Prior to abrasion, demineralisation of half of each enamel surface was performed by storage in hydrochloric acid (pH 2.0) for 60s. Brushing was carried out (1000 strokes) using a manual toothbrush and toothpaste slurry in a ratio of 1:3. Enamel loss was measured after 10, 20, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 1000 brushing strokes (BS). Pre- and post-brushing values of Knoop indentation length (5 indentations each sample) were measured and mean enamel loss was calculated from the change in indentation depth. Within- and between-group comparisons were performed by ANOVA and t-test followed by Bonferroni-correction. Enamel loss of acid-softened surfaces was significantly influenced by the brushing load applied and was mostly significantly higher in group D (10-1000 BS: 225-462 nm) compared to A (10-1000 BS: 164-384), B (10-1000 BS: 175-370 nm) and C (10-1000 BS: 191-396 nm). Abrasion of acid-softened enamel was fourfold higher compared to sound surfaces. Sound enamel was significantly influenced by the brushing force at 20-200 brushing strokes only, but revealed no significant differences between groups A-D. Brushing load influences abrasion of briefly eroded enamel, but might be of minor importance for abrasion of sound enamel surfaces.

  19. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  1. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing.... The abrasive polish is applied to the teeth by a handpiece attachment (prophylaxis cup). (b...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... crowns. The device is attached to a shank that is held by a handpiece. The device includes the abrasive...

  9. An epidemiologic approach to toothbrushing and dental abrasion.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J; Lavstedt, S

    1979-02-01

    Abrasion lesions were recorded in 818 individuals representing the adult population of 430,000 residents of the Stockholm region, Sweden. The subjects were asked about toothbrushing habits, toothbrush quality and dentifrice usage; these factors were related to abrasion criteria. Abrasion was prevalent in 30% and wedge-like or deep depressions were observed in 12%. The relationship between abrasion and toothbrushing was evident, the prevalence and severity of abrasion being correlated to toothbrushing consumption. The importance of the toothbrushing technique for the development of abrasion lesions was elucidated. Horizontal brushing technique was strongly correlated to abrasion. It was demonstrated by treating the data with the statistical AID analysis that toothbrushing factors related to the individual (brushing frequency and brushing technique) exert a greater influence than material-oriented toothbrushing factor such as dentifrice abrasivity and bristle stiffness.

  10. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  11. Influence of different toothpaste abrasives on the bristle end-rounding quality of toothbrushes.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, G J P L; de Aveiro, J M; Pavone, C; Marcantonio, R A C

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of different toothpaste abrasives on the bristle wear and bristle tip morphology of toothbrushes with different degrees of hardness. Ninety samples of bovine incisor teeth were used in this study. The samples were randomly divided into three groups according to the bristle hardness of the toothbrush used: soft bristles (S); extra-soft bristles (ES); hard bristles (H). The toothbrushes of each group were randomly divided into six subgroups with five toothbrushes each, according to the abrasive of the toothpaste used in the simulation: Negative control (distilled water); toothpaste 1 (silica); toothpaste 2 (hydrated silica); toothpaste 3 (calcium carbonate, calcium bicarbonate and silica); toothpaste 4 (tetrapotassium pyrophosphate, silica and titanium dioxide); toothpaste 5 (calcium carbonate). The samples were placed in a toothbrushing simulating machine that simulating three months of brushing. The toothbrush bristles were evaluated by the bristle wear index, and the bristle tips morphology was evaluated by the bristle tip morphology index. The ES brush presented the highest bristle wear among the toothbrushes. Additionally, the S brushes showed better morphology of the bristles followed by ES and H brushes. The type of abrasive only influenced the bristle tip morphology of the ES brushes. The toothpaste 3 induced the worse bristle tip morphology than all the other toothpastes. Different abrasives have influence only on the bristle tip morphology of the ES brushes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessment of thermal spray coatings for wear and abrasion resistance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karode, Ishaan Nitin

    Thermal spray cermet and metallic coatings are extensively used for wear, abrasion and corrosion control in a variety of industries. The first part of the thesis focuses mainly on testing of sand erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings on carbon composites used in the manufacture of helicopter rotor blades. The test set-up employed is a sand blasting machine and is an effort to duplicate the in-flight conditions especially those encountered in hot arid conditions. The technique adopted follows the Department of Defence test method standard. Carbon Composites have excellent stiffness, strength and low weight/density. The strength to weight ratio is high. Hence, these are used in aerospace applications to a large extent. However, the biggest problem encountered with carbon composites is its low abrasion resistance as its surface is very weak. Hence, thermal spray coatings are used to improve the surface properties of CFRP. Zinc bond coats and WC-Co coatings were tested. However, high amount of thermal stresses were developed between the substrate and the coating due to large differences in the CTE's of the both, leading to high mass losses within two minutes and just 130 grams of sand sprayed on to the coatings with the sand blasting machine built; and hence the coatings with CC as a substrate could not qualify for the application. The second part of the thesis focuses on the assessment of different thermal spray coatings used for manufacture of mechanical seals in pumps and analyze the best coating material for the wear resistance application through detail quantification of material loss by block-on-ring test set-up. A machine based on Block-on-ring test set-up following ASTM G77 (Measurement of Adhesive wear resistance of thermal spray coatings) standards was built to duplicate the pump conditions. Thermally sprayed coated materials were tested in different conditions (Load, time, abrasive). WC-Co had the highest wear resistance (lower volume losses) and

  13. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  14. Explosibility and Ignitability of Plastic Abrasive Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Polyplus Is an alpha cellulose filled urea formaldehyde with a hardness or 3.5. Type III is a urea melamine formaldehyde with a hardness of 4. A fourth...is a thermoplastic acrylic media and the Kopper’s media are thermoset formaldehydes . o The greatest potential for dust explosions is in the baghouss...type or plastio media trom E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company was also tested. This Type L Solidstrip plastic stripping abrasive is an acrylic resin

  15. Dentin abrasivity of various desensitizing toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Gröger, Ch; Bizhang, M; Naumova, E A

    2016-04-02

    The aim of this study was to compare the abrasivity of various commercially available toothpastes that claim to reduce dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin discs were prepared from 70 human extracted molars. The discs were etched with lemon juice for 5 min, and one half of the discs were covered with aluminum tape. Following this, they were brushed with 6 different toothpastes, simulating a total brushing time of 6 months. As a negative control, discs were brushed with tap water only. The toothpastes contained pro-arginine and calcium carbonate, strontium acetate, stannous fluoride, zinc carbonate and hydroxyapatite, new silica, or tetrapotassium pyrophosphate and hydroxyapatite. After brushing, the height differences between the control halves and the brushed halves were determined with a profilometer and statistically compared using a Mann-Whitney U test for independent variables. A significant difference (p < 0.001) in height difference between the controls and the toothpaste-treated samples was found in all cases, except for the stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste (p = 0.583). The highest abrasion was found in the toothpaste containing zinc carbonate and hydroxyapatite, and the lowest was found in the toothpaste containing pro-arginine and calcium carbonate. Desensitizing toothpastes with different desensitizing ingredients have different levels of abrasivity, which may have a negative effect on their desensitizing abilities over a long period of time.

  16. Effect of air-abrasion regimens and fine diamond bur grinding on flexural strength, Weibull modulus and phase transformation of zirconium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Michida, Silvia Masae de Araújo; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; dos Santos, Claudinei; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio Assunção; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-10-16

    This study evaluated the effect of air abrasion and polishing regimens on the flexural strength of yttrium stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). From Y-TZP blocks (InCeram 2000 YZ Cubes; Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) 120 bars (25 mm × 4 mm × 1.2 mm) were obtained according to ISO 6872:2008 and randomly divided into 4 groups: Group C: (control) without surface treatment (n = 30); Group APA: Air abrasion with aluminum oxide (44 µm) (n = 30); Group SC: Silica-coating (CoJet, 30 µm) (n = 30); Group FD: Fine diamond bur (n = 30). Subsequently, all specimens were subjected to 4-point bending test (in distilled water at 37 °C) in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL 1000; São José dos Pinhais, Paraná, Brazil); cross-head speed: 0.5 mm/min). The characteristic strength (σ0) of each specimen was obtained from the flexural strength test and evaluated using Weibull analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis was utilized to quantity the monoclinic phase. The surface topography of specimens was analyzed using 3D optical profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after surface conditioning methods. The flexural strength data (σ4p) were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, Tukey test (α = 0.05) and Weibull (m = modulus, σ0 = characteristic strength) were calculated. The mean ± standard deviations (MPa) of the groups were as follows: C: 1196.2 ± 284.2a; APA: 1369.7 ± 272.3a; SC: 1207.1 ± 229.7a and FD: 874.4 ± 365.4b. The values (m) and (σ0) were as follows: C: 4.5 and 1308.12; APA: 5.9 and 1477.88; SC: 6.0 and 1300.28; and FD: 2.6 and 985.901, respectively. Air particle abrasion with neither silica nor alumina showed significant difference compared to the control group but grinding with fine diamond bur impaired the flexural strength of the zirconia tested.

  17. The importance of measuring toothpaste abrasivity in both a quantitative and qualitative way

    PubMed Central

    Tellefsen, Georg; Johannsen, Annsofi; Liljeborg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the relative abrasivity of different toothpastes and polishing pastes both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and methods. Acrylic plates were exposed to brushing in a brushing machine with a toothpaste/water slurry for 1 and 6 h. Twelve different toothpastes were used and also four different polishing pastes. The results were evaluated using a profilometer after 1 and 6 h of brushing (corresponding to 2000 and 12 000 double strokes, respectively). A surface roughness value (Ra-value) and also a volume loss value were calculated from the profilometer measurements. These values were then correlated to each other. An unpaired t-test for the difference in the abrasion values between the toothpastes and the abrasion values over time was used. Results. The polishing paste RDA® 170 yielded higher Ra-values than RDA 250®, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing (1.01 ± 0.22 and 8.99 ± 1.55 compared to 0.63 ± 0.26 and 7.83 ± 5.89, respectively) as well as volume loss values (3.71 ± 0.17 and 20.20 ± 2.41 compared to 2.15 ± 1.41 and 14.79 ± 11.76, respectively), thus poor correlations between the RDA and Ra and Volume loss values were shown. Among the toothpastes, Apotekets® showed the highest Ra value after 1 h of brushing and Pepsodent® whitening after 6 h of brushing. Pepsodent® whitening also showed the highest volume loss values, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing. Conclusion. This study emphasizes the importance of not only considering the RDA value, but also a roughness value, when describing the abrasivity of a toothpaste. Furthermore, it can be concluded that so called ‘whitening' toothpastes do not necessarily have a higher abrasive effect than other toothpastes. PMID:22746180

  18. Abrasion resistance of direct and indirect resins as a function of a sealant veneer.

    PubMed

    Ferraz Caneppele, Taciana Marco; Rocha, Daniel Maranha; Màximo Araujo, Maria Amelia; Valera, Màrcia Carneiro; Salazar Marocho, Susana MarIa

    2014-01-01

    Abrasive wear is one of the most common type of wear that not only affect teeth, as also dental restorations. Thus to investigate one of the etiological factors as tooth brushing procedure is clinical relevant in order to select the best material combination that may prevent damage of resin dental restoration's abrasion. This study evaluated the influence of tooth brushing on mass loss and surface roughness of direct Venus (Vs) and indirect Signum (Sg) resin composites, with and without a surface sealant, Fortify (F). Twenty-four specimens were prepared with each resin composite, using their proprietary curing units, according to manufacturer's instructions. All the specimens were polished and ultrasonically cleaned in distilled water for 5 minutes. Half of the specimens of each resin (n = 12) were covered with F (Vs F and Sg F ), except for the control (C) specimens (Vs C and Sg C ), which were not sealed. Mass loss (ML) as well as surface roughness (Ra ) was measured for all the specimens. Then, the specimens were subjected to toothbrush-dentifrice abrasion, using a testing machine for 67.000 brushing strokes, in an abrasive slurry. After brushing simulation, the specimens were removed from the holder, rinsed thoroughly and blot dried with soft absorbent paper. The abrasion of the material was quantitatively determined with final measurements of ML and surface roughness, using the method described above. ML data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the analysis indicated that resin composites were not statistically different; however, the specimens sealed with F showed higher ML. Ra mean values of the groups Vs F and Sg F significantly increased. Tooth brushing affects mainly the roughness of the direct and indirect resin composites veneered with a sealant.

  19. The importance of measuring toothpaste abrasivity in both a quantitative and qualitative way.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Gunnar; Tellefsen, Georg; Johannsen, Annsofi; Liljeborg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relative abrasivity of different toothpastes and polishing pastes both qualitatively and quantitatively. Acrylic plates were exposed to brushing in a brushing machine with a toothpaste/water slurry for 1 and 6 h. Twelve different toothpastes were used and also four different polishing pastes. The results were evaluated using a profilometer after 1 and 6 h of brushing (corresponding to 2000 and 12 000 double strokes, respectively). A surface roughness value (Ra-value) and also a volume loss value were calculated from the profilometer measurements. These values were then correlated to each other. An unpaired t-test for the difference in the abrasion values between the toothpastes and the abrasion values over time was used. The polishing paste RDA® 170 yielded higher Ra-values than RDA 250®, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing (1.01 ± 0.22 and 8.99 ± 1.55 compared to 0.63 ± 0.26 and 7.83 ± 5.89, respectively) as well as volume loss values (3.71 ± 0.17 and 20.20 ± 2.41 compared to 2.15 ± 1.41 and 14.79 ± 11.76, respectively), thus poor correlations between the RDA and Ra and Volume loss values were shown. Among the toothpastes, Apotekets® showed the highest Ra value after 1 h of brushing and Pepsodent® whitening after 6 h of brushing. Pepsodent® whitening also showed the highest volume loss values, both after 1 and 6 h of brushing. This study emphasizes the importance of not only considering the RDA value, but also a roughness value, when describing the abrasivity of a toothpaste. Furthermore, it can be concluded that so called 'whitening' toothpastes do not necessarily have a higher abrasive effect than other toothpastes.

  20. Design of experimental setup for supercritical CO2 jet under high ambient pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; He, Zhenguo; Wang, Haizhu; Zhang, Shikun

    2016-12-01

    With the commercial extraction of hydrocarbons in shale and tight reservoirs, efficient methods are needed to accelerate developing process. Supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) jet has been considered as a potential way due to its unique fluid properties. In this article, a new setup is designed for laboratory experiment to research the SC-CO2 jet's characteristics in different jet temperatures, pressures, standoff distances, ambient pressures, etc. The setup is composed of five modules, including SC-CO2 generation system, pure SC-CO2 jet system, abrasive SC-CO2 jet system, CO2 recovery system, and data acquisition system. Now, a series of rock perforating (or case cutting) experiments have been successfully conducted using the setup about pure and abrasive SC-CO2 jet, and the results have proven the great perforating efficiency of SC-CO2 jet and the applications of this setup.

  1. Design of experimental setup for supercritical CO2 jet under high ambient pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; He, Zhenguo; Wang, Haizhu; Zhang, Shikun

    2016-12-01

    With the commercial extraction of hydrocarbons in shale and tight reservoirs, efficient methods are needed to accelerate developing process. Supercritical CO 2 (SC-CO 2 ) jet has been considered as a potential way due to its unique fluid properties. In this article, a new setup is designed for laboratory experiment to research the SC-CO 2 jet's characteristics in different jet temperatures, pressures, standoff distances, ambient pressures, etc. The setup is composed of five modules, including SC-CO 2 generation system, pure SC-CO 2 jet system, abrasive SC-CO 2 jet system, CO 2 recovery system, and data acquisition system. Now, a series of rock perforating (or case cutting) experiments have been successfully conducted using the setup about pure and abrasive SC-CO 2 jet, and the results have proven the great perforating efficiency of SC-CO 2 jet and the applications of this setup.

  2. Do Abrasives Play a Role in Toothpaste Efficacy against Erosion/Abrasion?

    PubMed

    Ganss, Carolina; Möllers, Maike; Schlueter, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Abrasives may counteract the efficacy of anti-erosion toothpastes either due to physical effects or due to interaction with active agents. This study aimed to investigate whether the amount of abrasives is a determinant for the efficacy of Sn2+-containing toothpastes with or without chitosan additive. Enamel samples were eroded (0.50 wt% citric acid, pH 2.5; 6 × 2 min/day) on a shaking desk - 30/min in experiment 1 (E1) and 35/min in experiments 2 (E2) and 3 (E3) - and immersed in toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min). Half of the samples were additionally brushed (15 s, load 200 g) within the immersion time. The toothpastes contained 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20% silica. In E1 and E2 the active ingredients were F- (700 ppm as amine fluoride, 700 ppm as NaF) and Sn2+ (3,500 ppm as SnCl2); in E3 chitosan (0.5%) was additionally added. The placebo contained 20% silica. Tissue loss was determined profilometrically. In E1, slurries completely inhibited tissue loss; distinct surface deposits occurred. With brushing, tissue loss significantly increased up to an abrasive content of 10%, but decreased significantly with higher amounts; 20% silica revealed similar values as the abrasive-free formulation. In E2, all slurries inhibited tissue loss distinctly irrespective of the amounts of abrasives. With brushing, a similar trend as in E1 was observed but with much less efficacy. The chitosan-containing formulations in E3 were much more effective; similar results as in E1 were found. In conclusion, the amount of abrasives had no effect when toothpastes were applied as slurries, but played an important role with brushing. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  4. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  5. Abrasion-Resistant Coating for Flexible Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mui, D.; Headding, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic coating increases durability and heat resistance of flexible high-temperature insulation. Coating compatible with quartz-fabric insulation allowing it to remain flexible during and after repeated exposures to temperatures of 1,800 degree F (982 degree C). Prevents fabric from becoming brittle while increasing resistance to aerodynamic abrasion and loading. Coating consists of penetrating precoat and topcoat. Major ingredients high-purity colloidal silica binder and ground silica filler, which ensure stability and compatibility with fabric at high temperatures. Both precoat and topcoat cured at room temperature.

  6. Pulsed, Hydraulic Coal-Mining Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In proposed coal-cutting machine, piston forces water through nozzle, expelling pulsed jet that cuts into coal face. Spring-loaded piston reciprocates at end of travel to refill water chamber. Machine a onecylinder, two-cycle, internal-combustion engine, fueled by gasoline, diesel fuel, or hydrogen. Fuel converted more directly into mechanical energy of water jet.

  7. Safety of stationary grinding machines - impact resistance of work zone enclosures.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Detlef; Adler, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Guards on machine tools are intended to protect persons from being injured by parts ejected with high kinetic energy from the work zone of the machine. Stationary grinding machines are a typical example. Generally such machines are provided with abrasive product guards closely enveloping the grinding wheel. However, many machining tasks do not allow the use of abrasive product guards. In such cases, the work zone enclosure has to be dimensioned so that, in case of failure, grinding wheel fragments remain inside the machine's working zone. To obtain data for the dimensioning of work zone enclosures on stationary grinding machines, which must be operated without an abrasive product guard, burst tests were conducted with vitrified grinding wheels. The studies show that, contrary to widely held opinion, narrower grinding wheels can be more critical concerning the impact resistance than wider wheels although their fragment energy is smaller.

  8. Surface assessment and modification of concrete using abrasive blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millman, Lauren R.

    Composite systems are applied to concrete substrates to strengthen and extend the service life. Successful restoration or rehabilitation requires surface preparation prior to the application of the overlay. Surface coatings, waterproofing systems, and other external surface applications also require surface preparation prior to application. Abrasive blast media is often used to clean and uniformly roughen the substrate. The appropriate surface roughness is necessary to facilitate a strong bond between the existing substrate and overlay. Thus, surface modification using abrasive blast media (sand and dry ice), their respective environmental effects, surface roughness characterization prior to and after blasting, and the adhesion between the substrate and overlay are the focus of this dissertation. This dissertation is comprised of an introduction, a literature review, and four chapters, the first of which addresses the environmental effects due to abrasive blasting using sand, water, and dry ice. The assessment considered four response variables: carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, fuel and energy consumption, and project duration. The results indicated that for sand blasting and water jetting, the primary factor contributing to environmental detriment was CO22 emissions from vehicular traffic near the construction site. The second chapter is an analysis of the International Concrete Repair Institute's (ICRI) concrete surface profiles (CSPs) using 3-D optical profilometry. The primary objective was to evaluate the suitability of approximating the 3-D surface (areal) parameters with those extracted from 2-D (linear) profiles. Four profile directions were considered: two diagonals, and lines parallel and transverse to the longitudinal direction of the mold. For any CSP mold, the estimation of the 3-D surface roughness using a 2-D linear profile resulted in underestimation and overestimation errors exceeding 50%, demonstrating the inadequacy of 2-D linear profiles to

  9. Effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rizwan M; McGarry, Frederick J; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Harris, William H

    2003-08-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is widely performed to recover hip joint functions lost by trauma or disease and to relieve pain. The major cause of failure in THR is the wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component. The dominant wear mechanism in THR occurs through adhesion and abrasion. While poor consolidation of UHMWPE is known to increase the incidence of a different damage mode, delamination, which is the dominant wear mechanism in tibial inserts but uncommon in THR, the effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of UHMWPE is not clear. In this study UHMWPE resin was subjected to hot isostatic pressing under a pressure of 138MPa at different temperatures (210 degrees C, 250 degrees C, and 300 degrees C) to achieve varying degrees of consolidation. The extent of consolidation was determined by optical microscopy using thin sections, and by scanning electron microscopy using cryofractured and solvent etched specimens. Wear behavior of the samples with varying degree of consolidation was determined using a bi-directional pin-on-disc machine simulating conditions in a hip joint. Increasing the processing temperature decreased the incidence of fusion defects and particle boundaries reflecting the powder flakes of the virgin resin, improving the consolidation. However, the bi-directional pin-on-disc wear rate did not change with the processing temperature, indicating that adhesive and abrasive wear is independent of the extent of consolidation in the range of parameters studied here.

  10. Jets Galore

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-04

    This enhanced image, one of the closest taken of comet Harley 2 by NASA EPOXI mission, shows jets and where they originate from the surface. There are jets outgassing from the sunward side, the night side, and along the terminator.

  11. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  12. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  13. Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain

    DOEpatents

    Plovnick, Ross; Celikkaya, Ahmet; Blake, Rodger D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.

  14. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.66 - Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. 3201.66 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.66 Cuts, burns, and abrasions ointments. (a) Definition. Products designed..., in accordance with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased cuts, burns...

  17. Evaluation of abrasion resistance of pipe and pipe lining materials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-09-01

    This project summarizes an evaluation of pipe material resistance to abrasion over a 5-year period (2001-2006) at a site known to be abrasive. : The key focus of the project was to gather more information to compare against existing guidance to desig...

  18. Abrasive wear of resin composites as related to finishing and polishing procedures.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Ferracane, Jack L; Serra, Mônica C

    2005-07-01

    Finishing and polishing procedures may cause topographical changes and introduce subsurface microcracks in dental composite restoratives. Since both of these effects may contribute toward the kinetics of wear, the purpose of this study was to assess and correlate the wear and surface roughness of minifilled and nanofilled composites finished and polished by different methods. Specimens (n=10) made of a minifilled and a nanofilled composite were finished and polished with one of the four sequences: (1) tungsten carbide burs plus Al(2)O(3)-impregnated brush (CbBr) or (2) tungsten carbide burs plus diamond-impregnated cup (CbCp), (3) diamond burs plus brush (DmBr) or (4) diamond burs plus cup (DmCp). As a control, abrasive papers were used. After surface roughness had been quantified, three-body abrasion was simulated using the OHSU wear machine. The wear facets were then scanned to measure wear depth and post-testing roughness. All sets of data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (alpha=0.05). Pearson's correlation test was applied to check for the existence of a relationship between pre-testing roughness and wear. Significantly smoother surfaces were attained with the sequences CbBr and CbCp, whereas DmCp yielded the roughest surface. Regardless of the finishing/polishing technique, the nanofilled composite exhibited the lowest pre-testing roughness and wear. There was no correlation between the surface roughness achieved after finishing/polishing procedures and wear (p=0.3899). Nano-sized materials may have improved abrasive wear resistance over minifilled composites. The absence of correlation between wear and surface roughness produced by different finishing/polishing methods suggests that the latter negligibly influences material loss due to three-body abrasion.

  19. Tooth wear: attrition, erosion, and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Litonjua, Luis A; Andreana, Sebastiano; Bush, Peter J; Cohen, Robert E

    2003-06-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification acts through a distinct process that is associated with unique clinical characteristics. Accurate prevalence data for each classification are not available since indices do not necessarily measure one specific etiology, or the study populations may be too diverse in age and characteristics. The treatment of teeth in each classification will depend on identifying the factors associated with each etiology. Some cases may require specific restorative procedures, while others will not require treatment. A review of the literature points to the interaction of the three entities in the initiation and progression of lesions that may act synchronously or sequentially, synergistically or additively, or in conjunction with other entities to mask the true nature of tooth wear, which appears to be multifactorial.

  20. Continuous Monitoring of Pin Tip Wear and Penetration into Rock Surface Using a New Cerchar Abrasivity Testing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaban, Mohammad-Taghi; Memarian, Hossein; Rostami, Jamal

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of rock abrasivity is important when utilizing mechanized excavation in various mining and civil projects in hard rock. This is due to the need for proper selection of the rock cutting tools, estimation of the tool wear, machine downtime for cutter change, and costs. The Cerchar Abrasion Index (CAI) test is one of the simplest and most widely used methods for evaluating rock abrasivity. In this study, a new device for the determination of frictional forces and depth of pin penetration into the rock surface during a Cerchar test is discussed. The measured parameters were used to develop an analytical model for calculation of the size of the wear flat (and hence a continuous measure of CAI as the pin moves over the sample) and pin tip penetration into the rock during the test. Based on this model, continuous curves of CAI changes and pin tip penetration into the rock were plotted. Results of the model were used for introduction of a new parameter describing rock-pin interaction and classification of rock abrasion.

  1. Characterization of fine abrasive particles for optical fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkenbusch, Paul D.; Zhou, Y. Y.; Takahashi, Toshio; Quesnel, David J.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    1995-08-01

    Material removal during fine grinding operations is accomplished primarily by the action of individual abrasive particles on the glass surface. The mechanical properties of the abrasive are therefore important. Unfortunately it is difficult to directly measure the mechanical response of abrasives once they reach the scale of approximately 10 microns. As a result mechanical properties of fine abrasives are sometimes characterized in terms of an empirical `friability', based on the response of the abrasive to crushing by a metal ball in a vial. In this paper we report on modeling/experiments designed to more precisely quantify the mechanical properties of fine abrasives and ultimately to relate them to the conditions experienced by bound particles during grinding. Experiments have been performed on various types and sizes of diamond abrasives. The response of the particles is a strong function of the loading conditions and can be tracked by changing the testing parameters. Diamond size is also found to play a critical role, with finer diamonds less susceptible to fracture. A micromechanical model from the literature is employed estimate the forces likely to be seen during testing. We are also developing dynamic models to better predict the forces experienced during `friability' testing as a function of the testing parameters.

  2. All-Water-Jet Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Version of jaw miner operates without mechanical cutting and crushing. Forward-pointing jets of water dislodge and break up coal. Rearward-pointing jets further break up coal and force particles into slurry chamber. Oscillatingjet mechanism itself stays within "jaw" structure and protected from wear and tear associated with coal handling. All-jet machine generates even less dust than anger, therefore poses lesser explosion or health hazard.

  3. How much information is in a jet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kaustuv; Larkoski, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Machine learning techniques are increasingly being applied toward data analyses at the Large Hadron Collider, especially with applications for discrimination of jets with different originating particles. Previous studies of the power of machine learning to jet physics have typically employed image recognition, natural language processing, or other algorithms that have been extensively developed in computer science. While these studies have demonstrated impressive discrimination power, often exceeding that of widely-used observables, they have been formulated in a non-constructive manner and it is not clear what additional information the machines are learning. In this paper, we study machine learning for jet physics constructively, expressing all of the information in a jet onto sets of observables that completely and minimally span N-body phase space. For concreteness, we study the application of machine learning for discrimination of boosted, hadronic decays of Z bosons from jets initiated by QCD processes. Our results demonstrate that the information in a jet that is useful for discrimination power of QCD jets from Z bosons is saturated by only considering observables that are sensitive to 4-body (8 dimensional) phase space.

  4. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  5. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  6. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  7. View of west elevation of building 18 section of machine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of west elevation of building 18 section of machine shops. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Interaction between attrition,abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Shellis, R P

    2006-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence seems insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear through formation of pellicle and by remineralisation but cannot prevent it.

  10. Method of protecting surfaces from abrasion and abrasion resistant articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-06-09

    Surfaces of fabricated structures are protected from damage by impacting particulates by a coating of hard material formed as a mass of thin flexible filaments having root ends secured to the surface and free portions which can flex and overlap to form a resilient cushioning mat which resembles hair or fur. The filamentary coating covers the underlying surface with hard abrasion resistance material while also being compliant and capable of local accommodation to particle impacts. The coating can also function as thermal and/or acoustical insulation and has a friction reducing effect. 11 figs.

  11. Surface Abrasive Torsion for Improved Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ji Hyun; Baek, Seung Mi; Lee, Seok Gyu; Yoon, Jae Ik; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-05-01

    A novel process of discrete surface abrasion during simple torsion (ST), named "surface abrasive torsion (SAT)," is proposed to overcome the limitation of ST, i.e., insufficient strain for severe plastic deformation (SPD) due to cracks initiated on the surface, by removing the roughened surface region. The effect of SAT on delayed crack initiation was explained using finite element simulations. Larger shear deformation applicable to the specimen in SAT than ST was demonstrated experimentally.

  12. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag.

    PubMed

    Kura, Bhaskar; Kambham, Kalpalatha; Sangameswaran, Sivaramakrishnan; Potana, Sandhya

    2006-08-01

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions.

  13. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast processmore » conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.« less

  14. Impact resistance of guards on grinding machines.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Detlef; Mewes, Olaf; Herbst, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Guards on machine tools are meant to protect persons from injuries caused by parts ejected with high kinetic energy from the machine's working zone. With respect to stationary grinding machines, Standard No. EN 13218:2002, therefore, specifies minimum wall thicknesses for guards. These values are mainly based on estimations and experience instead of systematic experimental investigations. This paper shows to what extent simple impact tests with standardizable projectiles can be used as basis for the evaluation of the impact resistance of guards, provided that not only the kinetic energy of the projectiles used but also, among others, their geometry corresponds to the abrasive product fragments to be expected.

  15. Spiral jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Ya N.

    2018-05-01

    We show that a quasi-cylindrical configuration of a jet in the central region, where direct electric current flows, is confined in a radial equilibrium by a spiral wave at the periphery of a jet. A spiral wave means that in a coordinate system moving with the velocity of the matter along the axis of the jet, all quantities are proportional to exp {ik∥z + imϕ}, z is the longitudinal coordinate, and ϕ is the azimuthal angle. The luminosity of such a jet corresponds to observations. It is also shown that the jet slowly expands with distance z from its base by the power law, R(z) ∝ zk, where the exponent k varies from ≃0.5 to ≃1.

  16. Comparative evaluation of cemental abrasion caused by soft and medium bristle hardness toothbrushes at three predetermined toothbrushing forces: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep; Patil, Agraja Ganpat; Karde, Prerna Ashok; Mahale, Swapna Arunkumar; Dani, Nitin Hemchandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plaque control has been shown to have a pivotal role in maintaining optimal periodontal health. Toothbrushing as a mechanical plaque control tool is the most popular and effective option for self-performed oral health maintenance. However, the detrimental effects of bristle hardness and force exerted by toothbrushes on the tooth surface are the areas of concern. Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the abrasive effect of two different manual toothbrushes exerting predetermined forces on cemental surfaces of the teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted first molars were selected. Totally six experimental groups were formed based on the three predetermined forces 1.5, 3, and 4.5 Newton (N) and two types of manual toothbrushes, i.e., soft and medium bristle hardness. Buccal and lingual surfaces were independently brushed for 5000 cycles using specially designed toothbrushing machine. Throughout the experiment, type and quantity of toothpaste were kept constant. Post 5000 cycles of toothbrushing, change in surface roughness was measured using profilometer in microns and change in weight indicating loss of substance was measured in milligrams. Results: Abrasion of cementum is force dependent. Data revealed that both soft and medium bristle hardness toothbrushes cause significant cemental abrasion at 3 and 4.5 N forces. Conclusions: Higher is the force, more is the cemental surface abrasion. Soft bristled toothbrush causes more cemental abrasion than medium bristled toothbrush at 3 and 4.5 N forces. PMID:29386794

  17. Effect of Whitening Toothpastes on Dentin Abrasion: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Gustavo Henrique Apolinario; Nogueira, Marcia Bessa; Gaio, Eduardo Jose; Rosing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Santiago, Sergio Lima; Rego, Rodrigo Otavio

    To compare the effect of toothbrushing abrasion with hydrated silica-based whitening and regular toothpastes on root dentin using contact profilometry. Ninety dentin specimens (4 x 4 x 2 mm) were randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 18) according to the toothpaste: three whitening (W1, W2 and W3) and two regular toothpastes (R1 and R2) produced by two different manufacturers. Using a brushing machine, each specimen was brushed with a constant load of 300 g for 2500 cycles (4.5 cycles/s). The toothpastes were diluted at a ratio of 1:3 w/w (dentifrice:distilled water). The brush diamond tip of the profilometer moved at a constant speed of 0.05 mm/s with a force of 0.7 mN. The average value of brushing abrasion in μm (mean ± SD) was obtained from five consecutive measurements of each specimen: W1 = 8.86 ± 1.58, W2 = 7.59 ± 1.04, W3 = 8.27 ± 2.39, R1 = 2.89 ± 1.05 and R2= 2.94 ± 1.29. There was a significant difference between groups (ANOVA, p<0.0001). Post-hoc Tukey's test for multiple comparisons showed differences between all the whitening and regular toothpastes, but not among the whitening nor among the regular toothpastes. The whitening toothpastes tested can cause more dentin abrasion than the regular ones.

  18. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser, air abrasion, and silane application on repaired shear bond strength of composites.

    PubMed

    Cho, S D; Rajitrangson, P; Matis, B A; Platt, J A

    2013-01-01

    Aged resin composites have a limited number of carbon-carbon double bonds to adhere to a new layer of resin. Study objectives were to 1) evaluate various surface treatments on repaired shear bond strength between aged and new resin composites and 2) to assess the influence of a silane coupling agent after surface treatments. Eighty disk-shape resin composite specimens were fabricated and thermocycled 5000 times prior to surface treatment. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the three surface treatment groups (n=20): 1) air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide, 2) tribochemical silica coating (CoJet), or 3) Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet) laser or to a no-treatment control group (n=20). Specimens were etched with 35% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10): A) no silanization and B) with silanization. The adhesive agent was applied and new resin composite was bonded to each conditioned surface. Shear bond strength was evaluated and data analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide showed significantly higher repair bond strength than the Er,Cr:YSGG laser and control groups. Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide was not significantly different from tribochemical silica coating. Tribochemical silica coating had significantly higher repair bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the control. Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the control did not have significantly different repair bond strengths. Silanization had no influence on repair bond strength for any of the surface treatment methods. Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide and tribochemical silica followed by the application of bonding agent provided the highest repair shear bond strength values, suggesting that they might be adequate methods to improve the quality of repairs of resin composites.

  19. Influence of artificial saliva on abrasive wear and microhardness of dental composites filled with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mayworm, Camila D; Camargo, Sérgio S; Bastian, Fernando L

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the wear resistance and hardness of two dental nanohybrid composites and to evaluate the influence of artificial saliva storage on those properties. Specimens were made from two commercial nanohybrid dental composites (Esthet-X-Dentsply and Filtek Supreme-3M). Abrasion tests were carried out in a ball-cratering machine (three body abrasion) and microscopic analysis of the wear surfaces was made using optical and scanning electron microscopy; hardness was quantified by Vickers hardness test. Those tests were repeated on specimens stored in artificial saliva. Results show that the wear rate of the studied materials is within 10(-7)mm(3)/Nmm range, one of the composites presenting wear rate twice as large as the other. After storage in artificial saliva, the wear resistance increases for both materials. Microhardness of the composites is around 52 and 64HV, Esthet-X presents higher hardness values than Filtek Supreme. After storage in artificial saliva, the microhardness of both materials decreases. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test, p < or = 0.05. Artificial saliva storage increases the materials' wear resistance, suggesting that in both materials bulk post-cure takes place and saliva absorption occurs only on the surface of the composites. This effect was confirmed by comparing the Vickers hardness before and after artificial saliva treatment and FTIR analyses. Surface microhardness of the composites decreases after storage in artificial saliva whereas bulk microhardness of the materials increases.

  20. In Vitro Assessment of the Abrasion Resistance of Two Types of Artificial Teeth Submitted to Brushing.

    PubMed

    Policastro, Vivian Barnabé; Giro, Gabriela; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; Mendoza-Marin, Danny Omar; Paleari, André Gustavo; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effect of brushing with different solutions on the abrasion resistance of two types of acrylic resin teeth. Maxillary premolars from two types of acrylic teeth (Biotone and Biotone IPN) were divided into six groups (n = 12), according to the solution used during brushing: distilled water (control), coconut soap, or dentifrice. A mechanical brushing machine was used to simulate approximately 1 year of brushing (11,000 strokes). The weight loss (WL) of teeth was obtained from the difference between the initial (IW) and final weight (FW) of each specimen, and the mean of percentage of weight loss (PWL) was calculated for each group. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Bonferroni's post-test comparison (α = 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found for the factor solution (p < 0.001). Brushing using dentifrice caused the highest values of weight loss (-0.50%), in comparison with the groups brushed with coconut soap (0.00%) or distilled water (0.00%). For both types of artificial teeth, brushing with dentifrice produced higher abrasion than brushing with coconut soap or water. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Prepolishing on a CNC platform with bound abrasive contour tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffler, Adrienne E.; Gregg, Leslie L.; Schoen, John M.; Fess, Edward M.; Hakiel, Michael; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Deterministic microgrinding (DMG) of optical glasses and ceramics is the commercial manufacturing process of choice to shape glass surfaces prior to final finishing. This process employs rigid bound matrix diamond tooling resulting in surface roughness values of 3-5μm peak to valley and 100-400nm rms, as well as mid-spatial frequency tool marks that require subsequent removal in secondary finishing steps. The ability to pre-polish optical surfaces within the grinding platform would reduce final finishing process times. Bound abrasive contour wheels containing cerium oxide, alumina or zirconia abrasives were constructed with an epoxy matrix. The effects of abrasive type, composition, and erosion promoters were examined for tool hardness (Shore D), and tested with commercial optical glasses in an Optipro CNC grinding platform. Metrology protocols were developed to examine tool wear and subsequent surface roughness. Work is directed to demonstrating effective material removal, improved surface roughness and cutter mark removal.

  2. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  3. Aeolian abrasion on Venus: Preliminary results from the Venus simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, D. W.; Pollack, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    The role of atmospheric pressure on aeolian abrasion was examined in the Venus Simulator with a constant temperature of 737 K. Both the rock target and the impactor were fine-grained basalt. The impactor was a 3 mm diameter angular particle chosen to represent a size of material that is entrainable by the dense Venusian atmosphere and potentially abrasive by virtue of its mass. It was projected at the target 10 to the 5 power times at a velocity of 0.7 m/s. The impactor showed a weight loss of approximately 1.2 x 10 to the -9 power gm per impact with the attrition occurring only at the edges. Results from scanning electron microscope analysis, profilometry, and weight measurement are summarized. It is concluded that particles can incur abrasion at Venusian temperatures even with low impact velocities expected for Venus.

  4. Study of Dominant Factors Affecting Cerchar Abrasivity Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Jamal; Ghasemi, Amireza; Alavi Gharahbagh, Ehsan; Dogruoz, Cihan; Dahl, Filip

    2014-09-01

    The Cerchar abrasion index is commonly used to represent rock abrasion for estimation of bit life and wear in various mining and tunneling applications. Although the test is simple and fast, there are some discrepancies in the test results related to the equipment used, condition of the rock surface, operator skills, and procedures used in conducting and measuring the wear surface. This paper focuses on the background of the test and examines the influence of various parameters on Cerchar testing including pin hardness, surface condition of specimens, petrographical and geomechanical properties, test speed, applied load, and method of measuring wear surface. Results of Cerchar tests on a set of rock specimens performed at different laboratories are presented to examine repeatability of the tests. In addition, the preliminary results of testing with a new device as a potential alternative testing system for rock abrasivity measurement are discussed.

  5. To Evaluate Effect of Airborne Particle Abrasion using Different Abrasives Particles and Compare Two Commercial Available Zirconia on Flexural Strength on Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Hari A; Pasha, Naveed; Hilal, Mohammed; Amarnath, G S; Kundapur, Vinaya; Anand, M; Singh, Sumeet

    2017-06-01

    airborne-particle abrasion using 50 µm Al 2 O 3 particles and 50 µm silica coated Al 2 O 3 are applied to the upper and lower surfaces of the specimens. Each specimen is held under a pressure of 30 psi for 15 seconds at a direction perpendicular to the surface and at a distance of 30mm with an airborne particle abrasion device for the specimens in the airborne particle abraded groups. Heat treatments were performed at a starting temperature of 500°C, heating rate of 100°c/ min, ending at a temperature of 1000°C and 15 minutes holding time without vacuum for the specimens in the group 4, 5, 9 and 10. Airborne-particle abrasion mimicking the preparation for cementation was applied to the lower surfaces with 50 µm alumina and silica coated alumina particles for the specimens in the groups 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The specimens were cleaned for 15 minutes in an ultrasonic bath containing distilled water. To determine the fracture strength, a disc of 10 mm diameter was used to place 3 hardened steel balls of 3 mm diameter separated each other by 120 degrees (described in the ISO standard 6872 for dental ceramics). Each specimen was centrally placed on this disc. The lower surface mimicking the internal surface of zirconia was the tension side, facing the supporting device testing, while the upper surface mimicking the external surface of the zirconia core was loaded with a flat punch (1 mm in diameter). A universal testing machine was used to perform the test at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The failure stress was calculated with the equation listed in ISO 6872. The results were then statistically analyzed. A post hoc test was used for pair wise comparisons. The mean fracture strength of commercially available Zirconia Ceramill (AMANNGIRBACH) showed a significant higher value compared to the ZR-White (UPCERA) Zirconia ( P <0.001), Airborne abrasion treatment to the specimens showed a significant difference between the abraded groups and the control group ( P <0.001); further

  6. To Evaluate Effect of Airborne Particle Abrasion using Different Abrasives Particles and Compare Two Commercial Available Zirconia on Flexural Strength on Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Hari A.; Pasha, Naveed; Hilal, Mohammed; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Anand, M; Singh, Sumeet

    2017-01-01

    specimens each. Heat treatment after airborne-particle abrasion using 50 µm Al2O3 particles and 50 µm silica coated Al2O3 are applied to the upper and lower surfaces of the specimens. Each specimen is held under a pressure of 30 psi for 15 seconds at a direction perpendicular to the surface and at a distance of 30mm with an airborne particle abrasion device for the specimens in the airborne particle abraded groups. Heat treatments were performed at a starting temperature of 500°C, heating rate of 100°c/ min, ending at a temperature of 1000°C and 15 minutes holding time without vacuum for the specimens in the group 4, 5, 9 and 10. Airborne-particle abrasion mimicking the preparation for cementation was applied to the lower surfaces with 50 µm alumina and silica coated alumina particles for the specimens in the groups 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The specimens were cleaned for 15 minutes in an ultrasonic bath containing distilled water. To determine the fracture strength, a disc of 10 mm diameter was used to place 3 hardened steel balls of 3 mm diameter separated each other by 120 degrees (described in the ISO standard 6872 for dental ceramics). Each specimen was centrally placed on this disc. The lower surface mimicking the internal surface of zirconia was the tension side, facing the supporting device testing, while the upper surface mimicking the external surface of the zirconia core was loaded with a flat punch (1 mm in diameter). A universal testing machine was used to perform the test at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The failure stress was calculated with the equation listed in ISO 6872. The results were then statistically analyzed. A post hoc test was used for pair wise comparisons. Result: The mean fracture strength of commercially available Zirconia Ceramill (AMANNGIRBACH) showed a significant higher value compared to the ZR-White (UPCERA) Zirconia (P<0.001), Airborne abrasion treatment to the specimens showed a significant difference between the abraded groups and the

  7. Pleurectomy versus pleural abrasion for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in children.

    PubMed

    Joharifard, Shahrzad; Coakley, Brian A; Butterworth, Sonia A

    2017-05-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) represents a common indication for urgent surgical intervention in children. First episodes are often managed with thoracostomy tube, whereas recurrent episodes typically prompt surgery involving apical bleb resection and pleurodesis, either via pleurectomy or pleural abrasion. The purpose of this study was to assess whether pleurectomy or pleural abrasion was associated with lower postoperative recurrence. The records of patients undergoing surgery for PSP between February 2005 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Recurrence was defined as an ipsilateral pneumothorax requiring surgical intervention. Bivariate logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with recurrence. Fifty-two patients underwent 64 index operations for PSP (12 patients had surgery for contralateral pneumothorax, and each instance was analyzed separately). The mean age was 15.7±1.2years, and 79.7% (n=51) of patients were male. In addition to apical wedge resection, 53.1% (n=34) of patients underwent pleurectomy, 39.1% (n=25) underwent pleural abrasion, and 7.8% (n=5) had no pleural treatment. The overall recurrence rate was 23.4% (n=15). Recurrence was significantly lower in patients who underwent pleurectomy rather than pleural abrasion (8.8% vs. 40%, p<0.01). In patients who underwent pleural abrasion without pleurectomy, the relative risk of recurrence was 2.36 [1.41-3.92, p<0.01]. Recurrence of PSP is significantly reduced in patients undergoing pleurectomy compared to pleural abrasion. Level III, retrospective comparative therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Field evidence of two-phase abrasion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Szabo, T.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.

    2013-12-01

    The rounded shape of river rocks is clear evidence that abrasion due to bed load transport is a significant agent for mass loss. Its contribution to downstream fining, however, is typically assumed to be negligible - as diminution trends may be explained solely by size-selective transport. A recent theory has predicted that pebble abrasion occurs in two well separated phases: in Phase 1, an intially-polyhedral pebble rounds to the shape of an inscribed ellipsoid without any change in axis dimensions; in Phase II, axis dimensions are slowly reduced. Importantly, Phase I abrasion means that an initially-blocky pebble may lose up to half its mass without any apparent change in 'size', which is only measured as the length of a single pebble axis by most field researchers. We hypothesize that field studies have significantly underestimated the importance of abrasion because they do not quantify pebble shape, and we set out to demonstrate that two-phase abrasion occurs in a natural stream. Our study examines downstream trends in pebble size and shape along a 10-km stretch of the Rio Mameyes within the Luquillo Critical Zone observatory, where volcaniclastic cobbles and boulders are transported by bed load at slopes up to 10%. The upper reaches of the stream consist of alluviated bedrock valleys that preclude sediment storage and thus minimize size-selective transport, which allows us to isolate the effects of abrasion. The lower 5 km is an alluvial river in which size-selective transport becomes operative. We quantified the shape and size of thousands of pebbles along the profile using hand and image-based techniques. The data provide the first field validation of two-phase abrasion; in the bedrock reaches, pebbles clearly evolve toward ellipsoids without any significant change in axis dimensions (rounding), while in the lower reaches pebbles slowly reduce their axis dimensions with little or no change in roundness. Results also show that shape metrics determined from

  9. Exposure to crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations where silica and non-silica abrasives are used.

    PubMed

    Radnoff, Diane L; Kutz, Michelle K

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to respirable crystalline silica is a hazard common to many industries in Alberta but particularly so in abrasive blasting. Alberta occupational health and safety legislation requires the consideration of silica substitutes when conducting abrasive blasting, where reasonably practicable. In this study, exposure to crystalline silica during abrasive blasting was evaluated when both silica and non-silica products were used. The crystalline silica content of non-silica abrasives was also measured. The facilities evaluated were preparing metal products for the application of coatings, so the substrate should not have had a significant contribution to worker exposure to crystalline silica. The occupational sampling results indicate that two-thirds of the workers assessed were potentially over-exposed to respirable crystalline silica. About one-third of the measurements over the exposure limit were at the work sites using silica substitutes at the time of the assessment. The use of the silica substitute, by itself, did not appear to have a large effect on the mean airborne exposure levels. There are a number of factors that may contribute to over-exposures, including the isolation of the blasting area, housekeeping, and inappropriate use of respiratory protective equipment. However, the non-silica abrasives themselves also contain silica. Bulk analysis results for non-silica abrasives commercially available in Alberta indicate that many contain crystalline silica above the legislated disclosure limit of 0.1% weight of silica per weight of product (w/w) and this information may not be accurately disclosed on the material safety data sheet for the product. The employer may still have to evaluate the potential for exposure to crystalline silica at their work site, even when silica substitutes are used. Limited tests on recycled non-silica abrasive indicated that the silica content had increased. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of product recycling

  10. Machine Shop Grinding Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James

    This curriculum manual is one in a series of machine shop curriculum manuals intended for use in full-time secondary and postsecondary classes, as well as part-time adult classes. The curriculum can also be adapted to open-entry, open-exit programs. Its purpose is to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the…

  11. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  12. Propelled abrasive grit for weed control in organic silage corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed management in organic farming requires many strategies to accomplish acceptable control and maintain crop yields. This two-year field study used air propelled abrasive grit for in-row weed control in a silage corn system. Corncob grit was applied as a single application at corn vegetative growt...

  13. Review of Artificial Abrasion Test Methods for PV Module Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Muller, Matt T.; Simpson, Lin J.

    This review is intended to identify the method or methods--and the basic details of those methods--that might be used to develop an artificial abrasion test. Methods used in the PV literature were compared with their closest implementation in existing standards. Also, meetings of the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force Task Group 12-3 (TG12-3, which is concerned with coated glass) were used to identify established test methods. Feedback from the group, which included many of the authors from the PV literature, included insights not explored within the literature itself. The combined experience and examples from the literature are intended tomore » provide an assessment of the present industry practices and an informed path forward. Recommendations toward artificial abrasion test methods are then identified based on the experiences in the literature and feedback from the PV community. The review here is strictly focused on abrasion. Assessment methods, including optical performance (e.g., transmittance or reflectance), surface energy, and verification of chemical composition were not examined. Methods of artificially soiling PV modules or other specimens were not examined. The weathering of artificial or naturally soiled specimens (which may ultimately include combined temperature and humidity, thermal cycling and ultraviolet light) were also not examined. A sense of the purpose or application of an abrasion test method within the PV industry should, however, be evident from the literature.« less

  14. Assessment of Rail Seat Abrasion Patterns and Environment

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-05-01

    Rail seat abrasion (RSA) of concrete ties is manifested by the loss of material under the rail seat area and, in extreme cases, results in loss of rail clip holding power, reverse rail cant, and gauge widening. RSA was measured in several curves on t...

  15. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. 311.14 Section 311.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND...

  16. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-21

    This image shows the round, metallic working end of the rock abrasion tool at the end of a metallic cylinder. The flat grinding face, attached brush, and much of the smooth, metallic exterior of cylinder are covered with a deep reddish-brown layer of dust

  17. [Brushing abrasion of the enamel surface after erosion].

    PubMed

    Lipei, Chen; Xiangke, Ci; Xiaoyan, Ou

    2017-08-01

    Objective A study was conducted to compare the effect of different enamel remineralization periods after erosion on the depth of brushing abrasion. Methods Ten volunteers were selected for a 4-day experiment. A total of 60 enamels were randomly assigned into six groups (A-F) and placed in intraoral palatal devices. On the first day, the palatal devices were placed in oral cavity (24 h) . On the following three days, brushing experiments were performed extraorally, two times per day. The specific experimental method of brushing follows these next steps. First, the group F specimens were covered with a film of wax, and then acid etched for 2 min. Subsequently, the film of wax was detached. The groups from A to D were brushed after remineralization at the following time intervals: group A, 0 min; group B, 20 min; group C, 40 min; group D, 60 min. Erosion and remineralization were performed on group E, but without brushing. Remineralization was performed on group F, but without acid etching and brushing. The depth of enamel abrasion was determined by a mechanical profilometer. The surface morphology of the enamel blocks was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Results 1) The depth of abrasion was different in varied enamel remineralization time after acid etching. The statistical significant differences between groups were as follows. 2) When the time of enamel remineralization after acid etching was short, the surface depression in the electron microscope was deep, and the surface morphology was rough. Conclusion Brushing immediately after acid etching would cause much serious abrasion to the enamel surface. Brushing after 60 min can effectively reduce the abrasion of acid etching enamel.

  18. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  19. Development of hybrid fluid jet/float polishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T. H.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Freeman, Richard R.

    2013-09-01

    On one hand, the "float polishing" process consists of a tin lap having many concentric grooves, cut from a flat by single point diamond turning. This lap is rotated above a hydrostatic bearing spindle of high rigidity, damping and rotational accuracy. The optical surface thus floats above a thin layer of abrasive particles. But whilst surface texture can be smoothed to ~0.1nm rms (as measured by atomic force microscopy), this process can only be used on flat surfaces. On the other hand, the CNC "fluid jet polishing" process consists of pumping a mixture of water and abrasive particles to a converging nozzle, thus generating a polishing spot that can be moved along a tool path with tight track spacing. But whilst tool path feed can be moderated to ultra-precisely correct form error on freeform optical surfaces, surface finish improvement is generally limited to ~1.5nm rms (with fine abrasives). This paper reports on the development of a novel finishing method, that combines the advantages of "fluid jet polishing" (i.e. freeform corrective capability) with "float polishing" (i.e. super-smooth surface finish of 0.1nm rms or less). To come up with this new "hybrid" method, computational fluid dynamic modeling of both processes in COMSOL is being used to characterize abrasion conditions and adapt the process parameters of experimental fluid jet polishing equipment, including: (1) geometrical shape of nozzle, (2) position relative to the surface, (3) control of inlet pressure. This new process is aimed at finishing of next generation X-Ray / Gamma Ray focusing optics.

  20. 12. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1979. FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1979. FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR LOOKING NORTH. SHOWING SELF-RISING FLOUR BIN AND SALEM MACHINE WORKS' WHEAT ROLLER MILLS AND FLOUR BAGGER/COMPACTOR. - Womack's Mill, Yanceyville, Caswell County, NC

  1. View of building 18 section looking southeast. Jet Lowe, Haer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 18 section looking southeast. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Machinability of cast commercial titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Kiyosue, S; Ohkubo, C; Aoki, T; Okabe, T

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the machinability of cast orthopedic titanium (metastable beta) alloys for possible application to dentistry and compared the results with those of cast CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-7Nb, which are currently used in dentistry. Machinability was determined as the amount of metal removed with the use of an electric handpiece and a SiC abrasive wheel turning at four different rotational wheel speeds. The ratios of the amount of metal removed and the wheel volume loss (machining ratio) were also evaluated. Based on these two criteria, the two alpha + beta alloys tested generally exhibited better results for most of the wheel speeds compared to all the other metals tested. The machinability of the three beta alloys employed was similar or worse, depending on the speed of the wheel, compared to CP Ti. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 5; Abrasion: Plowing and Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5 discusses abrasion, a common wear phenomenon of great economic importance. It has been estimated that 50% of the wear encountered in industry is due to abrasion. Also, it is the mechanism involved in the finishing of many surfaces. Experiments are described to help in understanding the complex abrasion process and in predicting friction and wear behavior in plowing and/or cutting. These experimental modelings and measurements used a single spherical pin (asperity) and a single wedge pin (asperity). Other two-body and three-body abrasion studies used hard abrasive particles.

  4. Michrohole Arrays Drilled with Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology to Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oglesby, Kenneth; Finsterle, Stefan; Zhang, Yingqi

    2014-03-12

    This project had two major areas of research for Engineered/ Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) development - 1) study the potential benefits from using microholes (i.e., bores with diameters less than 10.16 centimeters/ 4 inches) and 2) study FLASH ASJ to drill/ install those microbores between a well and a fracture system. This included the methods and benefits of drilling vertical microholes for exploring the EGS reservoir and for installing multiple (forming an array of) laterals/ directional microholes for creating the in-reservoir heat exchange flow paths. Significant benefit was found in utilizing small microbore sized connecting bores for EGS efficiency andmore » project life. FLASH ASJ was deemed too complicated to optimally work in such deep reservoirs at this time.« less

  5. Novel cavitation fluid jet polishing process based on negative pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengjun; Wang, Hui; Tang, Yu; Yin, Shaohui; Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Guanghua

    2018-04-01

    Traditional abrasive fluid jet polishing (FJP) is limited by its high-pressure equipment, unstable material removal rate, and applicability to ultra-smooth surfaces because of the evident air turbulence, fluid expansion, and a large polishing spot in high-pressure FJP. This paper presents a novel cavitation fluid jet polishing (CFJP) method and process based on FJP technology. It can implement high-efficiency polishing on small-scale surfaces in a low-pressure environment. CFJP uses the purposely designed polishing equipment with a sealed chamber, which can generate a cavitation effect in negative pressure environment. Moreover, the collapse of cavitation bubbles can spray out a high-energy microjet and shock wave to enhance the material removal. Its feasibility is verified through researching the flow behavior and the cavitation results of the negative pressure cavitation machining of pure water in reversing suction flow. The mechanism is analyzed through a computational fluid dynamics simulation. Thus, its cavitation and surface removal mechanisms in the vertical CFJP and inclined CFJP are studied. A series of polishing experiments on different materials and polishing parameters are conducted to validate its polishing performance compared with FJP. The maximum removal depth increases, and surface roughness gradually decreases with increasing negative outlet pressures. The surface becomes smooth with the increase of polishing time. The experimental results confirm that the CFJP process can realize a high material removal rate and smooth surface with low energy consumption in the low-pressure environment, together with compatible surface roughness to FJP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  7. Jet Crackle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT DISTRIBUTION A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fighter jets and other aircraft with high specific thrust engines...interim, memorandum, master’s thesis , progress, quarterly, research, special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED. Indicate the time during which the...State the type of report, such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis , progress, quarterly, research, special, group study, etc

  8. The effect of fiber treatment on abrasive wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Muhammad Firdaus Abdul; Bakar, Mimi Azlina Abu; Kasolang, Salmiah; Ahmad, Mohamad Ali

    2017-12-01

    Oil palm industries generate at least 30 million tons of lignocellulosic biomass annually in the form of oil palm trunks (OPT), empty fruit bunches (EFB), oil palm fronds (OPF) and palm pressed fibres (PPF). The palm fiber is one of the natural fibers used as reinforcement in composite materials in order to decrease environmental issues and promotes utilization of renewable resources. This paper presents a study on the effect of alkaline treatment on wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite. Abrasive wear testing was deployed to investigate the wear profile of the composite surfaces. Testing was carried out which focused on the effect of alkaline treatment to the palm fiber under different amounts of fiber loading i.e. 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt%. The palm fibers were soaked into 6 % of alkaline solution or natrium hydroxide (NaOH) for 12 hours. The fiber was treated in order to remove amorphous materials such as hemicelluloses, lignins and pectins of the fiber. The wear test samples were fabricated using hand lay-up technique and cured at room temperature for 24 hours. Surface roughness of the composite material was also measured using the surface measuring instrument. Dry sliding wear test was performed at room temperature at a constant velocity of 1.4 m/s with a constant load of 10 N by using the Abrasion Test Machine. Result shows that 5 wt% and 7 wt% treated palm fiber loadings have better specific wear rate compared to lower fiber loadings. The finding of this study contributes towards material development and utilization in promoting `waste into wealth' which is in line with national aspiration.

  9. Jet in jet in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2017-11-01

    New high-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometer observations of the prominent jet in the M87 radio galaxy show a persistent triple-ridge structure of the transverse 15-GHz profile with a previously unobserved ultra-narrow central ridge. This radio structure can reflect the intrinsic structure of the jet, so that the jet as a whole consists of two embedded coaxial jets. A relativistic magnetohydrodynamic model is considered in which an inner jet is placed inside a hollow outer jet and the electromagnetic fields, pressures and other physical quantities are found. The entire jet is connected to the central engine that plays the role of a unipolar inductor generating voltage between the jets and providing opposite electric currents, and the charge neutrality and current closure together with the electromagnetic fields between the jets can contribute to the jet stabilization. The constant voltage is responsible for the similar widening laws observed for the inner and outer jets. This jet-in-jet structure can indicate simultaneous operation of two different jet-launching mechanisms, one relating to the central supermassive black hole and the other to the surrounding accretion disc. An inferred magnetic field of 80 G at the base is sufficient to provide the observed jet luminosity.

  10. Self inflicted corneal abrasions due to delusional parasitosis

    PubMed Central

    Meraj, Adeel; Din, Amad U; Larsen, Lynn; Liskow, Barry I

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of self inflicted bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage due to ophthalmic and cutaneous delusional parasitosis. A male in his 50s presented with a 10 year history of believing that parasites were colonizing his skin and biting into his skin and eyes. The patient had received extensive medical evaluations that found no evidence that symptoms were due to a medical cause. He was persistent in his belief and had induced bilateral corneal abrasions and skin damage by using heat lamps and hair dryers in an attempt to disinfect his body. The patient was treated with olanzapine along with treatment for his skin and eyes. His delusional belief system persisted but no further damage to his eyes and skin was noted on initial follow-up. PMID:22689836

  11. The worn dentition--pathognomonic patterns of abrasion and erosion.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the dental literature has revealed various causes of tooth wear, yet it has failed to provide a conclusive method of differentiation and diagnosis of the condition. The categories of tooth wear encountered most commonly in dental practice are abrasion and erosion. The major causes of wear from abrasion are bruxism and toothpaste abuse, and the major causes of wear from erosion are regurgitation, coke-swishing and fruit-mulling. Through in-depth clinical study of these causes, this paper provides a diagnostic system that will enable dental professionals to determine and differentiate the exact aetiology of the worn dentition simply by the recognition of the pathognomonic wear patterns on diagnostic casts, which are based upon the position and quantity of the non-carious loss of tooth structure.

  12. Abrasion resistance of muscovite in aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Calvin J.; Struble, Alexander; Whitmore, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Complementary aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments showed a trend in muscovite abrasion that may be useful for identifying ancient sandstones as aeolian or subaqueous in origin. We found that our experimental aeolian processes pulverized the micas quickly, while our subaqueous processes did not. In a pair of abrasion resistance experiments conducted with micaceous quartz sand, it was found that large muscovite grains were (1) reduced by aeolian processes to less than 500 μm in just 4 days, and (2) preserved by subaqueous processes to 610 ± 90 μm even after 356 days. At 20 days of aeolian transport no loose micas could be found even under the microscope, but after a year of subaqueous transport loose muscovite grains could still be seen with the naked eye. Thus, the occurrence and character of micas in a sandstone, particularly muscovite, may be helpful in determining the ancient depositional process.

  13. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Metals Selection for Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Hoffman, Richard; Hill, Maria M.; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of metals was examined for suitability for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment, one of ten microrover experiments of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. The seven candidate metals were: Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Ni, Pt, and W. Thin films of candidate metals from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer thick were deposited on black anodized aluminum coupons by e-beam and resistive evaporation and chemical vapor deposition. Optical, corrosion, abrasion, and adhesion criteria were used to select Al, Ni, and Pt. A description is given of the deposition and testing of thin films, followed by a presentation of experimental data and a brief discussion of follow-on testing and flight qualification.

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. Investigation of wear resistance of polyurethanes in abrasive soil mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiórkowski, Jerzy; Ligier, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of polyurethane wear in different abrasive soil masses. Two types of polyurethanes of various chemical compositions and untreated 38GSA steel were tested, the latter being used as a reference standard. The study was conducted in natural soil mass at a "rotating bowl" stand. Relative wear resistance was determined from measurements of mass wear for the materials under study. The condition of the surface of the materials under wear test was analysed.

  16. Adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms in ion implanted metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-03-01

    The distinction between adhesive and abrasive wear processes was introduced originally by Burwell during the nineteen-fifties, though some authors prefer to classify wear according to whether it is mild or severe. It is argued here that, on the basis of the performance of a variety of ion implanted metal surfaces, exposed to different modes of wear, the Burwell distinction is a valid one which, moreover, enables us to predict under which circumstances a given treatment will perform well. It is shown that, because wear rates under abrasive conditions are very sensitive to the ratio of the hardness of the surface to that of the abrasive particles, large increases in working life are attainable as a result of ion implantation. Under adhesive wear conditions, the wear rate appears to fall inversely as the hardness increases, and it is advantageous to implant species which will create and retain a hard surface oxide or other continuous film in order to reduce metal-metal contact. By the appropriate combination of physico-chemical changes in an implanted layer it has been possible to reduce wear rates by up to three orders of magnitude. Such rates compensate for the shallow depths achievable by ion implantation.

  17. Surface characterization of current composites after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rena; Jin, Jian; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Hickel, Reinhard; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the surface roughness and the gloss of current composites before and after toothbrush abrasion. We assessed forty dimensionally standardized composite specimens (n=8/group) from five composites: two nanohybrids (i. e., IPS Empress Direct Enamel and IPS Empress Direct Dentin), two microhybrids (i. e., Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Z250) and one organically modified ceramics (Admira). All of the specimens were polished with 4000-grid silicon carbide papers. Surface roughness was measured with a profilometer and gloss was measured with a glossmeter before and after powered toothbrush abrasion with a 1:1 slurry (dentifrice/tap water) at 12,000 strokes in a toothbrush simulator. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness and a reduction in gloss after toothbrush abrasion in all of the composites except Clearfil AP-X (p<0.05). Simple regression analysis showed that there was not an association between the surface roughness and the gloss (R(2)=0.191, p<0.001).

  18. The role of erosion, abrasion and attrition in tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Michele E; Rees, Gareth D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing clinical awareness of erosion of enamel and dentine by dietary acids and the consequent increased susceptibility to physical wear. Enamel erosion is characterized by acid-mediated surface softening that, if unchecked, will progress to irreversible loss of surface tissue, potentially exposing the underlying dentine. In comparison, dentine erosion is less well understood as the composition and microstructure are more heterogeneous. Factors which affect the erosive potential of a solution include pH, titratable acidity, common ion concentrations, and frequency and method of exposure. Abrasion and attrition are sources of physical wear and are commonly associated with tooth brushing and tooth-to-tooth contact, respectively. A combination of erosion and abrasion or attrition exacerbates wear; however, further research is required to understand the role of fluoride in protecting mineralized tissues from such processes. Abrasive wear may be seen in a wide range of patients, whereas attritive loss is usually seen in individuals with bruxism. Wear processes are implicated in the development of dentine hypersensitivity. Saliva confers the major protective function against wear due to its role in pellicle formation, buffering, acid clearance, and hard tissue remineralization. This review focuses on the physiochemical factors impacting tooth wear.

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p < or = 0.05. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that

  20. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jetsmore » that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.« less

  1. Streaked Thomson Scattering on Laboratory Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasek, Jacob; Byvank, Tom; Rocco, Sophia; Kusse, Bruce; Hammer, David

    2017-10-01

    Streaked Thomson scattering measurements have been performed on plasma jets created from a 15 μm thick radial Al or Ti foil load on COBRA, a 1 MA pulsed power machine. The goal was to measure the electron temperatures inside the center of the plasma jet created by the radial foil. The laser used for these measurements had a maximum energy of 10 J at 526.5 nm in a 3 ns duration pulse. Early experiments showed using the full energy significantly heats the 5 ×1018 cm-3 jet by inverse bremsstrahlung radiation. Here we used a streak camera to record the scattered spectrum and measure the evolving electron temperature of this laser heated jet. Analysis of the streak camera image showed that the electron temperature of the Al jet was increased from about 25 eV to 80-100 eV within about 2 ns. The Ti jets showed even stronger interaction with the laser, being heated to over 150 eV, and showed some heating even when only 1 J of laser energy was used. Also, the ion-acoustic peaks in the scattered spectrum from the Ti jets were significantly narrower than those from Al jets. Initial results will also be presented with scattered spectra taken at two different times within a single experiment by splitting the probe beam. This research is supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836.

  2. Wire electric-discharge machining and other fabrication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Wire electric discharge machining and extrude honing were used to fabricate a two dimensional wing for cryogenic wind tunnel testing. Electric-discharge cutting is done with a moving wire electrode. The cut track is controlled by means of a punched-tape program and the cutting feed is regulated according to the progress of the work. Electric-discharge machining involves no contact with the work piece, and no mechanical force is exerted. Extrude hone is a process for honing finish-machined surfaces by the extrusion of an abrasive material (silly putty), which is forced through a restrictive fixture. The fabrication steps are described and production times are given.

  3. Controls on wind abrasion patterns through a fractured bedrock landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, J. P.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wind abrasion is an important geomorphic process for understanding arid landscape evolution on Earth and interpreting the post-fluvial history of Mars. Both the presence and orientation of wind-abraded landforms provide potentially important constraints on paleo-climatic conditions; however, such interpretations can be complicated by lithologic and structural heterogeneity. To explore the influence of pre-existing structure on wind abrasion, we exploit a natural experiment along the 10.2 Ma Lower Rio San Pedro ignimbrite in northern Chile. Here, a 3.2 Ma andesite flow erupted from Cerro de las Cuevas and deposited atop the ignimbrite, supplying wind-transportable sediment and initiating a phase of downwind abrasion. Additionally, the lava flow provides a continually varying degree of upwind topographic shielding along the ignimbrite that is reflected in a range of surface morphologies. Where fully shielded the ignimbrite surface is partially blanketed by sediment. However, as relief decreases the surface morphology shifts from large polygonal structures that emerge due to the concentration of wind abrasion along pre-existing fracture sets, to polygons that are bisected by wind-parallel grooves that cross-cut fracture sets, to linear sets of yardangs. We reconstruct the ignimbrite surface using a high-resolution digital elevation model, and calculate erosion rates ranging from 0.002 to 0.45 mm/kyr that vary strongly with degree of topographic shielding (R2 = 0.97). We use measured abrasion rates together with nearby weather station data to estimate the nondimensional Rouse number and Inertial Parameter for a range of particle sizes. From these calculations, we hypothesize that the change from fracture-controlled to flow-controlled morphology reflects increases in the grain size and inertia of particles in the suspension cloud. Where the ignimbrite experiences persistent high winds, large particles may travel in suspension and are largely insensitive to topographic

  4. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented. PMID:29562635

  5. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Alessandra

    2018-03-18

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented.

  6. Impact of toothpaste on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel: An in vitro white light interferometer study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maria; Kitasako, Yuichi; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of brushing using toothpastes marketed under different categories on abrasion of sound and eroded enamel in vitro at nanometer scale using a white light interferometer (WLI). Enamel surface of resin-embedded bovine incisors were fine polished with diamond slurry and divided into testing area (approximately 2 mm x 4 mm) and reference area using a nail varnish. The enamel specimens were randomly assigned to 10 groups (n = 10 each); six of which were subjected to erosive challenge. The testing area in these eroded groups was exposed to 10 ml of Coca-Cola for 90 seconds and then rinsed for 10 seconds in deionized water (DW). Enamel specimens, except for those in one eroded group, were brushed by an automatic brushing machine with 120 linear motion strokes in 60 seconds under load of 250 g with/without toothpaste slurry. After the toothbrushing abrasion, each specimen was rinsed for 10 seconds with DW followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 2 hours. Toothpaste slurries were prepared containing one of the four toothpastes used and DW in a ratio of 1:2. The erosion-abrasion cycle was repeated three times. Then, the nail varnish was removed and enamel surface loss (SL) was measured by the WLI. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's correction at significance level of 0.05. For eroded specimens, the mean SL values of groups not brushed and brushed with no toothpaste were not significantly different, but were significantly lower than those of whitening, anti-erosion and anti-caries toothpaste groups (P < 0.001). The whitening toothpaste group showed significantly higher SL than all other groups (P < 0.001). For sound enamel specimens, SL was not measured except for the whitening toothpaste group.

  7. Toothbrush abrasivity in a long-term simulation on human dentin depends on brushing mode and bristle arrangement.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Schmidt, Ilka; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of dentin to brushing abrasion using four different toothbrushes (rotating-oscillating, sonic and two types of manual toothbrushes) with the same brushing forces. Dentin samples (n = 72) were selected from 72 impacted third molars. Half of the surface of dentin samples was covered with an adhesive tape, creating a protected and a freely exposed area in the same specimen. Brushing was performed with either a: sonic (Sonicare PowerUp, Philips GmbH, Hamburg, Germany), b: oscillating-rotating (Oral B Vitality Precisions Clean, Procter & Gamble, Schwalbach am Taunus, Germany) or two different manual toothbrushes c: flat trim brush head toothbrush (Dr. Best: Original, Glaxo-Smith-Kline, Bühl, Germany) and d: rippled-shaped brush head toothbrush (Blend-a-Dent, Complete V-Interdental, Blend-a-med, Schwalbach, Germany) in a custom made automatic brushing machine. The brushing force was set to 2 N and a whitening toothpaste (RDA = 150) was used. The simulation period was performed over a calculated period to mimic a brushing behavior of two times a day brushing for eight years and six months. Dentin loss was quantitatively determined by profilometry and statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney-U Test (p < 0.05). The mean (standard deviation) surface loss was 21.03 (±1.26) μm for the sonic toothbrush, 15.71 (±0.85) μm for the oscillating-rotating toothbrush, 6.13 (±1.24) μm for the manual toothbrush with flat trim brush head and 2.50 (±0.43) μm for the manual toothbrush with rippled-shaped brush head. Differences between all groups were statistically significant at p<0.05. Using the same brushing force and a highly abrasive toothpaste, manual toothbrushes are significantly less abrasive compared to power toothbrushes for an 8.5-year simulation.

  8. Control technology for crystalline silica exposures in construction: wet abrasive blasting.

    PubMed

    Golla, Vijay; Heitbrink, William

    2004-03-01

    This study was designed to document the effect that wet abrasive blasting has on reducing worker exposure to crystalline silica, which has been associated with silicosis and premature death. In this study, worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica was monitored during wet abrasive blasting on the exterior walls of a parking garage to remove surface concrete and expose the underlying aggregate. In this process a wet sand mix comprised of 80% dry sand and 20% water was used. Sampling and analysis revealed that the geometric mean respirable quartz concentration was 0.2 mg/m(3) for workers conducting abrasive blasting and 0.06 mg/m(3) for helpers. When abrasive blasting was conducted in areas that apparently had reduced natural ventilation, dust exposures appeared to increase. When compared with other published data, this case study suggests that wet abrasive blasting causes less exposure to crystalline silica than dry abrasive blasting.

  9. Automatic feed system for ultrasonic machining

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1994-01-01

    Method and apparatus for ultrasonic machining in which feeding of a tool assembly holding a machining tool toward a workpiece is accomplished automatically. In ultrasonic machining, a tool located just above a workpiece and vibrating in a vertical direction imparts vertical movement to particles of abrasive material which then remove material from the workpiece. The tool does not contact the workpiece. Apparatus for moving the tool assembly vertically is provided such that it operates with a relatively small amount of friction. Adjustable counterbalance means is provided which allows the tool to be immobilized in its vertical travel. A downward force, termed overbalance force, is applied to the tool assembly. The overbalance force causes the tool to move toward the workpiece as material is removed from the workpiece.

  10. Resistance to abrasion of extrinsic porcelain esthetic characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Chi, Woo J; Browning, William; Looney, Stephen; Mackert, J Rodway; Windhorn, Richard J; Rueggeberg, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    A novel esthetic porcelain characterization technique involves mixing an appropriate amount of ceramic colorants with clear, low-fusing porcelain (LFP), applying the mixture on the external surfaces, and firing the combined components onto the surface of restorations in a porcelain oven. This method may provide better esthetic qualities and toothbrush abrasion resistance compared to the conventional techniques of applying color-corrective porcelain colorants alone, or applying a clear glaze layer over the colorants. However, there is no scientific literature to support this claim. This research evaluated toothbrush abrasion resistance of a novel porcelain esthetic characterization technique by subjecting specimens to various durations of simulated toothbrush abrasion. The results were compared to those obtained using the conventional characterization techniques of colorant application only or colorant followed by placement of a clear over-glaze. Four experimental groups, all of which were a leucite reinforced ceramic of E TC1 (Vita A1) shade, were prepared and fired in a porcelain oven according to the manufacturer's instructions. Group S (stain only) was characterized by application of surface colorants to provide a definitive shade of Vita A3.5. Group GS (glaze over stain) was characterized by application of a layer of glaze over the existing colorant layer as used for Group S. Group SL (stain+LFP) was characterized by application of a mixture of colorants and clear low-fusing add-on porcelain to provide a definitive shade of Vita A3.5. Group C (Control) was used as a control without any surface characterization. The 4 groups were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing using a 1:1 water-to-toothpaste solution for a simulated duration of 32 years of clinical use. The amount of wear was measured at time intervals simulating every 4 years of toothbrushing. These parameters were evaluated longitudinally for all groups as well as compared at similar time points among

  11. Jet-images — deep learning edition

    DOE PAGES

    de Oliveira, Luke; Kagan, Michael; Mackey, Lester; ...

    2016-07-13

    Building on the notion of a particle physics detector as a camera and the collimated streams of high energy particles, or jets, it measures as an image, we investigate the potential of machine learning techniques based on deep learning architectures to identify highly boosted W bosons. Modern deep learning algorithms trained on jet images can out-perform standard physically-motivated feature driven approaches to jet tagging. We develop techniques for visualizing how these features are learned by the network and what additional information is used to improve performance. Finally, this interplay between physically-motivated feature driven tools and supervised learning algorithms is generalmore » and can be used to significantly increase the sensitivity to discover new particles and new forces, and gain a deeper understanding of the physics within jets.« less

  12. Jet-images — deep learning edition

    SciTech Connect

    de Oliveira, Luke; Kagan, Michael; Mackey, Lester

    Building on the notion of a particle physics detector as a camera and the collimated streams of high energy particles, or jets, it measures as an image, we investigate the potential of machine learning techniques based on deep learning architectures to identify highly boosted W bosons. Modern deep learning algorithms trained on jet images can out-perform standard physically-motivated feature driven approaches to jet tagging. We develop techniques for visualizing how these features are learned by the network and what additional information is used to improve performance. Finally, this interplay between physically-motivated feature driven tools and supervised learning algorithms is generalmore » and can be used to significantly increase the sensitivity to discover new particles and new forces, and gain a deeper understanding of the physics within jets.« less

  13. Shock waves generated by sudden expansions of a water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Vázquez, M.; Echeverría, C.; Porta, D.; Stern, C. E.; Ascanio, G.; Vicente, W.; Aguayo, J. P.

    2018-07-01

    Direct shadowgraph with parallel light combined with high-speed recording has been used to analyze the water jet of a cutting machine. The use of image processing allowed observing sudden expansions in the jet diameter as well as estimating the jet velocity by means of the Mach angle, obtaining velocities of about 500 m s^{-1}. The technique used here revealed the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the jet. Additionally, this is the first reporting of the onset of shock waves generated by small fluctuations of a continuous flow of water at high velocity surrounded by air, a result confirmed by a transient computational fluid dynamics simulation.

  14. Shoe heel abrasion and its possible biomechanical cause: a transversal study with infantry recruits.

    PubMed

    Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando C; Macedo, Benjamim; Silva, Thiago Alexandre Alves; Baumfeld, Tiago; Favato, Danilo Fabrino; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Nery, Caio

    2015-11-19

    Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available about this feature and its possible causes. The purpose of this study was to relate this phenomenon with biomechanical factors that could predispose to shoe heel abrasion. Ninety-seven recruits (median age 25) were enrolled in this study. Shoe abrasion was assessed manually with a metric plastic tape on the posterior part of the heel that comes in contact with the ground. The number of sprains, foot alignment, and calf muscle shortening (Silfverskiold test) was also assessed in order to relate it with shoe heel abrasion. After using our exclusion criteria, 86 recruits and 172 were considered for this study. The most common abrasion site was the lateral portion of the heel surface (50 %). Forty-four percent of the participants had neutral hind-foot alignment and 39 % had valgus alignment. Twenty-six (30 %) patients have had previous ankle or foot sprains. Neutral foot was related with less calf muscle shortening. On the other hand, valgus hind-foot alignment was more associated with Achilles shortening (p < 0.05). Patients with neutral alignment were associated with more uniform shoe heel abrasion and varus feet were associated with more central and lateral abrasion (p < 0.05). The pattern of shoe heel abrasion was not statistically related with calf muscle shortening nor with number of sprains. This study was able to correlate shoe heel abrasion with biomechanical causes (neutral alignment-uniform abrasion/varus alignment-central and lateral abrasion). More effort has to be done to continue evaluating outsole abrasion with its possible biomechanical cause in order to predict and treat possible associated injuries.

  15. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are disclosed which are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Heat sealable coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are produced by dissolving the elastomeric composition to form a solution, casting the solution onto a release paper and drying it to form an elastomeric film. The film is then bonded to a woven, knitted, or felted fabric.

  16. Developing a trend prediction model of subsurface damage for fixed-abrasive grinding of optics by cup wheels.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo

    2016-11-10

    Fixed-abrasive grinding by cup wheels plays an important role in the production of precision optics. During cup wheel grinding, we strive for a large removal rate while maintaining fine integrity on the surface and subsurface layers (academically recognized as surface roughness and subsurface damage, respectively). This study develops a theoretical model used to predict the trend of subsurface damage of optics (with respect to various grinding parameters) in fixed-abrasive grinding by cup wheels. It is derived from the maximum undeformed chip thickness model, and it successfully correlates the pivotal parameters of cup wheel grinding with the subsurface damage depth. The efficiency of this model is then demonstrated by a set of experiments performed on a cup wheel grinding machine. In these experiments, the characteristics of subsurface damage are inspected by a wedge-polishing plus microscopic inspection method, revealing that the subsurface damage induced in cup wheel grinding is composed of craterlike morphologies and slender cracks, with depth ranging from ∼6.2 to ∼13.2  μm under the specified grinding parameters. With the help of the proposed model, an optimized grinding strategy is suggested for realizing fine subsurface integrity as well as high removal rate, which can alleviate the workload of subsequent lapping and polishing.

  17. Baking soda as an abrasive in toothpastes: Mechanism of action and safety and effectiveness considerations.

    PubMed

    Hara, Anderson T; Turssi, Cecilia P

    2017-11-01

    Toothpastes can be formulated with different abrasive systems, depending on their intended clinical application. This formulation potentially affects their effectiveness and safety and, therefore, requires proper understanding. In this article, the authors focused on abrasive aspects of toothpastes containing sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), which have gained considerable attention because of their low abrasivity and good compatibility, while providing clinical effectiveness (further detailed in the other articles of this special issue). The authors first appraised the role of toothpaste abrasivity on tooth wear, exploring some underlying processes and the existing methods to determine toothpaste abrasivity. The authors reviewed the available data on the abrasivity of toothpastes containing baking soda and reported a summary of findings highlighting the clinical implications. On the basis of the collected evidence, baking soda has an intrinsic low-abrasive nature because of its comparatively lower hardness in relation to enamel and dentin. Baking soda toothpastes also may contain other ingredients, which can increase their stain removal effectiveness and, consequently, abrasivity. Even those formulations have abrasivity well within the safety limit regulatory agencies have established and, therefore, can be considered safe. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Machine Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirrane, Diane E.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists seek to develop machines that can "learn," that is, solve problems by imitating the human brain, a gold mine of information on the processes of human learning is being discovered, expert systems are being improved, and human-machine interactions are being enhanced. (SK)

  19. Electric machine

    DOEpatents

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi [Niskayuna, NY; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath [Madison, WI

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  20. Contributions of Nanodiamond Abrasives and Deionized Water in Magnetorheological Finishing of Aluminum Oxynitride

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Romanofsky, H.

    2010-01-13

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a sub-aperture deterministic process for fabricating high-precision optics by removing material and smoothing the surface. The goal of this work is to study the relative contribution of nanodiamonds and water in material removal for MRF of aluminum oxynitride ceramic (ALON) based upon a nonaqueous magnetorheological (MR) fluid. Removal was enhanced by a high carbonyl iron concentration and the addition of nanodiamond abrasives. Small amounts of deionized (DI) water were introduced into the nonaqueous MR fluid to further influence the material removal process. Material removal data were collected with a spot-taking machine. Drag force (Fd) and normalmore » force (Fn) before and after adding nanodiamonds or DI water were measured with a dual load cell. Both drag force and normal force were insensitive to the addition of nanodiamonds but increased with DI water content in the nonaqueous MR fluid. Shear stress (i.e., drag force divided by spot area) was calculated, and examined as a function of nanodiamond concentration and DI water concentration. Volumetric removal rate increased with increasing shear stress, which was shown to be a result of increasing viscosity after adding nanodiamonds and DI water. This work demonstrates that removal rate for a hard ceramic with MRF can be enhanced by adding DI water into a nonaqueous MR fluid.« less

  1. Contributions of nanodiamond abrasives and deionized water in magnetorheological finishing of aluminum oxynitriden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Chunlin; Lambropoulos, John C.; Romanofsky, Henry; Shafrir, Shai N.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2009-08-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a sub-aperture deterministic process for fabricating high-precision optics by removing material and smoothing the surface. The goal of this work is to study the relative contribution of nanodiamonds and water in material removal for MRF of aluminum oxynitride ceramic (ALON) based upon a nonaqueous magnetorheological (MR) fluid. Removal was enhanced by a high carbonyl iron concentration and the addition of nanodiamond abrasives. Small amounts of deionized (DI) water were introduced into the nonaqueous MR fluid to further influence the material removal process. Material removal data were collected with a spot-taking machine. Drag force (Fd) and normal force (Fn) before and after adding nanodiamonds or DI water were measured with a dual load cell. Both drag force and normal force were insensitive to the addition of nanodiamonds but increased with DI water content in the nonaqueous MR fluid. Shear stress (i.e., drag force divided by spot area) was calculated, and examined as a function of nanodiamond concentration and DI water concentration. Volumetric removal rate increased with increasing shear stress, which was shown to be a result of increasing viscosity after adding nanodiamonds and DI water. This work demonstrates that removal rate for a hard ceramic with MRF can be enhanced by adding DI water into a nonaqueous MR fluid.

  2. A novel approach of magnetorheological abrasive fluid finishing with swirling-assisted inlet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheradmand, Saeid; Esmailian, Mojtaba; Fatahy, A.

    Abrasive flow machining has been the pioneer of new finishing processes. Rotating workpiece and imposing a magnetic field using magnetorheological working medium are some assisting manipulations to improve surface finishing, because they can increase the forces on the workpiece surface. Similarly, swirling the inlet flow using stationary swirler vanes, as a novel idea, may also increase forces on the surface, and then raise the material removal, with a lower expense and energy consumption compared with the case of workpiece rotation. Thus, in this paper, surface roughness improvement is studied in a pipe with rotating inlet flow of a magnetorheological finishing medium under imposing a magnetic field. The results are compared with the case of rotating workpiece, using 3D numerical simulation. The governing hydrodynamic parameters are investigated in both cases to monitor the flow variations. It is shown that surface roughness is improved by rotating inlet flow. However, it is found that finishing in the entrance length of swirling-assisted inlet flow can be so economical for short length workpieces, compared with the case of rotating workpiece, with very near Ra values. By comparison of the numerical results and published experimental data, current study also shows the ability of the numerical simulation, as an inexpensive and efficient tool, to predict the surface roughness changes in finishing processes.

  3. Sliding-gate valve for use with abrasive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ayers, Jr., William J.; Carter, Charles R.; Griffith, Richard A.; Loomis, Richard B.; Notestein, John E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a flow and pressure-sealing valve for use with abrasive solids. The valve embodies special features which provide for long, reliable operating lifetimes in solids-handling service. The valve includes upper and lower transversely slidable gates, contained in separate chambers. The upper gate provides a solids-flow control function, whereas the lower gate provides a pressure-sealing function. The lower gate is supported by means for (a) lifting that gate into sealing engagement with its seat when the gate is in its open and closed positions and (b) lowering the gate out of contact with its seat to permit abrasion-free transit of the gate between its open and closed positions. When closed, the upper gate isolates the lower gate from the solids. Because of this shielding action, the sealing surface of the lower gate is not exposed to solids during transit or when it is being lifted or lowered. The chamber containing the lower gate normally is pressurized slightly, and a sweep gas is directed inwardly across the lower-gate sealing surface during the vertical translation of the gate.

  4. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  5. Air abrasion experiments in U-Pb dating of zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldich, S.S.; Fischer, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    Air abrasion of zircon grains can remove metamict material that has lost radiogenic Pb and zircon overgrowths that were added during younger events and thereby improve the precision of the age measurements and permit closer estimates of the original age. Age discordance that resulted from a single disturbance of the U-Pb isotopic decay systems, as had been demonstrated by T.E. Krogh, can be considerably reduced, and, under favorable conditions, the ages brought into concordancy. Two or more events complicate the U-Pb systematics, but a series of abrasion experiments can be helpful in deciphering the geologic history and in arriving at a useful interpretation of the probable times of origin and disturbances. In east-central Minnesota, U.S.A., Penokean tonalite gneiss is dated at 1869 ?? 5 Ma, and sheared granite gneiss is shown to have been a high-level granite intrusion at 1982 ?? 5 Ma in the McGrath Gneiss precursor. Tonalite gneiss and a mafic granodiorite in the Rainy Lake area, Ontario, Canada, are dated at 2736 ?? 16 and 2682 ?? 4 Ma, respectively. The tonalitic phase of the Morton Gneiss, southwestern Minnesota, is dated at 3662 ?? 42 Ma. ?? 1986.

  6. Abrasion and Fragmentation Processes in Marly Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, C.; Naaim, F.; Mathys, N.; Lave, J.; Kaitna, R.

    2009-04-01

    In the highly erosive marly catchments of Draix (Southern Alps, France), downstream fining of sediments has been observed and can not be explained by selective sorting. Moreover, high concentrations of suspended fine sediment (up to 800 g/L) are measured during flood events in these basins. These observations lead to the hypothesis that abrasion and fragmentation of marly sediments during transport play an important role in the production of fine sediments. Several experiments are conducted in order to quantify these processes: material from the river bed is introduced into the water flow in a circular flume as well as in a large scale rotating drum. Abrasion rates range from 5 to 15%/km, depending on the lithology: marls from the upper basin are more erosive than those from the lower basin. Modifications of grain size distribution in the rough fraction are also observed. Field measurements are also conducted. Downstream of the main marly sediment sources, the river bed is composed of marls and limestone pebbles. We have sampled the river bed for analysis of grain size distribution and lithology. First results show a decrease of the proportion of marls along the river bed. This is in accordance with the high erosion rates observed in our laboratory experiments. Further investigations are planned in order to study more precisely marl grain size distribution, especially in the finer fraction.

  7. Abrasive-assisted Nickel Electroforming Process with Moving Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REN, Jianhua; ZHU, Zengwei; XIA, Chunqiu; QU, Ningsong; ZHU, Di

    2017-03-01

    In traditional electroforming process for revolving parts with complex profiles, the drawbacks on surface of deposits, such as pinholes and nodules, will lead to varying physical and mechanical properties on different parts of electroformed components. To solve the problem, compositely moving cathode is employed in abrasive-assisted electroforming of revolving parts with complicated profiles. The cathode translates and rotates simultaneously to achieve uniform friction effect on deposits without drawbacks. The influences of current density and translation speed on the microstructure and properties of the electroformed nickel layers are investigated. It is found that abrasive-assisted electroforming with compound cathode motion can effectively remove the pinholes and nodules, positively affect the crystal nucleation, and refine the grains of layer. The increase of current density will lead to coarse microstructure and lower micro hardness, from 325 HV down to 189 HV. While, faster translational linear speed produces better surface quality and higher micro hardness, from 236 HV up to 283 HV. The weld-ability of the electroformed layers are also studied through the metallurgical analysis of welded joints between nickel layer and 304 stainless steel. The electrodeposited nickel layer shows fine performance in welding. The novel compound motion of cathode promotes the mechanical properties and refines the microstructure of deposited layer.

  8. Abrasion Plus Local Fibrin Sealant Instillation Produces Pleurodesis Similar to Pleurectomy in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Evaldo; de Carvalho, Marcus V H; Ventureli, Tiago R; Fruchi, Andre J; Lazaro, Ariane; do Carmo, Deborah C; Barreto, Thayssa Y A S; Dias, Bruno V B; Acencio, Milena M P; Teixeira, Lisete R; Light, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Pleurodesis performed either by pleurectomy or pleural abrasion is recommended in the approach to primary spontaneous pneumothorax to avoid recurrence. However, the efficacy of parietal pleural abrasion in producing pleurodesis is questioned. This study aims to determine the efficacy of apical abrasion alone, abrasion plus fibrin sealant application, and pleurectomy in producing pleurodesis in rabbits. Rabbits were subjected to video-assisted thoracic surgery alone (control) or to video-assisted thoracic surgery with apical gauze abrasion, abrasion plus fibrin sealant instillation, or apical pleurectomy. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and 48 h and 28 days postoperatively to measure total leukocytes (white blood cell count), neutrophil counts, and serum interleukin (IL)-8 levels. After 28 days the animals were sacrificed for macroscopic evaluation of the degree of apical pleurodesis and microscopic evaluation of local pleural fibrosis and collagen deposition. White blood cell and neutrophil counts were similar in all groups, whereas the serum IL-8 level peaked at 48 h in all groups and decreased after 28 days, except in the pleurectomy group. After 28 days the abrasion plus fibrin sealant and pleurectomy groups had significantly more pleural adhesions, pleural fibrosis, and collagen deposition than the abrasion alone group, mainly due to thick mature fibers. Abrasion with local fibrin sealant instillation is as effective as pleurectomy in producing pleurodesis in rabbits. Apical pleurectomy elicits a more persistent elevation of serum IL-8 levels than apical abrasion alone or abrasion plus fibrin adhesive instillation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2017-04-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  10. Monitoring of the Abrasion Processes (by the Example of Alakol Lake, Republic of Kazakhstan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abitbayeva, Ainagul; Valeyev, Adilet; Yegemberdiyeva, Kamshat; Assylbekova, Aizhan; Ryskeldieva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the abrasion processes in the regions of dynamically changing Alakol lake shores. Using the field method, methods of positioning by the GPS receiver and interpretation of remote sensing data, the authors determined that abrasion processes actively contributed to the formation the modern landscape, causing the…

  11. Abrasive wear of ceramic wear protection at ambient and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Adam, K.; Tumma, M.; Alessio, K. O.

    2017-05-01

    Ceramic wear protection is often applied in abrasive conditions due to their excellent wear resistance. This is especially necessary in heavy industries conveying large amounts of raw materials, e.g. in steel industry. Some plants also require material transport at high temperatures and velocities, making the need of temperature stable and abrasion resistant wear protection necessary. Various types and wear behaviour of ceramic protection are known. Hence, the goal of this study is to identify the best suitable ceramic materials for abrasive conditions in harsh environments at temperatures up to 950°C and severe thermal gradients. Chamottes, known for their excellent thermal shock resistance are compared to high abrasion resistant ceramic wear tiles and a cost efficient cement-bounded hard compound. Testing was done under high-stress three-body abrasion regime with a modified ASTM G65 apparatus enabling for investigations up to ~950°C. Thereto heated abrasive is introduced into the wear track and also preheated ceramic samples were used and compared to ambient temperature experiments. Results indicate a significant temperature influence on chamottes and the hard compound. While the chamottes benefit from temperature increase, the cement-bounded hard compound showed its limitation at abrasive temperatures of 950°C. The high abrasion resistant wear tiles represented the materials with the best wear resistance and less temperature influence in the investigated range.

  12. Air-propelled abrasive grit can damage the perennial weed, quackgrass, Elytrigia repens (L.) Nevski

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New techniques are needed to control quackgrass in organic crops. With greater than or equal to 2 applications of abrasive air-propelled (800 kPa) corncob grit to 15 cm tall quackgrass tillers, regrowth was minimal at 5 weeks after treatment. Abrasive grits may be effective tools to help manage pere...

  13. Modeling of Micro Deval abrasion loss based on some rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capik, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-10-01

    Aggregate is one of the most widely used construction material. The quality of the aggregate is determined using some testing methods. Among these methods, the Micro Deval Abrasion Loss (MDAL) test is commonly used for the determination of the quality and the abrasion resistance of aggregate. The main objective of this study is to develop models for the prediction of MDAL from rock properties, including uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, point load index, Schmidt rebound hardness, apparent porosity, void ratio Cerchar abrasivity index and Bohme abrasion test are examined. Additionally, the MDAL is modeled using simple regression analysis and multiple linear regression analysis based on the rock properties. The study shows that the MDAL decreases with the increase of uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, point load index, Schmidt rebound hardness and Cerchar abrasivity index. It is also concluded that the MDAL increases with the increase of apparent porosity, void ratio and Bohme abrasion test. The modeling results show that the models based on Bohme abrasion test and L type Schmidt rebound hardness give the better forecasting performances for the MDAL. More models, including the uniaxial compressive strength, the apparent porosity and Cerchar abrasivity index, are developed for the rapid estimation of the MDAL of the rocks. The developed models were verified by statistical tests. Additionally, it can be stated that the proposed models can be used as a forecasting for aggregate quality.

  14. Solidification/stabilization of spent abrasives and use as nonstructural concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Brabrand, D.J.; Loehr, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Tons of spent abrasives result each year from the removal of old paint from bridges. Because the spent abrasives contain metals from the paint, some spent abrasives may be considered hazardous by the Toxicity Characteristic (TC) criteria. Incorporation of the spent blasting abrasives in nonstructural concrete (rip-rap, dolphins) offers an opportunity to recycle the spent abrasives while immobilizing potentially leachable metals. This study focused on the Portland Cement Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) of spent blasting abrasives taken from a bridge located in Southeast Texas. The study examined (a) the cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations in extracts obtained by using the Toxicity Characteristicmore » Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and (b) the compressive strengths of Portland Cement mixes that contained different amounts of the spent abrasives. Performance was measured by meeting the TC criteria as well as the requirements for compressive strength. Study results indicated that considerable quantities of these spent abrasives can be solidified/stabilized while reducing the leachability of cadmium, chromium, and lead and producing compressive strengths over 6,895 kN/m[sup 2] (1,000 psi).« less

  15. Machine Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    DTIC i.LE COPY RADC-TR-90-25 Final Technical Report April 1990 MACHINE LEARNING The MITRE Corporation Melissa P. Chase Cs) CTIC ’- CT E 71 IN 2 11990...S. FUNDING NUMBERS MACHINE LEARNING C - F19628-89-C-0001 PE - 62702F PR - MOlE S. AUTHO(S) TA - 79 Melissa P. Chase WUT - 80 S. PERFORMING...341.280.5500 pm I " Aw Sig rill Ia 2110-01 SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND Research in machine learning has taken two directions in the problem of

  16. The effect of abrading and cutting instruments on machinability of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, Satoshi; Nakao, Noriko; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2018-03-16

    The aim was to investigate the effect of machining instruments on machinability of dental ceramics. Four dental ceramics, including two zirconia ceramics were machined by three types (SiC, diamond vitrified, and diamond sintered) of wheels with a hand-piece engine and two types (diamond and carbide) of burs with a high-speed air turbine. The machining conditions used were abrading speeds of 10,000 and 15,000 r.p.m. with abrading force of 100 gf for the hand-piece engine, and a pressure of 200 kPa and a cutting force of 80 gf for the air-turbine hand-piece. The machinability efficiency was evaluated by volume losses after machining the ceramics. A high-abrading speed had high-abrading efficiency (high-volume loss) compared to low-abrading speed in all abrading instruments used. The diamond vitrified wheels demonstrated higher volume loss for two zirconia ceramics than those of SiC and diamond sintered wheels. When the high-speed air-turbine instruments were used, the diamond points showed higher volume losses compared to the carbide burs for one ceramic and two zirconia ceramics with high-mechanical properties. The results of this study indicated that the machinability of dental ceramics depends on the mechanical and physical properties of dental ceramics and machining instruments. The abrading wheels show autogenous action of abrasive grains, in which ground abrasive grains drop out from the binder during abrasion, then the binder follow to wear out, subsequently new abrasive grains come out onto the instrument surface (autogenous action) and increase the grinding amount (volume loss) of grinding materials.

  17. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  18. Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Mary J.

    1992-01-01

    The Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application is in support of the Abrasion Resistance Materials Screening Test. The fundamental assumption made for the SEM abrasion analysis was that woven fabrics to be used as the outermost layer of the protective overgarment in the design of the future, planetary space suits perform best when new. It is the goal of this study to determine which of the candidate fabrics was abraded the least in the tumble test. The sample that was abraded the least will be identified at the end of the report as the primary candidate fabric for further investigation. In addition, this analysis will determine if the abrasion seen by the laboratory tumbled samples is representative of actual EVA Apollo abrasion.

  19. Behaviors of 40Cr steel treated by laser quenching on impact abrasive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhikai; Zhu, Qinghai; Wang, Jing; Yun, Xiao; He, Bing; Luo, Jingshuai

    2018-07-01

    In present work, laser quenching had been carried out to improve the impact abrasive wear resistance of 40Cr steel. The distinct microstructure between original and quenched region was demonstrated after laser quenching. Since the effect of temperature and cooling rate, the phase combinations were apparently different for quenched layer in depth. The impact abrasive wear resistance of sample was experimentally investigated and the improved level was assessed in light of the average mass loss of three repetitive tests. Worn surface was detected by means of SEM, OM and EDS, and results showed that three typical failure modes were performed during the processing of impact abrasive wear, including abrasive wear, impact effect and rolling contact fatigue. Basing on the different worn surface profile, the mainly failure mode was respectively pointed out for matrix and quenched sample, which was significantly in accordance with the result of impact abrasive wear.

  20. Wear resistance and mechanisms of composite hardfacings at abrasive impact erosion wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhenkov, A.; Viljus, M.; Simson, T.; Tarbe, R.; Saarna, M.; Casesnoves, F.

    2017-05-01

    Tungsten carbide based hardmetal containing sprayed and melted composite hardfacings are prospective for protection against abrasive wear. For selection of abrasive wear resistant hardfacings under intensive impact wear conditions, both mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, etc.) and abrasive wear conditions (type of abrasive, impact velocity, etc.) should be considered. This study focuses on the wear (wear rate and mechanisms) of thick metal-matrix composite hardfacings with hardmetal (WC-Co) reinforcement produced by powder metallurgy technology. The influence of the hardmetal reinforcement type on the wear resistance at different abrasive impact erosion wear (AIEW) conditions was studied. An optimal reinforcement for various wear conditions is described. Based on wear mechanism studies, a mathematical model for wear prediction was drafted.

  1. Effect of ceramic coating by aerosol deposition on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yohsuke; Hatono, Hironori; Mizukane, Masahiro; Tokita, Masahiro; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD coating) is a novel technique to coat solid substances with a ceramic film. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of AD coating on abrasion resistance of a resin composite material. A 5-microm-thick aluminum oxide layer was created on the polymerized resin composite. The specimen was cyclically abraded using a toothbrush abrasion simulator for 100,000 cycles. Abraded surface was then measured with a profilometer to determine the average roughness (Ra) and maximum roughness (Rmax). It was found that abrasion cycling increased the Ra value of the No-AD-coating group, but decreased the Ra and Rmax values of the AD coating group. Moreover, the AD coating group showed significantly smaller Ra and Rmax values after 100,000 abrasion cycles as compared to the No-coating control group. Microscopic observation supported these findings. In conclusion, the resistance of the resin composite against toothbrush abrasion was improved by AD coating.

  2. Monel Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Castle Industries, Inc. is a small machine shop manufacturing replacement plumbing repair parts, such as faucet, tub and ballcock seats. Therese Castley, president of Castle decided to introduce Monel because it offered a chance to improve competitiveness and expand the product line. Before expanding, Castley sought NERAC assistance on Monel technology. NERAC (New England Research Application Center) provided an information package which proved very helpful. The NASA database was included in NERAC's search and yielded a wealth of information on machining Monel.

  3. View southwest of machine shops, building 18 section visible in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest of machine shops, building 18 section visible in foreground; building 16 section on left. This structure consists of two formerly separate buildings. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  5. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  6. Wear model simulating clinical abrasion on composite filling materials.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Gaute Floer; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien F; Haugen, Håvard J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a wear model for testing composite filling materials with abrasion properties closer to a clinical situation. In addition, the model was used to evaluate the effect of filler volume and particle size on surface roughness and wear resistance. Each incisor tooth was prepared with nine identical standardized cavities with respect to depth, diameter, and angle. Generic composite of 3 different filler volumes and 3 different particle sizes held together with the same resin were randomly filled in respective cavities. A multidirectional wet-grinder with molar cusps as antagonist wore the surface of the incisors containing the composite fillings in a bath of human saliva at a constant temperature of 37°C. The present study suggests that the most wear resistant filling materials should consist of medium filling content (75%) and that particles size is not as critical as earlier reported.

  7. Wire blade development for Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST) slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.; Smith, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost, effective slicing method is essential to make ingot technology viable for photovoltaics in terrestrial applications. The fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) combines the advantages of the three commercially developed techniques. In its development stage FAST demonstrated cutting effectiveness of 10 cm and 15 cm diameter workpieces. Wire blade development is still the critical element for commercialization of FAST technology. Both impregnated and electroplated wire blades have been developed; techniques have been developed to fix diamonds only in the cutting edge of the wire. Electroplated wires show the most near term promise and this approach is emphasized. With plated wires it has been possible to control the size and shape of the electroplating, it is expected that this feature reduces kerf and prolongs the life of the wirepack.

  8. Mars rover rock abrasion tool performance enhanced by ultrasonic technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macartney, A.; Li, X.; Harkness, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mars exploration Athena science goal is to explore areas where water may have been present on the early surface of Mars, and investigate the palaeo-environmental conditions of these areas in relation to the existence of life. The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) designed by Honeybee Robotics has been one of four key Athena science payload instruments mounted on the mechanical arm of the Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity Mars Exploration Rovers. Exposed rock surfaces weather and chemically alter over time. Although such weathered rock can present geological interest in itself, there is a limit to what can be learned. If the geological history of a landing site is to be constructed, then it is important to analyse the unweathered rock interior as clearly as possible. The rock abrasion tool's role is to substitute for a geologist's hammer, removing the weathered and chemically altered outer surface of rocks in order to view the pristine interior. The RAT uses a diamond resin standard common grinding technique, producing a 5mm depth grind with a relatively high surface roughness, achieved over a number of hours per grind and consumes approximately 11 watts of energy. This study assesses the benefits of using ultrasonic assisted grinding to improve surface smoothness. A prototype Micro-Optic UltraSonic Exfoliator (MOUSE) is tested on a range of rock types and demonstrates a number of advantages over the RAT. In addition to a smoother grind finish, these advantages include a lower rate of tool tip wear when using a tungsten carbide tip as opposed to diamond resin, less moving parts, a grind speed of minutes instead of hours, and a power consumption of only 1-5 Watts.

  9. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  10. Abrasive rolling effects on material removal and surface finish in chemical mechanical polishing analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Lina; Guo, Dan; Luo, Jianbin; Lu, Xinchun; Xie, Guoxin

    2011-04-01

    In an abrasive chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, materials were considered to be removed by abrasive sliding and rolling. Abrasive sliding has been investigated by many molecular dynamics (MD) studies; while abrasive rolling was usually considered to be negligible and therefore was rarely investigated. In this paper, an MD simulation was used to study the effects of abrasive rolling on material removal and surface finish in the CMP process. As the silica particle rolled across the silicon substrate, some atoms of the substrate were dragged out from their original positions and adhered to the silica particle, leaving some atomic vacancies on the substrate surface. Meanwhile, a high quality surface could be obtained. During the abrasive rolling process, the influencing factors of material removal, e.g., external down force and driving force, were also discussed. Finally, MD simulations were carried out to examine the effects of abrasive sliding on material removal under the same external down force as abrasive rolling. The results showed that the ability of abrasive rolling to remove material on the atomic scale was not notably inferior to that of abrasive sliding. Therefore, it can be proposed that both abrasive sliding and rolling play important roles in material removal in the abrasive CMP of the silicon substrate.

  11. Analytical model for force prediction when machining metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Snahungshu

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) offer several thermo-mechanical advantages over standard materials and alloys which make them better candidates in different applications. Their light weight, high stiffness, and strength have attracted several industries such as automotive, aerospace, and defence for their wide range of products. However, the wide spread application of Meal Matrix Composites is still a challenge for industry. The hard and abrasive nature of the reinforcement particles is responsible for rapid tool wear and high machining costs. Fracture and debonding of the abrasive reinforcement particles are the considerable damage modes that directly influence the tool performance. It is very important to find highly effective way to machine MMCs. So, it is important to predict forces when machining Metal Matrix Composites because this will help to choose perfect tools for machining and ultimately save both money and time. This research presents an analytical force model for predicting the forces generated during machining of Metal Matrix Composites. In estimating the generated forces, several aspects of cutting mechanics were considered including: shearing force, ploughing force, and particle fracture force. Chip formation force was obtained by classical orthogonal metal cutting mechanics and the Johnson-Cook Equation. The ploughing force was formulated while the fracture force was calculated from the slip line field theory and the Griffith theory of failure. The predicted results were compared with previously measured data. The results showed very good agreement between the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured cutting forces.

  12. A multi-machine scaling of halo current rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C. E.; Eidietis, N. W.; Gerasimov, S. N.

    Halo currents generated during unmitigated tokamak disruptions are known to develop rotating asymmetric features that are of great concern to ITER because they can dynamically amplify the mechanical stresses on the machine. This paper presents a multi-machine analysis of these phenomena. More specifically, data from C-Mod, NSTX, ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, and JET are used to develop empirical scalings of three key quantities: the machine-specific minimum current quench time,more » $$ \

  13. A multi-machine scaling of halo current rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, C. E.; Eidietis, N. W.; Gerasimov, S. N.; ...

    2017-12-12

    Halo currents generated during unmitigated tokamak disruptions are known to develop rotating asymmetric features that are of great concern to ITER because they can dynamically amplify the mechanical stresses on the machine. This paper presents a multi-machine analysis of these phenomena. More specifically, data from C-Mod, NSTX, ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, and JET are used to develop empirical scalings of three key quantities: the machine-specific minimum current quench time,more » $$ \

  14. A multi-machine scaling of halo current rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Eidietis, N. W.; Gerasimov, S. N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Hender, T. C.; Pautasso, G.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    Halo currents generated during unmitigated tokamak disruptions are known to develop rotating asymmetric features that are of great concern to ITER because they can dynamically amplify the mechanical stresses on the machine. This paper presents a multi-machine analysis of these phenomena. More specifically, data from C-Mod, NSTX, ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, and JET are used to develop empirical scalings of three key quantities: (1) the machine-specific minimum current quench time, \

  15. Simulations of Astrophysical Jets in Dense Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Martin; Gaibler, Volker; Camenzind, Max

    We have simulated the interaction of jets with a galactic wind at high resolution using the magnetohydrodynamics code NIRVANA on the NEC SX-6 at the HLRS. This setup may describe a typical situation for the starbursting radio galaxies of the early universe. The results show a clear resolution dependence in the expected way, but the formed clumps are denser than expected from linear extrapolation. We also report our recent progress in the adaptation of the magnetic part of NIRVANA to the SX-6. The code is now fully tuned to the machine and reached more than 3 Gflops. We plan to use this new code version to extend our study of magnetized jets down to very low jet densities. This should be especially applicable to the conditions in the young universe.

  16. Microhardness evaluation of silorane and methacrylate composites submitted to erosion and abrasion processes

    PubMed Central

    Gazola, Eloá Aguiar; Rego, Marcos Augusto; Brandt, William Cunha; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN) of methacrylate (MC) and silorane (SC) composites after being submitted to erosion and abrasion processes. Material and methods: Forty samples were made with each composite: MC and SC. The samples were divided into eight groups (n = 10) according to the type of composite (G1–G4, MC; G5–G8, SC) and the beverages involved in the erosion process (G1 and G5 – Control (C), without erosion, with abrasion; G2 and G6 – Orange Juice (OJ), abrasion; G3 and G7 – Smirnoff Ice® (SI), abrasion; G4 and G8 – Gatorade® (GA), abrasion). The KHN test was performed 24 h after the last cycle of erosion/abrasion. Results: The MC groups showed smaller KHN values for the SI group (p < 0.05) when compared to the Control and OJ groups; however, for the SC groups, no differences were found (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Methacrylate composite when submitted to acidic beverages erosive challenge combined with abrasive process might alter its surface microhardness. However, the beverages used in the present study were not able to interfere in silorane composite surface microhardness. PMID:28642903

  17. Aliasing Signal Separation of Superimposed Abrasive Debris Based on Degenerate Unmixing Estimation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongyang; Wang, Shaoping; Zio, Enrico; Shi, Jian; Hong, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Leakage is the most important failure mode in aircraft hydraulic systems caused by wear and tear between friction pairs of components. The accurate detection of abrasive debris can reveal the wear condition and predict a system’s lifespan. The radial magnetic field (RMF)-based debris detection method provides an online solution for monitoring the wear condition intuitively, which potentially enables a more accurate diagnosis and prognosis on the aviation hydraulic system’s ongoing failures. To address the serious mixing of pipe abrasive debris, this paper focuses on the superimposed abrasive debris separation of an RMF abrasive sensor based on the degenerate unmixing estimation technique. Through accurately separating and calculating the morphology and amount of the abrasive debris, the RMF-based abrasive sensor can provide the system with wear trend and sizes estimation of the wear particles. A well-designed experiment was conducted and the result shows that the proposed method can effectively separate the mixed debris and give an accurate count of the debris based on RMF abrasive sensor detection. PMID:29543733

  18. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance. PMID:26656260

  19. Study of Abrasive Wear Volume Map for PTFE and PTFE Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H.; Sen, U.; Mimaroglu, A.

    2007-11-01

    The potential of this work is based on consideration of wear volume map for the evaluation of abrasive wear performance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and PTFE composites. The fillers used in the composite are 25% bronze, 35% graphite and 17% glass fibre glass (GFR). The influence of filler materials, abrasion surface roughness and applied load values on abrasive wear performance of PTFE and PTFE composites were studied and evaluated. Experimental abrasive wear tests were carried out at atmospheric condition on pin-on-disc wear tribometer. Tests were performed under 4, 6, 8 and 10 N load values, travelling speed of 1 m/sec and abrasion surface roughness values of 5, 20 and 45 µm. Wear volume maps were obtained and the results showed that the lowest wear volume rate for PTFE is reached using GFR filler. Furthermore, the results also showed that the higher is the applied load and the roughness of the abrasion surface, the higher is the wear rate. Finally it is also concluded that abrasive wear process mechanism include ploughing and cutting mechanisms.

  20. Aliasing Signal Separation of Superimposed Abrasive Debris Based on Degenerate Unmixing Estimation Technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongyang; Wang, Shaoping; Zio, Enrico; Shi, Jian; Hong, Wei

    2018-03-15

    Leakage is the most important failure mode in aircraft hydraulic systems caused by wear and tear between friction pairs of components. The accurate detection of abrasive debris can reveal the wear condition and predict a system's lifespan. The radial magnetic field (RMF)-based debris detection method provides an online solution for monitoring the wear condition intuitively, which potentially enables a more accurate diagnosis and prognosis on the aviation hydraulic system's ongoing failures. To address the serious mixing of pipe abrasive debris, this paper focuses on the superimposed abrasive debris separation of an RMF abrasive sensor based on the degenerate unmixing estimation technique. Through accurately separating and calculating the morphology and amount of the abrasive debris, the RMF-based abrasive sensor can provide the system with wear trend and sizes estimation of the wear particles. A well-designed experiment was conducted and the result shows that the proposed method can effectively separate the mixed debris and give an accurate count of the debris based on RMF abrasive sensor detection.

  1. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b)more » a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.« less

  2. Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Chikkagoudar, Satish; Chatterjee, Samrat; Thomas, Dennis G.

    The absence of a robust and unified theory of cyber dynamics presents challenges and opportunities for using machine learning based data-driven approaches to further the understanding of the behavior of such complex systems. Analysts can also use machine learning approaches to gain operational insights. In order to be operationally beneficial, cybersecurity machine learning based models need to have the ability to: (1) represent a real-world system, (2) infer system properties, and (3) learn and adapt based on expert knowledge and observations. Probabilistic models and Probabilistic graphical models provide these necessary properties and are further explored in this chapter. Bayesian Networksmore » and Hidden Markov Models are introduced as an example of a widely used data driven classification/modeling strategy.« less

  3. Evaluation of Needle Gun and Abrasive Blasting Technologies in Bridge Paint Removal Practices.

    PubMed

    Randall, Paul M; Kranz, Paul B; Sonntag, Mary L; Stadelmaier, James E

    1998-03-01

    This paper reviews the results of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study that assessed needle gun technology as an alternative to conventional abrasive blasting technology to remove lead-based paint from steel bridges in western New York State. The study analyzed the operational and logistical aspects as they relate to worker health and safety, environmental protection, hazardous waste generation, and costs as compared to those arising from conventional abrasive blasting. In this 1992 EPA study, the costs and the product quality aspects favored conventional abrasive blasting over the needle gun technology for removing lead paint. However, abrasive blasting exposed workers to airborne lead levels that exceeded Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) as established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), as well as emitting high levels of lead-contaminated dusts and debris into the environment. It was estimated that more than 500 lbs of lead-contaminated spent abrasives and paint waste were released into the environment during paint removal operations. The needle gun system reduced (up to 97.5%) the generation of hazardous waste and the airborne concentrations (up to 99%) of respirable dusts and lead-containing particulates generated during paint removal operations. However, labor costs for the needle gun were three times higher than those for abrasive blasting primarily because of slower production rates that necessitated more operating personnel. The higher labor costs of the needle gun are partially offset by the increased costs associated with the expendable abrasive blast media and hazardous waste disposal. In the EPA study, the productivity of the needle gun system was 12.2 ft 2 /hr vs. 147.5 ft 2 /hr for abrasive blasting. A post blast was needed for the needle gun system to meet surface preparation specifications. When factoring in the costs of full containment structures to meet OSHA's 1993 Lead Exposure in Construction regulation

  4. Workout Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Orbotron is a tri-axle exercise machine patterned after a NASA training simulator for astronaut orientation in the microgravity of space. It has three orbiting rings corresponding to roll, pitch and yaw. The user is in the middle of the inner ring with the stomach remaining in the center of all axes, eliminating dizziness. Human power starts the rings spinning, unlike the NASA air-powered system. Marketed by Fantasy Factory (formerly Orbotron, Inc.), the machine can improve aerobic capacity, strength and endurance in five to seven minute workouts.

  5. CFD-DEM Analysis of Particle Attrition in a Jet in a Fluidised Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulchini, F.; Nan, W.; Ghadiri, M.; Yazdan Panah, M.; Bertholin, S.; Amblard, B.; Cloupet, A.; Gauthier, T.

    2017-06-01

    In fluidised bed processes, the solids are in vigorous motion and thus inevitably subjected to mechanical stresses due to inter-particle and particle-wall impacts. These stresses lead to a gradual degradation of the particles by surface wear, abrasion and body fragmentation commonly termed attrition. One significant contribution of attrition comes from the air jets of the fluidised bed distributor. Particles are entrained into the air jet, where they get accelerated and impacted onto the fluidised bed particles. The jet induced attrition only affects the part of the bed which is limited by the jet length, where the mode of attrition is largely collisional. The overall jet attrition rate is therefore the result of the combination of the single particle damage and the flux of particles entering into that region. The attrition behaviour of particles in the jet region is analysed by evaluating their propensity of breakage experimentally and by simulating an air-jet in a bed of particles by CFD-DEM. The frequency of collisions and impact velocities are estimated from which the attrition due to a single air-jet is predicted.

  6. Optical-model abrasion cross sections for high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of eikonal scattering theory, a generalized optical model potential approximation to the nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series is used in an abrasion-ablation collision model to predict abrasion cross sections for relativistic projectile heavy ions. Unlike the optical limit of Glauber theory, which cannot be used for very light nuclei, the abrasion formalism is valid for any projectile target combination at any incident kinetic energy for which eikonal scattering theory can be utilized. Results are compared with experimental results and predictions from Glauber theory.

  7. Target correlation effects on neutron-nucleus total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Second order optical model solutions to the elastic scattering amplitude were used to evaluate total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections for neutron nucleus scattering. Improved agreement with experimental data for total and absorption cross sections is found when compared with first order (coherent approximation) solutions, especially below several hundred MeV. At higher energies, the first and second order solutions are similar. There are also large differences in abrasion cross section calculations; these differences indicate a crucial role for cluster knockout in the abrasion step.

  8. New vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method for microstructured surface finishing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang; Kum, Chun Wai; Au, Ka Hing; Tan, Zhi'En Eddie; Wu, Hu; Liu, Kui

    2016-06-13

    In order to polish microstructured surface without deteriorating its profile, we propose a new vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method. In this method, magnetic force guarantees that the magnetic abrasives can well contact the microstructured surface and access the corners of microstructures while vibration produces a relative movement between microstructures and magnetic abrasives. As the vibration direction is parallel to the microstructures, the profile of the microstructures will not be deteriorated. The relation between vibration and magnetic force was analyzed and the feasibility of this method was experimentally verified. The results show that after polishing, the surface finish around microstructures was significantly improved while the profile of microstructures was well maintained.

  9. Three-Body Abrasion Testing Using Lunar Dust Simulants to Evaluate Surface System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Budinski, Kenneth G.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Klaus, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous unexpected operational issues relating to the abrasive nature of lunar dust, such as scratched visors and spacesuit pressure seal leaks, were encountered during the Apollo missions. To avoid reoccurrence of these unexpected detrimental equipment problems on future missions to the Moon, a series of two- and three-body abrasion tests were developed and conducted in order to begin rigorously characterizing the effect of lunar dust abrasiveness on candidate surface system materials. Two-body scratch tests were initially performed to examine fundamental interactions of a single particle on a flat surface. These simple and robust tests were used to establish standardized measurement techniques for quantifying controlled volumetric wear. Subsequent efforts described in the paper involved three-body abrasion testing designed to be more representative of actual lunar interactions. For these tests, a new tribotester was developed to expose samples to a variety of industrial abrasives and lunar simulants. The work discussed in this paper describes the three-body hardware setup consisting of a rotating rubber wheel that applies a load on a specimen as a loose abrasive is fed into the system. The test methodology is based on ASTM International (ASTM) B611, except it does not mix water with the abrasive. All tests were run under identical conditions. Abraded material specimens included poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), hardened 1045 steel, 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and 1018 steel. Abrasives included lunar mare simulant JSC- 1A-F (nominal size distribution), sieved JSC-1A-F (<25 m particle diameter), lunar highland simulant NU-LHT-2M, alumina (average diameter of 50 m used per ASTM G76), and silica (50/70 mesh used per ASTM G65). The measured mass loss from each specimen was converted using standard densities to determine total wear volume in cm3. Abrasion was dominated by the alumina and the simulants were only similar to the silica (i.e., sand) on the softer materials of

  10. Micro Fluidic Channel Machining on Fused Silica Glass Using Powder Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho-Su; Cho, Myeong-Woo; Park, Dong-Sam

    2008-01-01

    In this study, micro fluid channels are machined on fused silica glass via powder blasting, a mechanical etching process, and the machining characteristics of the channels are experimentally evaluated. In the process, material removal is performed by the collision of micro abrasives injected by highly compressed air on to the target surface. This approach can be characterized as an integration of brittle mode machining based on micro crack propagation. Fused silica glass, a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide, is selected as a workpiece material. It has a very low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range, especially in the ultraviolet range. The powder blasting process parameters affecting the machined results are injection pressure, abrasive particle size and density, stand-off distance, number of nozzle scanning, and shape/size of the required patterns. In this study, the influence of the number of nozzle scanning, abrasive particle size, and pattern size on the formation of micro channels is investigated. Machined shapes and surface roughness are measured using a 3-dimensional vision profiler and the results are discussed. PMID:27879730

  11. Wacky Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendrich, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Collectors everywhere know that local antique shops and flea markets are treasure troves just waiting to be plundered. Science teachers might take a hint from these hobbyists, for the next community yard sale might be a repository of old, quirky items that are just the things to get students thinking about simple machines. By introducing some…

  12. An evaluation of the effects of handpiece speed, abrasive characteristics, and polishing load on the flexural strength of polished ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rohana; Morgano, Steven M; Wu, Benjamin M; Giordano, Russell A

    2005-11-01

    Many studies on the strengthening effects of grinding and polishing, as well as heat treatment on ceramics, are not well standardized or use commercially available industrial polishing systems. The reported effectiveness of these strengthening mechanisms on ceramics may not be applicable to clinical dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of controlled polishing on the flexural strength of dental ceramics by using a custom-made machine that applied standardized loads and speeds that coincided with the mean loads and speeds used by experienced prosthodontists. A total of 140 aluminous dental ceramic bar-shaped specimens (Vitadur Alpha Enamel) measuring 1.5 x 2.0 x 25 mm were fabricated and divided into 12 groups (for most groups, n=10). Specimens were untreated, polished with different polishing systems, polished at different speeds, ground and autoglazed, polished and autoglazed, autoglazed and polished, polished with loose (paste) and bonded abrasives, or overglazed. Simulated clinical polishing was performed on the ceramic specimens by using a customized polishing apparatus that allowed independent control over the relevant polishing parameters (abrasive hardness, applied load, linear speed, rotational velocity, and wheel stiffness). Flexural strength (MPa) was measured with a 4-point bending test, and subjective surface roughness was assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Autoglazing was performed at various stages of the polishing sequence to determine the effects of polishing on surface stresses. Mean values, standard deviations, independent-sample t tests, 1-way and 2-way analyses of variance, Dunnett t tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied to the data (alpha=.05). Under a clinical load of 0.6 N for a coarse polishing wheel, 1.0 N for a medium polishing wheel, and 1.3 N for a fine polishing wheel, a linear speed of 499 mm/min, and a rotational velocity of 10,000 rpm, the use of clinical polishing instruments did not affect

  13. Toothbrush abrasivity in a long-term simulation on human dentin depends on brushing mode and bristle arrangement

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of dentin to brushing abrasion using four different toothbrushes (rotating-oscillating, sonic and two types of manual toothbrushes) with the same brushing forces. Methods Dentin samples (n = 72) were selected from 72 impacted third molars. Half of the surface of dentin samples was covered with an adhesive tape, creating a protected and a freely exposed area in the same specimen. Brushing was performed with either a: sonic (Sonicare PowerUp, Philips GmbH, Hamburg, Germany), b: oscillating-rotating (Oral B Vitality Precisions Clean, Procter & Gamble, Schwalbach am Taunus, Germany) or two different manual toothbrushes c: flat trim brush head toothbrush (Dr. Best: Original, Glaxo-Smith-Kline, Bühl, Germany) and d: rippled-shaped brush head toothbrush (Blend-a-Dent, Complete V-Interdental, Blend-a-med, Schwalbach, Germany) in a custom made automatic brushing machine. The brushing force was set to 2 N and a whitening toothpaste (RDA = 150) was used. The simulation period was performed over a calculated period to mimic a brushing behavior of two times a day brushing for eight years and six months. Dentin loss was quantitatively determined by profilometry and statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney-U Test (p < 0.05). Results The mean (standard deviation) surface loss was 21.03 (±1.26) μm for the sonic toothbrush, 15.71 (±0.85) μm for the oscillating-rotating toothbrush, 6.13 (±1.24) μm for the manual toothbrush with flat trim brush head and 2.50 (±0.43) μm for the manual toothbrush with rippled-shaped brush head. Differences between all groups were statistically significant at p<0.05. Conclusion Using the same brushing force and a highly abrasive toothpaste, manual toothbrushes are significantly less abrasive compared to power toothbrushes for an 8.5—year simulation. PMID:28222156

  14. The effects of an airborne-particle abrasion and silica-coating on the bond strength between grooved titanium alloy temporary cylinders and provisional veneering materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ann Yu-Chieh; Sharma, Arun B; Watanabe, Larry G; Finzen, Frederick C

    2011-03-01

    Even though mechanical retentive features, such as grooves, are incorporated into the surface of titanium alloy temporary cylinders, a reliable bond to veneering provisional materials is not always achievable for screw-retained provisional implant restorations. There is insufficient information about the effect of tribochemical silica coating on the bond strength between provisional materials and grooved titanium alloy temporary cylinders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the effect of an airborne-particle abrasion and silica-coating technique on the bond strength between grooved titanium alloy temporary cylinders and provisional veneering bisphenol-A glycidyl methacrylate and polymethyl methacrylate materials. Forty grooved titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) internal connection implant temporary cylinders were used. A disc of veneering material (7.1 × 3.4 mm) was created around the midsection of each cylinder. Forty specimens were divided into 4 groups (n=10): group NoTxPMMA, no surface treatment and polymethyl methacrylate veneering material; group NoTxBisGMA, no surface treatment and BisGMA veneering material; group AbPMMA, airborne-particle abrasion, silica-coating surface treatment (Rocatec), and polymethyl methacrylate; and group AbBisGMA, airborne-particle abrasion, silica-coating surface treatment (Rocatec), and BisGMA. Each specimen was subjected to ultimate shear load testing at the interface of the veneering material and the temporary cylinder in a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with a 1-way ANOVA (α=.05) followed by post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test. Each specimen underwent surface observation with a light microscope at ×40 magnification to compare fracture patterns. Airborne-particle abrasion and silica-coating surface treatment significantly lowered the shear bond strength (P<.05). The type of provisional material did not significantly affect the shear bond strength, with or

  15. Machine rates for selected forest harvesting machines

    Treesearch

    R.W. Brinker; J. Kinard; Robert Rummer; B. Lanford

    2002-01-01

    Very little new literature has been published on the subject of machine rates and machine cost analysis since 1989 when the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station Circular 296, Machine Rates for Selected Forest Harvesting Machines, was originally published. Many machines discussed in the original publication have undergone substantial changes in various aspects, not...

  16. Abrasive wear of Hilong BoTN hardfacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, L.; Fedorov, S.; Sadovnikov, A.; Ivanova, Y.; Voronina, M.

    2018-02-01

    The spread of steels, which are used to produce locks of steel drill pipes, adversely affects their wear resistance, which, in combination with low hardness of HV 2400 ... 2800 MPa as well as of the thread of screw, results in low wear resistance and the need for their reconstruction at the pipe control shop. An efficient way of improving the quality of drill pipe jonts is to hard-face them by the outside diameter with wear-resistant materials (hardbanding). One of the companies engaged in the development of hardfacing materials and hardbanding is Hilong (China) with weld seams of the brand BoTn. According to the results of the studies the following conclusion can be made: hardfacing increases the durability of the hardware, contributing to an increase in wear resistance of locks of DP under the conditions of abrasive action of aggressive geological formations; the usage of DP without wear-resistant weld seams is impermissible, because their further operation, as part of the drill-stem, can lead to emergency consequences; application of the pipes with the hardfacing collars together with the collars without hardfacing, due to varying degree of wear of jonts in the drill-stem, is also impermissible.

  17. Experimental investigation of the abrasive crown dynamics in orbital atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yihao; Belmont, Barry; Shih, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Orbital atherectomy is a catheter-based minimally invasive procedure to modify the plaque within atherosclerotic arteries using a diamond abrasive crown. This study was designed to investigate the crown motion and its corresponding contact force with the vessel. To this end, a transparent arterial tissue-mimicking phantom made of polyvinyl chloride was developed, a high-speed camera and image processing technique were utilized to visualize and quantitatively analyze the crown motion in the vessel phantom, and a piezoelectric dynamometer measured the forces on the phantom during the procedure. Observed under typical orbital atherectomy rotational speeds of 60,000, 90,000, and 120,000rpm in a 4.8mm caliber vessel phantom, the crown motion was a combination of high-frequency rotation at 1000, 1500, and 1660.4-1866.1Hz and low-frequency orbiting at 18, 38, and 40Hz, respectively. The measured forces were also composed of these high and low frequencies, matching well with the rotation of the eccentric crown and the associated orbital motion. The average peak force ranged from 0.1 to 0.4N at different rotational speeds. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Abrasion-set limits on Himalayan gravel flux.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Elizabeth H; Attal, Mikaël; Sinclair, Hugh D

    2017-04-26

    Rivers sourced in the Himalayan mountain range carry some of the largest sediment loads on the planet, yet coarse gravel in these rivers vanishes within approximately 10-40 kilometres on entering the Ganga Plain (the part of the North Indian River Plain containing the Ganges River). Understanding the fate of gravel is important for forecasting the response of rivers to large influxes of sediment triggered by earthquakes or storms. Rapid increase in gravel flux and subsequent channel bed aggradation (that is, sediment deposition by a river) following the 1999 Chi-Chi and 2008 Wenchuan earthquakes reduced channel capacity and increased flood inundation. Here we present an analysis of fan geometry, sediment grain size and lithology in the Ganga Basin. We find that the gravel fluxes from rivers draining the central Himalayan mountains, with upstream catchment areas ranging from about 350 to 50,000 square kilometres, are comparable. Our results show that abrasion of gravel during fluvial transport can explain this observation; most of the gravel sourced more than 100 kilometres upstream is converted into sand by the time it reaches the Ganga Plain. These findings indicate that earthquake-induced sediment pulses sourced from the Greater Himalayas, such as that following the 2015 Gorkha earthquake, are unlikely to drive increased gravel aggradation at the mountain front. Instead, we suggest that the sediment influx should result in an elevated sand flux, leading to distinct patterns of aggradation and flood risk in the densely populated, low-relief Ganga Plain.

  19. Report D : self-consolidating concrete (SCC) for infrastructure elements - creep, shrinkage and abrasion resistance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    Concrete specimens were fabricated for shrinkage, creep, and abrasion resistance : testing. Variations of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete were : all tested. The results were compared to previous similar testing programs an...

  20. Effect of dried sunflower seeds on incisal edge abrasion: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Rath, Avita; Ramamurthy, Priyadarshini H; Fernandes, Bennete Aloysius; Sidhu, Preena

    2017-01-01

    Tooth surface loss (TSL) is a complex phenomenon characterized by the loss of hard tooth structure at various locations of the teeth, usually due to more than one factor. TSL due to abrasion can be significant in patients consuming coarse, abrasive diet. The present case reports an interesting incisal edge abrasion in a female patient, attributed to a particular dietary behavior of long-term consumption of sunflower seeds. All her family members and most of the people from her native place were also reported to have similar lesions by the patient. Larger epidemiological studies to assess the prevalence and severity of such abrasive lesions in geographic areas with this particular dietary habit need to be carried out so that people may be made aware and educated about alternative ways of eating sunflower seeds that will not cause any form of tooth wear.

  1. Abrasion-resistant concrete mix designs for precast bridge deck panels.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-01

    The report documents laboratory investigations undertaken to develop high performance concrete (HPC) for precast and pre-stressed bridge deck components that would reduce the life-cycle cost of bridges by improving the studded tire wear (abrasion) re...

  2. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  3. Feasibility and Economics Study of the Treatment, Recycling and Disposal of Spent Abrasives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-09

    compression, and film stripping. The recycling performance testing plan is summarized in Table 2. (The test plan is discussed in detail in Appendix B: Law...D1188 Yes Yes Immersion Compression ................... ASTM C4867 Yes Yes Film Stripping................................... CalTrans 302 Yes Yes...from 10% to 20% for aluminum oxide abrasives, and 15% to 30% for garnet abrasives. 9 Data Intepretation SSPC-AB 1 requires that the conductivitiy of

  4. Characterization of Conventional and High-Translucency Y-TZP Dental Ceramics Submitted to Air Abrasion.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Guimarães, Renato Bastos; Noronha-Filho, Jaime Dutra; Botelho, Glauco Dos Santos; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air-abrasion on t®m phase transformation, roughness, topography and the elemental composition of three Y-TZP (Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal) dental ceramics: two conventional (Lava Frame and IPS ZirCad) and one with high-translucency (Lava Plus). Plates obtained from sintered blocks of each ceramic were divided into four groups: AS (as-sintered); 30 (air-abrasion with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles); 50 (air-abrasion with 50 mm Al2O3 particles) and 150 (air-abrasion with 150 mm Al2O3 particles). After the treatments, the plates were submitted to X-ray diffractometry; 3-D profilometry and SEM/EDS. The AS surfaces were composed of Zr and t phases. All treatments produced t®m phase transformation in the ceramics. The diameter of air-abrasion particles influenced the roughness (150>50>30>AS) and the topography. SEM analysis showed that the three treatments produced groove-shaped microretentions on the ceramic surfaces, which increased with the diameter of air-abrasion particles. EDS showed a decrease in Zr content along with the emergence of O and Al elements after air-abrasion. Presence of Si was also detected on the plates air-abraded with 30 mm Si-coated Al2O3 particles. It was concluded that irrespective of the type and diameter of the particles, air-abrasion produced t®m phase transformation, increased the roughness and changed the elemental composition of the three Y-TZP dental ceramics. Lava Plus also behaved similarly to the conventional Y-TZP ceramics, indicating that this high translucency ceramic could be more suitable to build monolithic ceramic restorations in the aesthetic restorative dentistry field.

  5. Abrasive Wear of Four Direct Restorative Materials by Standard and Whitening Dentifrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    after an acidic challenge . Enamel loss was significantly greater when erosive and abrasive effects were combined. They concluded that acid-softened...surrounding soft tissues. Another benefit of restoration is the elimination of a challenging area for the patient and hygienist to clean. These areas...abrasion challenge ; the resin cement with the smallest sized filler particles had the smallest weight loss and maintained the smoothest surface of all the

  6. Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Achim; Mahidadia, Ashesh

    The purpose of this chapter is to present fundamental ideas and techniques of machine learning suitable for the field of this book, i.e., for automated scientific discovery. The chapter focuses on those symbolic machine learning methods, which produce results that are suitable to be interpreted and understood by humans. This is particularly important in the context of automated scientific discovery as the scientific theories to be produced by machines are usually meant to be interpreted by humans. This chapter contains some of the most influential ideas and concepts in machine learning research to give the reader a basic insight into the field. After the introduction in Sect. 1, general ideas of how learning problems can be framed are given in Sect. 2. The section provides useful perspectives to better understand what learning algorithms actually do. Section 3 presents the Version space model which is an early learning algorithm as well as a conceptual framework, that provides important insight into the general mechanisms behind most learning algorithms. In section 4, a family of learning algorithms, the AQ family for learning classification rules is presented. The AQ family belongs to the early approaches in machine learning. The next, Sect. 5 presents the basic principles of decision tree learners. Decision tree learners belong to the most influential class of inductive learning algorithms today. Finally, a more recent group of learning systems are presented in Sect. 6, which learn relational concepts within the framework of logic programming. This is a particularly interesting group of learning systems since the framework allows also to incorporate background knowledge which may assist in generalisation. Section 7 discusses Association Rules - a technique that comes from the related field of Data mining. Section 8 presents the basic idea of the Naive Bayesian Classifier. While this is a very popular learning technique, the learning result is not well suited for

  7. Drilling Machines: Vocational Machine Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    The lessons and supportive information in this field tested instructional block provide a guide for teachers in developing a machine shop course of study in drilling. The document is comprised of operation sheets, information sheets, and transparency masters for 23 lessons. Each lesson plan includes a performance objective, material and tools,…

  8. Mangrove Cultivation For Dealing With Coastal Abrasion Case Study Of Karangsong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimatuzzahroh, Feti; Hadi, Sudharto P.; Purnaweni, Hartuti

    2018-02-01

    Coastal abrasion is consequence from destructive waves and sea current. One of cause is human intervention. The effort to solve of abrasion is by mangrove cultivation. Mangroves are halophyte plant that can restrain the sea wave. Mangrove cultivation required participation community that give awareness the importance of mangrove in coastal sustainability. Mangroves in coastal Karangsong, Indramayu west java, in 2007 was through abrasion approximately 127.30 ha. Mangrove cultivation in Karangsong has been replanting since 1998 to 2003, but there was no maintenance and management. In 2007 until 2015 Karangsong replanting mangroves and has been succeed. Karangsong became the center of mangrove study for west java area in 2015. This achievement is result of cooperation between community, NGO, and local government. In addition, this effort made not only overcome the abrasion problem but also give community awareness about the importance of mangrove cultivation in preventing coastal abrasion throughout community development. This paper reviews abrasion in Karangsong and the impact for local community and empowerment in mangrove cultivation. To achieve the success mangrove cultivation required community development approach from planning process, planting, maintenance and management.

  9. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  11. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  12. Jets in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Tim

    2018-05-01

    Jet streams, "jets" for short, are remarkably coherent streams of air found in every major atmosphere. They have a profound effect on a planet's global circulation, and have been an enigma since the belts and zones of Jupiter were discovered in the 1600s. The study of jets, including what processes affect their size, strength, direction, shear stability, and predictability, are active areas of research in geophysical fluid dynamics. Jet research is multidisciplinary and global, involving collaborations between observers, experimentalists, numerical modelers, and applied mathematicians. Jets in atmospheres have strong analogies with shear instability in nonneutral plasmas, and these connections are highlighted throughout the article. The article begins with a description of four major challenges that jet researchers face: nonlinearity, non-intuitive wave physics, non-constant-coefficients, and copious nondimensional numbers. Then, two general fluid-dynamical tenets, the practice of rendering expressions dimensionally homogeneous (nondimensional), and the universal properties of shocks are applied to the open question of what controls the on-off switch of shear instability. The discussion progresses to how the physics of jets varies in equatorial, midlatitude, and polar regions, and how jets are observed to behave in each of these settings. The all-in-one conservation law of potential vorticity (PV), which combines the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and thermal energy into a single expression, is the common language of jet research. Earth and Uranus have weak retrograde equatorial jets, but most planets exhibit super-rotating equatorial jets, which require eddies to transport momentum up gradient in a non-intuitive manner. Jupiter and Saturn exhibit multiple alternating jets in their midlatitudes. The theory for why jets are invariably zonal (east-west orientated) is reviewed, and the particular challenges that Jupiter's sharp westward jets present to existing

  13. The use of water-jetting technology in prostheses revision surgery-first results of parameter studies on bone and bone cement.

    PubMed

    Honl, M; Rentzsch, R; Müller, G; Brandt, C; Bluhm, A; Hille, E; Louis, H; Morlock, M

    2000-01-01

    Water-jet cutting techniques have been used in industrial applications for many different materials. Recently these techniques have been developed into a revolutionary cutting tool for soft tissues in visceral surgery. The present study investigates the usage of this cutting technology for the revision surgery of endoprostheses. In the first part of the study, samples of bovine bone and acrylic bone cement (PMMA) were cut using an industrial jet cutting device with pure water. Below 400 bar, only PMMA was cut; above 400 bar, bone was also cut, but only pressures above 800 bar resulted in clinically useful rates of material removal (cut depth 2. 4 mm at 10 mm/min traverse speed). In the second part of the study, the effect of adding biocompatible abrasives to the water in order to reduce the required pressure was investigated, resulting in a significantly higher removal of material. At 600 bar, PMMA was cut 5. 2 mm deep with plain water and 15.2 mm deep with added abrasives. The quality of the cuts was increased by the abrasive. Though there was no clear selectivity between bone and PMMA any more, the rate of material removal at similar pressures was significantly higher for PMMA than for bone (600 bar: 1.6 mm cut depth for bone samples, 15.2 mm for PMMA). The measured cut depths with either method were not influenced by a change of the cutting direction with respect to the main direction of the osteons in the bone. However, a reduction of the jet surface angle (90 degrees to 23 degrees ) resulted for bone in a significantly lower cut depth at 600 bar (plain water: 0.62 mm vs. 0.06 mm; abrasive: 1.61 mm vs. 0.60 mm). The laboratory experiments indicate that abrasive water jets may be suitable for cutting biomaterials like bone and bone cement. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J. R.; Meloy, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere themselves to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs' hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated

  15. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment MECA Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J.; Meloy, T. P.; Cobbly, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs'hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated: note that

  16. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  17. Toothbrushing abrasion susceptibility of enamel and dentin bleached with calcium-supplemented hydrogen peroxide gel.

    PubMed

    Borges, A B; Santos, L F T F; Augusto, M G; Bonfiette, D; Hara, A T; Torres, C R G

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate enamel and dentin susceptibility to toothbrushing abrasion, after bleaching with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel supplemented or not with 0.5% calcium gluconate (Ca). Toothbrushing was performed immediately and 1h after bleaching, with two suspensions (high and low abrasivity). Bovine enamel and dentin specimens were divided into 12 groups (n=10) according to the bleaching gel (with and without Ca), slurry abrasivity (high or low) and elapsed time after bleaching (immediately and after 1h). As control, a group was not bleached, but abraded. The treatment cycle (7 d) consisted of bleaching (1h) and toothbrushing (135 strokes/day) immediatelly or after 1h of artificial saliva exposure. Surface roughness and surface loss (μm) were measured by profilometry and analysed by three-way ANOVA (5%). Surface roughness means were significantly influenced by slurry abrasivity (p<0.0001). For enamel loss, significant triple interaction was observed (p<0.0001). HP-bleached groups and immediately brushed with high-abrasive slurry exhibited increased loss (1.41±0.14) compared to other groups (μm). Control and HP+Ca-bleached groups brushed after 1h with low abrasive slurry presented the lowest loss (0.21±0.03/0.27±0.02). For dentin loss, significant interaction was observed for bleaching and interval factors (p<0.001). 7.5%HP-bleached groups and immediately brushed showed significantly higher loss (8.71±2.45) than the other groups. It was concluded that surface roughness increased when high abrasive was used, independently of bleaching. 7.5%HP increased enamel and dentin loss, mainly with high abrasive slurries. Calcium supplementation of bleaching gel reduced surface loss. Additionally, in order to minimize tooth wear susceptibility, it is recommended to delay brushing after bleaching. After bleaching gel application, postponing toothbrushing is recommended, as well as brushing with low abrasive dentifrices. Additionally

  18. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  19. The remarkable AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei

    The jets from active galactic nuclei exhibit stability which seems to be far superior compared to that of terrestrial and laboratory jets. They manage to propagate over distances up to a billion of initial jet radii. Yet this may not be an indication of some exotic physics but mainly a reflection of the specific environment these jets propagate through. The key property of this environment is a rapid decline of density and pressure along the jet, which promotes its rapid expansion. Such an expansion can suppress global instabilities, which require communication across the jet, and hence ensure its survival over huge distances. At kpc scales, some AGN jets do show signs of strong instabilities and even turn into plumes. This could be a result of the flattening of the external pressure distribution in their host galaxies or inside the radio lobes. In this regard, we discuss the possible connection between the stability issue and the Fanaroff-Riley classification of extragalactic radio sources. The observations of AGN jets on sub-kpc scale do not seem to support their supposed lack of causal connectivity. When interpreted using simple kinematic models, they reveal a rather perplexing picture with more questions than answers on the jets dynamics.

  20. Tool path strategy and cutting process monitoring in intelligent machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Chengdong; An, Qinglong; Ming, Weiwei

    2018-06-01

    Intelligent machining is a current focus in advanced manufacturing technology, and is characterized by high accuracy and efficiency. A central technology of intelligent machining—the cutting process online monitoring and optimization—is urgently needed for mass production. In this research, the cutting process online monitoring and optimization in jet engine impeller machining, cranio-maxillofacial surgery, and hydraulic servo valve deburring are introduced as examples of intelligent machining. Results show that intelligent tool path optimization and cutting process online monitoring are efficient techniques for improving the efficiency, quality, and reliability of machining.

  1. Effects of Load and Speed on Wear Rate of Abrasive Wear for 2014 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabas, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the normal load and sliding speed on wear rate of two-body abrasive wear for 2014 Al Alloy were investigated in detail. In order to understand the variation in wear behaviour with load and speed, wear tests were carried out at a sliding distance of 11 m, a speed of 0.36 m/s, a duration of 30 s and loads in the range 3-11 N using 220 grit abrasive paper, and at a speed range 0.09-0.90 m/s, a load of 5 N and an average sliding distance of 11 m using abrasive papers of 150 grit size under dry friction conditions. Before the wear tests, solution treatment of the 2014 Al alloy was carried out at temperatures of 505 and 520 °C for 1 h in a muffle furnace and then quenched in cold water at 15 °C. Later, the ageing treatment was carried out at 185 °C for 8 h in the furnace. Generally, wear rate due to time increased linearly and linear wear resistance decreased with increasing loads. However, the wear rate was directly proportional to the load up to a critical load of 7 N. After this load, the slope of the curves decreased because the excessive deformation of the worn surface and the instability of the abrasive grains began to increase. When the load on an abrasive grain reaches a critical value, the groove width is about 0.17 of the abrasive grain diameter, and the abrasive grains begin to fail. The wear rate due to time increased slightly as the sliding speed increased in the range 0.09-0.90 m/s. The reason for this is that changes arising from strain rate and friction heating are expected with increasing sliding speeds.

  2. Impact of dentifrice abrasivity and remineralization time on erosive tooth wear in vitro.

    PubMed

    Buedel, Sarah; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick T; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the in vitro effects of simulated dentifrice slurry abrasivity (L-low, M-medium and H-high) and remineralization time (0, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) on erosive tooth wear. Enamel and root dentin specimens were prepared from bovine incisors (n= 8) and submitted to a cycling protocol including erosion, remineralization at the test times, and brushing with each of the tested slurries, for 5 days. Dental surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry. Data was analyzed using mixed-model ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (alpha= 0.05). SL generally increased along with the increase in slurry abrasive level, with significance dependent upon the specific substrate and remineralization times. H showed the highest SL on both enamel and dentin; remineralization for 30 minutes reduced SL significantly (P< 0.05), but only for enamel. M showed intermediate SL values, with remineralization benefit clearly seen only after 120 minutes of remineralization (P< 0.05). L caused the least SL for both enamel and dentin, which was further reduced after remineralization for 120 and 30 minutes, respectively (both P< 0.05). Overall, root dentin had significantly higher SL than enamel. Less abrasive dentifrice slurries were able to reduce toothbrushing abrasion on both enamel and root dentin. This protection was enhanced by remineralization for all abrasive levels on enamel, but only for L on root dentin. High-risk erosion patients should avoid highly abrasive toothpastes, as remineralization can only partially compensate for their deleterious effects on eroded dental surfaces. Lower abrasive toothpastes are recommended. Copyright©American Journal of Dentistry.

  3. Investigating selective transport and abrasion on an alluvial fan using quantitative grain size and shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Selective sorting and abrasion are the two major fluvial processes that are attributed to the downstream fining of sediments in rivers and alluvial fans. Selective transport is the process by which smaller grains are preferentially transported downstream while larger grains are deposited closer to the source. Abrasion is defined by the production of fine sediments and sand that occurs by saltation of gravel, where particle-to-particle collisions supply the energy required to break apart grains. We hypothesize that abrasion results in the gradual fining of large grains and the production of fine sands and silts, while sorting accounts for the differences in transport of these two grain-size fractions produced from abrasion, thereby creating the abrupt gravel-sand transition observed in many channel systems. In this research, we explore both selective transport and abrasion processes on the Dog Canyon alluvial fan near Alamogordo, New Mexico. We complete an extensive grain size analysis down the main channel of the fan employing an image-based technique that utilizes an autocorrelation process. We also characterize changes in grain shape using standard shape parameters, as well as Fourier analysis, which allows the study of contributions of grain roughness on a variety of length scales. Sorting appears to dominate the upper portion of the fan; the grain-size distribution narrows moving downstream until reaching a point of equal mobility, at which point sorting ceases. Abrasion exerts a subtle but persistent effect on grains during transport down the fan. Shape analysis reveals that particles become more rounded by the removal of small-scale textural features, a process that is expected to only modestly influence grain size of gravel, but should produce significant quantities of sand. This study provides a better understanding of the importance of grain abrasion and sorting on the downstream fining of channel grains in an alluvial fan, as well as an improved knowledge

  4. [Polyethylene abrasion: cause or consequence of an endoprosthesis loosening? Investigations of firm and loosened hip implants].

    PubMed

    Busse, B; Niecke, M; Püschel, K; Delling, G; Katzer, A; Hahn, M

    2007-01-01

    Periprosthetic tissue was analysed by the combination of different investigation techniques without destruction. The localisation and geometry of polyethylene abrasion particles were determined quantitatively to differentiate between abrasion due to function and abrasion due to implant loosening. Non-polyethylene particles from implant components which contaminate the tissue were micro-analytically measured. The results will help us to understand loosening mechanisms and thus lead to implant optimisations. A non-destructive particle analysis using highly sensitive proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was developed to achieve a better histological allocation. Five autopsy cases with firmly fitting hip endoprosthesis (2 x Endo-Modell Mark III, 1 x St. Georg Mark II, LINK, Germany; 2 x Spongiosa Metal II, ESKA, Germany) were prepared as ground tissue specimens. Wear investigations were accomplished with a combined application of different microscopic techniques and microanalysis. The abrasion due to implant loosening was histologically evaluated on 293 loosened cup implants (St. Georg Mark II, LINK, Germany). Wear particles are heterogeneously distributed in the soft tissue. In cases of cemented prostheses, cement particles are dominating whereas metal particles could rarely be detected. The concentration of the alloy constituent cobalt (Co) is increased in the mineralised bone tissue. The measured co-depositions depend on the localisation and/or lifetime of an implant. Functional polyethylene (PE) abrasion needs to be differentiated from PE abrasion of another genesis (loosening, impingement) morphologically and by different tissue reactions. In the past a reduction of abrasion was targeted primarily by the optimisation of the bearing surfaces and tribology. The interpretation of our findings indicates that different mechanisms of origin in terms of tissue contamination with wear debris and the alloy should be included in the improvement of implants or implantation

  5. Deformations of free jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruchuri, Srinivas

    This thesis studies three different problems. First we demonstrate that a flowing liquid jet can be controllably split into two separate subfilaments through the applications of a sufficiently strong tangential stress to the surface of the jet. In contrast, normal stresses can never split a liquid jet. We apply these results to observations of uncontrolled splitting of jets in electric fields. The experimental realization of controllable jet splitting would provide an entirely novel route for producing small polymeric fibers. In the second chapter we present an analytical model for the bending of liquid jets and sheets from temperature gradients, as recently observed by Chwalek et al. [Phys. Fluids, 14, L37 (2002)]. The bending arises from a local couple caused by Marangoni forces. The dependence of the bending angle on experimental parameters is presented, in qualitative agreement with reported experiments. The methodology gives a simple framework for understanding the mechanisms for jet and sheet bending. In chapter 4 we address the discrepancy between hydrodynamic theory of liquid jets, and the snap-off of narrow liquid jets observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [23]. This has been previously attributed to the significant role of thermal fluctuations in nanofluidic systems. We argue that hydrodynamic description of such systems should include corrections to the Laplace pressure which result from the failure of the sharp interface assumption when the jet diameter becomes small enough. We show that this effect can in principle give rise to jet shapes similar to those observed in MD simulations, even when thermal fluctuations are completely neglected. Finally we summarize an algorithm developed to simulate droplet impact on a smooth surface.

  6. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  7. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  8. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing PMID:26229264

  9. Release of carbon nanotubes from an epoxy-based nanocomposite during an abrasion process.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Chu, Bryan T T; Buha, Jelena; Nüesch, Frank; Wang, Jing

    2012-07-03

    The abrasion behavior of an epoxy/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite was investigated. An experimental setup has been established to perform abrasion, particle measurement, and collection all in one. The abraded particles were characterized by particle size distribution and by electron microscopy. The abrasion process was carried out with a Taber Abraser, and the released particles were collected by a tube for further investigation. The particle size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and revealed four size modes for all measured samples. The mode corresponding to the smallest particle sizes of 300-400 nm was measured with the SMPS and showed a trend of increasing size with increasing nanofiller content. The three measured modes with particle sizes from 0.6 to 2.5 μm, measured with the APS, were similar for all samples. The measured particle concentrations were between 8000 and 20,000 particles/cm(3) for measurements with the SMPS and between 1000 and 3000 particles/cm(3) for measurements with the APS. Imaging by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that free-standing individual CNTs and agglomerates were emitted during abrasion.

  10. Air powder abrasive treatment as an implant surface cleaning method: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Tastepe, Ceylin S; van Waas, Rien; Liu, Yuelian; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the air powder abrasive treatment as an implant surface cleaning method for peri-implantitis based on the existing literature. A PubMed search was conducted to find articles that reported on air powder abrasive treatment as an implant surface cleaning method for peri-implantitis. The studies evaluated cleaning efficiency and surface change as a result of the method. Furthermore, cell response toward the air powder abrasive-treated discs, reosseointegration, and clinical outcome after treatment is also reported. The PubMed search resulted in 27 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. In vitro cleaning efficiency of the method is reported to be high. The method resulted in minor surface changes on titanium specimens. Although the air powder abrasive-treated specimens showed sufficient levels of cell attachment and cell viability, the cell response decreased compared with sterile discs. Considerable reosseointegration between 39% and 46% and improved clinical parameters were reported after treatment when applied in combination with surgical treatment. The results of the treatment are influenced by the powder type used, the application time, and whether powder was applied surgically or nonsurgically. The in vivo data on air powder abrasive treatment as an implant surface cleaning method is not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. However, in vitro results allow the clinician to consider the method as a promising option for implant surface cleaning in peri-implantitis treatment.

  11. A Study on Postmortem Wound Dating by Gross and Histopathological Examination of Abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, Javaregowda; Harish, Sathyanarayana; Mangala, Gouri S.R.; Hugar, Basappa S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Abrasions are the most common blunt force injuries. The precise dating of injury is extremely important in forensic medicine practice. As we know, the wound healing occurs in well-orchestrated sequence, consisting of inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. A study of occurrence of such phases will help in understanding the sequence of events in wound healing. In this context, this study of wound dating from gross and microscopic level was taken. Materials and Methods Postmortem study of wound dating by gross and histopathological examination of abrasions was carried out in the Department of Forensic Medicine, in M.S. Ramaiah Medical College. A total of 101 abrasions were correlated to time frame the occurrence of different gross changes and microscopic changes that follow the blunt trauma. Abrasions ranging from 0 hour to a maximum of 45 days were studied. Results The gross changes of abrasions were in correlation with the microscopic changes; however, the role of the comorbid conditions is significant because the results showed variations with respect to healing process. Conclusions This study signifies that, if naked eye examination is studied along with histopathological examination, the reliability and accuracy of dating of wound increase. Whenever accurate determination of age is required, the autopsy surgeon can subject the samples for histopathological examination and correlate before opining the age of injury. PMID:28418938

  12. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  13. A Study on Postmortem Wound Dating by Gross and Histopathological Examination of Abrasions.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Javaregowda; Harish, Sathyanarayana; Mangala, Gouri S R; Hugar, Basappa S

    2017-06-01

    Abrasions are the most common blunt force injuries. The precise dating of injury is extremely important in forensic medicine practice. As we know, the wound healing occurs in well-orchestrated sequence, consisting of inflammation, proliferation, and maturation.A study of occurrence of such phases will help in understanding the sequence of events in wound healing. In this context, this study of wound dating from gross and microscopic level was taken. Postmortem study of wound dating by gross and histopathological examination of abrasions was carried out in the Department of Forensic Medicine, in M.S. Ramaiah Medical College. A total of 101 abrasions were correlated to time frame the occurrence of different gross changes and microscopic changes that follow the blunt trauma. Abrasions ranging from 0 hour to a maximum of 45 days were studied. The gross changes of abrasions were in correlation with the microscopic changes; however, the role of the comorbid conditions is significant because the results showed variations with respect to healing process. This study signifies that, if naked eye examination is studied along with histopathological examination, the reliability and accuracy of dating of wound increase. Whenever accurate determination of age is required, the autopsy surgeon can subject the samples for histopathological examination and correlate before opining the age of injury.

  14. Cracking of porcelain surfaces arising from abrasive grinding with a dental air turbine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chee W; Waddell, J Neil; Lyons, Karl M; Swain, Michael V

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate porcelain cracking induced by abrasive grinding with a conventional dental air turbine and abrasive diamond burs. Four commercially available porcelains were examined-Wieland ALLUX, Wieland ZIROX, IPS e.max Ceram, and IPS Empress Esthetic Veneering porcelain. Sixty discs of each porcelain type were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions, followed by an auto-glaze cycle. Abrasive grinding using fine, extra-fine, and ultra-fine diamond burs was carried out, using a conventional dental air turbine. The grinding parameters were standardized with regard to the magnitude of the force applied, rotational speed of the diamond bur, and flow rate of the water coolant. A testing apparatus was used to control the magnitude of force applied during the grinding procedure. The ground surfaces were then examined under scanning electron microscope. Cracking was seen for all porcelain types when ground with the fine bur. Cracking was not seen for specimens ground with the extra-fine or the ultra-fine bur. Wet abrasive grinding with a conventional dental air turbine and fine grit diamond burs has the potential to cause cracking in the four porcelain types tested. Similar abrasive grinding with smaller grit size particles does not cause similar observable cracking. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  16. Dependence of Non-Prestonian Behavior of Ceria Slurry with Anionic Surfactant on Abrasive Concentration and Size in Shallow Trench Isolation Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun‑Goo; Kim, Dae‑Hyeong; Katoh, Takeo; Kim, Sung‑Jun; Paik, Ungyu; Park, Jea‑Gun

    2006-05-01

    The dependencies of the non-Prestonian behavior of ceria slurry with anionic surfactant on the size and concentration of abrasive particles were investigated by performing chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) experiments using blanket wafers. We found that not only the abrasive size but also the abrasive concentration with surfactant addition influences the non-Prestonian behavior. Such behavior is clearly exhibited with small abrasive sizes and a higher concentrations of abrasives with surfactant addition, because the abrasive particles can locally contact the film surface more effectively with applied pressure. We introduce a factor to quantify these relations with the non-Prestonian behavior of a slurry. For ceria slurry, this non-Prestonian factor, βNP, was determined to be almost independent of the abrasive concentration for a larger size and a smaller weight conentration of abrasive particles, but it increased with the surfactant concentration for a smaller size and a higher concentration of abrasives with surfactant addition.

  17. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  18. New tools for jet analysis in high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffty, Daniel

    Our understanding of the fundamental interactions of particles has come far in the last century, and is still pushing forward. As we build ever more powerful machines to probe higher and higher energies, we will need to develop new tools to not only understand the new physics objects we are trying to detect, but even to understand the environment that we are searching in. We examine methods of identifying both boosted objects and low energy jets which will be shrouded in a sea of noise from other parts of the detector. We display the power of boosted-b tagging in a simulated W search. We also examine the effect of pileup on low energy jet reconstructions. For this purpose we develop a new priority-based jet algorithm, "p-jets", to cluster the energy that belongs together, but ignore the rest.

  19. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  20. Electrical machine

    SciTech Connect

    De Bock, Hendrik Pieter Jacobus; Alexander, James Pellegrino; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi

    2016-06-21

    An apparatus, such as an electrical machine, is provided. The apparatus can include a rotor defining a rotor bore and a conduit disposed in and extending axially along the rotor bore. The conduit can have an annular conduit body defining a plurality of orifices disposed axially along the conduit and extending through the conduit body. The rotor can have an inner wall that at least partially defines the rotor bore. The orifices can extend through the conduit body along respective orifice directions, and the rotor and conduit can be configured to provide a line of sight along the orifice directionmore » from the respective orifices to the inner wall.« less

  1. The effect of air abrasion of metal implant abutments on the tensile bond strength of three luting agents used to cement implant superstructures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Jugdev, Jasvinder; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lynch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of airborne particle abrasion of metal implant abutments on tensile bond strength (TBS) of TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier implant cements. Specimens were designed to replicate a single metal implant crown cemented to both smooth and airborne particle-abraded Osteo-Ti implant abutments with zero degrees of taper. Twenty castings were fabricated and cemented to either a smooth surface abutment (SSA) or to an airborne particle-abraded abutment (AAA). TBS was measured with a 50-kg load and a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min in a universal testing machine. Each cement was tested 10 times on both abutment types. The mean TBS values (standard deviations, 95% confidence intervals) of SSAs for TempBond, Retrieve, and Premier cements were 115.89 N (26.44, 96.98-134.81), 134.43 N (36.95, 108.25-160.60), and 132.51 N (55.10, 93.09-171.93), respectively. The corresponding values for AAAs were 129.69 N (30.39, 107.95-151.43), 298.67 N (80.36, 241.19-356.16), and 361.17 N (133.23, 265.86-456.48), respectively. There was no significant difference in TBS among the dental cements when used with an SSA. Air abrasion of abutments did not increase the TBS of TempBond but significantly increased crown retention with Retrieve and Premier. For SSAs, all failures were adhesive on the abutment surface; for AAAs, mostly cohesive cement failures occurred. The retention of copings cemented with Retrieve or Premier to zero-degree-taper abutments was significantly increased after airborne particle abrasion of the abutments. However, this was not significant when TempBond was used. Airborne particle abrasion of abutments and the use of Retrieve or Premier can be recommended for nonretrievable prostheses. Although TempBond functioned similarly to the two other cements in SSAs, it is advisable to limit its use to provisional prostheses; its long-term performance needs to be assessed clinically.

  2. Pre-polishing on a CNC platform with bound abrasive contour tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffer, Adrienne E.

    2003-05-01

    Deterministic micorgrinding (DMG) of optical glasses and ceramics is the commercial manufacturing process of choice to shape glass surfaces prior to final finishing. This process employs rigid bound matrix diamond tooling resulting in surface roughness values of 3-51.tm peak to valley and 100-400nm rms, as well as mid-spatial frequency tool marks that require subsequent removal in secondary finishing steps. The ability to pre-polish optical surfaces within the grinding platform would reduce final finishing process times. Bound abrasive contour wheels containing cerium oxide, alumina or zirconia abrasives were constructed with an epoxy matrix. The effects of abrasive type, composition, and erosion promoters were examined for tool hardness (Shore D), and tested with commercial optical glasses in an OptiproTM CNC grinding platform. Metrology protocols were developed to examine tool wear and subsequent surface roughness. Work is directed to demonstrating effective material removal, improved surface roughness and cutter mark removal.

  3. Abrasive wear behavior of in-situ RZ5-10wt%TiC composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Deepak; Mahapatra, M. M.; Harsha, S. P.

    2018-05-01

    RZ5 Magnesium alloys containing zinc, rare earth and zirconium are well-known to have high specific strength, good creep resistance widely used in aerospace components. The incorporation of hard ceramic strengthens RZ5 mg alloy. The RZ5-10wt%TiC composite has been fabricated in situ using RZ5 mg alloy as matrix and TiC as reinforcement by self propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) technique. This paper investigates the abrasive wear behavior of RZ5-10wt%TiC. Tests were performed using pin-on-disc apparatus against 600 grit abrasive paper by varying the sliding distance and applied load. The results showed improvement in the wear resistance of testing composite as compared to the unreinforced RZ5 Mg alloy. The coefficient of friction and weight loss increased linearly as applied load and sliding distance increased. The field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) showed dominate wear mechanisms: abrasion, ploughing grooves.

  4. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J.; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  5. Photodetector Development for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on the Sojourner Microrover of the Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    On-board the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, launched in December of 1996, is a small roving vehicle named Sojourner. On Sojourner is an experiment to determine the abrasive characteristics of the Martian surface, called the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The experiment works as follows: one of the wheels of the rover has a strip of black anodized aluminum bonded to the tread. The aluminum strip has thin coatings of aluminum, nickel and platinum deposited in patches. There are five (5) patches or samples of each metal, and the patches range in thickness from 200 A to 1000 A. The different metals were chosen for their differing hardness and their environmental stability. As the wheel is spun in the Martian soil, the thin patches of metal are abraded away, exposing the black anodization. The abrasion is monitored by measuring the amount of light reflected off of the samples. A photodetector was developed for this purpose, and that is the subject of this paper.

  6. Abrasion-ablation model for neutron production in heavy ion reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1995-01-01

    In heavy ion reactions, neutron production at forward angles is observed to occur with a Gaussian shape that is centered near the beam energy and extends to energies well above that of the beam. This paper presents an abrasion-ablation model for making quantitative predictions of the neutron spectrum. To describe neutrons produced from the abrasion step of the reaction where the projectile and target overlap, the authors use the Glauber model and include effects of final-state interactions. They then use the prefragment mass distribution from abrasion with a statistical evaporation model to estimate the neutron spectrum resulting from ablation. Measurements of neutron production from Ne and Nb beams are compared with calculations, and good agreement is found.

  7. Jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  8. Jet angularity measurements for single inclusive jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Lee, Kyle; Ringer, Felix

    2018-04-01

    We study jet angularity measurements for single-inclusive jet production at the LHC. Jet angularities depend on a continuous parameter a allowing for a smooth interpolation between different traditional jet shape observables. We establish a factorization theorem within Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) where we consistently take into account in- and out-of-jet radiation by making use of semi-inclusive jet functions. For comparison, we elaborate on the differences to jet angularities measured on an exclusive jet sample. All the necessary ingredients for the resummation at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) accuracy are presented within the effective field theory framework. We expect semiinclusive jet angularity measurements to be feasible at the LHC and we present theoretical predictions for the relevant kinematic range. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of jet angularities for quark-gluon discrimination.

  9. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were severely abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub-layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

  10. Impact Capacity Reduction in Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers with Surface Abrasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Li, Dan; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    Railway sleepers (also called ‘railroad tie’ in North America) embedded in ballasted railway tracks are a main part of railway track structures. Its important role is to transfer the loads evenly from the rails to a wider area of ballast bed and to secure rail gauge and enable safe passages of rolling stocks. By nature, railway infrastructure is nonlinear, evidenced by its behaviours, geometry and alignment, wheel-rail contact and operational parameters such as tractive efforts. Based on our critical review, the dynamic behaviour of railway sleepers has not been fully investigated, especially when the sleepers are deteriorated by excessive wears. In fact, the ballast angularity causes differential abrasions on the soffit or bottom surface of sleepers (especially at railseat zone). Furthermore, in sharp curves and rapid gradient change, longitudinal and lateral dynamics of rails increase the likelihood of railseat abrasions in concrete sleepers due to the unbalanced loading conditions. This paper presents a structural capacity of concrete sleepers under dynamic transient loading. The modified compression field theory for ultimate strength design of concrete sleepers under impact loading will be highlighted in this study. The influences of surface abrasions, including surface abrasion and soffit abrasion, on the dynamic behaviour of prestressed concrete sleepers, are firstly highlighted. The outcome of this study will improve the rail maintenance and inspection criteria in order to establish appropriate and sensible remote track condition monitoring network in practice. Moreover, this study will also improve the understanding of the fundamental dynamic behaviour of prestressed concrete sleepers with surface abrasions. The insight into these behaviours will not only improve safety and reliability of railway infrastructure but will enhance the structural safety of other concrete structures.

  11. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  12. Status of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerian, G.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of jet noise generation and suppression have been studied in great detail over the past twenty-five years. Considerable progress has been made recently in our understanding of this subject, though some aspects of it remain perplexing. The importance of accounting for the influence of the jets mean flow in shrouding acoustic sources is now recognized and the large amount of information obtained on jet noise reduction schemes, e.g., the internal mixer nozzle, the inverted profile nozzle and multi-element suppressors, has helped clarify trends and identify remaining issues. Current understanding of inflight effects is limited and in need of much more attention.

  13. Abrasion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Waste-Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Roller-compacted Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildizel, S. A.; Timur, O.; Ozturk, A. U.

    2018-05-01

    The potential use of waste glass fibers in roller-compacted concrete (RCC) was investigated with the aim to improve its performance and reduce environmental effects. The research was focused on the abrasion resistance and compressive and flexural strengths of the reinforced concrete relative to those of reference mixes without fibers. The freeze-thaw resistance of RCC mixes was also examined. It was found that the use of waste glass fibers at a rate of 2 % increased the abrasion resistance of the RCC mixes considerably.

  14. Experimental Evidence that Abrasion of Carbonate Sand is a Significant Source of Carbonate Mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trower, L.; Kivrak, L.; Lamb, M. P.; Fischer, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonate mud is a major sedimentary component of modern and ancient tropical carbonate environments, yet its enigmatic origin remains debated. Early views on the origin of carbonate mud considered the abrasion of carbonate sand during sediment transport as a possible mechanism. In recent decades, however, prevailing thought has generally settled on a binary explanation: 1) precipitation of aragonite needles within the water column, and 2) post-mortem dispersal of biological aragonite, in particular from algae, and perhaps aided by fish. To test these different hypotheses, we designed a model and a set of laboratory experiments to quantify the rates of mud production associated with sediment transport. We adapted a recent model of ooid abrasion rate to predict the rate of mud production by abrasion of carbonate sand as a function of grain size and sediment transport mode. This model predicts large mud production rates, ranging from 103 to 104 g CaCO3/m2/yr for typical grain sizes and transport conditions. These rate estimates are at least one order of magnitude more rapid than the 102 g CaCO3/m2/yr estimates for other mechanisms like algal biomineralization, indicating that abrasion could produce much larger mud fluxes per area as other mechanisms. We tested these estimates using wet abrasion mill experiments; these experiments generated mud through mechanical abrasion of both ooid and skeletal carbonate sand for grain sizes ranging from 250 µm to >1000 µm over a range of sediment transport modes. Experiments were run in artificial seawater, including a series of controls demonstrating that no mud was produced via homogenous nucleation and precipitation in the absence of sand. Our experimental rates match the model predictions well, although we observed small systematic differences in rates between abrasion ooid sand and skeletal carbonate sand that likely stems from innate differences in grain angularity. Electron microscopy of the experimental products revealed

  15. Effect of air-abrasion on the retention of zirconia ceramic crowns luted with different cements before and after artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Ramez; Kern, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of intaglio surface air-abrasion on the retention of CAD/CAM produced zirconia ceramic crowns cemented with three different types of cement. In addition the influence of artificial aging in masticatory simulator and thermocycling was tested. Extracted human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic crowns (12 degrees taper, 3 mm axial length). CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were manufactured. Half of the crowns were air-abraded with 50 microm alumina particles at 0.25 MPa, the rest was left as machined. The crowns were luted with zinc phosphate cement (Hoffmann), glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), or composite resin (Panavia 21), subgroups were either stored for 3 days in 37 degrees water bath or stored for 150 days in 37 degrees water bath, with additional 37,500 thermal cycles (5-55 degrees) and 300,000 cycles dynamic loading with 5 kg in a masticatory simulator. Then crown retention was measured in tension at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with three-way ANOVA. Mean retention values were ranged from 2.8 to 7.1 MPa after 3 days and from 1.6 to 6.1 MPa after artificial aging. Air-abrasion significantly increased crown retention (p<0.001), while artificial aging decreased retention (p=0.017). In addition, the luting material had a significant influence on retention (p<0.001) with the adhesive luting resin providing the highest retention. The use of phosphate monomer containing composite resin on air-abraded zirconia ceramic can be recommended as most retentive luting method. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Machine musicianship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Robert

    2002-05-01

    The training of musicians begins by teaching basic musical concepts, a collection of knowledge commonly known as musicianship. Computer programs designed to implement musical skills (e.g., to make sense of what they hear, perform music expressively, or compose convincing pieces) can similarly benefit from access to a fundamental level of musicianship. Recent research in music cognition, artificial intelligence, and music theory has produced a repertoire of techniques that can make the behavior of computer programs more musical. Many of these were presented in a recently published book/CD-ROM entitled Machine Musicianship. For use in interactive music systems, we are interested in those which are fast enough to run in real time and that need only make reference to the material as it appears in sequence. This talk will review several applications that are able to identify the tonal center of musical material during performance. Beyond this specific task, the design of real-time algorithmic listening through the concurrent operation of several connected analyzers is examined. The presentation includes discussion of a library of C++ objects that can be combined to perform interactive listening and a demonstration of their capability.

  17. Undercover Jet Exposed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-04

    This image layout shows two views of the same baby star from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Spitzer view shows that this star has a second, identical jet shooting off in the opposite direction of the first.

  18. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  19. Blinded by the Jets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-04

    This image shows the view from NASA Deep Impact probe 30 minutes before it was pummeled by comet Tempel 1. The picture brightness has been enhanced to show the jets of dust streaming away from the comet.

  20. NK cells are necessary for recovery of corneal CD11c+ dendritic cells after epithelial abrasion injury

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mechanisms controlling CD11c(+) MHCII(+) DCs during corneal epithelial wound healing were investigated in a murine model of corneal abrasion. Selective depletion of NKp46(+) CD3- NK cells that normally migrate into the cornea after epithelial abrasion resulted in >85% reduction of the epithelial CD1...

  1. Free compressible jet investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2014-03-01

    The nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) effect on a supersonic turbulent jet was investigated. A dedicated convergent/divergent nozzle together with a flow feeding system was designed and manufactured. A nozzle Mach exit of M j = 1.5 was selected in order to obtain a convective Mach number of M c = 0.6. The flow was investigated for over-expanded, correctly expanded and under-expanded jet conditions. Mach number, total temperature and flow velocity measurements were carried out in order to characterise the jet behaviour. The inlet conditions of the jet flow were monitored in order to calculate the nozzle exit speed of sound and evaluate the mean Mach number distribution starting from the flow velocity data. A detailed analysis of the Mach results obtained by a static Pitot probe and by a particle image velocimetry measurement system was carried out. The mean flow velocity was investigated, and the axial Mach decay and the spreading rate were associated with the flow structures and with the compressibility effects. Aerodynamics of the different jet conditions was evaluated, and the shock cells structures were detected and discussed correlating the jet structure to the flow fluctuation and local turbulence. The longitudinal and radial distribution of the total temperature was investigated, and the temperature profiles were analysed and discussed. The total temperature behaviour was correlated to the turbulent phenomena and to the NPR jet conditions. Self-similarity condition was encountered and discussed for the over-expanded jet. Compressibility effects on the local turbulence, on the turbulent kinetic energy and on the Reynolds tensor were discussed.

  2. Linearized unsteady jet analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viets, H.; Piatt, M.

    1979-01-01

    The introduction of a time dependency into a jet flow to change the rate at which it mixes with a coflowing stream or ambient condition is investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of the unsteady flow are discussed in terms of steady state mass and momentum transfer. A linear system which is not limited by frequency constraints and evolves through a simplification of the equations of motion is presented for the analysis of the unsteady flow field generated by the time dependent jet.

  3. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  4. Physics of liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Jens; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    Jets, i.e. collimated streams of matter, occur from the microscale up to the large-scale structure of the universe. Our focus will be mostly on surface tension effects, which result from the cohesive properties of liquids. Paradoxically, cohesive forces promote the breakup of jets, widely encountered in nature, technology and basic science, for example in nuclear fission, DNA sampling, medical diagnostics, sprays, agricultural irrigation and jet engine technology. Liquid jets thus serve as a paradigm for free-surface motion, hydrodynamic instability and singularity formation leading to drop breakup. In addition to their practical usefulness, jets are an ideal probe for liquid properties, such as surface tension, viscosity or non-Newtonian rheology. They also arise from the last but one topology change of liquid masses bursting into sprays. Jet dynamics are sensitive to the turbulent or thermal excitation of the fluid, as well as to the surrounding gas or fluid medium. The aim of this review is to provide a unified description of the fundamental and the technological aspects of these subjects.

  5. Relativistic Jets from Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; MacFadyen, A.

    2000-03-01

    Using a collapsar progenitor model of MacFadyen & Woosley, we have simulated the propagation of an axisymmetric jet through a collapsing rotating massive star with the GENESIS multidimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code. The jet forms as a consequence of an assumed (constant or variable) energy deposition in the range of 1050-1051 ergs s-1 within a 30 deg cone around the rotation axis. The jet flow is strongly beamed (approximately less than a few degrees), spatially inhomogeneous, and time dependent. The jet reaches the surface of the stellar progenitor (R*=2.98x1010 cm) intact. At breakout, the maximum Lorentz factor of the jet flow is 33. After breakout, the jet accelerates into the circumstellar medium, whose density is assumed to decrease exponentially and then become constant, ρext=10-5 g cm-3. Outside the star, the flow begins to expand laterally also (v~c), but the beam remains very well collimated. At a distance of 2.54 R*, where the simulation ends, the Lorentz factor has increased to 44.

  6. Design and evaluation of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete mixes, report D : creep, shrinkage, and abrasion resistance of HVFA concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effect on shrinkage, creep, : and abrasion resistance of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete. The HVFA concrete : test program consisted of comparing the shrinkage, creep, and abrasion performance...

  7. Apical bud toughness tests and tree sway movements to examine crown abrasion: preliminary results

    Treesearch

    Tyler Brannon; Wayne Clatterbuck

    2012-01-01

    Apical bud toughness differences were examined for several species to determine if crown abrasion affects shoot growth of determinate and indeterminate species during stand development. Determinate buds will set and harden after initial shoot elongation in the spring, while the indeterminate shoots form leaves from the apical meristem continuously based on the...

  8. Study of abrasive wear process of lining of grinding chamber of vortex-acoustic disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelygin, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    The theoretical and experimental studies of the process of gas-abrasive wear of the lining of a vortex-acoustic disperser made it possible to establish the conditions and patterns of their occurrence and also to develop proposals for its reduction.

  9. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  10. Spent coffee grounds as air-propelled abrasive grit for weed control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) represent a significant food waste residue. Value-added uses for this material would be beneficial. Gritty agricultural residues, such as corncob grit, can be employed as abrasive air-propelled agents for organically-compatible postemergence shredding of weed seedlings sel...

  11. Propelled abrasive grit applications for weed management in transitional corn grain production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed control is challenging to farmers who are transitioning from production systems that use synthetic herbicides to organic systems. A two-year field study examined weed control efficacy and corn grain yield of air-propelled corncob grit abrasion for in-row weed control. Grits were applied based o...

  12. Tribological properties of multifunctional coatings with Shape Memory Effect in abrasive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednova, Zh. M.; Dmitrenko, D. V.; Balaev, E. U. O.

    2018-01-01

    The article gives research results of the abrasive wear process on samples made of Steel 1045, U10 and with applied composite surface layer "Nickel-Multicomponent material with Shape Memory Effect (SME) based on TiNi". For the tests we have chosen TiNiZr, which is in the martensite state and TiNiHfCu, which is in the austenitic state at the test temperature. The formation of the surface layer was carried out by high-speed oxygen-fuel deposition in a protective atmosphere of argon. In the wear test, Al2O3 corundum powder was used as an abrasive. It is shown that the wear rate of samples with a composite surface layer of multicomponent materials with SME is significantly reduced in comparison with the base, which is explained by reversible phase transformations of the surface layer with SME. After carrying out the additional surface plastic deformation (SPD), the resistance of the laminated composition to abrasion wear has greatly enhanced, due to the reinforcing effect of the SPD. It is recommended for products working in conditions of abrasive wear and high temperatures to use the complex formation technology of the surface composition "steel-nickel-material with high-temperature SME", including preparation of the substrate surface and the deposited material, high-speed spraying in the protective atmosphere of argon, followed by SPD.

  13. Neural network approximation of tip-abrasion effects in AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, Peter; Yacoot, Andrew; Dziomba, Thorsten; Koenders, Ludger; Krüger-Sehm, Rolf

    2008-06-01

    The abrasion (wear) of tips used in scanning force microscopy (SFM) directly influences SFM image quality and is therefore of great relevance to quantitative SFM measurements. The increasing implementation of automated SFM measurement schemes has become a strong driving force for increasing efforts towards the prediction of tip wear, as it needs to be ensured that the probe is exchanged before a level of tip wear is reached that adversely affects the measurement quality. In this paper, we describe the identification of tip abrasion in a system of SFM measurements. We attempt to model the tip-abrasion process as a concatenation of a mapping from the measured AFM data to a regression vector and a nonlinear mapping from the regressor space to the output space. The mapping is formed as a basis function expansion. Feedforward neural networks are used to approximate this mapping. The one-hidden layer network gave a good quality of fit for the training and test sets for the tip-abrasion system. We illustrate our method with AFM measurements of both fine periodic structures and randomly oriented sharp features and compare our neural network results with those obtained using other methods.

  14. Air-propelled abrasive grit for postemergence in-row weed control in field corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic growers need additional tools for weed control. A new technique involving abrasive grit propelled by compressed air was tested in field plots. Grit derived from corn cobs was directed at seedlings of summer annual weeds growing at the bases of corn plants when the corn was at differing early...

  15. Optical tools for high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of combinatorial libraries of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Chisholm, Bret J.; Olson, Daniel R.; Brennan, Michael J.; Molaison, Chris A.

    2002-02-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8x6 arrays of coating elements that are deposited on a plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2 to 5 micrometers thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the organic coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at single-or multiple-abrasion conditions, followed by high- throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0 to 30% haze. System precision of 0.1 to 2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. While the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied to a variety of other applications where materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools.

  16. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  17. Martian and Terrestrial Rock Abrasion from Wind Tunnel and Field Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Greeley, R.; Eddlemon, E.; Laity, J. E.; Meyer, C.; Phoreman, J.; White, B. R.

    2003-01-01

    Earth and Mars exhibit ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by saltating sand. Previous theoretical and laboratory studies have determined abrasion susceptibilities of rocks as a function of sand type and impact angle and rock material strengths. For the last two years we have been engaged in wind tunnel and field studies to better understand the fundamental factors which control and influence rock abrasion and ventifact formation on Earth and Mars. In particular, we are examining: 1) What types of rocks (composition, texture, and shape) preferentially erode and what are the relative rates of one type vs. another? 2) What are the controlling factors of the aeolian sand cloud (flux, particle speed, surface roughness, etc) which favor rock abrasion?, 3) How do specific ventifact characteristics tie into their mode of formation and rock properties? We find several important factors: 1) Initial rock shape controls the rate of abrasion, with steeper faces abrading faster than shallower ones. The relationship is partly dependent on angle-dependent flux (proportional to sin[theta]) but exhibits additional non-linear effects from momentum transfer efficiency and rebound effects that vary with incidence angle. 2) Irregular targets with pits or grooves abrade at greater rates than targets with smooth surfaces, with indentations generally enlarging with time. Surfaces become rougher with time. 3) Targets also abrade via slope retreat, which is roughly dependent on the slope of the front face. The formation of basal sills is common, as observed on terrestrial and Martian ventifacts.

  18. Erosion of enamel by non-carbonated soft drinks with and without toothbrushing abrasion.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, C A; Parker, D M; Addy, M; Barbour, M E

    2006-10-07

    To investigate how enamel loss due to erosion, and due to cycling of erosion and abrasion, depends on compositional parameters of soft drinks, and particularly whether the thickness of the erosive softened layer is a function of drink composition. University dental hospital research laboratory in the UK, 2004. Six drinks were chosen based on their popularity and composition: apple juice, orange juice, apple drink, orange drink, cranberry drink and 'ToothKind' blackcurrant drink. Group A samples (n = 36) were exposed to soft drinks at 36 degrees C for six consecutive 10 minute periods. Group B samples (n = 36) were subjected to alternating erosion and toothbrushing, repeated six times. Enamel loss was measured using optical profilometry. Group A: significant enamel loss was seen for all drinks (p < 0.001). Erosion was correlated with pH and calcium concentration but not phosphate concentration or titratable acidity. Group B: significant additional material loss due to toothbrush abrasion occurred with all drinks. Abrasive enamel loss differed between the drinks and was positively correlated with drink erosive potential. Enamel loss by erosion is exacerbated by subsequent abrasion. The amount of softened enamel removed by toothbrushing is a function of the chemical composition of the erosive medium.

  19. Scratching technique for the study and analysis of soil surface abrasion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wanquan

    2007-11-01

    Aeolian abrasion is the most fundamental and active surface process that takes place in arid and semi-arid environments. Its nature is a wear process for wind blown grains impinging on a soil or sediment surface, which causes particles and aggregates to fracture from the soil surface through a series of plastic and brittle cracking deformation such as cutting, ploughing and brittle fracturing. Using a Universal Micro-Tribometer (UMT), a scratching test was carried out on six soil surfaces (sandy soil, sand loam, silt loam, loam, silt clay loam, and silt clay). The results indicate that traces of normal and tangential force vs. time show a jagged curve, which can reflect the plastic deformation and brittle fracturing of aggregates and particles of various sizes fractured from the soil surfaces. The jagged curve peaks, and the area enclosed underneath, may represent the bonding forces and bonding energies of some aggregates and grains on the soil surface, respectively. Connecting the scratching test with an impact abrasion experiment furthermore demonstrates that soil surface abrasion rates are proportional to the square of speeds of impacting particles and to the 2.6 power of mean soil grain size, and inversely proportional to the 1.5 power of specific surface abrasive energy or to the 1.7 power of specific surface hardness.

  20. Laser abrasion for cosmetic and medical treatment of facial actinic damage

    SciTech Connect

    David, L.M.; Lask, G.P.; Glassberg, E.

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser to be effective in the treatment of actinic cheilitis. After CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion, normal skin and marked cosmetic improvement of the lip were noted. In our study, twenty-three patients were treated with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasions for cosmetic improvement of facial lines and actinic changes. Pre- and postoperative histopathologic examinations were made on two patients. Preoperative examination of specimens from actinically damaged skin showed atypical keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, with overlying dense compact orthokeratosis and parakeratosis. Abundant solar elastosis was seen in the papillary dermis.more » Postoperative histologic specimens showed a normal-appearing epidermis with fibrosis in the papillary dermis and minimal solar elastosis (about four weeks after laser treatment). At present, various modalities are available for the regeneration of the aged skin, including chemical peels and dermabrasion. Significantly fewer complications were noted with CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion than with these methods. Thus, CO/sub 2/ laser abrasion can be useful in the cosmetic and medical treatment of the aged skin. Marked clinical and histologic improvement has been demonstrated.« less

  1. Interfacing superhydrophobic silica nanoparticle films with graphene and thermoplastic polyurethane for wear/abrasion resistance.

    PubMed

    Naderizadeh, Sara; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Bayer, Ilker S

    2018-06-01

    Nanoparticle films are one of the most suitable platforms for obtaining sub-micrometer and nanometer dual-scale surface texture required for liquid repellency. The assembly of superhydrophobic nanoparticles into conformal and strongly adherent films having abrasion-induced wear resistance still poses a significant challenge. Various techniques have been developed over the years to render nanoparticle films with good liquid repellent properties and transparency. However, forming abrasion resistant superhydrophobic nanoparticle films on hard surfaces is challenging. One possibility is to partially embed or weld nanoparticles in thin thermoplastic primers applied over metals. Hexamethyldisilazane-functionalized fumed silica nanoparticle films spray deposited on aluminum surfaces were rendered abrasion resistant by thermally welding them into thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) primer applied a priori over aluminum. Different solvents, nanoparticle concentrations and annealing temperatures were studied to optimize nanoparticle film morphology and hydrophobicity. Thermal annealing at 150 °C enhanced stability and wear resistance of nanoparticle films. A thin thermal interface layer of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) between the primer and the nanoparticle film significantly improved superhydrophobic wear resistance after annealing. As such, superhydrophobic nanocomposite films with the GnPs thermal interface layer displayed superior abrasion-induced wear resistance under 20 kPa compared to films having no GnPs-based thermal interface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  3. NK cells modulate the inflammatory response to corneal epithelial abrasion and thereby support wound healing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural killer cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that have crucial cytotoxic and regulatory roles in adaptive immunity and inflammation. Herein, we consider a role for these cells in corneal wound healing. After a 2-mm central epithelial abrasion of the mouse cornea, a subset of clas...

  4. Platelet recruitment promotes keratocyte repopulation following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corneal abrasion not only damages the epithelium but also induces stromal keratocyte death at the site of injury. While a coordinated cascade of inflammatory cell recruitment facilitates epithelial restoration, it is unclear if this cascade is necessary for keratocyte recovery. Since platelet and ne...

  5. IBPAT/OSHA Health and Safety Education Quiz Book. Painters, Abrasive Blasters, Tapers, Paint Makers, Floorcoverers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades, Washington, DC.

    Designed for use by instructors using the "Health and Safety Education Book" (International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades/Occupational Safety and Health Act), this book contains quizzes specifically for painters, abrasive blasters, tapers, paint makers, and floorcoverers. Quizzes included in the book focus on testing areas such as (1)…

  6. The efficacy of a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice on bovine enamel subjected to erosion and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Polo, Renata Ocon Braga; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2008-12-01

    Researchers have proposed the use of fluoride for the prevention of enamel wear; however, only limited information is available about the impact of fluoridated dentifrices. Because tooth wear is a well-recognized dental problem, the authors conducted an in situ, ex vivo study to assess the efficacy of a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice on bovine enamel subjected to erosion and abrasion. The authors conducted a double-blind, crossover in situ study consisting of three phases (seven days each). In each phase, the authors tested one of the dentifrices (5,000 parts per million fluoride [F]; 1,100 ppm F; no F). They performed erosive challenges with the use of cola drink (60 seconds, four times per day) and abrasive challenges via toothbrushing (30 seconds, four times per day). The authors determined the enamel loss via profilometry. The authors tested the data by using two-way analysis of variance (P < .05). For the erosion-plus-abrasion condition, the study results showed that enamel wear was significantly higher than that with erosion alone. The findings showed no significant differences between the dentifrices regarding enamel wear. Within the in situ, ex vivo conditions of this study, the authors concluded that the highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice did not have a protective effect on enamel against erosion and erosion plus toothbrushing abrasion. Patients at risk of developing enamel erosion should benefit from preventive measures other than fluoride dentifrice, because even a highly concentrated fluoride dentifrice does not appear to prevent enamel erosion.

  7. Rates of Eolian Rock Abrasion in the Ice-Free Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallet, B.; Malin, M. C.; Sletten, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Eolian abrasion is a principal surface process in dry regions of Earth and Mars and there is evidence for wind processes active on Venus and Titan. Rock abrasion also has practical significance in diverse fields ranging from preservation of cultural material (artifacts, monuments) to damage of solar panels and windshields in arid regions. Despite its scientific and practical importance, and there have ben only few studies that define rates of rock abrasion quantitatively under natural conditions. Herein we report abrasion rates that have been exceptionally well characterized through a unique long-term (30+-year) field experiment in the ice-free McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. In 1983 and 1984, over 5000 rock targets of several lithologies (25.4 mm-diameter and 5 mm-thick disks of dolerite, basalt, tuff and sandstone) were installed at five heights (7,14, 21, 35, and 70 cm) facing the 4 cardinal directions at 10 locations (one additional site contains fewer targets). Sequential collections of rock targets exposed to abrasion enable definition of mass loss after 1, 5, 10, 30 and 31 years of exposure; the latter were retrieved during the 2014-2015 season. The abrasion rates generally show striking consistency for each lithology at any site; the multiple targets permit definition of intrinsic differences in mass loss. The rates vary considerably from site to site owing to differences in availability of transportable sediment, wind regime, and surface roughness, and at each site, owing to target orientation relative to the dominant winds and, secondarily, to height above the ground. For the hardest targets, basalt and dolerite, mass loss in 30+ years ranged from essentially zero at some sites to 1/3 of the deployed mass (2.59 g; equivalent to a rock thickness >1.8 mm) where abrasion was most active (Site 7, Central Wright Valley). The tuff targets showed the greatest mass loss, and in many cases were entirely abraded away by the end of the experiment.Current work is

  8. Effect of etching and airborne particle abrasion on the microstructure of different dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Sophr, Ana Maria; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Sobrinho, Lourenço Correr; Chan, Daniel C N

    2003-05-01

    The ceramic composition and microstructure surface of all-ceramic restorations are important components of an effective bonding substrate. Both hydrofluoric acid etching and airborne aluminum oxide particle abrasion produce irregular surfaces necessary for micromechanical bonding. Although surface treatments of feldspathic and leucite porcelains have been studied previously, the high alumina-containing and lithium disilicate ceramics have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess the surface topography of 6 different ceramics after treatment with either hydrofluoric acid etching or airborne aluminum oxide particle abrasion. Five copings each of IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2 (0.8 mm thick), Cergogold (0.7 mm thick), In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera (0.8 mm thick) were fabricated following the manufacturer's instructions. Each coping was longitudinally sectioned into 4 equal parts by a diamond disk. The resulting sections were then randomly divided into 3 groups depending on subsequent surface treatments: Group 1, specimens without additional surface treatments, as received from the laboratory (control); Group 2, specimens treated by use of airborne particle abrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide; and Group 3, specimens treated with 10% hydrofluoric acid etching (20 seconds for IPS Empress 2; 60 seconds for IPS Empress and Cergogold; and 2 minutes for In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera). Airborne particle abrasion changed the morphologic surface of IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, and Cergogold ceramics. The surface topography of these ceramics exhibited shallow irregularities not evident in the control group. For Procera, the 50-microm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion produced a flattened surface. Airborne particle abrasion of In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Zirconia did not change the morphologic characteristics and the same shallows pits found in the control group remained. For IPS Empress 2, 10% hydrofluoric

  9. Air-particle abrasion on zirconia ceramic using different protocols: effects on biaxial flexural strength after cyclic loading, phase transformation and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Valandro, Luiz F; Melo, Renata M; Machado, João P B; Bottino, Marco A; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different air-particle abrasion protocols on the biaxial flexural strength and structural stability of zirconia ceramics. Zirconia ceramic specimens (ISO 6872) (Lava, 3M ESPE) were obtained (N=336). The specimens (N=118, n=20 per group) were randomly assigned to one of the air-abrasion protocols: Gr1: Control (as-sintered); Gr2: 50 µm Al2O3 (2.5 bar); Gr3: 50 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr4: 110 µm Al2O3(2.5 bar); Gr5: 110 µm Al2O3 (3.5 bar); Gr6: 30 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (CoJet); Gr7: 30 µm SiO2(3.5 bar); Gr8: 110 µm SiO2 (2.5 bar) (Rocatec Plus); and Gr9: 110 µm SiO2 (3.5 bar) (duration: 20 s, distance: 10 mm). While half of the specimens were tested immediately, the other half was subjected to cyclic loading in water (100,000 cycles; 50 N, 4 Hz, 37 °°C) prior to biaxial flexural strength test (ISO 6872). Phase transformation (t→m), relative amount of transformed monoclinic zirconia (FM), transformed zone depth (TZD) and surface roughness were measured. Particle type (p=0.2746), pressure (p=0.5084) and cyclic loading (p=0.1610) did not influence the flexural strength. Except for the air-abraded group with 110 µm Al2O3 at 3.5 bar, all air-abrasion protocols increased the biaxial flexural strength (MPa) (Controlnon-aged: 1,030 ± 153, Controlaged: 1,138 ± 138; Experimentalnon-aged: 1,307 ± 184-1,554 ± 124; Experimentalaged: 1,308 ± 118-1,451 ± 135) in both non-aged and aged conditions, respectively. Surface roughness (Ra) was the highest with 110 µm Al2O3(0.84 µm. FM values ranged from 0% to 27.21%, higher value for the Rocatec Plus (110 µm SiO2) and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure. TZD ranged between 0 and 1.43 µm, with the highest values for Rocatec Plus and 110 µm Al2O3 groups at 3.5 bar pressure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Pleural Abrasion on the Treatment of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mo-yu; Cai, Shuang-qi; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural abrasion has been widely used to control the recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, controversy still exists regarding the advantages and disadvantages of pleural abrasion compared with other interventions in preventing the recurrence of PSP. Methods The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched up to December 15, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of pleural abrasion with those of other interventions in the treatment of PSP. The study outcomes included the PSP recurrence rate and the occurrence rate of adverse effects. Results Mechanical pleural abrasion and apical pleurectomy after thoracoscopic stapled bullectomy exhibited similarly persistent postoperative air leak occurrence rates (p = 0.978) and 1-year PSP recurrence rates (p = 0.821), whereas pleural abrasion led to reduced residual chest pain and discomfort (p = 0.001) and a smaller rate of hemothorax (p = 0.036) than did apical pleurectomy. However, the addition of minocycline pleurodesis to pleural abrasion did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with apical pleurectomy (3.8% for both procedures) but was associated with fewer complications. There was no statistical difference in the pneumothorax recurrence rate between mechanical pleural abrasion and chemical pleurodesis with minocycline on either an intention-to-treat basis (4 of 42 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.12; Fisher exact test) or after exclusions (2 of 40 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.24; Fisher exact test). Pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis also did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with pleural abrasion alone (p = 0.055). Moreover, pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis was associated with more intense acute chest pain. The postoperative overall recurrence rate in patients who underwent staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue was similar to that

  11. 15 CFR 700.31 - Metalworking machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... machines covered by this section include: Bending and forming machines Boring machines Broaching machines... Planers and shapers Polishing, lapping, boring, and finishing machines Punching and shearing machines...

  12. 15 CFR 700.31 - Metalworking machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... machines covered by this section include: Bending and forming machines Boring machines Broaching machines... Planers and shapers Polishing, lapping, boring, and finishing machines Punching and shearing machines...

  13. 15 CFR 700.31 - Metalworking machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... machines covered by this section include: Bending and forming machines Boring machines Broaching machines... Planers and shapers Polishing, lapping, boring, and finishing machines Punching and shearing machines...

  14. 15 CFR 700.31 - Metalworking machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... machines covered by this section include: Bending and forming machines Boring machines Broaching machines... Planers and shapers Polishing, lapping, boring, and finishing machines Punching and shearing machines...

  15. 15 CFR 700.31 - Metalworking machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... machines covered by this section include: Bending and forming machines Boring machines Broaching machines... Planers and shapers Polishing, lapping, boring, and finishing machines Punching and shearing machines...

  16. HUBBLE VIEWS OF THREE STELLAR JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope views of gaseous jets from three newly forming stars show a new level of detail in the star formation process, and are helping to solve decade-old questions about the secrets of star birth. Jets are a common 'exhaust product' of the dynamics of star formation. They are blasted away from a disk of gas and dust falling onto an embryonic star. [upper left] - This view of a protostellar object called HH-30 reveals an edge-on disk of dust encircling a newly forming star. Light from the forming star illuminates the top and bottom surfaces of the disk, making them visible, while the star itself is hidden behind the densest parts of the disk. The reddish jet emanates from the inner region of the disk, and possibly directly from the star itself. Hubble's detailed view shows, for the first time, that the jet expands for several billion miles from the star, but then stays confined to a narrow beam. The protostar is 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: C. Burrows (STScI and ESA), the WFPC 2 Investigation Definition Team, and NASA [upper right] - This view of a different and more distant jet in object HH-34 shows a remarkable beaded structure. Once thought to be a hydrodynamic effect (similar to shock diamonds in a jet aircraft exhaust), this structure is actually produced by a machine-gun-like blast of 'bullets' of dense gas ejected from the star at speeds of one-half million miles per hour. This structure suggests the star goes through episodic 'fits' of construction where chunks of material fall onto the star from a surrounding disk. The protostar is 1,500 light- years away and in the vicinity of the Orion Nebula, a nearby star birth region. Credit: J. Hester (Arizona State University), the WFPC 2 Investigation Definition Team, and NASA [bottom] - This view of a three trillion mile-long jet called HH-47 reveals a very complicated jet pattern that indicates the star (hidden inside a dust cloud near the left edge of the

  17. Aeolian Rat Tails (ARTs): A New Morphological Indicator of Abrasion Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaro, E. A.; Hugenholtz, C.; Barchyn, T.

    2016-12-01

    Aeolian rat tails (ARTs) are a previously undocumented aeolian abrasion feature observed on ignimbrite surfaces in the Puna Plateau of Northwest Argentina and bare morphological similarity to small-scale features on Mars. We describe the terrestrial features and present an evolutionary sequence from inception to demise. ARTs are regionally-ubiquitous and characterized by a windward abrasion-resistant lithic clast and a downwind-tapering tail. The size of ARTs is controlled by the diameter of the windward lithic clast, observed on the sub-decimeter to meter scale. Their distribution throughout the Campo de Piedra Pómez, and adjacent regions is determined by the ignimbrite clast content. ARTs develop under a uni-modal abrasion direction when lithic clasts are eroded out of the ignimbrite matrix, protrude from the surface, and shelter material directly behind the clast. As the surrounding material is eroded away, a downwind-tapered tail develops. Continued erosion of the adjacent surface leads to the undercutting of clasts, liberating them from the feature where, if small enough, the clasts can be transported downwind, leading to the destruction of the tail and ultimately the feature. This evolutionary sequence accounts not only for the morphology of the feature, but also the presence of loose clasts on the ignimbrite surface, which plays a role in the development of other enigmatic landforms in the area, such as periodic bedrock ridges, yardangs, and megaripples. The significance of the identification of ARTs is due to the necessity of uni-modal abrasion direction for their development, thereby making their orientation a diagnostic indicator of long-term aeolian abrasion direction. ARTs are likely analogs of features identified by MSL Curiosity Rover on Mars, possibly providing information on past and present wind regimes.

  18. Gingival abrasion and recession in manual and oscillating-rotating power brush users.

    PubMed

    Rosema, N A M; Adam, R; Grender, J M; Van der Sluijs, E; Supranoto, S C; Van der Weijden, G A

    2014-11-01

    To assess gingival recession (GR) in manual and power toothbrush users and evaluate the relationship between GR and gingival abrasion scores (GA). This was an observational (cross-sectional), single-centre, examiner-blind study involving a single-brushing exercise, with 181 young adult participants: 90 manual brush users and 91 oscillating-rotating power brush users. Participants were assessed for GR and GA as primary response variables. Secondary response variables were the level of gingival inflammation, plaque score reduction and brushing duration. Pearson correlation was used to describe the relationship between number of recession sites and number of abrasions. Prebrushing (baseline) and post-brushing GA and plaque scores were assessed and differences analysed using paired tests. Two-sample t-test was used to analyse group differences; ancova was used for analyses of post-brushing changes with baseline as covariate. Overall, 97.8% of the study population had at least one site of ≥1 mm of gingival recession. For the manual group, this percentage was 98.9%, and for the power group, this percentage was 96.7% (P = 0.621). Post-brushing, the power group showed a significantly smaller GA increase than the manual group (P = 0.004); however, there was no significant correlation between number of recession sites and number of abrasions for either group (P ≥ 0.327). Little gingival recession was observed in either toothbrush user group; the observed GR levels were comparable. Lower post-brushing gingival abrasion levels were seen in the power group. There was no correlation between gingival abrasion as a result of brushing and the observed gingival recession following use of either toothbrush. © 2014 The Authors International Journal of Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Gingival abrasion and recession in manual and oscillating–rotating power brush users

    PubMed Central

    Rosema, NAM; Adam, R; Grender, JM; Van der Sluijs, E; Supranoto, SC; Van der Weijden, GA

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess gingival recession (GR) in manual and power toothbrush users and evaluate the relationship between GR and gingival abrasion scores (GA). Methods This was an observational (cross-sectional), single-centre, examiner-blind study involving a single-brushing exercise, with 181 young adult participants: 90 manual brush users and 91 oscillating–rotating power brush users. Participants were assessed for GR and GA as primary response variables. Secondary response variables were the level of gingival inflammation, plaque score reduction and brushing duration. Pearson correlation was used to describe the relationship between number of recession sites and number of abrasions. Prebrushing (baseline) and post-brushing GA and plaque scores were assessed and differences analysed using paired tests. Two-sample t-test was used to analyse group differences; ancova was used for analyses of post-brushing changes with baseline as covariate. Results Overall, 97.8% of the study population had at least one site of ≥1 mm of gingival recession. For the manual group, this percentage was 98.9%, and for the power group, this percentage was 96.7% (P = 0.621). Post-brushing, the power group showed a significantly smaller GA increase than the manual group (P = 0.004); however, there was no significant correlation between number of recession sites and number of abrasions for either group (P ≥ 0.327). Conclusions Little gingival recession was observed in either toothbrush user group; the observed GR levels were comparable. Lower post-brushing gingival abrasion levels were seen in the power group. There was no correlation between gingival abrasion as a result of brushing and the observed gingival recession following use of either toothbrush. PMID:24871587

  20. Machine Shop Lathes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James

    This guide, the second in a series of five machine shop curriculum manuals, was designed for use in machine shop courses in Oklahoma. The purpose of the manual is to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the machine trade at the machine-operator level. The curriculum is designed so that it can be used in…

  1. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1993-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex-sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. It is demonstrated that the boundary element method can be used to calculate the dispersion relations and eigenfunctions of these instability wave modes. The method is robust and efficient. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  2. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  3. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  4. Development of feedback-speed-control system of fixed-abrasive tool for mat-surface fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, K.; Kita, R.

    2018-01-01

    This study deals with the new method to fabricate a mat-surface by using fixed-abrasive tool. Mat-surface is a surface with microscopic irregularities whose dimensions are close to the wavelengths of visible light (400-700 nanometers). In order to develop the new method to fabricate mat-surface without pre-masking and large scale back up facility, utilization of fixed-abrasive tool is discussed. The discussion clarifies that abrasives in shot blasting are given kinetic energy along to only plunge-direction while excluding traverse-direction. If the relative motion between tool and work in fixed-abrasive process can be realized as that in blasting, mat-surface will be accomplished with fixed-abrasive process. To realize the proposed idea, new surface-fabrication system to which is adopted feedback-speed-control of abrasive wheel has been designed. The system consists of micro-computer unit (MPU), work-speed sensor, fixed-abrasive wheel, and wheel driving unit. The system can control relative speed between work and wheel in optimum range to produce mat-surface. Finally experiment to verify the developed system is carried out. The results of experiments show that the developed system is effective and it can produce the surface from grinding to mat-surface seamlessly.

  5. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiative Processes in Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Gabriela S.

    Relativistic jets and collimated outflows are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysical settings, from young stellar objects up to Active Galactic Nuclei. The observed emission from some of these jets can cover the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to gamma-rays. The relevant features of the spectral energy distributions depend on the nature of the source and on the characteristics of the surrounding environment. Here the author reviews the main physical processes that command the interactions between populations of relativistic particles locally accelerated in the jets, with matter, radiation and magnetic fields. Special attention is given to the conditions that lead to the dominance of the different radiative mechanisms. Examples from various types of sources are used to illustrate these effects.

  7. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  8. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    DOE PAGES

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies $-$ dijet resonances,more » Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs$-$ that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.« less

  9. Control of Asymmetric Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    with 5hciir Irycr frequencies arnd miodfy th-e preferied mode. Perforte~d steel plateCs "-leed with tempcratuze-resistatr: mnsulativ- mineral wool reduce...Insulation of the Jet facility was initially ... ovid. d 6y ibuiglass, then mineral wool and at the present there is none for health concerns. The...imerior of the jet’s anechoic chamber was also insulated with mineral wool to foitify acoustic damping, however this too has been removed due to portions

  10. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  11. Effect of using nano and micro airborne abrasive particles on bond strength of implant abutment to prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Shadmehr, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Connecting prostheses to the implant abutments has become a concern and achieving a satisfactory retention has been focused in cement-retention prostheses recently. Sandblasting is a method to make a roughened surface for providing more retention. The aim of this study was to compare effects of nano and micro airborne abrasive particles (ABAP) in roughening surface of implant abutments and further retention of cemented copings. Thirty Xive abutments and analogues (4.5 D GH1) were mounted vertically in self-cured acrylic blocks. Full metal Ni-Cr copings with a loop on the top were fabricated with appropriate marginal adaptation for each abutment. All samples were divided into 3 groups: first group (MPS) was sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 micro ABAP, second group (NSP) was sandblasted with 80 nm Al2O3 nano ABAP, and the third group (C) was assumed as control. The samples were cemented with provisional cement (Temp Bond) and tensile bond strength of cemented copings was evaluated by a universal testing machine after thermic cycling. The t test for independent samples was used for statistical analysis by SPSS software (version 15) at the significant level of 0.05. Final result showed significant difference among all groups (p<0.001) and MPS manifested the highest mean retention (207.88 ± 45.61 N) with significant difference among other groups (p<0.001). The control group showed the lowest bond strength as predicted (48.95 ± 10.44 N). Using nano or micro ABAP is an efficient way for increasing bond strengths significantly, but it seems that micro ABAP was more effective.

  12. Use of a two-body belt abrasion test to measure the grindability of advanced ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1998-07-01

    Structural materials, such as superalloys, intermetallic alloys and engineering ceramics, have been developed to achieve high hardness, high temperature strength, and high fracture toughness. However, these strong materials also tend to be difficult to grind and finish. In the 1990's, the US Department of Energy supported a series of projects to help reduce the cost of machining advanced ceramics. The same properties that make engineering materials attractive for use on severe thermal and mechanical environments (e.g., high hardness, high temperature strength, high fracture toughness) generally tend to make those materials difficult to grind and finish. In the mid-1990's, a beltmore » abrasion test was developed under subcontract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help to assess the grindability of structural ceramic materials. The procedure involves applying a 10 N normal force to the end face of a 3 x 4 mm cross-section test bar for 30 seconds which is rubbed against a wet, 220 grit diamond belt moving at 10 m/s. By measuring the change in the bar length after at least six 30-second tests, a belt grindability index is computed and expressed using the same units as a traditional wear factor (i.e., mm{sup 3}/N-m). The test has shown an excellent capability to discriminate not only between ceramics of different basic compositions, e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but also between different lots of the same basic ceramic. Test-to-test variability decreases if the belt is worn in on the material of interest. The surface roughness of the abraded ends of the test specimens does not correlate directly with the belt grindability index, but instead reflects another attribute of grindability; namely the ability of a material to abrade smoothly without leaving excessive rough and pitted areas.« less

  13. Micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of a biomedical Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in simulated physiological fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Yan; Huang, Weijiu; Chen, Xiaoli; He, Haoran

    2016-10-01

    The micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of the biomedical Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in Hank׳s solution with protein has been investigated using electrochemical measurements, tribological tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The potentiodynamic polarization tests showed that the corrosion potential (Ecorr) exhibits the maximum value at the abrasive concentration of 0.05gcm(-3) despite of the load level. The tribological results indicated that the total material loss of the Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy during micro-abrasion increased with the increasing abrasive concentration at a certain applied load. When the abrasive concentration is no more than 0.15gcm(-3), the total material loss increases with increasing load, while the total material loss exhibits the maximum value at a moderate load in case of higher abrasive concentration levels. This was ascribed to the three-body or two-body micro-abrasion-corrosion at different abrasive concentration levels. The wastage map, abrasion mode map and synergy map associated with the applied load and the abrasive concentration were constructed to evaluate the micro-abrasion-corrosion behaviour of the Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy in potential biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  15. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  16. Effects of toothbrushing with fluoride abrasive and whitening dentifrices on both unbleached and bleached human enamel surface in terms of roughness and hardness: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bolay, Sukran; Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Gurgan, Sevil

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness and hardness of both unbleached and bleached (opalescence; 10% carbamide peroxide) human enamel brushed with water (without dentifrice), fluoride abrasive dentifrice (Colgate Total) and whitening dentifrice (Natural White). Human enamel samples were obtained from third molars and randomly divided into five groups (n = 8): G1 - Control (brushed with water without dentifrice), G2 - Colgate Total (fluoride abrasive dentifrice), G3 - Natural White (whitening dentifrice), G4 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Colgate Total, G5 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Natural White. Bleaching regimen was applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The brushing process was performed with a modified Nyffenegger's brushing machine. Surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Microhardness testing was performed with a Brinell hardness tester. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, one-way ANOVA analysis and Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks tests. There were significant differences in surface roughness values for all groups, which showed an increase in roughness (p < 0.05). When the bleaching treatment combined with brushing with whitening dentifrice was performed (G5), there was a significant decrease in hardness values (p < 0.05). The other groups (G1, G2, G3, G4) showed no significant hardness differences (p > 0.05). It was concluded that toothbrushing procedures increased the enamel surface roughness, and that bleaching regimen performed with cleaning treatment, through brushing with whitening dentifrice decreased hardness values. When applied together, bleaching and cleaning treatments may alter the enamel surface roughness and hardness values.

  17. High performance cutting using micro-textured tools and low pressure jet coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obikawa, Toshiyuki; Nakatsukasa, Ryuta; Hayashi, Mamoru; Ohno, Tatsumi

    2018-05-01

    Tool inserts with different kinds of microtexture on the flank face were fabricated by laser irradiation for promoting the heat transfer from the tool face to the coolant. In addition to the micro-textured tools, jet coolant was applied to the tool tip from the side of the flank face, but under low-pressure conditions, to make Reynolds number of coolant as high as possible in the wedge shape zone between the tool flank and machined surface. First, the effect of jet coolant on the flank wear evolution was investigated using a tool without microtexture. The jet coolant showed an excellent improvement of the tool life in machining stainless steel SUS304 at higher cutting speeds. It was found that both the flow rate and velocity of jet coolant were indispensable to high performance cutting. Next, the effect of microtexture on the flank wear evolution was investigated using jet coolant. Three types of micro grooves extended tool life largely compared to the tool without microtexture. It was found that the depth of groove was one of important parameters affecting the tool life extension. As a result, the tool life was extended by more than l00 % using the microtextured tools and jet coolant compared to machining using flood coolant and a tool without microtexture.

  18. A Study on 3-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 8011 / Graphite Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha Shankar, B.; Anil, K. C.; Patil, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Metals and alloys have found their vital role in many applications like structural, corrosive, tribological, etc., in engineering environment. The alloys/composites having high strength to low weight ratio have gained attention of many researchers recently. In this work, graphite reinforced Aluminium 8011 metal matrix composite was prepared by conventional stir casting route, by varying the weight % of reinforcement. Uniform distribution of Graphite in matrix alloy was confirmed by optical micrographs. Prepared composite specimens were subjected to 3-body abrasive testing by varying applied load and time, the silica particles of 400 grit size were used as abrasive particles. It was observed that with the increase of weight% of Graphite the wear resistance of composite was also increasing and on comparison it was found that reinforced composite gives good wear resistance than base alloy.

  19. Influence of Surface Abrasion on Creep and Shrinkage of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    Ballasted railway track is very suitable for heavy-rail networks because of its many superior advantages in design, construction, short- and long-term maintenance, sustainability, and life-cycle cost. The sleeper, which supports rail and distributes loads from rail to ballast, is a very important component of rail track system. Prestressed concrete is very popular used in manufacturing sleepers. Therefore, improved knowledge about design techniques for prestressed concrete (PC) sleepers has been developed. However, the ballast angularity causes differential abrasions on the soffit or bottom surface of sleepers. Furthermore, in sharp curves and rapid gradient change, longitudinal and lateral dynamics of rails increase the likelihood of abrasions in concrete sleepers. This paper presents a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate creep and shrinkage effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve the material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  20. Correlating field and laboratory rates of particle abrasion, Rio Medio, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, P. J.; Sklar, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    River bed sediments commonly fine downstream due to a combination of particle abrasion, selective transport of finer grains, and fining of the local sediment supply from hillslopes and tributaries. Particle abrasion rates can be directly measured in the laboratory using tumbling barrels and annular flumes, however, scaling experimental particle abrasion rates to the field has proven difficult due to the confounding effects of selective transport and local supply variations. Here we attempt to correlate laboratory and field rates of particle abrasion in a field setting where these confounding effects can be controlled. The Rio Medio, which flows westward from the crest of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in north central New Mexico, is one of several streams studied by John P. Miller in the early 1960's. Several kilometers downstream of its headwaters, the river crosses the Picuris-Pecos fault. Upstream of the fault the river receives quartzite, sandstone and shale clasts from the Ortega Formation, while downstream sediments are supplied by the Embudo Granite. Because the upstream lithologies are not resupplied downstream of the fault, any observed fining of these clasts should be due only to abrasion and selective transport. We hypothesize that we can account for the effects of selective transport by comparing relative fining rates for the different upstream lithologies from both the field and a laboratory tumbler. By correlating laboratory abrasion rates with rock strength, we can predict the relative fining rates due solely to abrasion expected in the field; differences between the predicted and observed fining rates could then be attributed to selective transport. We used point counts to measure bed surface sediment grain size distributions at 15 locations along a 25 kilometer reach of the Rio Medio, beginning just downstream of the fault and ending upstream of a developed area with disturbed channel conditions. We recorded intermediate particle diameter as well

  1. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  2. Self-healing of the superhydrophobicity by ironing for the abrasion durable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingxia; Li, Jingye; Deng, Bo; Jiang, Haiqing; Wang, Ziqiang; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Xing, Chenyang; Li, Yongjin

    2013-01-01

    Self-healing of the superhydrophobic cotton fabric (SCF) obtained by the radiation-induced graft polymerization of lauryl methacrylate (LMA) and n-hexyl methacrylate (HMA), can be achieved by ironing. Through the steam ironing process, the superhydrophobicity of the SCFs will be regenerated even after the yarns are ruptured during the abrasion test under a load pressure of 44.8 kPa. SCFs made from LMA grafted cotton fabric can ultimately withstand at least 24,000 cycles of abrasion with periodic steam ironing. The FT-IR microscope results show that the migration of the polymethacrylates graft chains from the interior to the surface is responsible for the self-healing effect. PMID:24135813

  3. Degradation of the Crystalline Structure of ZnS Ceramics under Abrasive Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, I. P.; Dunaev, A. A.; Chmel, A. E.

    2018-04-01

    Stability of optical elements based on ZnS ceramics to dust and rain erosion is usually estimated from the loss of material mass in a directional flow of solid particles or atmospheric precipitates. In this case, the mechanism of degradation and fracture of the surface layer of an optical element is not considered. The photoluminescence (PL) method was used for investigating the crystal lattice response to the abrasive action and the formation of cleavage in ZnS ceramics, which differ in manufacturing technology and, accordingly, in the grain size by two orders of magnitude. It is shown that during abrasive treatment of samples, their spectra exhibit changes typical of degradation of the crystal lattice of material grains. The PL spectra of cleavage surfaces reveal almost complete degradation of the structure of crystallite grains with a size from 1-2 to 100-200 μm.

  4. The jet-disk symbiosis without maximal jets: 1D hydrodynamical jets revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumley, Patrick; Ceccobello, Chiara; Connors, Riley M. T.; Cavecchi, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    In this work we discuss the recent criticism by Zdziarski (2016, A&A, 586, A18) of the maximal jet model derived in Falcke & Biermann (1995, A&A, 293, 665). We agree with Zdziarski that in general a jet's internal energy is not bounded by its rest-mass energy density. We describe the effects of the mistake on conclusions that have been made using the maximal jet model and show when a maximal jet is an appropriate assumption. The maximal jet model was used to derive a 1D hydrodynamical model of jets in agnjet, a model that does multiwavelength fitting of quiescent/hard state X-ray binaries and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. We correct algebraic mistakes made in the derivation of the 1D Euler equation and relax the maximal jet assumption. We show that the corrections cause minor differences as long as the jet has a small opening angle and a small terminal Lorentz factor. We find that the major conclusion from the maximal jet model, the jet-disk symbiosis, can be generally applied to astrophysical jets. We also show that isothermal jets are required to match the flat radio spectra seen in low-luminosity X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, in agreement with other works.

  5. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width as currently defined by the ASTM G 171 Standard. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement, in some cases considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for detailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness parameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Data are presented to show that different combinations of scratch tips and abraded materials can actually yield the same scratch width, but result in different volume displacement or removal measurements and therefore, the ZOI method is more discriminating than the ASTM method scratch width. Furthermore, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for our specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. This work lays the foundation for updating scratch measurement standards to improve modeling and characterization of three-body abrasion test results.

  6. Heat sealable, flame and abrasion resistant coated fabric. [clothing and containers for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschirch, R. P.; Sidman, K. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Flame retardant, abrasion resistant elastomeric compositions are comprised of thermoplastic polyurethane polymer and flame retarding amounts of a filler selected from decabromodiphenyloxide and antimony oxide in a 3:1 weight ratio, and decabromodiphenyloxide, antimony oxide, and ammonium polyphosphate in a 3:1:3 weight ratio respectively. Coated fabrics employing such elastomeric compositions as coating film are flexible, lightweight, and air impermeable and can be made using heat or dielectric sealing procedures.

  7. Toothbrush abrasion, simulated tongue friction and attrition of eroded bovine enamel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Overweg, E; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2006-05-01

    Enamel erosion results in the formation of a softened layer that is susceptible to disruption by mechanical factors such as brushing abrasion, tongue friction and attrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the individual contribution of those mechanical insults to the enamel loss caused by dental erosion. Forty two bovine enamel samples were randomly divided into seven groups (n=6 per group) that were submitted to 3cycles of one of the following regimes: erosion and remineralization (er/remin); toothbrush abrasion and remineralization (abr/remin); erosion, toothbrush abrasion and remineralization (er/abr/remin); attrition and remineralization (at/remin); erosion, attrition and remineralization (er/at/remin); simulated tongue friction and remineralization (tg/remin); erosion, simulated tongue friction and remineralization (er/tg/remin). Erosion took place in a demineralization solution (50mM citric acid, pH 3) for 10min under agitation. Brushing abrasion, tongue friction and attrition were simulated for 1min using a home-made wear device. Remineralization was carried out in artificial saliva for 2h. Enamel loss was quantified using optical profilometry. One-way ANOVA indicated a significant difference between the amounts of enamel lost due to the different wear regimes (p

  8. Relating the physical properties of volcanic rocks to the characteristics of ash generated by experimental abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckland, Hannah M.; Eychenne, Julia; Rust, Alison C.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2018-01-01

    Interactions between clasts in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) generate volcanic ash that can be dispersed to the atmosphere in co-PDC plumes, and due to its small size, is far-travelled. We designed a series of experiments to determine the effects of pyroclast vesicularity and crystal content on the efficiency and type of ash generated by abrasion. Two different pyroclastic materials were used: (1) basaltic-andesite pyroclasts from Fuego volcano (Guatemala) with 26-46% vesicularity and high groundmass crystallinity and (2) tephri-phonolite Avellino pumice (Vesuvius, Italy) with 55-75% vesicularity and low groundmass crystallinity. When milled, both clast types produced bimodal grain size distributions with fine ash modes between 4 and 5φ (32-63 μm). Although the vesicular Avellino pumice typically generated more ash than the denser Fuego pyroclasts, the ash-generating potential of a single pyroclast was independent of density, and instead governed by heterogeneous crystal and vesicle textures. One consequence of these heterogeneities was to cause the vesicular Avellino clasts to split in addition to abrading, which further enhanced abrasion efficiency. The matrix characteristics also affected ash shape and componentry, which will influence the elutriation and transport properties of ash in the atmosphere. The experimental abrasion successfully replicated some of the characteristics of natural co-PDC ash samples, as shown by similarities in the Adherence Factor, which measures the proportion of attached matrix on phenocrysts, of both the experimentally generated ash and natural co-PDC ash samples. Our results support previous studies, which have shown that abrasion is an effective mechanism for generating fine ash that is similar in size ( 5φ; 30 μm) to that found in co-PDC deposits. We further show that both the abundance and nature (shape, density, components, size distribution) of those ash particles are strongly controlled by the matrix properties of

  9. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  10. Comparison between different interdental stripping methods and evaluation of abrasive strips: SEM analysis.

    PubMed

    Grippaudo, Cristina; Cancellieri, Daniela; Grecolini, Maria E; Deli, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological effects and the surface irregularities produced by different methods of mechanical stripping (abrasive strips and burs) and chemical stripping (37% orthophosphoric acid) and the surface changes following the finishing procedures (polishing strips) or the subsequent application of sealants, in order to establish the right stripping method that can guarantee the smoothest surface. We have also analysed the level of wear on the different abrasive strips employed, according to their structure. 160 proximal surfaces of 80 sound molar teeth extracted for orthodontic and periodontal reasons, were divided into: 1 control group with non-treated enamel proximal surfaces and 5 different groups according to the stripping method used, were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each one of the 5 treated groups was also divided into 3 different subgroups according to the finishing procedures or the subsequent application of sealants. The finishing stage following the manual reduction proves to be fundamental in reducing the number and depth of grooves created by the stripping. After the air rotor stripping method, the use of sealants is advised in order to obtain a smoother surface. The analysis of the combinations of mechanical and chemical stripping showed unsatisfactory results. Concerning the wear of the strips, we have highlighted a different abrasion degree for the different types of strips analysed with SEM. The enamel damages are limited only if the finishing procedure is applied, independently of the type of abrasive strip employed. It would be advisable, though clinically seldom possible, the use of sealants after the air rotor stripping technique. Copyright © 2010 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  11. Process for producing a well-adhered durable optical coating on an optical plastic substrate. [abrasion resistant polymethyl methacrylate lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A low temperature plasma polymerization process is described for applying an optical plastic substrate, such as a polymethyl methacrylate lens, with a single layer abrasive resistant coating to improve the durability of the plastic.

  12. Toothbrush abrasion of paint-on resins for shade modification and crown resins: effect of water absorption.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koichi; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Ban, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    In order to investigate the clinical application of paint-on resins, the effect of water absorption on toothbrush abrasion and light transmittance of ten crown resins including three paint-on resins was examined. Water absorption into each material ranged from 0.29 to 0.89 mg/cm2 after storage in distilled-water for 6 weeks and their hardnesses decreased by 3.5-22.3%. Maximum surface roughness (Rmax) of the materials stored in distilled water for 6 weeks increased with an increasing number of toothbrush abrasion cycles and ranged from 1.9 to 10.5 microm after 100,000 cycles. Also, Maximum depth and weight loss as an indicator of the amount of each material lost by abrasion showed similar behaviors similar to Rmax. These results indicated that the abrasion resistance of paint-on resins was located in the middle among all materials examined.

  13. Theoretical study on removal rate and surface roughness in grinding a RB-SiC mirror with a fixed abrasive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xuejun

    2009-02-10

    This paper is based on a microinteraction principle of fabricating a RB-SiC material with a fixed abrasive. The influence of the depth formed on a RB-SiC workpiece by a diamond abrasive on the material removal rate and the surface roughness of an optical component are quantitatively discussed. A mathematical model of the material removal rate and the simulation results of the surface roughness are achieved. In spite of some small difference between the experimental results and the theoretical anticipation, which is predictable, the actual removal rate matches the theoretical prediction very well. The fixed abrasive technology's characteristic of easy prediction is of great significance in the optical fabrication industry, so this brand-new fixed abrasive technology has wide application possibilities.

  14. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization.

  15. Release of copper-amended particles from micronized copper-pressure-treated wood during mechanical abrasion.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Chiara; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Cordula; Mucchino, Claudio; Wichser, Adrian; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-11-28

    We investigated the particles released due to abrasion of wood surfaces pressure-treated with micronized copper azole (MCA) wood preservative and we gathered preliminary data on its in vitro cytotoxicity for lung cells. The data were compared with particles released after abrasion of untreated, water (0% MCA)-pressure-treated, chromated copper (CC)-pressure-treated wood, and varnished wood. Size, morphology, and composition of the released particles were analyzed. Our results indicate that the abrasion of MCA-pressure-treated wood does not cause an additional release of nanoparticles from the unreacted copper (Cu) carbonate nanoparticles from of the MCA formulation. However, a small amount of released Cu was detected in the nanosized fraction of wood dust, which could penetrate the deep lungs. The acute cytotoxicity studies were performed on a human lung epithelial cell line and human macrophages derived from a monocytic cell line. These cell types are likely to encounter the released wood particles after inhalation. Our findings indicate that under the experimental conditions chosen, MCA does not pose a specific additional nano-risk, i.e. there is no additional release of nanoparticles and no specific nano-toxicity for lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

  16. Property-process relations in simulated clinical abrasive adjusting of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on property-process correlations in simulated clinical abrasive adjusting of a wide range of dental restorative ceramics using a dental handpiece and diamond burs. The seven materials studied included four mica-containing glass ceramics, a feldspathic porcelain, a glass-infiltrated alumina, and a yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia. The abrasive adjusting process was conducted under simulated clinical conditions using diamond burs and a clinical dental handpiece. An attempt was made to establish correlations between process characteristics in terms of removal rate, chipping damage, and surface finish and material mechanical properties of hardness, fracture toughness and Young's modulus. The results show that the removal rate is mainly a function of hardness, which decreases nonlinearly with hardness. No correlations were noted between the removal rates and the complex relations of hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness. Surface roughness was primarily a linear function of diamond grit size and was relatively independent of materials. Chipping damage in terms of the average chipping width decreased with fracture toughness except for glass-infiltrated alumina. It also had higher linear correlations with critical strain energy release rates (R²=0.66) and brittleness (R²=0.62) and a lower linear correlation with indices of brittleness (R²=0.32). Implications of these results can provide guidance for the microstructural design of dental ceramics, optimize performance, and guide the proper selection of technical parameters in clinical abrasive adjusting conducted by dental practitioners. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tooth brush abrasion of paint-on resins for shade modification of crown and bridge resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji; McCabe, John F

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and resistance to toothbrush abrasion of three experimental paint-on composite resins developed for the shade modification of crown and bridge resins. The paint-on resins had less filler volume fraction than restorative composites or the crown and bridge resins and consequently were of low viscosity. The maximum surface roughness (Rmax) and the maximum depth loss by abrasion for the paint-on resins following 40,000 cycles of brushing ranged from 2.45 to 4.07 microm and 8.63 to 13.67 microm, respectively. Rmax values were 37.7-67.5% lower than that for the crown and bridge resin subjected to the same test. Wear depth was 19.9-49.4% lower than for the crown and bridge resin. These results suggest that the paint-on resins are expected to have adequate resistance to toothbrush abrasion and may therefore be suitable for clinical use.

  18. Drill Holes and Predation Traces versus Abrasion-Induced Artifacts Revealed by Tumbling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Salamon, Mariusz A.; Trzęsiok, Dawid; Niedźwiedzki, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Drill holes made by predators in prey shells are widely considered to be the most unambiguous bodies of evidence of predator-prey interactions in the fossil record. However, recognition of traces of predatory origin from those formed by abiotic factors still waits for a rigorous evaluation as a prerequisite to ascertain predation intensity through geologic time and to test macroevolutionary patterns. New experimental data from tumbling various extant shells demonstrate that abrasion may leave holes strongly resembling the traces produced by drilling predators. They typically represent singular, circular to oval penetrations perpendicular to the shell surface. These data provide an alternative explanation to the drilling predation hypothesis for the origin of holes recorded in fossil shells. Although various non-morphological criteria (evaluation of holes for non-random distribution) and morphometric studies (quantification of the drill hole shape) have been employed to separate biological from abiotic traces, these are probably insufficient to exclude abrasion artifacts, consequently leading to overestimate predation intensity. As a result, from now on, we must adopt more rigorous criteria to appropriately distinguish abrasion artifacts from drill holes, such as microstructural identification of micro-rasping traces. PMID:23505530

  19. Stirling machine operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brad; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  20. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  1. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  2. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  3. Control of brushing variables for the in vitro assessment of toothpaste abrasivity using a novel laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Parry, Jason; Harrington, Edward; Rees, Gareth D; McNab, Rod; Smith, Anthony J

    2008-02-01

    Design and construct a tooth-brushing simulator incorporating control of brushing variables including brushing force, speed and temperature, thereby facilitating greater understanding of their importance in toothpaste abrasion testing methodologies. A thermostable orbital shaker was selected as a base unit and 16- and 24-specimen brushing rigs were constructed to fit inside, consisting of: a square bath partitioned horizontally to provide brushing channels, specimen holders for 25 mm diameter mounted specimens to fit the brushing channels and individually weighted brushing arms, able to support four toothbrush holders suspended over the brushing channels. Brush head holders consisted of individually weighted blocks of Delrin, or PTFE onto which toothbrush heads were fixed. Investigating effects of key design criteria involved measuring abrasion depths of polished human enamel and dentine. The brushing simulator demonstrated good reproducibility of abrasion on enamel and dentine across consecutive brushing procedures. Varying brushing parameters had a significant impact on wear results: increased brushing force demonstrated a trend towards increased wear, with increased reproducibility for greater abrasion levels, highlighting the importance of achieving sufficient wear to optimise accuracy; increasing brushing temperature demonstrated increased enamel abrasion for silica and calcium carbonate systems, which may be related to slurry viscosities and particle suspension; varying brushing speed showed a small effect on abrasion of enamel at lower brushing speed, which may indicate the importance of maintenance of the abrasive in suspension. Adjusting key brushing variables significantly affected wear behaviour. The brushing simulator design provides a valuable model system for in vitro assessment of toothpaste abrasivity and the influence of variables in a controlled manner. Control of these variables will allow more reproducible study of in vitro tooth wear processes.

  4. Apprentice Machine Theory Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This volume contains outlines for 16 courses in machine theory that are designed for machine tool apprentices. Addressed in the individual course outlines are the following topics: basic concepts; lathes; milling machines; drills, saws, and shapers; heat treatment and metallurgy; grinders; quality control; hydraulics and pneumatics;…

  5. Your Sewing Machine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Marion E.

    The programed instruction manual is designed to aid the student in learning the parts, uses, and operation of the sewing machine. Drawings of sewing machine parts are presented, and space is provided for the student's written responses. Following an introductory section identifying sewing machine parts, the manual deals with each part and its…

  6. Abrasion Resistance of Nano Silica Modified Roller Compacted Rubbercrete: Cantabro Loss Method and Response Surface Methodology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamu, Musa; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Shafiq, Nasir

    2018-04-01

    Roller compacted concrete (RCC) when used for pavement is subjected to skidding/rubbing by wheels of moving vehicles, this causes pavement surface to wear out and abrade. Therefore, abrasion resistance is one of the most important properties of concern for RCC pavement. In this study, response surface methodology was used to design, evaluate and analyze the effect of partial replacement of fine aggregate with crumb rubber, and addition of nano silica on the abrasion resistance of roller compacted rubbercrete (RCR). RCR is the terminology used for RCC pavement where crumb rubber was used as partial replacement to fine aggregate. The Box-Behnken design method was used to develop the mixtures combinations using 10%, 20%, and 30% crumb rubber with 0%, 1%, and 2% nano silica. The Cantabro loss method was used to measure the abrasion resistance. The results showed that the abrasion resistance of RCR decreases with increase in crumb rubber content, and increases with increase in addition of nano silica. The analysis of variance shows that the model developed using response surface methodology (RSM) has a very good degree of correlation, and can be used to predict the abrasion resistance of RCR with a percentage error of 5.44%. The combination of 10.76% crumb rubber and 1.59% nano silica yielded the best combinations of RCR in terms of abrasion resistance of RCR.

  7. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required "time taken". BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  8. Evolution and diagnostic utility of aeolian rat-tails: A new type of abrasion feature on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaro, Elena A.; Hugenholtz, Christopher H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.

    2017-10-01

    Aeolian rat-tails (ARTs) are a previously undocumented, regionally-ubiquitous aeolian abrasion feature observed on matrix-supported ignimbrite surfaces in the Puna Plateau of Northwest Argentina. ARTs consist of an abrasion-resistant lithic clast projecting above the surface with a lee tail or 'keel' in the more erodible matrix. Size is controlled by the dimensions of the windward lithic clast, ranging from centimetre to meter scale; spatial density varies with clast content, which may reflect variations in ignimbrite facies. Field observations suggest ARTs follow a definable evolutionary sequence. First, an abrasion-resistant lithic clast contained within the ignimbrite is exposed to abrasion at the surface. Impacts from abrading particles erode the softer ignimbrite matrix adjacent to the clast. The clast shelters the leeward surface under a unimodal abrasion direction, creating a tail that tapers downwind and elongates as the clast emerges. Clasts become dislodged from the matrix as the surrounding surface erodes, ultimately destroying the feature if the clast is small enough to be mobilized directly by wind or impacting particles. This evolutionary sequence explains the morphology of ARTs and the presence of loose clasts on the ignimbrite surface, which contributes to the development of other landforms in the region, such as periodic bedrock ridges, yardangs, and megaripples. Satellite and rover images suggest similar features also exist on Mars. Because the formation and preservation of ARTs is contingent on unimodal abrasion direction, their orientation can be used as an indicator of long-term aeolian sediment transport direction.

  9. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  10. Rock Abrasion as Seen by the MSL Curiosity Rover: Insights on Physical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Day, M. D.; Le Mouelic, S.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ullan, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is a dry planet, with actively blowing sand in many regions. In the absence of stable liquid water and an active hydrosphere, rates of chemical weathering are slow, such that aeolian abrasion is a dominant agent of landscape modification where sand is present and winds above threshold occur at sufficient frequency. Reflecting this activity, ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles, and wind-eroded outcrops, are common. They provide invaluable markers of the Martian wind record and insight into climate and landscape modification. Ventifacts are distributed along the traverse of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. They contain one or more diagnostic features and textures: Facets, keels, basal sills, elongated pits, scallops/flutes, grooves, rock tails, and lineations. Keels at the junction of facets are sharp enough to pose a hazard MSL's wheels in some areas. Geomorphic and textural patterns on outcrops indicate retreat of windward faces. Moonlight Valley and other depressions are demarcated by undercut walls and scree boulders, with the valley interiors containing fewer rocks, most of which show evidence for significant abrasion. Together, this suggests widening and undercutting of the valley walls, and erosion of interior rocks, by windblown sand. HiRISE images do not show any dark sand dunes in the traverse so far, in contrast to the large dune field to the south that is migrating up to 2 m per year. In addition, ChemCam shows that the rock Bathurst has a rind rich in mobile elements that would be removed in an abrading environment. This indicates that rock abrasion was likely more dominant in the past, a hypothesis consistent with rapid scarp retreat as suggested by the cosmogenic noble gases in Yellowknife Bay. Ventifacts and evidence for bedrock abrasion have also been found at the Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity sites, areas, like the Curiosity traverse so far, that lack evidence for current high sand fluxes. Yardangs

  11. Surface and subsurface cracks characteristics of single crystal SiC wafer in surface machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiusheng, Y.; Senkai, C.; Jisheng, P.

    2015-03-01

    Different machining processes were used in the single crystal SiC wafer machining. SEM was used to observe the surface morphology and a cross-sectional cleavages microscopy method was used for subsurface cracks detection. Surface and subsurface cracks characteristics of single crystal SiC wafer in abrasive machining were analysed. The results show that the surface and subsurface cracks system of single crystal SiC wafer in abrasive machining including radial crack, lateral crack and the median crack. In lapping process, material removal is dominated by brittle removal. Lots of chipping pits were found on the lapping surface. With the particle size becomes smaller, the surface roughness and subsurface crack depth decreases. When the particle size was changed to 1.5µm, the surface roughness Ra was reduced to 24.0nm and the maximum subsurface crack was 1.2µm. The efficiency of grinding is higher than lapping. Plastic removal can be achieved by changing the process parameters. Material removal was mostly in brittle fracture when grinding with 325# diamond wheel. Plow scratches and chipping pits were found on the ground surface. The surface roughness Ra was 17.7nm and maximum subsurface crack depth was 5.8 µm. When grinding with 8000# diamond wheel, the material removal was in plastic flow. Plastic scratches were found on the surface. A smooth surface of roughness Ra 2.5nm without any subsurface cracks was obtained. Atomic scale removal was possible in cluster magnetorheological finishing with diamond abrasive size of 0.5 µm. A super smooth surface eventually obtained with a roughness of Ra 0.4nm without any subsurface crack.

  12. Jet Substructure at the Large Hadron Collider : Experimental Review

    SciTech Connect

    Asquith, Lily; Campanelli, Mario; Delitzsch, Chris

    Jet substructure has emerged to play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where it has provided numerous innovative new ways to search for new physics and to probe the Standard Model, particularly in extreme regions of phase space. In this article we focus on a review of the development and use of state-of-the-art jet substructure techniques by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. ALICE and LHCb have been probing fragmentation functions since the start of the LHC and have also recently started studying other jet substructure techniques. It is likely that in the near future all LHC collaborationsmore » will make significant use of jet substructure and grooming techniques. Much of the work in this field in recent years has been galvanized by the Boost Workshop Series, which continues to inspire fruitful collaborations between experimentalists and theorists. We hope that this review will prove a useful introduction and reference to experimental aspects of jet substructure at the LHC. A companion overview of recent progress in theory and machine learning approaches is given in 1709.04464, the complete review will be submitted to Reviews of Modern Physics.« less

  13. A gyrokinetic perspective on the JET-ILW pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, D. R.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.; Valanju, P.; Liu, X.

    2017-03-01

    JET has been unable to recover historical confinement levels when operating with an ITER-like wall (ILW) due largely to the inaccessibility of high pedestal temperatures. Finding a path to overcome this challenge is of utmost importance for both a prospective JET DT campaign and for future ITER operation. Gyrokinetic simulations (using the Gene code) quantitatively capture experimental transport levels for a representative experimental discharge and qualitatively recover the major experimental trends. Microtearing turbulence is a major transport mechanisms for the low-temperature pedestals characteristic of unseeded JET-ILW discharges. At higher temperatures and/or lower {ρ\\ast} , we identify electrostatic ITG transport of a type that is strongly shear-suppressed on smaller machines. Consistent with observations, this transport mechanism is strongly reduced by the presence of a low-Z impurity (e.g. carbon or nitrogen at the level of {{Z}\\text{eff}}∼ 2 ), recovering the accessibility of high pedestal temperatures. Notably, simulations based on dimensionless {ρ\\ast} scans recover historical scaling behavior except in the unique JET-ILW parameter regime where ITG turbulence becomes important. Our simulations also elucidate the observed degradation of confinement caused by gas puffing, emphasizing the important role of the density pedestal structure. This study maps out important regions of parameter space, providing insights that may point to optimal physical regimes that can enable the recovery of high pedestal temperatures on JET.

  14. Quantum machine learning.

    PubMed

    Biamonte, Jacob; Wittek, Peter; Pancotti, Nicola; Rebentrost, Patrick; Wiebe, Nathan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-09-13

    Fuelled by increasing computer power and algorithmic advances, machine learning techniques have become powerful tools for finding patterns in data. Quantum systems produce atypical patterns that classical systems are thought not to produce efficiently, so it is reasonable to postulate that quantum computers may outperform classical computers on machine learning tasks. The field of quantum machine learning explores how to devise and implement quantum software that could enable machine learning that is faster than that of classical computers. Recent work has produced quantum algorithms that could act as the building blocks of machine learning programs, but the hardware and software challenges are still considerable.

  15. Quantum machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob; Wittek, Peter; Pancotti, Nicola; Rebentrost, Patrick; Wiebe, Nathan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-09-01

    Fuelled by increasing computer power and algorithmic advances, machine learning techniques have become powerful tools for finding patterns in data. Quantum systems produce atypical patterns that classical systems are thought not to produce efficiently, so it is reasonable to postulate that quantum computers may outperform classical computers on machine learning tasks. The field of quantum machine learning explores how to devise and implement quantum software that could enable machine learning that is faster than that of classical computers. Recent work has produced quantum algorithms that could act as the building blocks of machine learning programs, but the hardware and software challenges are still considerable.

  16. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  17. Plasma jet takes off.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the corrosive acids and chemical solvents traditionally used to clean semiconductor chips, the jet oxidizes contaminants, producing only benign gaseous by-products such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The new technology is also easy to transport, cleans thoroughly and quickly, and presents no hazards to its operators. PMID:10417375

  18. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-26

    The Twin Jet Nebula, or PN M2-9, is a striking example of a bipolar planetary nebula. Bipolar planetary nebulae are formed when the central object is not a single star, but a binary system, Studies have shown that the nebula’s size increases with time, and measurements of this rate of increase suggest that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1200 years ago.

  19. Far Noise Field of Air Jets and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Coles, Willard D

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study and compare the acoustic radiation of air jets and jet engines. A number of different nozzle-exit shapes were studied with air jets to determine the effect of exit shape on noise generation. Circular, square, rectangular, and elliptical convergent nozzles and convergent-divergent and plug nozzles were investigated. The spectral distributions of the sound power for the engine and the air jet were in good agreement for the case where the engine data were not greatly affected by reflection or jet interference effects. Such power spectra for a subsonic or slightly choked engine or air jet show that the peaks of the spectra occur at a Strouhal number of 0.3.

  20. Active control of continuous air jet with bifurcated synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dančová, Petra; Vít, Tomáš; Jašíková, Darina; Novosád, Jan

    The synthetic jets (SJs) have many significant applications and the number of applications is increasing all the time. In this research the main focus is on the primary flow control which can be used effectively for the heat transfer increasing. This paper deals with the experimental research of the effect of two SJs worked in the bifurcated mode used for control of an axisymmetric air jet. First, the control synthetic jets were measured alone. After an adjustment, the primary axisymmetric jet was added in to the system. For comparison, the primary flow without synthetic jets control was also measured. All experiments were performed using PIV method whereby the synchronization between synthetic jets and PIV system was necessary to do.

  1. Jovian Jet Stream

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-31

    See a jet stream speeding through Jupiter's atmosphere in this new view taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft. The jet stream, called Jet N2, was captured along the dynamic northern temperate belts of the gas giant planet. It is the white stream visible from top left to bottom right in the image. The color-enhanced image was taken at 10:34 p.m. PST on May 23 (1:34 a.m. EST on May 24), as Juno performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 3,516 miles (5,659 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a northern latitude of 32.9 degrees. Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager. The view is a composite of several separate JunoCam images that were re-projected, blended, and healed. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22422

  2. Machine tool task force

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, G.P.

    1980-10-22

    The Machine Tool Task Force (MTTF) is a multidisciplined team of international experts, whose mission was to investigate the state of the art of machine tool technology, to identify promising future directions of that technology for both the US government and private industry, and to disseminate the findings of its research in a conference and through the publication of a final report. MTTF was a two and one-half year effort that involved the participation of 122 experts in the specialized technologies of machine tools and in the management of machine tool operations. The scope of the MTTF was limited tomore » cutting-type or material-removal-type machine tools, because they represent the major share and value of all machine tools now installed or being built. The activities of the MTTF and the technical, commercial and economic signifiance of recommended activities for improving machine tool technology are discussed. (LCL)« less

  3. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜<2‧‧) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2015, Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  4. Synthetic Jets in Cross-flow. Part 1; Round Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation on synthetic jets from round orifices with and without cross-flow are presented. Jet Reynolds number up to 46,000 with a fully turbulent approach boundary layer, and Stokes number up to 400. are covered. The threshold of stroke length for synthetic jet formation. in the absence of the cross-flow, is found to be Lo /D approximately 0.5. Above Lo /D is approximately 10, the profiles of normalized centerline mean velocity appear to become invariant. It is reasoned that the latter threshold may be related to the phenomenon of saturation of impulsively generated vortices. In the presence of the cross-flow, the penetration height of a synthetic jet is found to depend on the momentum- flux ratio . When this ratio is defined in terms of the maximum jet velocity and the cross-flow velocity. not only all data collapse but also the jet trajectory is predicted well by correlation equation available for steady jets-in-cross-flow. Distributions of mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as turbulence intensity for a synthetic jet in cross-flow are found to be similar to those of a steady jet-in-cross-flow. A pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, corresponding to the bound vortex pair of the steady case, is clearly observed. Mean velocity distribution exhibits a dome of low momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer, and the entire domain is characterized by high turbulence.

  5. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  6. Noise shielding by a hot subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the shielding of the noise emitted by a high speed round jet by a hot, subsonic, semicircular jet. A plane wave front in the primary jet is resolved into elementary plane waves which undergo multiple reflections at the jet boundaries of the primary and the shielding jets. The jet boundaries are idealized to be vortex sheets. The far field sound is evaluated asymptotically by a superposition of the waves that penetrate the shielding jet. The angular directivities are plotted for several values of jet temperature and velocity to examine the effectiveness of shielding by the semicircular jet layer.

  7. W + Jet Production at Cdf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The cross section for the inclusive production of W bosons in association with jets in pbar {p} collisions at √ {s} = 1.96\\ TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb-1, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the ith-jet are measured. For W + ≥ 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass mj1j2 and angular separation ΔRj1j2 is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  9. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  10. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  11. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  12. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  13. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  14. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  15. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a) A...

  17. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system to...

  18. Method and apparatus for jet-assisted drilling or cutting

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David Archibold; Woelk, Klaus Hubert; Oglesby, Kenneth Doyle; Galecki, Grzegorz

    2012-09-04

    An abrasive cutting or drilling system, apparatus and method, which includes an upstream supercritical fluid and/or liquid carrier fluid, abrasive particles, a nozzle and a gaseous or low-density supercritical fluid exhaust abrasive stream. The nozzle includes a throat section and, optionally, a converging inlet section, a divergent discharge section, and a feed section.

  19. Method and apparatus for jet-assisted drilling or cutting

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David Archibold; Woelk, Klaus Hubert; Oglesby, Kenneth Doyle; Galecki, Grzegorz

    2013-07-02

    An abrasive cutting or drilling system, apparatus and method, which includes an upstream supercritical fluid and/or liquid carrier fluid, abrasive particles, a nozzle and a gaseous or low-density supercritical fluid exhaust abrasive stream. The nozzle includes a throat section and, optionally, a converging inlet section, a divergent discharge section, and a feed section.

  20. The JET diagnostic fast central acquisition and trigger system (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. W.; Blackler, K.

    1995-01-01

    Most plasma physics diagnostics sample at a fixed frequency that is normally matched to available memory limits. This technique is not appropriate for long pulse machines such as JET where sampling frequencies of hundreds of kHz are required to diagnose very fast events. As a result of work using real-time event selection within the previous JET soft x-ray diagnostic, a single data acquisition and event triggering system for all suitable fast diagnostics, the fast central acquisition and trigger system (Fast CATS), has been developed for JET. The front-end analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) part samples all channels at 250 kHz, with a 100 kHz pass band and a stop band of 125 kHz. The back-end data collection system is based around Texas Instruments TMS320C40 microprocessors. Within this system, two levels of trigger algorithms are able to evaluate data. The first level typically analyzes data on a per diagnostic and individual channel basis. The second level looks at the data from one or more diagnostics in a window around the time of interest flagged by the first level system. Selection criteria defined by the diagnosticians are then imposed on the results from the second level to decide whether that data should be kept. The use of such a system involving intelligent real time trigger algorithms and fast data analysis will improve both the quantity and quality of JET diagnostic data, while providing valuable input to the design of data acquisition systems for very long pulse machines such as ITER. This paper will give an overview of the various elements of this new system. In addition, first results from this system following the restart of JET operation will be presented.

  1. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  2. Toothpastes and enamel erosion/abrasion - Impact of active ingredients and the particulate fraction.

    PubMed

    Ganss, C; Marten, J; Hara, A T; Schlueter, N

    2016-11-01

    To investigate in vitro a range of differently characterised toothpastes with respect to their efficacy in an erosion/abrasion setting with special emphasis on the role of the particulate ingredients. Human enamel samples were erosively demineralised with citric acid (2min, 6×/day; 0.5%, pH 2.5; 10 days) and immersed in slurries (2min, 2×/day) either without or with brushing (15s, load 200g). The toothpastes were eight NaF-toothpastes, three hydroxyapatite-toothpastes (one without and two with NaF), one fluoride-free chitosan-toothpaste and three Sn-toothpastes. Negative control was erosion only, positive control was SnF 2 gel. Tissue loss was quantified profilometrically. The SnF 2 gel was most effective (reduction of tissue loss of 79%). Most of the products reduced tissue loss significantly when applied as slurries (between 28 and 66%). Brushing increased tissue loss in almost all toothpastes, only 5 formulations (all Sn-toothpastes and 2 NaF-toothpastes) reduced tissue loss significantly when compared to negative control (between 33 and 59%). There was a non-linear association between abrasiveness and amount of particles in a formulation, the particle size had no impact. Toothpastes had a protecting effect when applied as slurries but to a much lesser degree when applied with brushing. The particulate fraction may be a determinant for toothpaste efficacy in erosion/abrasion settings. Toothpastes are important carriers of active agents against erosion, but physical impacts through brushing modifies efficacy distinctly. Understanding the role of the particulate fraction in toothpastes may offer perspectives for designing effective formulations for patients with erosive lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of aluminum and carbon on the abrasion resistance of high manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckholz, Samuel August

    Abrasive wear testing of lightweight, austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C cast steel has been performed in accordance with ASTM G65 using a dry sand, rubber wheel, abrasion testing apparatus. Testing was conducted on a series of Fe-30Mn-XAl-YC-1Si-0.5Mo chemistries containing aluminum levels from 2.9 to 9.5 wt.% and carbon levels from 0.9 to 1.83 wt.%. Solution treated materials having an austenitic microstructure produced the highest wear resistance. Wear resistance decreased with higher aluminum, lower carbon, and higher hardness after age hardening. In the solution treated condition the wear rate was a strong function of the aluminum to carbon ratio and the wear rate increased with a parabolic dependence on the Al/C ratio, which ranged from 1.8 to 10.2. Examination of the surface wear scar revealed a mechanism of plowing during abrasion testing and this method of material removal is sensitive to work hardening rate. Work hardening behavior was determined from tensile tests and also decreased with increasing Al/C ratio and after aging hardening. The loss of wear resistance is related to short range ordering of Al and C in the solution treated materials and kappa-carbide precipitation in age hardened materials and both contribute to planar slip and lower work hardening rates. A high carbon tool steel (W1) and a bainitic low alloy steel (SAE 8620) were also tested for comparison. A lightweight steel containing 6.5 wt.% Al and 1.2 wt.% C has wear resistance comparable to within 5% of the bainitic SAE 8620 steel forging currently used for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle track shoe and this cast Fe-Mn-Al-C steel, at equivalent tensile properties, would be 10% lighter.

  4. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation.

  5. Simplified Abrasion Test Methodology for Candidate EVA Glove Lay-Ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabel, Emily; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, space suit outer-layer fabrics were badly abraded after performing just a few extravehicular activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots that penetrated the outer-layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than 8 hrs of surface operations. Current plans for the exploration planetary space suits require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on a lunar or Martian surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last 40 years and improve on the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo Program. Over the past 25 years the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division has focused on tumble testing as means of simulating wear on the outer layer of the space suit fabric. Most recently, in 2009, testing was performed on 4 different candidate outer layers to gather baseline data for future use in design of planetary space suit outer layers. In support of the High Performance EVA Glove Element of the Next Generation Life Support Project, testing a new configuration was recently attempted in which require 10% of the fabric per replicate of that need in 2009. The smaller fabric samples allowed for reduced per sample cost and flexibility to test small samples from manufacturers without the overhead to have a production run completed. Data collected from this iteration was compared to that taken in 2009 to validate the new test method. In addition the method also evaluated the fabrics and fabric layups used in a prototype thermal micrometeoroid garment (TMG) developed for EVA gloves under the NASA High Performance EVA Glove Project. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, results of the validation study, and results of the TMG testing.

  6. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  7. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Friday, June 29, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... general dentist, who has been trained in restorative dentistry techniques, will perform any procedures that use air- ...

  8. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... goggles or a facemask) when you're enjoying sports like skiing, snowboarding, hockey, and lacrosse. Safety goggles can protect your eyes when you're using tools or experimenting in science class. If you go outside on a sunny ...

  9. Machine tool locator

    DOEpatents

    Hanlon, John A.; Gill, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    Machine tools can be accurately measured and positioned on manufacturing machines within very small tolerances by use of an autocollimator on a 3-axis mount on a manufacturing machine and positioned so as to focus on a reference tooling ball or a machine tool, a digital camera connected to the viewing end of the autocollimator, and a marker and measure generator for receiving digital images from the camera, then displaying or measuring distances between the projection reticle and the reference reticle on the monitoring screen, and relating the distances to the actual position of the autocollimator relative to the reference tooling ball. The images and measurements are used to set the position of the machine tool and to measure the size and shape of the machine tool tip, and examine cutting edge wear. patent

  10. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  11. Ultra precision machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debra, Daniel B.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Binford, Thomas

    1990-05-01

    There are a number of fields that require or can use to advantage very high precision in machining. For example, further development of high energy lasers and x ray astronomy depend critically on the manufacture of light weight reflecting metal optical components. To fabricate these optical components with machine tools they will be made of metal with mirror quality surface finish. By mirror quality surface finish, it is meant that the dimensions tolerances on the order of 0.02 microns and surface roughness of 0.07. These accuracy targets fall in the category of ultra precision machining. They cannot be achieved by a simple extension of conventional machining processes and techniques. They require single crystal diamond tools, special attention to vibration isolation, special isolation of machine metrology, and on line correction of imperfection in the motion of the machine carriages on their way.

  12. Cleaning and modification of intraorally contaminated titanium discs with calcium phosphate powder abrasive treatment.

    PubMed

    Tastepe, Ceylin S; Liu, Yuelian; Visscher, Corine M; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency on intraorally contaminated titanium discs by using calcium phosphate and air powder abrasive (APA) treatment. The modification of titanium surface (SLA) was evaluated and compared with the conventional air powder abrasive methods and phosphoric acid. This treatment modality might give new perspectives for peri-implant surface treatment. A total of 36 SLA surface titanium discs were kept in the human mouth for 48 h by 14 volunteers. The intraorally contaminated discs were stained with erythrosine dye to make the biofilm visible. Discs were randomly assigned to one of the six groups: APA without powder-only water and air (Control). APA with Hydroxylapatite (HA). APA with Hydroxylapatite and Calcium Phosphate (HA + TCP). APA with Titanium Dioxide (TiO2). APA with EMS Soft Subgingival powder (EMS). Phosphoric Acid. Light microscope photos were taken during the treatment. Following the cleaning, the residual biofilm, surface changes, and surface chemical content were evaluated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic random sampling protocol and a point counting method were applied for the quantitative evaluation of the remaining biofilm. Multiple comparisons within and between groups are performed by Kruskall Wallis test and if significant Mann-Whitney U-test as post hoc testing is applied. The significance level was P < 0.05. All methods with the exception of phosphoric acid could decrease the initial amount of biofilm significantly. Among all air powder abrasive treatments, the HA + TCP group showed the best results with 99% biofilm removal, followed by HA and EMS powders. The cleaning method caused minimal changes to the surface structure. With the exception of the control group, all air powder applications caused sharp edges around the grooves in the implant surface to be rounded. TiO2 powder caused less change than HA and HA + TCP. Phosphoric

  13. The grain-size distribution of pyroclasts: Primary fragmentation, conduit sorting or abrasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Schauroth, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions expel a mixture of pyroclasts and lithics. Pyroclasts, fragments of the juvenile magma, record the state of the magma at fragmentation in terms of porosity and crystallinity. The grain size distribution of pyroclasts is generally considered to be a direct consequence of the conditions at magma fragmentation that is mainly driven by gas overpressure in bubbles, high shear rates, contact with external water or a combination of these factors. Stress exerted by any of these processes will lead to brittle fragmentation by overcoming the magma's relaxation timescale. As a consequence, most pyroclasts exhibit angular shapes. Upon magma fragmentation, the gas pyroclast mixture is accelerated upwards and eventually ejected from the vent. The total grain size distribution deposited is a function of fragmentation conditions and transport related sorting. Porous pyroclasts are very susceptible to abrasion by particle-particle or particle-conduit wall interaction. Accordingly, pyroclastic fall deposits with angular clasts should proof a low particle abrasion upon contact to other surfaces. In an attempt to constrain the degree of particle interaction during conduit flow, monomodal batches of washed pyroclasts have been accelerated upwards by rapid decompression and subsequently investigated for their grain size distribution. In our set-up, we used a vertical cylindrical tube without surface roughness as conduit. We varied grain size (0.125-0.25; 0.5-1; 1-2 mm), porosity (0; 10; 30 %), gas-particle ratio (10 and 40%), conduit length (10 and 28 cm) and conduit diameter (2.5 and 6 cm). All ejected particles were collected after settling at the base of a 3.3 m high tank and sieved at one sieve size below starting size (half-Φ). Grain size reduction showed a positive correlation with starting grain size, porosity and overpressure at the vent. Although milling in a volcanic conduit may take place, porous pyroclasts are very likely to be a primary product

  14. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for analgesia in traumatic corneal abrasions.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Abel; Lawrenson, John G; Lawrenson, Annali L; Wang, Yongjun; Brown, Michael D; Quirke, Michael; Ghandour, Omar; McCormick, Ryan; Walsh, Cathal D; Amayem, Ahmed; Lang, Eddy; Harrison, Nick

    2017-05-18

    Traumatic corneal abrasions are relatively common and there is a lack of consensus about analgesia in their management. It is therefore important to document the clinical efficacy and safety profile of topical ophthalmic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the management of traumatic corneal abrasions. To identify and evaluate all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the use of topical NSAIDs with placebo or any alternative analgesic interventions in adults with traumatic corneal abrasions (including corneal abrasions arising from foreign body removal), to reduce pain, and its effects on healing time. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 30 March 2017), Embase Ovid (1947 to 30 March 2017), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to 30 March 2017), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/); searched 30 March 2017, ZETOC (1993 to 30 March 2017), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch); searched 30 March 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 30 March 2017 and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 30 March 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials.We checked the reference lists of identified trials to search for further potentially relevant studies. RCTs comparing topical NSAIDs to placebo or any alternative analgesic interventions in adults with traumatic corneal abrasions. Two review authors independently performed data extraction and assessed risks of bias in the included studies. We rated the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. We included nine studies that met the inclusion criteria, reporting data on 637 participants.The studies took place in the UK, USA, Israel, Italy

  15. Abrasion-Erosion Resistance of Concrete Made with Two Aggregates, Stonewall Jackson Dam, West Virginia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    the concrete mixtures; Mr. Dale Glass , Mr. Frank W. Dorsey, and Mr. Roger Buttner conducted the abrasion-erosion tests. Mr. Stuart Long served as the...PITT- 8 S-1, was from the Buffalo Slag Co., Franklinville, New York. This fine aggregate is classified as a glacial sand and is composed primarily of...MATERIAL Fine Aggregate ILZAI% Franklin, NY R:.rLcE- Buffalo Slag Co. sA--L.. BY ~ J2rhDst:r esne Kinzua Damn - . USED A PROCESSING BEFORE TESTING

  16. Dental Wear: Attrition, Erosion, and Abrasion-A Palaeo-Odontological Approach.

    PubMed

    Sperber, Geoffrey H

    2017-06-17

    This paper reviews the surface ablation of early hominin teeth by attrition, abrasion, and erosive dental wear. The occurrence of these lesions is explored in a sample of South African fossil australopithecine dentitions revealing excessive wear. Interpretation of the nature of the dietary components causing such wear in the absence of carious erosion provides insight into the ecology of the Plio-pleistocene epoch (1-2 million years ago). Fossil teeth inform much of the living past by their retained evidence after death. Tooth wear is the ultimate forensic dental evidence of lives lived.

  17. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-01-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  18. Bonding of composite resins to PEEK: the influence of adhesive systems and air-abrasion parameters.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Taufall, Simon; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lümkemann, Nina

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the tensile bond strength (TBS) to polyaryletheretherketone (PEEK) after different pretreatment and conditioning methods. Four hundred PEEK specimens were fabricated and allocated to the following air-abrasion methods (n 1  = 80/pretreatment): (i) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (ii) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); (iii) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (iv) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); and (v) Rocatec 110 μm (0.28 MPa). These pretreatments were combined with the following conditioning methods (n 2  = 20/pretreatment/conditioning): (a) visio.link (VL); (b) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH); (c) Scotchbond Universal (SU); and (d) dialog bonding fluid (DB). After veneering of all specimens with dialog occlusal and aging (28 days H 2 O, 37 °C + 20,000 thermal cycles, 5/55 °C), TBS was measured. Data was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Breslow-Gehan test and Cox-regressions. The major impact on TBS showed the conditioning, followed by the air-abrasion-pressure, while the grain size of the air-abrasion powder did not show any effect. Specimens air-abraded at 0.35 MPa showed the highest survival rates. However, within VL groups, this observation was not statistically significant. Within MH groups, pretreatment using 110 μm Al 2 O 3 and 0.05 MPa resulted in higher survival rates compared to groups treated with 50 and 110 μm Al 2 O 3 using a pressure of 0.35 MPa. The use of VL showed the highest survival rates between the adhesive systems and the TBS values higher than 25 MPa independent of the pretreatment method. As an exception, only VL showed significantly higher survival rates when compared to MH. The adequate choice of the adhesive system and higher pressures improved the TBS between PEEK and veneering resin composite. The particle size had no major impact. According to this study, best veneering of PEEK with dialog occlusal can be achieved by conditioning with visio.link in combination with

  19. Microstructure and abrasive wear test of different composite layers formed by laser coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, J.

    1994-09-01

    Layers containing different particles of different sizes (TiC: 2,7 micrometers and 31 micrometers mid size; TaC: 15 micrometers mid size) were formed on the surface of 90 MnCrV8 tool steel. A CO2-gas laser equipment was used to form these layers. The grain contents of the layers were between 35% - 55%. Some of the ready TiC layers were hardened by laser in order to reduce the retained amount. We compared the wear resistance of the layers employing abrasive wheel test. For reference purposes we carried out the test of traditionally hardened, traded TICALLOY II and TICALLOY W materials as well.

  20. The geomorphic effect of recent storms - Quantifying meso scale abrasion across a shore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Niamh; Bourke, Mary; Naylor, Larissa

    2017-04-01

    Boulder abrasion trails (BATs) are lineations on the surface of rock platforms formed by the movement of traction-load clasts by waves. They have been observed on a variety of platform lithologies, including limestone, granite and basalt. Despite previous reporting of these features, the abrasion styles and geomorphic work done by boulder transport has not been quantified. We present the first quantitative measurement of shore platform erosion by boulder transport during extreme storms that occurred in the winter of 2015-2016. Following two storm events in 2016 we mapped and measured 33 individual BATs on a sandstone platform on the west coast of Ireland. The total (minimum) abraded surface area was 10m2. The total (minimum) volume of material abraded was 0.2m3. In order to test the efficacy of this process during non-storm conditions we conducted field experiments on the same platform. We identified two sites on the platform that were similar, but differed in their intertidal roughness. We installed an RBR solo wave pressure transducer (PT) at 0m OD at both locations to record wave data. We measured platform roughness, determined as the fractal dimension of the platform profiles at both sites. We deployed an array of boulders of known dimensions and mass, parallel to the shoreline at 0.5m intervals from the PTs. The experiments were conducted 1. during relatively calm conditions and 2. during higher energy conditions. Data was collected for one tidal cycle. Any boulder displacement distance and direction was measured and geomorphic effects were documented. We find that BATs are formed under a range of wave energy conditions. Our observations indicate that along the North Atlantic coastline, BATs can occur at a high frequency, only limited by sediment supply. Our data show that abrasion by boulder transport is a potentially significant geomorphological process acting to abrade platforms under contemporary climate conditions. In addition, our preliminary findings

  1. Rapid Confined Mixing with Transverse Jets Part 1: Single Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, David; Forliti, David

    2012-11-01

    Transverse jets have been studied extensively due to their relevance and efficiency in fluid mixing applications. Gas turbine burners, film cooling, and chemical reactors are some examples of rapid transverse jet mixing. Motivated by a lack of universal scaling laws for confined and unconfined transverse jets, a newly developed momentum transfer parameter was found to improve correlation of literature data. Jet column drag and entrainment arguments for momentum transfer are made to derive the parameter. A liquid-phase mixing study was conducted to investigate confined mixing for a low number of jets. Planar laser induced fluorescence was implemented to measure mixture fraction for a single confined transverse jet. Time-averaged cross-sectional images were taken with a light sheet located three diameters downstream of transverse injection. A mixture of water and sodium fluorescein was used to distinguish jet fluid from main flow fluid for the test section images. Image data suggest regimes for under- and overpenetration of jet fluid into the main flow. The scaling parameter is found to correlate optimum unmixedness for multiple diameter ratios at a parameter value of 0.75. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12655.

  2. Lear jet telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Dix, M. G.; Hitchman, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The telescope system was designed as a multi-user facility for observations of celestial objects at infrared wavelengths, where ground-based observations are difficult or impossible due to the effects of telluric atmospheric absorption. The telescope is mounted in a Lear jet model 24B which typically permits 70 min. of observing per flight at altitudes in excess of 45,000 ft (13 km). Telescope system installation is discussed, along with appropriate setup and adjustment procedures. Operation of the guidance system is also explained, and checklists are provided which pertain to the recommended safe operating and in-flight trouble-shooting procedures for the equipment.

  3. Progress in machine consciousness.

    PubMed

    Gamez, David

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a review of the work that has been carried out on machine consciousness. A clear overview of this diverse field is achieved by breaking machine consciousness down into four different areas, which are used to understand its aims, discuss its relationship with other subjects and outline the work that has been carried out so far. The criticisms that have been made against machine consciousness are also covered, along with its potential benefits, and the work that has been done on analysing systems for signs of consciousness. Some of the social and ethical issues raised by machine consciousness are examined at the end of the paper.

  4. Machine listening intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, C. E.

    2017-05-01

    This manifesto paper will introduce machine listening intelligence, an integrated research framework for acoustic and musical signals modelling, based on signal processing, deep learning and computational musicology.

  5. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    PubMed Central

    Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance. PMID:29027926

  6. Walking Machine Control Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-31

    configuration is useful for two reasons: first, the machine won’t fit through the garage door unless it is in the tuck position, and second, a principal way...machine out of its garage . ’We call the garage a "laboratory" even though the shorter term is more apt.- We regularly run the machine in the parking...comes down from a high push-up. The natural position for the feet as the machine comes out of the garage is the "tuck" in which each knee is bent in as

  7. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric jets of air and helium. I - Air jet. II - Helium jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.; Lumley, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements on turbulent round jets of air and of helium of the same nozzle momentum efflux, using, for the air jets, x-wire hot-wire probes mounted on a moving shuttle and, for He jets, a composite probe consisting of an interference probe of the Way-Libby type and an x-probe. Current models for scalar triple moments were evaluated. It was found that the performance of the model termed the Full model, which includes all terms except advection, was very good for both the air and the He jets.

  8. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  11. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  12. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  13. Impinging jets atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, E. A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of the spray produced by an impinging-jet injector is presented. Predictions of the spray droplet size and distribution are obtained through studying the formation and disintegration of the liquid sheet formed by the impact of two cylindrical jets of the same diameter and momentum. Two breakup regimes of the sheet are considered depending on Weber number, with transition occurring at Weber numbers between 500 and 2000. In the lower Weber number regime, the breakup is due to Taylor cardioidal waves, while at Weber number higher than 2000, the sheet disintegration is by the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability waves. Theoretical expressions to predict the sheet thickness and shape are derived for the low Weber number breakup regime. An existing mathematical analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of radially moving liquid sheets is adopted in the predictions of resultant drop sizes by sheet breakup at Weber numbers greater than 2000. Comparisons of present theoretical results with experimental measurements and empirical correlations reported in the literature reveal favorable agreement.

  14. Micro Machining Enhances Precision Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced thermal systems developed for the Space Station Freedom project are now in use on the International Space Station. These thermal systems employ evaporative ammonia as their coolant, and though they employ the same series of chemical reactions as terrestrial refrigerators, the space-bound coolers are significantly smaller. Two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts between Creare Inc. of Hanover, NH and Johnson Space Center developed an ammonia evaporator for thermal management systems aboard Freedom. The principal investigator for Creare Inc., formed Mikros Technologies Inc. to commercialize the work. Mikros Technologies then developed an advanced form of micro-electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM) to make tiny holes in the ammonia evaporator. Mikros Technologies has had great success applying this method to the fabrication of micro-nozzle array systems for industrial ink jet printing systems. The company is currently the world leader in fabrication of stainless steel micro-nozzles for this market, and in 2001 the company was awarded two SBIR research contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center to advance micro-fabrication and high-performance thermal management technologies.

  15. Corkscrew Structures and Precessing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2005-07-01

    Collimated jets are one of the most intriguing, yet poorly understood phenomena in astrophysics. Jets have been found in a wide variety of object classes which include AGNs, YSOs, massive X-ray binaries {e.g. SS433}, black hole X-ray transients, symbiotic stars, supersoft X-ray sources, and finally, planetary and preplanetary nebulae {PNs & PPNs}. In the case of PNs and PPNs, we have propsoed that wobbling collimated jets are the universal mechanism which can shape the wide variety of bipolar and multipolar morphologies seen in these objects. Most of our knowledge of post-AGB jets is indirectly inferred from their effects on the circumstellar envelopes of the progenitor AGB stars and, for that reason, these jets remain very poorly understood. Thus the mechanism that powers and collimates these jet-like post-AGB outflows remains as one of the most important, unsolved issues in post-AGB evolution. We propose an archival study of two bipolar PPNs, motivated by two recent discoveries which indicate that precessing jets are likely to be operational in them, and that the properties of the jets and the bipolar lobes produced by them, may be directly measured. One of these is IRAS16342-3814 {IRAS1634}, previously imaged with WPFC2, in which new Adaptive Optics {AO} observations at near-IR wavelengths show a remarkable corkscrew-shaped structure, the tell-tale signature of a precessing jet. Inspection of WFPC2 images of another PPN, OH231.8+4.2 in which we have recently discovered a A-type companion to the central mass-losing star, shows a sinuous nebulosity in a broad-band continuum image, resembling a corkscrew structure. We will use the latter to constrain the phsyical properties of the jet {precession period, opening angle, jet beam diameter, temporal history} in OH231.8. Using the multi-wavelength data on both sources, we will build models of the density distribution of the lobes and their interiors. In the case of IRAS1634, these models will be used to investigate the

  16. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  17. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Multi-jet Effects in Swirling Jet Combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Many practical combustion devices use multiple swirling jets to stabilize flames. However, much of the understanding of swirling jet dynamics has been generated from experimental and computational studies of single reacting, swirling jets. A smaller body of literature has begun to explore the effects of multi-jet systems and the role of jet-jet interactions on the macro-system dynamics. This work uses local temporal and spatio-temporal stability analyses to isolate the hydrodynamic interactions of multiple reacting, swirling jets, characterized by jet diameter, D, and spacing, L. The results first identify the familiar helical modes in the single jet. Comparison to the multi-jet configuration reveals these same familiar modes simultaneously oscillating in each of the jets. Jet-jet interaction is mostly limited to a spatial synchronization of each jet's oscillations at the jet spacing values analyzed here (L/D =3.5). The presence of multiple jets vs a single jet has little influence on the temporal and absolute growth rates. The biggest difference between the single and multi-jet configurations is the presence of nearly degenerate pairs of hydrodynamic modes in the multi-jet case, with one mode dominated by oscillations in the inner jet, and the other in the outer jets. The close similarity between the single and multi-jet hydrodynamics lends insight into experiments from our group.

  18. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-09-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, monitoring of early erosion by reflection analysis was possible even in the abraded eroded teeth. The presence of the salivary pellicle induced up to 22% higher reflection intensities due to the smoothing of the eroded enamel by the adhered proteins. However, this measurement artifact could be significantly minimized (p<0.05) by removing the pellicle layer with 3% NaOCl solution. Change of the measurement angles from 45 to 60 deg did not improve the sensitivity of the analysis at late erosion stages. The applicability of the method for monitoring the remineralization of eroded enamel remained unclear in a demineralization/remineralization cycling model of early dental erosion in vitro.

  19. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-09-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, monitoring of early erosion by reflection analysis was possible even in the abraded eroded teeth. The presence of the salivary pellicle induced up to 22% higher reflection intensities due to the smoothing of the eroded enamel by the adhered proteins. However, this measurement artifact could be significantly minimized (p<0.05) by removing the pellicle layer with 3% NaOCl solution. Change of the measurement angles from 45 to 60 deg did not improve the sensitivity of the analysis at late erosion stages. The applicability of the method for monitoring the remineralization of eroded enamel remained unclear in a demineralization/remineralization cycling model of early dental erosion in vitro.

  20. Physicochemical Characterization of Functional Lignin–Silica Hybrid Fillers for Potential Application in Abrasive Tools

    PubMed Central

    Strzemiecka, Beata; Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Jamrozik, Artur; Szalaty, Tadeusz J.; Matykiewicz, Danuta; Sterzyński, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2016-01-01

    Functional lignin–SiO2 hybrid fillers were prepared for potential application in binders for phenolic resins, and their chemical structure was characterized. The properties of these fillers and of composites obtained from them with phenolic resin were compared with those of systems with lignin or silica alone. The chemical structure of the materials was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C CP MAS NMR). The thermal stability of the new functional fillers was examined by thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry (TG-MS). Thermo-mechanical properties of the lignin–silica hybrids and resin systems were investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The DMTA results showed that abrasive composites with lignin–SiO2 fillers have better thermo-mechanical properties than systems with silica alone. Thus, fillers based on lignin might provide new, promising properties for the abrasive industry, combining the good properties of lignin as a plasticizer and of silica as a filler improving mechanical properties. PMID:28773639