Science.gov

Sample records for abrasive tool wear

  1. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  2. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  3. Abrasive wear of advanced structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Young

    Wear of advanced structural materials, namely composites and ceramics, in abrasion has been examined in the present study. A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of reinforcement is estimated by modeling three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, cracking at the matrix/reinforcement interface or in the reinforcement, and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as the relative size, fracture toughness, and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on-drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy-matrix composite material. In addition, the effects of post heat-treatment on the wear behavior of toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC) are investigated by characterizing the role of the microstructures introduced during the post annealing processes. When the annealing temperature is above 1300°C, an aluminum rich secondary phase (nano-precipitate) forms and grows inside the SiC grains. This toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC), annealed at temperatures ranging from 0 to 1600°C, is subjected to two- and three-body abrasions with different sizes of abrasives (3˜70 mum). The test results exhibit that the effect of nano-precipitates on wear resistance of post-annealed ABC-SiC is restricted to the abrasion with fine abrasives (3 mum), since nano-precipitates, in the range from 4 nm at 1300°C to 25 nm at 1600°C, are comparable in dimension

  4. Predicting abrasive wear with coupled Lagrangian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a mesh-less approach for the simulation of a fluid with particle loading and the prediction of abrasive wear is presented. We are using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for modeling the fluid and the discrete element method (DEM) for the solid particles, which represent the loading of the fluid. These Lagrangian methods are used to describe heavily sloshing fluids with their free surfaces as well as the interface between the fluid and the solid particles accurately. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations model is applied for handling turbulences. We are predicting abrasive wear on the boundary geometry with two different wear models taking cutting and deformation mechanisms into account. The boundary geometry is discretized with special DEM particles. In doing so, it is possible to use the same particle type for both the calculation of the boundary conditions for the SPH method as well as the DEM and for predicting the abrasive wear. After a brief introduction to the SPH method and the DEM, the handling of the boundary and the coupling of the fluid and the solid particles are discussed. Then, the applied wear models are presented and the simulation scenarios are described. The first numerical experiment is the simulation of a fluid with loading which is sloshing inside a tank. The second numerical experiment is the simulation of the impact of a free jet with loading to a simplified pelton bucket. We are especially investigating the wear patterns inside the tank and the bucket.

  5. Tool Wear in Friction Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Scott F; Blau, Peter Julian; Shih, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the wear of carbide tools used in friction drilling, a nontraditional hole-making process. In friction drilling, a rotating conical tool uses the heat generated by friction to soften and penetrate a thin workpiece and create a bushing without generating chips. The wear of a hard tungsten carbide tool used for friction drilling a low carbon steel workpiece has been investigated. Tool wear characteristics were studied by measuring its weight change, detecting changes in its shape with a coordinate measuring machine, and making observations of wear damage using scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was applied to analyze the change in chemical composition of the tool surface due to drilling. In addition, the thrust force and torque during drilling and the hole size were measured periodically to monitor the effects of tool wear. Results indicate that the carbide tool is durable, showing minimal tool wear after drilling 11000 holes, but observations also indicate progressively severe abrasive grooving on the tool tip.

  6. Microstructure and abrasive wear in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    It is well known that abrasive wear resistance is not strictly a materials property, but also depends upon the specific conditions of the wear environment. Nonetheless, characteristics of the ceramic microstructure do influence its hardness and fracture toughness and must, therefore, play an active role in determining howa ceramic will respond to the specific stress states imposed upon it by the wear environment. In this study, the ways in which composition and microstructure influence the abrasive wear behavior of six commercially-produced silicon nitride based ceramics are examined. Results indicate that microstructural parameters, such as matrix grain size and orientation, porosity, and grain boundary microstructure, and thermal expansion mismatch stresses created as the result of second phase formation, influence the wear rate through their effect on wear sheet formation and subsurface fracture. It is also noted that the potential impact of these variables on the wear rate may not be reflected in conventional fracture toughness measurements.

  7. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  8. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  9. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  10. Microfracture patterns of abrasive wear striations on teeth indicate directionality.

    PubMed

    Gordon, K R

    1984-03-01

    A method is described that will indicate the direction that an abrasive particle was traveling as it scored the surface of a brittle material. Light and scanning electron micrographs of glass, dentine, and enamel abraded by loose and, steel carbide, and diamond indicate that partial Hertzian fracture cones are formed at the margins of wear striations during abrasion. The bases of these fracture cones face in the direction of travel of the abrasive particle and, therefore, indicate directionality. Because this method is based only on the consistent geometry of fracturing of brittle materials, it is independent of the loading of the abrasive particle. The only other method available to determine directionality of striations is unreliable since it uses the width of striations, and, hence, is dependent upon a consistent loading regime of the abrasive particle. This new method has direct application for determining the direction of movement of the jaws during mastication in living or fossil animals. PMID:6731603

  11. Wear of artificial denture teeth by use of toothbrushes. Part 1: Abrasive wear of anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Y; Ohtani, K; Maejima, K; Morikawa, M; Matsuzu, M; Nagai, E; Toyoma, H; Ohwa, M; Ohki, K; Kaketani, M

    1990-12-01

    High-strength denture teeth (HS teeth) were developed in order to improve the hardness and wear resistance of conventional plastic denture teeth (PL teeth), while retaining their feature of easy occlusal adjustment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance of HS teeth. We conducted wear tests and measured surface roughness using six types of anterior artificial teeth, i.e., three types of HS teeth and three types of PL teeth, the latter serving as the control. The results of the toothbrush abrasion test revealed that the HS teeth had about 5 times greater wear resistance than the PL teeth. It was also found that the type of artificial teeth and the number of abrasive wear-testing strokes had a significant (P less than 0.05) influence on the surface roughness of artificial teeth. PMID:2074493

  12. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  13. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  14. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  15. Abrasive Wear Study of NiCrFeSiB Flame Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satpal

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, abrasive wear behavior of NiCrFeSiB alloy coating on carbon steel was investigated. The NiCrFeSiB coating powder was deposited by flame spraying process. The microstructure, porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. Elemental mapping was carried out in order to study the distribution of various elements in the coating. The abrasive wear behavior of these coatings was investigated under three normal loads (5, 10 and 15 N) and two abrasive grit sizes (120 and 320 grit). The abrasive wear rate was found to increase with the increase of load and abrasive size. The abrasive wear resistance of coating was found to be 2-3 times as compared to the substrate. Analysis of the scanning electron microscope images revealed cutting and plowing as the material removal mechanisms in these coatings under abrasive wear conditions used in this investigation.

  16. Wear and abrasion resistance selection maps of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Amini, Shahrouz; Miserez, Ali

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical design of biological materials has generated widespread interest in recent years, providing many insights into their intriguing structure-property relationships. A critical characteristic of load-bearing materials, which is central to the survival of many species, is their wear and abrasion tolerance. In order to be fully functional, protective armors, dentitious structures and dynamic appendages must be able to tolerate repetitive contact loads without significant loss of materials or internal damage. However, very little is known about this tribological performance. Using a contact mechanics framework, we have constructed materials selection charts that provide general predictions about the wear performance of biological materials as a function of their fundamental mechanical properties. One key assumption in constructing these selection charts is that abrasion tolerance is governed by the first irreversible damage at the contact point. The maps were generated using comprehensive data from the literature and encompass a wide range of materials, from heavily mineralized to fully organic materials. Our analysis shows that the tolerance of biological materials against abrasion depends on contact geometry, which is ultimately correlated to environmental and selective pressures. Comparisons with experimental data from nanoindentation experiments are also drawn in order to verify our predictions. With the increasing amount of data available for biological materials also comes the challenge of selecting relevant model systems for bioinspired materials engineering. We suggest that these maps will be able to guide this selection by providing an overview of biological materials that are predicted to exhibit the best abrasion tolerance, which is of fundamental interest for a wide range of applications, for instance in restorative implants and protective devices. PMID:23643608

  17. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  18. Structural transformations, strengthening, and wear resistance of titanium nickelide upon abrasive and adhesive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Pushin, V. G.; Chernenko, N. L.; Makarov, V. V.

    2010-07-01

    Wear resistance and structural transformations upon abrasive and adhesive wear of titanium nickelide Ti49.4Ni50.6 in microcrystalline (MC) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) states have been investigated. It has been shown that the abrasive wear resistance of this alloy exceeds that of the steel 12Kh18N9 by a factor of about 2, that of the steel 110G13 (Hadfield steel), by a factor of 1.3, and is close to that of the steel 95Kh18. Upon adhesive wear in a testing-temperature range from -50 to +300°C, the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy, as compared to the steel 12Kh18N9, is characterized by the wear rate that is tens of times smaller and by a reduced (1.5-2.0 times) friction coefficient. The enhanced wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy is due to the development of intense strain hardening in it and to a high fracture toughness, which is a consequence of effective relaxation of high contact stresses arising in the surface layer of the alloy. The SMC state produced in the alloy with the help of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) has no effect on the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy. The favorable effect of ECAP on the wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy takes place under conditions of its adhesive wear at temperatures from -25 to +70°C. The electron-microscopic investigation showed that under conditions of wear at negative and room temperatures in the surface layer (1-5 μm thick) of titanium nickelide there arises a mixed structure consisting of an amorphous phase and nanocrystals of supposedly austenite and martensite. Upon friction at 200-300°C, a nanocrystalline structure of the B2 phase arises near the alloy surface, which, as is the case with the amorphous-nanocrystalline structure, is characterized by significant effective strength and wear resistance.

  19. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  20. Improvement in high stress abrasive wear property of steel by hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Mondal, D.P.; Khaira, H.K.; Jha, A.K.

    1999-12-01

    High stress abrasive wear behavior of mild steel, medium carbon steel, and hardfacing alloy has been studied to ascertain the extent of improvement in the wear properties after hardfacing of steel. High stress abrasive wear tests were carried out by sliding the specimen against the abrasive media consisting of silicon carbide particles, rigidly bonded on paper base and mounted on disk. Maximum wear was found in the case of mild steel followed by a medium carbon alloy steel and a hardfacing alloy. Different compositions of steels and constituent phases present led to different wear rates of the specimen. The extent of improvement in wear performance of steel due to hardfacing is quite appreciable (twice compared to mild steel). Microstructural examination of the wear surface has been carried out to understand the wear mechanism.

  1. Influence of material characteristics on the abrasive wear response of some hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, A.K.; Prasad, B.K.; Dasgupta, R.; Modi, O.P.

    1999-04-01

    This study examines the abrasive wear behavior of two iron-base hardfacing materials with different combinations of carbon and chromium after deposition on a steel substrate. Effects of applied load and sliding distance on the wear behavior of the specimens were studied. Operating material removal mechanisms also were analyzed through the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of typical wear surfaces, subsurface regions, and debris particles. The results suggest a significant improvement in the wear resistance of the hardfaced layers over that of the substrate. Further, the specimens overlaid with the material with low carbon and high chromium contents attained better wear resistance than the one consisting of more carbon but less chromium. The former specimens also attained superior hardness. Smoother abrasion grooves on the wear surfaces and finer debris formation during the abrasion of the hardfaced samples were consistent with wear resistance superior to that of the substrate.

  2. Experimental, numerical and analytical studies of abrasive wear: correlation between wear mechanisms and friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezlini, Salah; Zidi, M.; Arfa, H.; Ben Tkaya, Mohamed; Kapsa, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    The transport of granular material often generates severe damage. Understanding the correlation between the friction coefficient, particle geometry and wear mechanisms is of primary importance for materials undergoing abrasive wear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle geometry on wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. Numerical and analytical simulations and experimental results have been compared. The process to be studied is the scratch made by a rigid cone with different attack angles on a 5xxx aluminium alloy (Al-Mg) flat surface. A scratch test was used and the wear mechanisms were observed for different attack angles. A numerical study with a finite element code was made in order to understand the effect of attack angle on the friction coefficient. The contact surface and the friction coefficient were also studied, and the results compared to the Bowden and Tabor model. The superposition of the numerical, analytical and experimental results showed a better correlation between the wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. It also showed the importance of the model hypothesis used to simulate the scratch phenomenon. To cite this article: S. Mezlini et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  3. Pebble Jammed in Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity stopped working on sol 199 (Aug. 15, 2004), rover operators used the panoramic camera to take this image the next day for help in diagnosing the problem. The tool was closer than the camera could focus on sharply, but the image does show a dark spot just left of center, which engineers have determined is likely to be a pebble jammed between the cutting-blade rotor and the wire-brush rotor. If that diagnosis is confirmed by further analysis, the tool will likely be commanded to turn the rotors in reverse to release the pebble.

  4. Circular Signs of the Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's front hazard-avoidance camera, providing a circular sign of the success of the rover's first grinding of a rock. The round, shallow hole seen in this image is on a rock dubbed 'McKittrick,' located in the 'El Capitan' area of the larger outcrop near Opportunity's landing site.

    Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool to grind off a patch of rock 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter during the 30th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Feb. 23, 2004). The grinding exposed fresh rock for close inspection by the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers located on its robotic arm. The Honeybee Robotics team, which designed and operates the rock abrasion tool, determined the depth of the cut at 'McKittrick' to be 4.4 millimeters (0.17 inches) deep.

    On sol 34 (Feb. 27, 2004), the rover is scheduled to grind into its second target on the 'El Capitan' area, a rock dubbed 'Guadalupe' in the upper middle part of this image. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  5. Relationship between abrasive wear and microstructure of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Draughn, R A; Harrison, A

    1978-08-01

    The in vitro abrasion resistance of seven commercial composite resin restorative materials has been measured. Analysis of the composite microstructures shows that abrasion rates are dependent upon the size, hardness, and volume fraction of particles in the material. The most abrasion-resistant composites contain a high volume fraction of large, hard particles. PMID:278840

  6. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-07

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  7. An energetic approach to abrasive wear of a martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pamuk, U.; Baydogan, M.; Niluefer, B.; Cimenoglu, H.

    2000-04-01

    Abrasive wear is the most common type of wear that causes failure of machine elements. Examinations of abraded surfaces revealed presence of embedded particles and grooves elongated along the sliding direction. This indicates that, there are two sequential stages of an abrasion process. In the first stage, asperities on the hard surface and/or hard abrasive grains penetrate into the soft material surface and then in the second stage, they grind the surface in the sliding direction. Therefore, indentation and scratching of an indenter, which can be realized by hardness and scratch tests, can simulate the damage produced on the abraded surface. On the basis of this simulation, an energetic model is proposed for abrasive wear in the present study. In this study, abrasive wear behavior of a martensitic stainless steel is examined by hardness and scratch tests. The results of tests were evaluated to estimate the work done during abrasion and to find out the dimensional wear coefficient according to the model proposed above.

  8. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  9. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  10. Mars Exploration Rovers' Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorevan, S.; Myrick, T.; Davis, K.; Ji, J.; Bartlett, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Arafat, T.

    2003-04-01

    Each of the twin 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers will be equipped with a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) designed and tested by Honeybee Robotics. The RAT is a robotic grinding tool and science instrument about the size of a soda can and weighing less than 690 grams that is carried by the robotic arm or Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) of the rover. The primary purpose of the RAT is to remove the dust and surface rind from Mars rock targets to reveal the underlying petrographic features. After the RAT is placed and preloaded against the target rock by the IDD, all operations of the RAT are performed autonomously. Using three small motors to drive the rotation, revolve and z-axis subassemblies the RAT removes a 45 mm diameter, 5 mm deep patch of rock. The RAT has a resin-bonded diamond abrasion wheel and two brushes to provide a clean observation surface for the three surface instruments - APXS, Microscopic Imager and Moessbauer Spectrometer. Detailed design and operation descriptions, as well as recent qualification and operational testing results will be presented.

  11. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, June 1981-January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.; Rao, C.M.; Fernandes, M.T.; Fiore, N.F.

    1982-02-24

    This report describes research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials, including high-Cr white irons and powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling, and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion, and transfer applications. Recent work has concentrated on analysis of results. The many detailed observations obtained in the work on scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms have been summarized in drafts of three papers. The first, a study of abrasive wear mechanisms using diamond and alumina scratch tests, was included as an appendix to Quarterly Report 16/17 and has been accepted for publication in the journal Wear. Revision of the other two papers is in progress. Two papers representing our analysis of results are included as appendices to this report. The first, abrasion in multiphase alloys, was presented at the NACE conference on corrosion-erosion-wear of materials at Berkeley, California in January 1982, and will be published in the proceedings. The second, on a deformation-induced phase transformation during abrasive wear of Co-base alloys, is being submitted for publication in Metallurgical Transactions. In addition, work on the gouging abrasion resistance of the previously tested high Cr-Mo white cast irons is completed. The abstract of a short paper on the results is included as an appendix. (Note: since the appendices are, or will be, available in the open literature they have been removed from the report.)

  12. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-12-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant.

  13. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools. (a) Power. All grinding machines shall be supplied with sufficient power to maintain...

  14. Continuous Monitoring of Pin Tip Wear and Penetration into Rock Surface Using a New Cerchar Abrasivity Testing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaban, Mohammad-Taghi; Memarian, Hossein; Rostami, Jamal

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of rock abrasivity is important when utilizing mechanized excavation in various mining and civil projects in hard rock. This is due to the need for proper selection of the rock cutting tools, estimation of the tool wear, machine downtime for cutter change, and costs. The Cerchar Abrasion Index (CAI) test is one of the simplest and most widely used methods for evaluating rock abrasivity. In this study, a new device for the determination of frictional forces and depth of pin penetration into the rock surface during a Cerchar test is discussed. The measured parameters were used to develop an analytical model for calculation of the size of the wear flat (and hence a continuous measure of CAI as the pin moves over the sample) and pin tip penetration into the rock during the test. Based on this model, continuous curves of CAI changes and pin tip penetration into the rock were plotted. Results of the model were used for introduction of a new parameter describing rock-pin interaction and classification of rock abrasion.

  15. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, January 1-June 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, N.F.; Kosel, T.H.; Channagiri, M.; Desai, V.; Fulcher, J.; Shetty, H.R.

    1980-06-01

    Research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials is described including high-Cr white irons and experimental Co-base and Ni-base powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion and transfer applications. Research has concentrated on the investigation of wear in Co-base PM alloys No. 19 and No. 6, which have been sintered to provide different carbide sizes at the same volume fraction in each respective alloy. Low-stress abrasion tests using Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ abrasive have been completed on Alloy No. 19 and the results show a monotonic decrease in wear rate with increasing size. A series of single-point scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms has been initiated, and these tests provide valuable insights into material removal processes in the Co-base alloys.

  16. The abrasion-wear resistance of arc sprayed stainless steel and composite stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.; Levert, H.

    1994-12-31

    Stainless steels are often used to palliate wear problems in various industries. Though they are not wear resistant, they have been used to a limited extent in applications involving both corrosive and abrasive/erosive environments. The protection of industrial components by arc sprayed stainless steel composite coatings could be considered very attractive provided these coatings offer a better wear protection than bulk stainless steel. The wear resistance of stainless steel and composite stainless steel-titanium boride coatings arc sprayed with air and argon was evaluated following the ASTM G-65 Abrasion Wear Test procedures. Wear volume loss measurements show that stainless steel coatings arc sprayed with air were slightly more resistant than bulk stainless steel while those sprayed with argon were slightly less resistant. The abrasion wear resistance of composite stainless steel-titanium diboride coatings is by two or four times beyond the wear resistance of bulk stainless steel depending upon the core wire constitution and the type of gas used for spraying. Microstructural analysis of coatings, microhardness measurements of sprayed lamellae and optical profilometry were used to characterize coatings and wear damages. Spraying with air instead of argon produced much more small particles. These particles, being removed from the metal sheath surface, are individually sprayed without diluting the concentration hard phases within cores. It results in coatings that contain large lamellae with hardnesses sufficient to withstand abrasion. By considering both the wire constitution and the spraying conditions, it was found possible to fabricate composite stainless steel coatings that show a 400% increase in wear resistance over bulk stainless steel.

  17. Sliding and Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC-CoCr Coatings with Different Carbide Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the sliding and abrasive wear behaviors of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings with different WC grain sizes. The HVOF coating deposition was assisted by in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system. The powder feedstocks and their corresponding coatings were characterized by means of XRD and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope analysis. Hardness, porosity, and indentation fracture toughness of these coatings were calculated and compared with each other. Sliding wear resistance of these coatings was calculated using pin-on-disk tribometer (ASTM G99-90). The two-body abrasion was quantified by sliding the samples over silicon carbide (SiC) abrasive paper bonded to a rotating flat disk of auto-polisher. The mechanism of materials' removal in both the sliding and abrasive wears was studied and discussed on microstructural investigations. It was observed that fine grain WC-CoCr cermet coating exhibits higher sliding and abrasive wear resistances as compared with conventional cermet coating.

  18. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  19. Abrasive Wear Behaviour of COPPER-SiC and COPPER-SiO2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umale, Tejas; Singh, Amarjit; Reddy, Y.; Khatitrkar, R. K.; Sapate, S. G.

    The present paper reports abrasive wear behaviour of copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide and silica particles. Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites were prepared by powder metallurgical technique. Metallography, image analysis and hardness studies were carried out on copper composites. The abrasive wear experiments were carried out using pin on disc apparatus. The effect of sliding distance and load was studied on Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abrasive wear volume loss increased with sliding distance in both the composites although the magnitude of increase was different in each case. Copper - SiC (12%) composites exhibited relatively better abrasion resistance as compared to and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abraded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the morphology of abraded surfaces and operating wear mechanism. The analysis of wear debris particles was also carried out to substantiate the findings of the investigation.

  20. Parametric Study to Correlate the Applied Factors and Abrasive Wear Resistance of HVOF Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satpal

    2012-12-01

    Co-Ni-base powder was modified with the addition of CeO2 to study the effect of CeO2 addition on microstructure, hardness, and abrasive wear behavior of the unmodified (without CeO2) and modified (with CeO2) HVOF sprayed coatings. To investigate the abrasive wear behavior of coatings statistical response surface methodology (RSM) with four factors such as load, abrasive size, sliding distance, and temperature with three levels of each factor were used. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to determine the significant factors and their interactions. Thus abrasive wear model was developed in terms of main factors and their significant interactions. The validity of the model was evaluated by conducting experiments under different wear conditions. A comparison of modeled and experimental results showed 2-8% error. The wear resistance of coatings increased with the addition of CeO2. This is due to increase in hardness with the addition of CeO2 in Co-Ni-base coatings.

  1. Method for forming an abrasive surface on a tool

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Swindeman, Catherine J.; Kahl, W. Keith

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating a tool used in cutting, grinding and machining operations, is provided. The method is used to deposit a mixture comprising an abrasive material and a bonding material on a tool surface. The materials are propelled toward the receiving surface of the tool substrate using a thermal spray process. The thermal spray process melts the bonding material portion of the mixture, but not the abrasive material. Upon impacting the tool surface, the mixture or composition solidifies to form a hard abrasive tool coating.

  2. Wear of combinations of acrylic resin and porcelain, on an abrasion testing machine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A

    1978-04-01

    Wear tests of various combinations of acrylic resin and porcelain were made using a machine which was designed to test materials under conditions similar to those of masticatory function by simulating the loads, sliding distances, and contact times encountered in the human masticatory cycle. The results showed that the amount of wear of the two materials worn in combination depended on the nature of the surrounding medium and on the surface roughness of the opposing material. Acrylic resin showed good wear resistance provided no third party abrasive or opposing hard, rough surface was present. When a mild abrasive was incorporated in the system, the acrylic resin vs acrylic resin combination wore almost seven times more than porcelain vs porcelain. Clinical experience would suggest that this is a reasonably sound order of wear. PMID:213546

  3. Abrasive wear: The efects of fibres size on oil palm empty fruit bunch polyester composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasolang, S.; Kalam, A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Suhadah, W. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to determine the effect of palm oil empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre size in dry sliding testing of polyester composite. These composite samples were produced by mixing raw OPEFB fibre with resin. The samples were prepared at different sizes of fibre (100, 125, 180 and 250μm). Abrasion Resistance Tester (TR-600) was used to carried out abrasive wear tests in dry sliding conditions. These tests were performed at room temperature for two different loads (10 and 30N) and at a constant sliding velocity of 1.4m/s. The specific wear rates of OPEFB polyester composites were obtained. The morphology of composite surface before and after tests was also examined using 3D microscope imaging. Preliminary work on thermal distribution at the abrasive wheel point was also conducted for selected samples.

  4. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  5. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  6. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of Ni-Wc Composite Microwave Clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, Ni-WC powder was deposited on mild steel substrate to develop clads through microwave hybrid heating technique. The cladding trials were carried out in an industrial microwave applicator at 1.1 kW for 540 s. The Ni-WC composite clads were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of x-ray diffraction, electron and optical microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests. Phase analysis of the Ni-WC clad indicated the presence of stable carbides such as WC, W2C, Ni2W4C, and Fe6W6C. The microstructure study of the clad layer revealed the presence of a uniformly distributed interlocked WC-based reinforcement embedded in the Ni-based matrix. The average Vicker's microhardness in the clad layer was observed to be 1028 ± 90 HV, which was approximately three times the microhardness of the substrate. Abrasive wear resistance of the microwave clads was superior to the MS substrate. Abrasion was the main wear mechanism in the Ni-WC clads and the substrate samples. However, the presence of WC-based reinforcement in the composite clads reduced microcutting, resulting in enhanced wear resistance.

  7. Abrasive wear behavior of P/M titanium metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Hawk, J.A.; Simmons, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The abrasive wear behavior of titanium metal-matrix composites produced by powder metallurgical techniques was studied. Ti powder was mixed with 0, 20, or 40 volume percent (v%) TiB2, TiC, TiN, SiC, an B4C powder to produce a composite powder blend. The blends were consolidated by hot-pressing at 1200° C and 20 MPa for 2 hours. Also a series of Ti-TiB2 composites was consolidated by press and sinter techniques. Two-body abrasive wear resistance, of the composites worn against either SiC or garnet particles, was evaluated using a pin-on-drum apparatus. The wear behavior of the composites was correlated to the physical properties (e.g., microstructure, sintered density, hardness, strength) of the composites, and compared to the behavior of conventional cast adn wrought Ti and other alloys.

  8. Effect of carbonitride precipitates on the abrasive wear behaviour of hardfacing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ke; Yu, Shengfu; Li, Yingbin; Li, Chenglin

    2008-06-01

    Hardfacing alloy of martensitic stainless steel expect higher abradability to be achieved through the addition of nitrogen being provided by the fine scale precipitation of complex carbonitride particles. Niobium and titanium as the most effective carbonitride alloying elements were added in the Fe-Cr13-Mn-N hardfacing alloy to get carbonitride precipitates. Carbonitride was systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and energy spectrum analysis. Abrasive wear resistance of hardfacing alloy in as-welded and heat-treated conditions was tested by using the belt abrasion test apparatus where the samples slide against the abrasive belt. It is found that carbonitride particles in the hardfacing alloy are complex of Cr, Ti and Nb distributing on the grain boundary or matrix of the hardfacing alloy with different number and size in as-welded and heat-treated conditions. A large number of carbonitrides can be precipitated with very fine size (nanoscale) after heat treatment. As a result, the homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles can significantly improve the grain-abrasion wear-resisting property of the hardfacing alloy, and the mass loss is plastic deformation with minimum depth of grooving by abrasive particles and fine delamination.

  9. Two-body, dry abrasive wear of Fe/Cr/C experimental alloys - relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn based alloys has been carried out using a two body pin-on-disc wear machine. Abrasives used were silicon carbide, alumina and quartz. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance and to investigate the relationships between microstructure, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental alloys. Several commercial alloys were also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The goal of this study was to develop information so as to improve wear resistance of these experimental alloys by means of thermal treatments. Grain-refinement by double heat treatment was carried out in this research.

  10. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy. PMID:10907431

  11. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  12. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. PMID:26849309

  13. Biodegradation and abrasive wear of nano restorative materials.

    PubMed

    de Paula, A B; Fucio, S B P; Ambrosano, G M B; Alonso, R C B; Sardi, J C O; Puppin-Rontani, R M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical degradation of two nanofilled restorative materials (a resin-modified glass ionomer, Ketac N100 and a composite, Filtek Z350), compared with conventional materials (Vitremer and TPH Spectrum). Twenty specimens obtained from each material were divided into two storage groups (n=10): relative humidity (control) and Streptococcus mutans biofilm (biodegradation). After 7 days of storage, roughness values (Ra) and micrographs by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. In a second experimental phase, the specimens previously subjected to biodegradation were fixed to the tooth-brushing device and abraded via toothbrushes, using dentifrice slurry (mechanical degradation). Next, these specimens were washed, dried, and reassessed by roughness and SEM. The data were submitted to repeated measures three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (p<0.05). There was statistically significant interaction among factors: material, storage (humidity/biofilm), and abrasion (before/after). After biodegradation (S mutans biofilm storage), Ketac N100 presented the highest Ra values. Concerning bio plus mechanical challenge, TPH Spectrum, Ketac N100, and Vitremer presented the undesirable roughening of their surfaces, while the nano composite Filtek Z350 exhibited the best resistance to cumulative challenges proposed. The degraded aspect after biodegradation and the exposure of fillers after mechanical degradation were visualized in micrographs. This study demonstrated that the nanotechnology incorporated in restorative materials, as in composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer, was important for the superior resistance to biomechanical degradation. PMID:21913859

  14. Rock Abrasion Tool Exhibits the Deep Red Pigment of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During recent soil-brushing experiments, the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became covered with dust, as shown here. An abundance of iron oxide minerals in the dust gave the device a reddish-brown veneer. Investigators were using the rock abrasion tool to uncover successive layers of soil in an attempt to reveal near-surface stratigraphy. Afterward, remnant dirt clods were visible on both the bit and the brush of the tool. Designers of the rock abrasion tool at Honeybee Robotics and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a plan to run the brush on the rock abrasion tool in reverse to dislodge the dirt and return the tool to normal operation. Subsequent communications with the rover revealed that the procedure is working and the rock abrasion tool remains healthy.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 893rd sol, or Martian day (July 8, 2006). The image combines exposures taken through three of the camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 430 nanometers.

  15. Characterization of High-Temperature Abrasive Wear of Cold-Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Compound Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Hong-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun; Bao, Chong-Gao

    2011-01-01

    FeAl intermetallic compound coating was prepared by cold spraying using a mechanically alloyed Fe(Al) alloy powder followed by post-spray annealing at 950 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear test was carried out for the FeAl coating at a temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear of a heat-resistant stainless steel 2520 was performed for comparison. It was observed that the abrasive wear weight loss of FeAl coating was proportional to wear cycles in terms of sample revolutions at the tested temperatures. It was found that with the increase of the test temperature higher than 400 °C, the wear rate of cold-sprayed FeAl coating decreased with the increase of test temperature, while the wear rate of the heat-resistant steel increased significantly. The results indicate that the high-temperature abrasive wear resistance of the cold-sprayed FeAl intermetallic coating increased with the increase of the wear temperature in a temperature range from 400 to 800 °C. The wear resistance of cold-sprayed FeAl coating was higher than that of heat-resistant 2520 stainless steel under 800 °C by a factor of 3.

  16. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  17. The abrasive wear of plasma sprayed nanoscale tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewksbury, Graham Alfred

    Thermal spray coatings composed of a variety of carbide sizes and cobalt contents were sprayed with a high energy plasma spray system. The size of the carbides used fell into three rough groupings, micrometer scale carbides (1--2 mum), submicrometer (700--300 nm), and nanoscale (≈100 nm). The feedstock powder was evaluated in terms of their size distribution, external morphology, internal morphology, and initial carbide size. Two different fixtures were used in spraying to evaluate the effect of cooling rate on the wear resistance of the coatings. The microstructures of the sprayed coatings were examined using optical metallography, SEM, FESEM, TEM, XRD and chemical analysis. The coatings were evaluated in low stress abrasive wear by the ASTM G-65 Dry Sand Rubber Wheel test. Furthermore, the porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. The cobalt content was found to be the predominant influence on the wear rate of the coatings. The decrease in the carbide size was not found to effect the wear rate of the coatings. Coatings sprayed on the 'hot' fixture were found to have slightly improved wear resistance as compared to coatings sprayed on the 'cold' fixture. The wear rates of the coatings were found to be a function of the WC/Co volume ratio.

  18. Sliding and abrasive wear resistance of thermal-sprayed WC-CO coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yunfei; Liu, Yourong; Fischer, Traugott E.

    2001-03-01

    We studied the resistance of the coatings to abrasive and unlubricated sliding wear of 40 WC/Co coatings applied by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), high-energy plasma spray (HEPS), and high velocity plasma spray (HVPS), using commercial and nanostructured experimental powders. The hardness of the coatings varies from 3 to 13 GPA, which is much lower than that of sintered samples (10 to 23 GPA) because of the porosity of the coatings. Phase analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed various amounts of decarburization in the coatings, some of which contain WC, W2C, W, and η phase. The abrasive and sliding wear resistance is limited by the hardness of the samples. For a given hardness, the wear resistance is lowered by decarburization, which produces a hard but brittle phase. Nanocarb powders have the shape of thin-walled hollow spheres that heat up rapidly in the gun and are more prone to decarburization than commercial materials. The work shows that, in order to obtain the performance of nanostructured coatings, the powder and spray techniques must be modified.

  19. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-01-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  20. The effect of daily fluoride mouth rinsing on enamel erosive/abrasive wear in situ.

    PubMed

    Stenhagen, K R; Hove, L H; Holme, B; Tveit, A B

    2013-01-01

    It is not known whether application of fluoride agents on enamel results in lasting resistance to erosive/abrasive wear. We investigated if one daily mouth rinse with sodium fluoride (NaF), stannous fluoride (SnF(2)) or titanium tetrafluoride (TiF(4)) solutions protected enamel against erosive/abrasive wear in situ (a paired, randomised and blind study). Sixteen molars were cut into 4 specimens, each with one amalgam filling (measurement reference surface). Two teeth (2 × 4 specimens) were mounted bilaterally (buccal aspects) on acrylic mandibular appliances and worn for 9 days by 8 volunteers. Every morning, the specimens were brushed manually with water (30 s) extra-orally. Then fluoride solutions (0.4% SnF(2) pH 2.5; 0.15% TiF(4) pH 2.1; 0.2% NaF pH 6.5, all 0.05 M F) were applied (2 min). Three of the specimens from each tooth got different treatment, and the fourth served as control. At midday, the specimens were etched for 2 min in 300 ml fresh 0.01 M hydrochloric acid and rinsed in tap water. This etch procedure was repeated in the afternoon. Topographic measurements were performed by a white-light interferometer. Mean surface loss (±SD) for 16 teeth after 9 days was: SnF(2) 1.8 ± 1.9 µm, TiF(4) 3.1 ± 4.8 µm, NaF 26.3 ± 4.7 µm, control 32.3 ± 4.4 µm. Daily rinse with SnF(2), TiF(4) and NaF resulted in 94, 90 and 18% reduction in enamel erosive/abrasive wear, respectively, compared with control (p < 0.05). The superior protective effect of daily rinse with either stannous or titanium tetrafluoride solutions on erosive/abrasive enamel wear is promising. PMID:23006823

  1. Forecasting of operational indicators of grinding tools with the controlled form and orientation of abrasive grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. A.; Minkin, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    The interconnection of the abrasive grain front angle parameter with the form, orientation and wear out parameters is investigated. The form of the abrasive grains was estimated by means of form coefficient which represents the relation of diameters of the spheres described around contours of grains, to diameters of the spheres entered in them. The spatial orientation angle of the abrasive grains was defined between main (i.e. the biggest) axis of the grains and the cutting plane. It is established that, depending on an orientation angle at increase in a form coefficient of the abrasive grains can be either an increase or a decrease in the values of their front angles. In most cases, with an increase in a form coefficient of the oriented grinding grains (at orientation angles Θ=10°÷125°) the growth of their front angles is fixed. At tangential orientation of grains (Θ=0°) and at the close directions of orientation (Θ=135°÷80°) the return picture is observed. Also established that the longer the abrasive grain wears along the main axis and located in the tool body, the larger is its front angle. Besides that, the front angles of the abrasive grains reach the maximum positive values at orientation angles Θ=22.5°÷45°.Dependence of tension in grains during the work with parameters of their form, orientation and depth of embedment in the bundle is investigated. It was found that for all orientation angles of grains their tension significantly increases with an increase in their form coefficient. Besides that it is confirmed that the deeper the grain is in the bundle, the lower the tension is there. Also found that tension is minimal when the grains are tangential orientated. Further on increase the option of the grains in the direction of action of the cutting force follows. Such option of orientation is the most rational both from the point of view of minimization of tension, and for ensuring rational sizes of front angles of the abrasive grains. The

  2. Optical tools for high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of combinatorial libraries of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Chisholm, Bret J.; Olson, Daniel R.; Brennan, Michael J.; Molaison, Chris A.

    2002-02-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8x6 arrays of coating elements that are deposited on a plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2 to 5 micrometers thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the organic coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at single-or multiple-abrasion conditions, followed by high- throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0 to 30% haze. System precision of 0.1 to 2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. While the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied to a variety of other applications where materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools.

  3. Tool wear studies in fabrication of microchannels in ultrasonic micromachining.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Manjot S; Dvivedi, Akshay; Sharma, Apurbba K

    2015-03-01

    Form accuracy of a machined component is one of the performance indicators of a machining process. Ultrasonic micromachining is one such process in which the form accuracy of the micromachined component significantly depends upon the form stability of tool. Unlike macromachining, a very small amount of tool wear in micromachining could lead to considerable changes in the form accuracy of the machined component. Appropriate selection of tool material is essential to overcome this problem. The present study discusses the effect of tool material, abrasive size and step feed in fabrication of microchannels by ultrasonic machining on borosilicate glass. Development of microchannels using ultrasonic micromachining were rarely reported. It was observed that tungsten carbide tool provided a better form accuracy in comparison to the microchannel machined by stainless steel tool. The tool wear mechanism in both materials is proposed by considering scanning electron micrographs of the tool as evidence. A one factor at a time approach was used to study the effect of various process parameters. PMID:25465965

  4. Effect of Intercritical Heat Treatment on the Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Plain Carbon Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, M. K.; Pancholi, V.; Nath, S. K.

    Dual phase (DP) steels have been prepared from low carbon steel (0.14% C) at intercritical temperature 740°C and time is varied from 1 minute to 30 minutes followed by water quenching. These steels have been characterized by optical microscopy, FE-SEM, hardness measurements, tensile properties and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) studies. Tensile properties of a typical dual phase steel are found to be 805 MPa ultimate tensile strength with 18% total elongation. Martensite volume fraction of D P steel (determined by EBSD technique) prepared at 740°C for 6 minutes is found to be 10.2% and the grain size of ferrite and martensite found to be 14.39 micron and 1.05 microns respectively. Abrasive wear resistance of dual phase steels has been determined by pin on drum wear testing machine. DP steels have been found to be 25% more wear resistant than that of normalized steel. Short intercritical heating time followed by water quenching gives higher wear resistance by virtue of smaller and well dispersed martensite island in the matrix of ferrite.

  5. Abrasive wear by diesel engine coal-fuel and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the work summarized in this report was to obtain a basic understanding of the factors which are responsible for wear of the piston ring and cylinder wall surfaces in diesel engines utilizing coal-fuel. The approach included analytical studies using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses to characterize coal-fuel and various combustion particles, and two different wear tests. The wear tests were a modified pin-on-disk test and a block-on-ring test capable of either unidirectional or reciprocating-rotational sliding. The wear tests in general were conducted with mixtures of the particles and lubricating oil. The particles studied included coal-fuel, particles resulting from the combustion of coal fuel, mineral matter extracted during the processing of coal, and several other common abrasive particle types among which quartz was the most extensively examined. The variables studied included those associated with the particles, such as particle type, size, and hardness; variables related to contact conditions and the surrounding environment; and variables related to the type and properties of the test specimen materials.

  6. A critical review of non-carious cervical (wear) lesions and the role of abfraction, erosion, and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D W; Shah, P

    2006-04-01

    The terms 'abfraction' and 'abrasion' describe the cause of lesions found along the cervical margins of teeth. Erosion, abrasion, and attrition have all been associated with their formation. Early research suggested that the cause of the V-shaped lesion was excessive horizontal toothbrushing. Abfraction is another possible etiology and involves occlusal stress, producing cervical cracks that predispose the surface to erosion and abrasion. This article critically reviews the literature on abrasion, erosion, and abrasion, and abfraction. The references were obtained by a MEDLINE search in March, 2005, and from this, hand searches were undertaken. From the literature, there is little evidence, apart from laboratory studies, to indicate that abfraction exists other than as a hypothetical component of cervical wear. PMID:16567549

  7. Tool Wear Characteristics of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Particleboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnasingam, Jegatheswaran; Chew Tek, Tee; Farrokhpayam, Saied Reza

    A series of machining experiments on the Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) particleboard were carried out using a CNC router, to evaluate the tool wearing properties of the composite in comparison to the conventional wood-material particleboard. A single-fluted tungsten-carbide router bit (12 mm φ, 18 000 rpm), with a rake angle of 15° was used in this experiment, in which the depth of cut was 1.5 mm and feed speed was 4.5 m min-1. The router bit machined the edge of the board, moving along the full length before returning to repeat the cycle. The tool was examined for the extent of wear after complete failure had occurred. The result found that the wear pattern was similar in the oil-palm based particleboard and the wood-based particleboard, but the former was twice more abrasive compared to the latter. Microscopic examination of the cutter edge revealed greater incidence of micro-fracture when cutting the oil-palm based particleboard, indicating the presence of hard impurities in the composite. From an economic perspective, the tooling cost for machining oil-palm based particleboard is estimated to be twice of the cost for machining wood-based particleboard. This study shows that the machining properties of oil-palm based particleboard will be a primary concern, if the board is to find widespread application as a potential substitute for wood-based particleboard.

  8. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  9. Tooth length and incisal wear and growth in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) fed diets of different abrasiveness.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Clauss, M; Codron, D; Schulz, E; Hummel, J; Kircher, P; Hatt, J-M

    2015-06-01

    Dental diseases are among the most important reasons for presenting guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and other rodents to veterinary clinics, but the aetiopathology of this disease complex is unclear. Clinicians tend to believe that the ever-growing teeth of rabbits and rodents have a constant growth that needs to be worn down by the mastication of an appropriate diet. In this study, we tested the effect of four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness [due to both internal (phytoliths) and external abrasives (sand)] or whole grass hay fed for 2 weeks each in random order to 16 guinea pigs on incisor growth and wear, and tooth length of incisors and cheek teeth. There was a positive correlation between wear and growth of incisors. Tooth lengths depended both on internal and external abrasives, but only upper incisors were additionally affected by the feeding of whole hay. Diet effects were most prominent in anterior cheek teeth, in particular M1 and m1. Cheek tooth angle did not become shallower with decreasing diet abrasiveness, suggesting that a lack of dietary abrasiveness does not cause the typical 'bridge formation' of anterior cheek teeth frequently observed in guinea pigs. The findings suggest that other factors than diet abrasiveness, such as mineral imbalances and in particular hereditary malocclusion, are more likely causes for dental problems observed in this species. PMID:25041439

  10. Borosiliciding of Fe Ni alloys and evaluation of their resistance to abrasive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambogna, G.; Palombarini, G.; Carbucicchio, M.; Ciprian, R.

    2008-11-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis, Mössbauer measurements and metallographic observations were performed on borosilicide coatings grown at 850°C on Armco iron and the Fe64Ni36 binary alloy using a KBF4-activated powder mixture of B4C and Si3N4. The phase composition of the coatings was determined, a result allowing to show that the thermochemical treatment gives rise to iron boriding and iron siliciding reactions of different strength, depending on the treated material. The presence of Ni in the base metal allows iron-free nickel silicides to form as important components of the coating. The resistance of borosilicide coatings to abrasive wear is evaluated and discussed.

  11. Investigation of machining damage and tool wear resulting from drilling powder metal aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the cutting of aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) parts for the North Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The parts, an aluminum powder metal formulation, were supplied by Sinter Metals Inc., of Conover, North Carolina. The intended use of the alloy is for automotive components. Machining tests were conducted at Y-12 in the machine shop of the Skills Demonstration Center in Building 9737. Testing was done on June 2 and June 3, 1997. The powder metal alloy tested is very abrasive and tends to wear craters and produce erosion effects on the chip washed face of the drills used. It also resulted in huge amounts of flank wear and degraded performance on the part of most drills. Anti-wear coatings on drills seemed to have an effect. Drills with the coating showed less wear for the same amount of cutting. The usefulness of coolants and lubricants in reducing tool wear and chipping/breakout was not investigated.

  12. Particle size effects on the abrasive wear of 20 vol% SiC{sub p}/7075Al composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, C.Y.; Lin, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites have many advantages over the unreinforced aluminum alloys and have found increasing applications in the automotive industry. The wear behavior plays a very important role in DRA composites for such applications. The commonly used apparatus for studying the DRA abrasive wear include pin-on-disk, block-on-ring, and pin-on-drum. The pins or blocks are the composites and the abrasive papers are bonded onto the counter parts. The main drawback of the block-on-ring and pin-on-drum techniques is that the contact area does not remain a constant during the initial testing period. In the pin-on-disk method, the abrasive testing conditions are not easily kept identical either. The abrasive particles are prone to be blunted and smeared by composites when running a single-track test and the sliding speed is not constant when running a spiral-track test. In this study, a modified pin-on-disk apparatus was developed. During the entire testing period, the contact area remains unchanged, and the composite pin can be always abraded y fresh abrasive particles. An aluminum alloy, AA 7075 was reinforced with 20 vol% SiC{sub p} at various particle sizes (82, 59, 37, 16, and 12 {micro}m).

  13. A Phenomenological Model for Tool Wear in Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie J.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.; Gibson, Brian T.; Cox, Chase D.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is advantageous because the solid-state nature of the process precludes formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which accompany melting. FSW of MMCs is complicated by rapid and severe wear of the welding tool, a consequence of contact between the tool and the much harder abrasive reinforcement which gives the workpiece material its enhanced strength. The current article demonstrates that Nunes's rotating plug model of material flow in FSW, which has been successfully applied in many other contexts, can also help us understand wear in FSW of MMCs. An equation for predicting the amount of wear in this application is developed and compared with experimental data. This phenomenological model explains the relationship between wear and FSW process parameters documented in previous studies.

  14. Abrasive wear behavior of a brittle matrix (MoSi2) composite reinforced with a ductile phase (Nb)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    The toughness of a variety of brittle ceramic and intermetallic matrices has been improved through the incorporation of ductile metallic reinforcements. In these composites resistance to catastrophic failure of the matrix is derived through a combination of mechanisms, including matrix crack bridging, matrix crack defection and rupturing of the ductile phase. The degree to which these mechanisms operate is a function of composite microstructure. In general, the ductile phase is softer than the matrix phase. This may have unique implications when the materials are subjected to a wear environment, whether intentional or not. Hence, it is important to understand the wear behavior of these new materials. MoSi2–Nb was selected as a model composite system, in part because of the wide body of open literature regarding this system. The influences of abrasive wear environment and the composite microstructure (Nb reinforcement size, shape and volume fraction) on the wear resistance of the composites are reported.

  15. Micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of medical implant material Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy on various friction pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguo; Huang, Weijiu; Ma, Yanlong

    2014-09-01

    The micro-scale abrasion behaviors of surgical implant materials have often been reported in the literature. However, little work has been reported on the micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn (TLM) titanium alloy in simulated body fluids, especially with respect to friction pairs. Therefore, a TE66 Micro-Scale Abrasion Tester was used to study the micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of the TLM alloy. This study covers the friction coefficient and wear loss of the TLM alloy induced by various friction pairs. Different friction pairs comprised of ZrO2, Si3N4 and Al2O3 ceramic balls with 25.4mm diameters were employed. The micro-scale abrasive wear mechanisms and synergistic effect between corrosion and micro-abrasion of the TLM alloy were investigated under various wear-corrosion conditions employing an abrasive, comprised of SiC (3.5 ± 0.5 μm), in two test solutions, Hanks' solution and distilled water. Before the test, the specimens were heat treated at 760°C/1.0/AC+550°C/6.0/AC. It was discovered that the friction coefficient values of the TLM alloy are larger than those in distilled water regardless of friction pairs used, because of the corrosive Hanks' solution. It was also found that the value of the friction coefficient was volatile at the beginning of wear testing, and it became more stable with further experiments. Because the ceramic balls have different properties, especially with respect to the Vickers hardness (Hv), the wear loss of the TLM alloy increased as the ball hardness increased. In addition, the wear loss of the TLM alloy in Hanks' solution was greater than that in distilled water, and this was due to the synergistic effect of micro-abrasion and corrosion, and this micro-abrasion played a leading role in the wear process. The micro-scale abrasive wear mechanism of the TLM alloy gradually changed from two-body to mixed abrasion and then to three-body abrasion as the Vickers hardness of the balls increased. PMID:25063112

  16. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-07-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  17. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Quarterly progress report, December 1980-1 June 1981. [Alloys for use in coal mining, handling, and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.; Rao, M.C.; Shetty, H.R.; Fernandes, M.T.; Fiore, N.F.

    1981-10-29

    This report describes research aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between microstructure and wear resistance of highly alloyed materials, including high-Cr white irons and experimental Co-base and Ni-base powder metallurgy (PM) alloys now used or potentially to be used in coal mining, handling, and gasification. The specific types of wear under study are low-stress abrasion and gouging wear encountered in mining, coal conversion, and transfer applications. During this period, work was concentrated on analysis of results. The many detailed observations obtained in the work on scratch test simulations of abrasive wear mechanisms have been summarized in drafts of three papers. The first, A Study of Abrasive Wear Mechanisms Using Diamond and Alumina Scratch Tests, is included as an appendix to this report and is being submitted for publication. Revision of the other papers is in progress.

  18. Adhesion and wear behaviour of NCD coatings on Si3N4 by micro-abrasion tests.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G; Neto, M A; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings offer an excellent alternative for tribological applications, preserving most of the intrinsic mechanical properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond and adding to it an extreme surface smoothness. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics are reported to guarantee high adhesion levels to CVD microcrystalline diamond coatings, but the NCD adhesion to Si3N4 is not yet well established. Micro-abrasion tests are appropriate for evaluating the abrasive wear resistance of a given surface, but they also provide information on thin film/substrate interfacial resistance, i.e., film adhesion. In this study, a comparison is made between the behaviour of NCD films deposited by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) and microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) techniques. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic discs were selected as substrates. The NCD depositions by HFCVD and MPCVD were carried out using H2-CH4 and H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures, respectively. An adequate set of growth parameters was chosen for each CVD technique, resulting in NCD films having a final thickness of 5 microm. A micro-abrasion tribometer was used, with 3 microm diamond grit as the abrasive slurry element. Experiments were carried out at a constant rotational speed (80 r.p.m.) and by varying the applied load in the range of 0.25-0.75 N. The wear rate for MPCVD NCD (3.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-5) mm3 N(-1) m(-1)) is compatible with those reported for microcrystalline CVD diamond. The HFCVD films displayed poorer adhesion to the Si3N4 ceramic substrates than the MPCVD ones. However, the HFCVD films show better wear resistance as a result of their higher crystallinity according to the UV Raman data, despite evidencing premature adhesion failure. PMID:19504945

  19. Cutting Tool Wear After Pulsed Laser Processing in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yares'ko, S. I.

    2014-01-01

    We have ascertained the influence of the oxide film formed on the surface of the laser-processed zone of tool steels by irradiation in air on the wear of the cutting tool. It has been shown that laser pulsed processing makes it possible to influence actively the process of its wear. The presence of the oxide film increases the wear stability of the tool in a wide range of cutting speeds, widens the range of cutting regimes in which its least wear is achieved, and minimizes the wear rate. Cutting regimes, in which the highest efficiency of the irradiated tool is achieved, have been established.

  20. Effect of experimental parameters on the high-stress abrasive wear behavior of steels and a software package for its prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, R.; Roy, A.; Prasad, B.K.; Yegneswaran, A.H.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of different experimental factors on the high-stress abrasive wear properties of steels has been studied. A correlation among the factors has been established by linear regression analysis. A computer software in Microsoft Basic language utilizing linear regression analysis has been developed with the capability of predicting the wear response of steels from the experimental factors.

  1. Cutting Tools, Files and Abrasives. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on cutting tools, files, and abrasives is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to enable students to identify and explain the proper use and care of various knives, saws, snips, chisels, and abrasives. The module may contain some or all of the…

  2. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J. R.; Meloy, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere themselves to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs' hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated

  3. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment MECA Abrasion Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J.; Meloy, T. P.; Cobbly, T.

    1999-09-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs'hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated: note that

  4. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment MECA Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J.; Meloy, T. P.; Cobbly, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs'hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated: note that

  5. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Third annual progress report, August 12, 1983-August 14, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.

    1984-08-14

    The two major goals of the project are to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of carbide removal and of the role of matrix properties in abrasion. In the area of carbide removal mechanisms, progress this year has included completion of the fixed-depth scratch test apparatus and its use to demonstrate the occurrence of gross carbide cracking under fixed-depth conditions; comparable cracking does not occur under fixed-load conditions at a similar mean load. A high-stress abrasion system has been constructed and tested which will facilitate studies of abrasion under conditions similar to those produced by the fixed-depth scratch test system. Analysis of the work on the size effect in abrasion of dual-phase alloys has been completed. The largest single item in this year's proposed work in a study of the abrasion resistance and mechanisms of material removal in model alloys having second-phase particles (SPP's) with varying fracture properties. In the area of the effects of matrix properties on abrasion, the majority of the effort this year has centered on transmission electron microscopy of the subsurface deformation microstructures developed during abrasion.

  6. Effect of ion nitriding on the abrasive wear resistance of ultrahigh-strength steels with different silicon contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofano, R. M. Muñoz; Casteletti, L. C.; Nascente, P. A. P.

    2005-02-01

    This article studies the effect of silicon (Si) on ultrahigh-strength AISI 4340 steels in connection with the thermal treatment, as well as the influence of this element on nitriding and, consequently, abrasive wear. Four alloys with different Si contents were nitrided at 350 °C (4 and 8 h) and 500 and 550 °C (2 and 4 h) in a gas mixture of 80 vol.% H2 and 20 vol.% N2. The nitrided layers were characterized by microhardness and pin-on-disk tests, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The increase in Si enhanced the tempering resistance of the steels and also improved considerably the hardness of the nitrided layers. The increase in Si produced thinner compound layers with better hardness quality and high abrasive wear resistance. XRD analysis detected a mixture of nitrides in the layers γ‧-Fe4N, ɛ-Fe2 3N, CrN, MoN, and Si3N4 with their proportions varying with the nitriding conditions.

  7. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  8. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... spindle speed at safe levels under all conditions of normal operation. (b) Guarding. (1) Grinding machines.... (1) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding, shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and...

  9. Investigation on Tool Wear Rate for Modified and Unmodified Aluminium-Silicon Casting Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, M. M.; Khan, A. A.; Ismail, Ahmad F.

    This study demonstrates and explains the effect of strontium modification on machinability of aluminium-silicon eutectic (LM-6 type) alloy. This alloy is known to have many favourable features including weight to strength ratio, high corrosion resistance and excellent castability. However, normal unmodified LM-6 alloy has poor machinability, which reduces its applications range. In this work, various samples of LM-6 alloy were cast using sand and metallic chill mould with and without strontium addition. Machining on each cast product, was carried out using recommended cutting parameters for Al-Si alloys. Strontium modified samples have recorded a reduction in average flank wear, an increase in shear plane angles and a reduction in chip thickness. The main reason for this improvement is the refining effect of strontium, which reduces the size of the hard silicon particles. As a result, their abrasive action on the tool face has reduced a lot. Dramatic reductions in tool wear rate were recorded when the microstructures were refined. On the other hand, when no refinement of microstructure occurs, tool wear rate becomes high. Chip analysis showed that strontium modified sample produced a thinner chip thickness with a larger shear plane angle, requiring less cutting forces. The tool wear depends not only on the phases present in the work material, but also on their sizes and distribution over entire structure. Thus, strontium modification has better effect on machinability of die cast alloy compared to that of the sand cast LM-6 alloy.

  10. Thermal EMF method for monitoring drilling tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haili; An, Bangjian; Chen, Yu-bao; Orady, Elsayed

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a techniQue for on-line monitoring of drilling tool wear based on the thermal EMF (electromotive force) signal. The EMF signal was obtained from a natural thermocouple consisting of the tool (H. S. S.) and workpiece (AISI 1045) metals. The natural thermocouple is thus used as a kind of functional sensor which is sensitive to the cutting zone. The signal was collected and analyzed for three experiments at different cutting conditions. Analysis was carried out in time, frequency and amplitude domains. Several indices for the EMF signal were computed and their relationships with the tool wear were constructed. The results showed that the thermal EMF signal can be used to identify the occurrence of abnormal tool wear on major cutting edges and can indicate the end of tool life. Tool breakage can also be predicted. Consequently, a methodology for monitoring drilling tool wear can be established.

  11. Effect of microstructure on the abrasive wear properties of infiltrated tungsten alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, Pablo G

    2002-08-15

    Tungsten-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) were produced by compacting tungsten powder followed by infiltration with liquid 56Cu-43Zn-1Sn and 60Cu-40Ag. It was found that higher tungsten contents were associated with improved wear resistance. This effect, however, is small compared to the effect of different infiltrant alloys. An infiltrated species of higher ductility caused a significant improvement on the wear resistance of the composite. A small amount of harder particles in the microstructure, such as WC, SiC or SiO{sub 2}, changed the wear properties of the composite beyond the changes expected by their volume fraction.

  12. Microstructural analyses and wear behavior of the cemented carbide tools after laser surface treatment and PVD coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Davi; Diniz, Anselmo Eduardo; Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion is one of the most important characteristics of coating on cutting tools. Poor coating adhesion on the tool favors fragmentation and release of hard abrasive particles between the tool and the workpiece. These particles interact with the surfaces of the tool, accelerating its wear and decreasing tool life. One possible solution is the use of laser texturing prior to coating in order to achieve a desired surface topography with enhanced adhesion properties. In the texturing, a high-frequency short-pulse laser changes surface characteristics, generating resolidified material and selective vaporization. This work evaluated the effectiveness of laser texturing in improving the substrate-coating adhesion of PVD coated cemented carbide tools. To this end, the substrates were textured with a Nd:YAG laser, in four different intensities, and then coated with a PVD TiAlN film. To ascertain the effectiveness of laser texturing, Rockwell C indentation and turning experiments were performed on both textured tools and conventional unlasered tools. The PVD coated laser-textured tool showed better performance in the indentation and turning tests than the standard tools. A comparative evaluation of tool wear mechanisms indicated that texturing did not change the wear mechanisms, but altered their importance to tool wear. The anchoring provided by the higher roughness of the textured surface increased the adhesion of the coating on the substrate, thus increasing tool life. Additionally, the chemical modification of the carbide grains due to the laser heating might be responsible for an enhanced adhesion between coating and substrate.

  13. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-01

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry1,2,3. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago1. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear. First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test. All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  14. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-04

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  15. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  16. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, a high-carbon, high-alloy steel (0.79 pct C, 1.5 pct Si, 1.98 pct Mn, 0.98 pct Cr, 0.24 pct Mo, 1.06 pct Al, and 1.58 pct Co in wt pct) was subjected to an isothermal bainitic transformation at a temperature range of 473 K to 623 K (200 °C to 350 °C), resulting in different fully bainitic microstructures consisting of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. With a decrease in the transformation temperature, the microstructure was significantly refined from ~300 nm at 623 K (350 °C) to less than 60 nm at 473 K (200 °C), forming nanostructured bainitic microstructure. In addition, the morphology of retained austenite was progressively altered from film + blocky to an exclusive film morphology with a decrease in the temperature. This resulted in an enhanced wear resistance in nanobainitic microstructures formed at low transformation temperature, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). Meanwhile, it gradually deteriorated with an increase in the phase transformation temperature. This was mostly attributed to the retained austenite characteristics (i.e., thin film vs blocky), which significantly altered their mechanical stability. The presence of blocky retained austenite at high transformation temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C) resulted in an early onset of TRIPing phenomenon during abrasion. This led to the formation of coarse martensite with irregular morphology, which is more vulnerable to crack initiation and propagation than that of martensite formed from the thin film austenite, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). This resulted in a pronounced material loss for the fully bainitic microstructures transformed at high temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C), leading to distinct sub-surface layer and friction coefficient curve characteristics. A comparison of the abrasive behavior of the fully bainitic microstructure formed at 623 K (350 °C) and fully pearlitic microstructure demonstrated a detrimental effect of blocky retained austenite with low mechanical stability on the

  17. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  18. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  19. Assessment of Abrasive Wear of Nanostructured WC-Co and Fe-Based Coatings Applied by HP-HVOF, Flame, and Wire Arc Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Libardi, R.; Camargo, F.; Fals, H. C.; Ferraresi, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal spray processes have been widely used to minimize losses caused by wear mechanisms. Sprayed deposits using conventional wire and powder materials have been long solving tribological problems in engineering equipment. More recently, the option for new different technologies and consumables like nanostructured powder materials and nanocomposite cored wires have expanded the possibilities for technical solutions. Cored wire technology allows the use of compositions that cannot be drawn into wire form like carbides in metallic matrix and high-temperature materials, thus, intensifying the use of spraying processes with low operating cost to demanding wear and corrosion applications. The objective of this work was to study the mechanical characteristics and wear performance of coatings obtained by Flame, Wire Arc, and HVOF spraying using selected nanostructured WC10Co4Cr, WC12Co, and Fe-based 140 MXC powder and wire materials. Abrasive wear performance of the coatings was determinate following the ASTM G-65 standard. Based on the results, a higher abrasive wear resistance was found for the HVOF-sprayed WC10Co4Cr nanostructured coating.

  20. Diamond Tool Wear Vs. Cutting Distance On Electroless Nickel Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syn, C. K.; Taylor, J. S.; Donaldson, R. R.

    1987-02-01

    Wear data are presented for diamond tools cutting electroless nickel (eNi) for cut lengths up to 70,000 ft (13 miles). Two tools having different infrared absorption characteristics were used to cut an eNi preparation that had yielded minimum values for surface roughness and tool wear rate in a previous study. The data include Talystep measurement of the rms amplitude of the feed-marks versus cumulative cutting distance, representative examples of shape changes for the feed-mark profiles, SEM and optical micrographs of the tool rake and flank face wear zones, and measurements of the cutting edge profile and edge recession distance by a tool-nose replication technique. Feed-mark roughness values were found to increase from 5 to 90 A rms over the duration of the test, with an associated edge recession of about 1000 A and the development of a periodic tool edge grooving indicative of burnishing of the part surface. The IR absorption data successfully predicted the order of the two tools in terms of wear rate and fracture toughness.

  1. Diamond tool wear vs cutting distance on electroless nickel mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Taylor, J.S.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1986-10-14

    Wear data are presented for diamond tools cutting electroless nickel (eNi) for cut lengths up to 70,000 ft (13 miles). Two tools having different infrared absorption characteristics were used to cut an eNi preparation that had yielded minimum values for surface roughness and tool wear rate in a previous study. The data include Talystep measurement of the rms amplitude of the feed-marks versus cumulative cutting distance, representative examples of shape changes for the feed-mark profiles, SEM and optical micrographs of the tool rake and flank face wear zones, and measurements of the cutting edge profile and edge recession distance by a tool-nose replication technique. Feed-mark roughness values were found to increase from 5 to 90 A rms over the duration of the test, with an associated edge recession of about 1000 A and the development of a periodic tool edge grooving indicative of burnishing of the part surface. The ir absorption data successfully predicted the order of the two tools in terms of wear rate and fracture toughness.

  2. Characteristic of wear behavior of micro deep drawing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z.; Huferath-von Luepke, S.; von Kopylow, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the wear behavior of the tools in micro forming, micro deep drawing with a punch diameter of 1 mm was performed. The stainless steel (German standard 1.4301) with a thickness of 0.025 mm was used as blank material. The forming tools are made of tool steel (German standard 1.2379). The mineral oil HBO 947/11 was used as lubricant. Two different failures resulting from tool wear were observed in this investigation. The experimentally measured punch forces show no relation between the change of the maximum punch force and the wear of micro deep drawing tools. Furthermore, the surface of the micro deep drawing tools was investigated using a confocal microscope. It was found that the surface quality of the used die changes clearly with the number of experiments. Moreover, the EDX analysis shows clearly that elements from the blank material exist on the surface of the die. This indicates an adhesive wear in micro deep drawing.

  3. Interface abrasion between rough surface femoral stems and PMMA cement results in extreme wear volumes--a retrieval study and failure analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchhorn, Gottfried Hans; Bersebach, Petra; Stauch, Tilo; Schultz, Wolfgang; Köster, Georg

    2015-01-01

    During the loosening cascade of cemented rough femoral stems, the destruction of the mantle and the production of cement and metal wear debris occur after the loss of constraint at the interface. Two-dimensional (2D) measurements (light microscopy based morphometry on fragments of mantles and vertical scanning interferometry of femoral stems) permitted mathematical 3D-extrapolations to estimate the wear volumes. Fragments of the cement mantles available lost volumes from 0.85 mm(3) to 494.10 mm(3) (median amount of bone cement wear = 178,426 mg). The harder metal surfaces lost between 1.459 mm(3) and 5.688 mm(3) of material (the median amount of metal wear per surface = 1.504 mg/100 mm(2)). Compared to the loss of material due to the fretting of stems, the abrasion of metal, and cement in defective cement mantles produced wear volumes sufficiently high to induce osteolysis. Though the design of the femoral stem and the handling of bone cement do not represent contemporary design and clinical practice, respectively, an extremely high number of joint replacements still in daily use may be impacted by this study because of possible predicted failures. Once the processes of fragmentation, abrasion, and osteolysis have been realized, the time until revision surgery should not be unduly prolonged. PMID:24820132

  4. New Rock Physical Properties Assessments From the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, P. W.; Basso, B.; Kusack, A.; Wilson, J.; Zacny, K.

    2005-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) serves as the sample preparation device on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) science payload. The RAT grinds a circular area 45 millimeter in diameter, and on the order of a few millimeters deep, into a rock face. This process removes surface fines and weathered layers in preparation for imaging and spectral observations of the rock. As of September 2005, 15 grinding operations have been performed at Gusev Crater and 26 at Meridiani Planum. Since the RAT performs a mechanical operation on a rock, deductions can be made via the RAT's engineering data about the rock's physical properties. For each grinding operation, the energy consumed while grinding is converted to provide a physically relevant Specific Grind Energy (SGE) in terms of Joules per cubic millimeter of rock removed. The calculation is performed over the last 0.25 millimeter of a grinding operation, where it is possible, by taking measurements from Microscopic Imager images of the abraded area, to make an accurate estimate of the volume of rock removed. Progress is presented on recent refinement of the SGE calculation methods including decoupling of artifacts. Environmental factors and differing parameters used to command the RAT operations are among the key artifacts recently analyzed. Progress is also presented on further characterization of the dynamics and wear mechanics involved in the grinding process, and how they influence SGE. A library of Earth rocks has been assembled and it is being used with the RAT Engineering Model to create a set of similar SGE data products that can be compared to Mars rocks in order to contribute to physical properties assessments of the Mars rocks. Initial results indicate that the Martian rocks are analogous to a range of Earth rocks, from gypsum to low-strength basalt in terms of grindability; however, caution needs to be exercised in making a direct comparison of grinding energies. This is because the grindability of rocks was found to

  5. The wear of composite drilling tools and its influence on the energy consumption in drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Mishnaevsky, L.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Theoretical investigations of wear of drilling tools from matrix composites and its influence on the energy consumption in drilling are presented. A formula for wear rate depending on the structure and properties of the tool material is obtained. Influence of drilling conditions and regimes on the composite tool wear is studied on the basis of mathematical model of wear. Relations between the energy consumption in drilling and tool wear are investigated. It is shown that the more heterogeneous are the physical properties of the tool material components, the less the tool wear, and, thus, the less the energy consumption in drilling.

  6. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  7. An investigation of chatter and tool wear when machining titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The low thermal conductivity of titanium, together with the low contact area between chip and tool and the unusually high chip velocities, gives rise to high tool tip temperatures and accelerated tool wear. Machining speeds have to be considerably reduced to avoid these high temperatures with a consequential loss of productivity. Restoring this lost productivity involves increasing other machining variables, such as feed and depth-of-cut, and can lead to another machining problem commonly known as chatter. This work is to acquaint users with these problems, to examine the variables that may be encountered when machining a material like titanium, and to advise the machine tool user on how to maximize the output from the machines and tooling available to him. Recommendations are made on ways of improving tolerances, reducing machine tool instability or chatter, and improving productivity. New tool materials, tool coatings, and coolants are reviewed and their relevance examined when machining titanium.

  8. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outeiro, José C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Pina, José C.; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  9. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Jose C.; Pina, Jose C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-17

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  10. Abrasion and erosion wear resistance of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings prepared by plasma, detonation and high-velocity oxyfuel spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maekelae, A.; Maentylae, T.

    1994-12-31

    Chromium carbide based cermet coatings (Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr) deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), detonation gun spraying (DGS), and high-velocity oxyfuel flame spraying (HVOF) methods were evaluated with the microstructure, microhardness, phase structure, room temperature abrasion wear and particle erosion wear resistance. The influence of some spray parameters, e.g, the use of different plasma gases (Ar-H{sub 2}, Ar-He) in plasma spraying, and fuel gas-to-oxygen ratio (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}) and diluent gas content in detonation gun spraying, were studied in order to optimize the wear resistance of the coatings. The results showed that Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings had different wear properties depending on the spray parameters and spray methods used. Highest wear resistance was obtained with coatings prepared by the high-velocity combustion processes, i.e. by HVOF and detonation gun spraying.

  11. Novel testing facility for investigating wear on PGM sample tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Frank; Georgiadis, Kyriakos; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz

    2013-09-01

    For the fabrication of highly precise glass optics, Precision Glass Molding (PGM) is the state-of-the-art replicative manufacturing process. However, the process efficiency is mainly determined by the service lifetime of the molding tools and, in particular, the performance of the protective coatings. Testing the lifetime in real molding machines is extremely cost and effort intensive. In a new testing facility the protective coating performance can be evaluated by systematically inducing tool wear under realistic process conditions. A high number of pressing cycles can be executed under minimal time and material effort, reducing the cost consumption for such coating validation tests significantly. In this paper, a fast method for evaluating the performance of coatings is provided. The machine concept and evaluation method are presented in comparison to the production conditions. Investigations are targeted on the similarities between tool wear in production and those induced in the testing facility. After inducing wear patterns on test specimens in the new facility, surface alterations are characterized with light microscopy. The results show similar degradation patterns as known from production, on the coated tools. The results presented show that the facility provides unique opportunity for optimizing coatings, but also glass compositions, for use in Precision Glass Molding.

  12. Influence of a corrosive-abrasive medium on the wear resistance of 12Kh18N10T steel with surface hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Golubets, V.M.; Kozub, V.V.; Shchuiko, Ya.V.; Pashechko, M.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study the wear and corrosion resistance of 12Kh18N10T steel after diffusion boriding, electrospark alloying, and combined hardening in a corrosive abrasive medium consisting of 50 percent sand and 3 percent NaCl with hydrochloric acid added to obtain a pH of 1. Metallographic analysis revealed a 40-micrometer-deep case with a microhardness of 6-8.5 GPa on the surface. X-ray diffraction established that the boride case consists of an FeB phase alloyed with chromium and nickel. Results are graphed.

  13. [Abrasion resistance of dental materials. 3. Surface quality study of Evicrol by wear measurements at different layer depths].

    PubMed

    Tappe, A; Eichhorn, T

    1980-04-01

    Abrasion determinations in various layer depths showed that the layer of the filling material Evicrol directly under the matrix-hardened surface is more abrasion-resistant than the matrix- hardened surface. From this it is concluded that it is good practice to overfill in making restorations of Evicrol and to remove a certain layer of material (approximately 0.25 mm, according to Fraunhofer). PMID:6935842

  14. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Cold-Sprayed 20 vol.% Cubic BN-NiCrAl Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Er-Juan; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chen-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    20 vol.% cubic boron nitride (cBN) dispersoid reinforced NiCrAl matrix nanocomposite coating was prepared by cold spray using mechanically alloyed nanostructured composite powders. The as-sprayed nanocomposite coating was annealed at a temperature of 750 °C to enhance the inter-particle bonding. Microstructure of spray powders and coatings was characterized. Vickers microhardness of the coatings was measured. Two-body abrasive wear behavior of the coatings was examined on a pin-on-disk test. It was found that, in mechanically alloyed composite powders, nano-sized and submicro-sized cBN particles are uniformly distributed in nanocrystalline NiCrAl matrix. Dense coating was deposited by cold spray at a gas temperature of 650 °C with the same phases and grain size as those of the starting powder. Vickers hardness test yielded a hardness of 1063 HV for the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl coating. After annealed at 750 °C for 5 h, unbonded inter-particle boundaries were partially healed and evident grain growth of nanocrystalline NiCrAl was avoided. Wear resistance of the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl nanocomposite coating was comparable to the HVOF-sprayed WC-12Co coating. Annealing of the nanocomposite coating resulted in the improvement of wear resistance by a factor of ~33% owing to the enhanced inter-particle bonding. Main material removal mechanisms during the abrasive wear are also discussed.

  15. Machining conditions and the wear of TiC-coated carbide tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C.Y.H.; Lim, S.C.; Lee, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper examines the wear behavior of TiC-coated cemented carbide tools in turning. Experimental data from dry turning tests, together with similar data from the open literature, are used to construct wear maps depicting the flank and crater wear characteristics of these tools over a wide range of machining conditions. The maps show that both flank and crater wear rates vary according to the cutting speeds and feed rates used. An overall wear-damage map for this class of coated tools is also presented for the first time. The presence of the safety zone and the least-wear regime, within which the overall wear damage to the tools is low, suggests the possibility of selecting the machining conditions to achieve a compromise between the rates of material removal and tool wear.

  16. Effects of a Destabilization Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Behavior of High-Chromium White Cast Iron Investigated Using Different Characterization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasan, Hakan; Erturk, Fatih

    2013-11-01

    The hypoeutectic white cast iron was subjected to various destabilization heat treatment temperatures of 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K (900 °C, 1000 °C, and 1100 °C) for 2 hours. The as-cast and destabilized specimens were characterized by optical metallography, classical direct comparison, and the Rietveld method. The volume fractions of carbides were measured by optical metallography. Moreover, the volume fractions of retained austenite and martensite were measured by the classical direct comparison method. Despite the limitations of optical metallography and the classical direct comparison method, the Rietveld method was successively and accurately applied to determine the volume fractions of all phases. In addition, the Rietveld analysis yielded certain results, such as the crystallographic properties of the phases that can be used to explain the relationship between the microstructural parameters and the wear behavior. Abrasive wear tests with different sliding speeds were carried out on the as-cast and destabilized alloys to identify the effect of microstructural parameters on the wear behavior. The results indicated that the morphologies of secondary carbides, the crystallographic properties of the phases, and the proper combination of the amount of martensite, retained austenite, and carbides were the principle parameters that affect the hardness and wear behavior of the alloy.

  17. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  18. Acoustic emission from single point machining: Part 2, Signal changes with tool wear. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.; Armentrout, D.L.; McManigle, A.P.

    1989-12-31

    Changes in acoustic emission signal characteristics with tool wear were monitored during single point machining of 4340 steel and Ti-6Al-4V heat treated to several strength levels, 606l-T6 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, 17-4PH stainless steel, 410 stainless steel, lead, and teflon. No signal characteristic changed in the same way with tool wear for all materials tested. A single change in a particular AE signal characteristic with tool wear valid for all materials probably does not exist. Nevertheless, changes in various signal characteristic with wear for a given material may be sufficient to be used to monitor tool wear.

  19. Acoustic emission from single point machining: Part 2, Signal changes with tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.; Armentrout, D.L.; McManigle, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in acoustic emission signal characteristics with tool wear were monitored during single point machining of 4340 steel and Ti-6Al-4V heat treated to several strength levels, 606l-T6 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, 17-4PH stainless steel, 410 stainless steel, lead, and teflon. No signal characteristic changed in the same way with tool wear for all materials tested. A single change in a particular AE signal characteristic with tool wear valid for all materials probably does not exist. Nevertheless, changes in various signal characteristic with wear for a given material may be sufficient to be used to monitor tool wear.

  20. Communication research between working capacity of hard- alloy cutting tools and fractal dimension of their wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, K.; Nesterenko, V.; Daneykina, N.

    2016-06-01

    The results of communication research between the wear resistance of the K applicability hard-alloy cutting tools and the fractal dimension of the wear surface, which is formed on a back side of the cutting edge when processing the materials showing high adhesive activity are presented in the paper. It has been established that the wear resistance of tested cutting tools samples increases according to a fractal dimension increase of their wear surface.

  1. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  2. Investigation on the Surface Integrity and Tool Wear in Cryogenic Machining

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra Xavier, Sandro E.; Delijaicov, Sergio; Farias, Adalto de; Stipkovic Filho, Marco; Ferreira Batalha, Gilmar

    2011-01-17

    This work aimed to study the influences of cryogenic cooling on tool wear, comparing it to dry machining during on the surface integrity of test circular steel SAE 52100 hardened to 62 HRC, during the turning of the face, with the use of special PcBN, using liquid nitrogen with cooler. The surface integrity parameters analyzed were: surface roughness and white layer and tool wear. The results of the present work indicated reduction in tool wear, which enhance the tool life.

  3. Study of Tool Wear Mechanisms and Mathematical Modeling of Flank Wear During Machining of Ti Alloy (Ti6Al4V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetan; Narasimhulu, A.; Ghosh, S.; Rao, P. V.

    2014-12-01

    Machinability of titanium is poor due to its low thermal conductivity and high chemical affinity. Lower thermal conductivity of titanium alloy is undesirable on the part of cutting tool causing extensive tool wear. The main task of this work is to predict the various wear mechanisms involved during machining of Ti alloy (Ti6Al4V) and to formulate an analytical mathematical tool wear model for the same. It has been found from various experiments that adhesive and diffusion wear are the dominating wear during machining of Ti alloy with PVD coated tungsten carbide tool. It is also clear from the experiments that the tool wear increases with the increase in cutting parameters like speed, feed and depth of cut. The wear model was validated by carrying out dry machining of Ti alloy at suitable cutting conditions. It has been found that the wear model is able to predict the flank wear suitably under gentle cutting conditions.

  4. Abrasive wear of nitrogen-implanted boron-coated Ti-6Al-4V and temperature effect on microhardness and sliding friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baazi, Tandjaoui; Knystautas, Emile J.; Fiset, Michel

    1993-02-01

    Boron was electron-gun evaporated onto manually polished surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V and bombarded with 100 keV nitrogen ions for different doses. The highest increase in Knoop microhardness was observed for the highest dose considered in this work, i.e., 10 17ions cm -2, which was maintained for subsequent abrasive wear investigation by optical and scanning electron microscopies. Relative changes of Knoop microhardness and sliding friction coefficient as a function of implantation temperature (room temperature, 150, 300, 450 and 600°C) were measured. The optimal improvements obtained for the 450°C implantation correlate with the higher nitrogen retention as evidenced by XPS depth-concentration analysis.

  5. Diamond tool wear of electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Donaldson, R.R.; Syn, C.K. ); Sugg, D.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nickel-Phosphorus alloys are attractive materials for diamond turning applications such as fabrication of large optics and other high precision parts. Although the mechanism is not understood, diamond tool wear is minimized when the phosphorus content of the deposit is greater than 11% (wgt). In recent years, increased attention has been directed at electrodeposition as an alternate to electroless deposition for producing Ni-P alloys. One principal advantage of the electrodeposition process is that alloys with 14--15% P can be obtained; another is that an order of magnitude greater deposition thickness can be provided if necessary. This paper compares diamond turning results for electrodeposited and electroless Ni-P alloys and shows that the electrodeposited coatings provide promising results. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fabrication of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng-Yih; Yu, Tsung-Han; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2007-06-01

    A manufacturing process of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools using a LIGA-like technology is reported here. The thickness of JSR THB-151N resist coated on an aluminum alloy substrate for micro lithography can reach up to 110 µm. During the lithography, different geometrical photomasks were used to create specific design patterns of the resist mold on the substrate. Micro roots, made by electrolytic machining on the substrate with guidance of the resist mold, can improve the adhesion of micro nickel abrasive pellets electroplated on the substrate. During the composite electroforming, the desired hardness of the nickel matrix inside the micro diamond abrasive pellets can be obtained by the addition of leveling and stress reducing agents. At moderate blade agitation and ultrasonic oscillation, higher concentration and more uniform dispersion of diamond powders deposited in the nickel matrix can be achieved. With these optimal experiment conditions of this fabrication process, the production of micro nickel/diamond abrasive pellet array lapping tools is demonstrated.

  7. Estimation of tool wear during CNC milling using neural network-based sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, N.; Ravi, Y. B.; Patra, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Paul, S.; Mohanty, A. R.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Cutting tool wear degrades the product quality in manufacturing processes. Monitoring tool wear value online is therefore needed to prevent degradation in machining quality. Unfortunately there is no direct way of measuring the tool wear online. Therefore one has to adopt an indirect method wherein the tool wear is estimated from several sensors measuring related process variables. In this work, a neural network-based sensor fusion model has been developed for tool condition monitoring (TCM). Features extracted from a number of machining zone signals, namely cutting forces, spindle vibration, spindle current, and sound pressure level have been fused to estimate the average flank wear of the main cutting edge. Novel strategies such as, signal level segmentation for temporal registration, feature space filtering, outlier removal, and estimation space filtering have been proposed. The proposed approach has been validated by both laboratory and industrial implementations.

  8. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials. These include chemical etching, X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which effect wear such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  9. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  10. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2011-05-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  11. A review of the use of wear-resistant coatings in the cutting-tool industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main mechanisms involved in the wear of cutting tools are reviewed. Evaluation of the different coating properties required for the reduction of the different kinds of wear was also reviewed. The types of coatings and their ranges of applicability are presented and discussed in view of their properties. Various coating processes as well as their advantages and shortcomings are described. Potential future developments in the field of wear-resistant coatings are discussed.

  12. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  13. Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

    2011-09-14

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  14. Wear Reduction Effects of Ca Sulfonate on Coated Tools in Hobbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Hironori; Ono, Hajime; Tsuda, Yoshihiro

    This paper presents the influence of Ca sulfonate on tool life (flank wear), crater wear and finished surface roughness in hobbing. Experiments were carried out using two kinds of fully coated fly tools with TiN and (Al, Ti)N films respectively. As the results, when using the TiN fully coated tool, Ca sulfonate prolongs the tool life, and decreases the crater wear compared with the machine oil 23 as a base oil. With the (Al, Ti)N fully coated tool, an interesting result was obtained that the base oil containing no additives gives a longer tool life and a smaller crater wear than those obtained with Ca sulfonates added. It was suggested that the increase in the flank wear and the crater wear is caused by the chemical and/or the corrosive actions of Ca sulfonate, when Ca sulfonate was used for the (Al, Ti)N coated tool. Ca sulfonates improve the finished surface roughness for both coated tools.

  15. Analytical and Empirical Modeling of Wear and Forces of CBN Tool in Hard Turning - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vallabh Dahyabhai; Gandhi, Anishkumar Hasmukhlal

    2016-06-01

    Machining of steel material having hardness above 45 HRC (Hardness-Rockwell C) is referred as a hard turning. There are numerous models which should be scrutinized and implemented to gain optimum performance of hard turning. Various models in hard turning by cubic boron nitride tool have been reviewed, in attempt to utilize appropriate empirical and analytical models. Validation of steady state flank and crater wear model, Usui's wear model, forces due to oblique cutting theory, extended Lee and Shaffer's force model, chip formation and progressive flank wear have been depicted in this review paper. Effort has been made to understand the relationship between tool wear and tool force based on the different cutting conditions and tool geometries so that appropriate model can be used according to user requirement in hard turning.

  16. Creation Of The Residual Stress By Influence Of Wear Of Cutting Tool And Their Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordík, Marek; Čilliková, Mária; Mrazik, Jozef; Martinček, Juraj; Janota, Miroslav; Nicielnik, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is analysis of turned bearing ring made of material 14109 (DIN 100Cr6) without heat treatment. For the analysis a mechanical destructive method was chosen. Analysis focused on existence and character of residual stresses after turning operation of bearing ring by tool with different level of wear. The experiment reveals the relationships between residual stress creation and cutting tool wear.

  17. Friction and wear with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide in contact with iron base binary alloys in oil: Effects of alloying element and its content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a rider of 0.025-millimeter-radius, single-crystal silicon carbide in mineral oil. Results indicate that atomic size and content of alloying element play a dominant role in controlling the abrasive-wear and -friction properties of iron-base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction and groove height (wear volume) general alloy decrease, and the contact pressure increases in solute content. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic radius ratio with the decreasing rate of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of groove height (wear volume), and the increasing rate of contact pressure with increasing solute content C. Those rates increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases from unity.

  18. Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

    2011-06-06

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  19. Approach to in-process tool wear monitoring in drilling: Application of Kalman filter theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ning; Zhang, Youzhen; Pan, Liangxian

    1993-05-01

    The two parameters often used in adaptive control, tool wear and wear rate, are the important factors affecting machinability. In this paper, it is attempted to use the modern cybernetics to solve the in-process tool wear monitoring problem by applying the Kalman filter theory to monitor drill wear quantitatively. Based on the experimental results, a dynamic model, a measuring model and a measurement conversion model suitable for Kalman filter are established. It is proved that the monitoring system possesses complete observability but does not possess complete controllability. A discriminant for selecting the characteristic parameters is put forward. The thrust force Fz is selected as the characteristic parameter in monitoring the tool wear by this discriminant. The in-process Kalman filter drill wear monitoring system composed of force sensor microphotography and microcomputer is well established. The results obtained by the Kalman filter, the common indirect measuring method and the real drill wear measured by the aid of microphotography are compared. The result shows that the Kalman filter has high precision of measurement and the real time requirement can be satisfied.

  20. Mobile load simulators - A tool to distinguish between the emissions due to abrasion and resuspension of PM10 from road surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrig, R.; Zeyer, K.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Poulikakos, L. D.; Furger, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2010-12-01

    Mechanically produced abrasion particles and resuspension processes are responsible for a significant part of the PM10 emissions of road traffic. However, specific differentiation between PM10 emissions due to abrasion and resuspension from road pavement is very difficult due to their similar elemental composition and highly correlated variation in time. In this work Mobile Load Simulators were used to estimate PM10 emission factors for pavement abrasion and resuspension on different pavement types for light and heavy duty vehicles. From the experiments it was derived that particle emissions due to abrasion from pavements in good condition are quite low in the range of only a few mg·km -1 per vehicle if quantifiable at all. Considerable abrasion emissions, however, can occur from damaged pavements. Resuspension of deposited dust can cause high and extremely variable particle emissions depending strongly on the dirt load of the road surface. Porous pavements seem to retain deposited dust better than dense pavements, thus leading to lower emissions due to resuspension compared to pavements with a dense structure (e.g. asphalt concrete). Tyre wear seemed not to be a quantitatively significant source of PM10 emissions from road traffic.

  1. Tool wear in cryogenic turning of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K. A.; Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Though titanium alloys are being increasingly sought in a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications, their manufacturability, especially machining and grinding imposes lot of constraints. Rapid tool wear encountered in machining of titanium alloys is a challenge that needs to be overcome. Cryogenic machining with liquid nitrogen as coolant is being investigated by researchers to reduce the cutting zone temperatures and enhance the tool life. The effects of cryogenic cooling have been studied on growth and nature tool wear in the present investigation while turning Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars with microcrystalline uncoated carbide inserts under dry, wet and cryogenic cooling environments in the cutting velocity range of 70-100 m/min. Cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jets enabled substantial improvement in tool life through reduction in adhesion-dissolution-diffusion tool wear through control of machining temperature desirably at the cutting zone.

  2. Wear inspection of a single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Kwon Su; Takahashi, Hideaki; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Single-point diamond turning is a useful optical fabrication method for simultaneously obtaining a smooth surface and generating an accurate shape. Generally, a single-crystal diamond tool has been used in the single-point diamond turning method and a degree of the wear on the diamond tool is unavoidable. Tool wear causes the degradation of the surface quality, surface roughness, and shape accuracy of the workpiece. Inspection of tool wear is important in improving the surface quality. A single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning was inspected by a laser scanning microscope and a scanning probe microscope. Regular grooves were observed on the flank face of the diamond tool, and the pitch interval was the same as the feed rate. The worn distance was obtained by measuring the clearance angle and the groove length on the flank face of the worn diamond tool. The worn distance of the diamond tool was 1.7 μm after machining electroless nickel for a 3.18 km cutting distance. The worn distance could also be obtained using the worn width on the flank face and the nose radius and was 2.05 μm, which was very close to 1.7 μm. Two methods based on the wear measurement of the flank face will be new methods to measure the worn distance of the single-crystal diamond tool.

  3. Wear Resistance of Coating Films on Hob Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezaki, Yoji; Funaki, Yoshiyuki; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Doi, Toshiro

    The wear resistance of coating films on hob teeth is investigated through the simulated hobbing tests with a flytool. The coating films on hob teeth are titanium family ceramics such as TiN, TiCN, TiSiN and TiAlN and aluminum chromium family ceramics such as AlCrN and AlCrSiN. The wear of coated tools is shown about film thickness, film materials, ingredient ratio in a film component and the oxidization of coating films. The oxidization is clarified from a result of the influence on the crater wear progress through wear cutting tests in atmosphere of nitrogen gas or oxygen gas. The oxidization of TiAlN coating films produces oxide products on the tool rake face, and this oxidation relates to the amount of crater wear. The increase of aluminum concentration in the TiAlN film improves the crater wear resistance in air atmosphere, while it has a reverse effect in nitrogen gases. The AlCrSiN film has effective wear resistance against the abrasive wear and/or oxidization wear. The oxidation film formed on the AlCrSiN film is very firm and this suppresses the oxidation wear on the rake face and works against the abrasive wear advantageously.

  4. Acoustic emission from single point machining: Source mechanisms and signal changes with tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.; Armentrout, D.L.; McManigle, A.P.

    1994-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was monitored during single point, continuous machining of 4340 steel and Ti-6Al-4V as a function of heat treatment. Heat treatments that increase the strength of 4340 steel substantially increase the amount of AE produced during deformation, while heat treatments that increase the strength of Ti-6Al-4V dramatically decrease the amount of AE produced during deformation. There was little change in root-mean-square (rms) AE level during machining for either alloy as a function of prior heat treatment, demonstrating that chip deformation is not a major source of AE in single point machining. Additional data from a variety of materials suggest that sliding friction between the nose and/or flank of the tool and the newly machined surface is the primary source of AE. Changes in AE signal characteristics with tool wear were also monitored during single point machining. No signal characteristic changed in the same way with tool wear for all materials tested. A single change in a particular AE signal characteristic with tool wear valid for all materials probably does not exist. Nevertheless, changes in various signal characteristics with wear for a given material may be sufficient to be used to monitor tool wear.

  5. Cutting Properties and Wearing Process of Diamond Film Coated Tools in the Dry-Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qimao

    Dry cutting can eliminate a series of negative effects of coolant. Based on tribology principle of coated tool, diamond film coated tool is used to cut the same workpiece under the conditions of dry-cutting and coolant. The tool's cutting properties and wear mechanism are studied by tests. Results imply that this coated tool will be applied more widely day by day in the dry-cutting.

  6. Diamond tool wear detection method using cutting force and its power spectrum analysis in ultra-precision fly cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. Q.; To, S.

    2014-08-01

    Cutting force and its power spectrum analysis was thought to be an effective method monitoring tool wear in many cutting processes and a significant body of research has been conducted on this research area. However, relative little similar research was found in ultra-precision fly cutting. In this paper, a group of experiments were carried out to investigate the cutting forces and its power spectrum characteristics under different tool wear stages. Result reveals that the cutting force increases with the progress of tool wear. The cutting force signals under different tool wear stages were analyzed using power spectrum analysis. The analysis indicates that a characteristic frequency does exist in the power spectrum of the cutting force, whose power spectral density increases with the increasing of tool wear level, this characteristic frequency could be adopted to monitor diamond tool wear in ultra-precision fly cutting.

  7. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  8. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  9. Use-Wear Patterns on Wild Macaque Stone Tools Reveal Their Behavioural History

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Michael; Gumert, Michael D.; Biro, Dora; Carvalho, Susana; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2013-01-01

    Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) are one of a limited number of wild animal species to use stone tools, with their tool use focused on pounding shelled marine invertebrates foraged from intertidal habitats. These monkeys exhibit two main styles of tool use: axe hammering of oysters, and pound hammering of unattached encased foods. In this study, we examined macroscopic use-wear patterns on a sample of 60 wild macaque stone tools from Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand, that had been collected following behavioural observation, in order to (i) quantify the wear patterns in terms of the types and distribution of use-damage on the stones, and (ii) develop a Use-Action Index (UAI) to differentiate axe hammers from pound hammers by wear patterns alone. We used the intensity of crushing damage on differing surface zones of the stones, as well as stone weight, to produce a UAI that had 92% concordance when compared to how the stones had been used by macaques, as observed independently prior to collection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative archaeological use-wear techniques can accurately reconstruct the behavioural histories of non-human primate stone tools. PMID:23977365

  10. Effects of cutting parameters on tool insert wear in end milling of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Jing; Wu, Baohai; Zhang, Dinghua

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy is a kind of typical hard-to-cut material due to its low thermal conductivity and high strength at elevated temperatures, this contributes to the fast tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys. The influence of cutting conditions on tool wear has been focused on the turning process, and their influence on tool wear in milling process as well as the influence of tool wear on cutting force coefficients has not been investigated comprehensively. To fully understand the tool wear behavior in milling process with inserts, the influence of cutting parameters on tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V by using indexable cutters is investigated. The tool wear rate and trends under different feed per tooth, cutting speed, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut are analyzed. The results show that the feed rate per tooth and the radial depth of cut have a large influence on tool wear in milling Ti6Al4V with coated insert. To reduce tool wear, cutting parameters for coated inserts under experimental cutting conditions are set as: feed rate per tooth less than 0.07 mm, radial depth of cut less than 1.0 mm, and cutting speed sets between 60 and 150 m/min. Investigation on the relationship between tool wear and cutting force coefficients shows that tangential edge constant increases with tool wear and cutter edge chipping can lead to a great variety of tangential cutting force coefficient. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of milling Ti6Al4V alloy with coated inserts, and the recommend cutting parameters can be immediately applied in practical production.

  11. Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

  12. Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear based on monocular vision and multi-color structured light illuminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongren; Li, Bo; Zhou, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear from 2D images has great importance to 3D measuring and objective evaluating tool wear condition, determining accurate tool change and insuring machined part's quality. Extracting 3D information of tool wear zone based on monocular multi-color structured light can realize fast recovery of surface topography of tool wear, which overcomes the problems of traditional methods such as solution diversity and slow convergence when using SFS method and stereo match when using 3D reconstruction from multiple images. In this paper, a kind of new multi-color structured light illuminator was put forward. An information mapping model was established among illuminator's structure parameters, surface morphology and color images. The mathematical model to reconstruct 3D morphology based on monocular multi-color structured light was presented. Experimental results show that this method is effective and efficient to reconstruct the surface morphology of tool wear zone.

  13. Abrasion of restorative materials by toothaste.

    PubMed

    Heath, J R; Wilson, H J

    1976-04-01

    The procedure developed in this investigation is suitable for determining the abrasion resistance of restorative materials to toothbrush/dentifrice abrasion. Ideally, a restoration should have an abrasion resistance similar to that of enamel. Of the materials tested, gold was the only one that wore slightly less than enamel, whilst amalgam wore almost twice as quickly. The silicate material and composites (excluding TD.71) wear away 2-4 times faster than enamel. TD.71 and especially the unfilled resin exhibited very high rates of abrasion. After prolonged toothbrush/dentifrice abrasion, the surfaces of gold and amalgam were considerably smoother than those of the silicate and composite materials. PMID:1066445

  14. Cyclostationarity approach for monitoring chatter and tool wear in high speed milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, M.; Thomas, M.; El Badaoui, M.

    2014-02-01

    Detection of chatter and tool wear is crucial in the machining process and their monitoring is a key issue, for: (1) insuring better surface quality, (2) increasing productivity and (3) protecting both machines and safe workpiece. This paper presents an investigation of chatter and tool wear using the cyclostationary method to process the vibrations signals acquired from high speed milling. Experimental cutting tests were achieved on slot milling operation of aluminum alloy. The experimental set-up is designed for acquisition of accelerometer signals and encoding information picked up from an encoder. The encoder signal is used for re-sampling accelerometers signals in angular domain using a specific algorithm that was developed in LASPI laboratory. The use of cyclostationary on accelerometer signals has been applied for monitoring chatter and tool wear in high speed milling. The cyclostationarity appears on average properties (first order) of signals, on the energetic properties (second order) and it generates spectral lines at cyclic frequencies in spectral correlation. Angular power and kurtosis are used to analyze chatter phenomena. The formation of chatter is characterized by unstable, chaotic motion of the tool and strong anomalous fluctuations of cutting forces. Results show that stable machining generates only very few cyclostationary components of second order while chatter is strongly correlated to cyclostationary components of second order. By machining in the unstable region, chatter results in flat angular kurtosis and flat angular power, such as a pseudo (white) random signal with flat spectrum. Results reveal that spectral correlation and Wigner Ville spectrum or integrated Wigner Ville issued from second-order cyclostationary are an efficient parameter for the early diagnosis of faults in high speed machining, such as chatter, tool wear and bearings, compared to traditional stationary methods. Wigner Ville representation of the residual signal shows

  15. Investigations of High Temperature Wear Mechanisms for Tool Steel Under Open-Sliding Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnif, R.; Baccouch, Z.; Elleuch, R.; Richard, C.

    2014-08-01

    During hot working processes, working tools are subjected to severe conditions. Wear is one of the major life limiting factors of the hot working tools. The identification and understanding of the wear mechanism are extremely important for solving problems related to the hot working process. The ultimate aim of this paper is to assess some wear mechanisms of the tool steel used in hot drawing. The tribological tests were performed on high temperature pin-on-disc tribometer with an open-sliding contact for a simulation of hot-drawing process with a refreshed contact surface. The pin material was X40 CrMoV5 steel and the disc material was Fe 360B steel. Experiments were carried out for different disc temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800°C, a constant sliding speed of 50 rev/min and a constant normal load of 70 N. The evolution surface damage and oxides tribolayers have been investigated by SEM and EDS. The results have shown that an increase in test temperature facilitates the generation of oxide and assists in the compaction of the debris, thus producing a wear protective layer, and therefore, a reduction in friction coefficient.

  16. A comparative assessment of texture analysis techniques applied to bone tool use-wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Adam S.; Gleason, Matthew A.

    2016-06-01

    The study of bone tools, a specific class of artifacts often essential to perishable craft production, provides insight into industries otherwise largely invisible archaeologically. Building on recent breakthroughs in the analysis of microwear, this research applies confocal laser scanning microscopy and texture analysis techniques drawn from the field of surface metrology to identify use-wear patterns on experimental and archaeological bone artifacts. Our approach utilizes both conventional parameters and multi-scale geometric characterizations of the areas of worn surfaces to identify statistical similarities as a function of scale. The introduction of this quantitative approach to the study of microtopography holds significant potential for advancement in use-wear studies by reducing inter-observer variability and identifying new parameters useful in the detection of differential wear-patterns.

  17. On the Problem of Wear Resistant Coatings Separation From Tools and Machine Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gubaidulina, R. H.; Gruby, S. V.; Likholat, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The article considers separation of wear resistant coatings of tool and engineering materials which arises both during coating fabrication and use of the product. The cause of this phenomenon is assumed to be related to thermal residual stresses generating on the coating- substrate border. These stresses have been analyzed and methods are provided to calculate it after produced composite material is cooled down from the temperature of coating synthesis to the ambient temperature. A no-fracture condition has been stated in relation to coating- substrate thicknesses, temperature differences and physical and mechanical properties of combined materials. The issue of intermediate layer incorporation with pre-set parameters has been discussed. A co-effect of thermal residual and functional stresses on the strength of the boundary layer has been considered when heating, tension and compression of a product with wear resistant coating. Conclusions have been made, as well as recommendations to improve fracture strength of products with thin wear resistant coatings.

  18. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhmanii, S.; Mohideen, R.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Hasan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips.

  19. Surface Roughness Model Based on Force Sensors for the Prediction of the Tool Wear

    PubMed Central

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Rubio, Eva María; Sebastián, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a methodology has been developed with the objective of evaluating the surface roughness obtained during turning processes by measuring the signals detected by a force sensor under the same cutting conditions. In this way, the surface quality achieved along the process is correlated to several parameters of the cutting forces (thrust forces, feed forces and cutting forces), so the effect that the tool wear causes on the surface roughness is evaluated. In a first step, the best cutting conditions (cutting parameters and radius of tool) for a certain quality surface requirement were found for pieces of UNS A97075. Next, with this selection a model of surface roughness based on the cutting forces was developed for different states of wear that simulate the behaviour of the tool throughout its life. The validation of this model reveals that it was effective for approximately 70% of the surface roughness values obtained. PMID:24714391

  20. The evaluation of chemical wear on single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning a binary Cu-Ni alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browy, Eric Calmer

    The current work describes the evaluation of chemical wear on diamond tools while diamond turning copper nickel alloys of varying composition. The primary goal of my project is to quantify the chemical wear of single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning Cu-Ni alloys of different compositions. Pure copper is commonly understood to give negligible tool wear, while pure nickel is reported to give rapid wear. The Cu-Ni equilibrium phase diagram shows a single phase at all compositions. The development and testing of a method to evaluate and quantify diamond tool wear is also described within the current work. The method chosen for development is the metrology of the progressive edge recession of the diamond. A procedure of progressive plunge cuts into an ultra-bright acid copper before and after diamond turning of the workpiece takes a snapshot of the edge of the diamond tool as the cutting distance increases. An algorithm executed in MatLabRTM displays the residual tool wear after removal of the initial diamond tool geometry. A theoretical model has been developed to predict the chemical diamond tool wear and the results will be shown within the body of work.

  1. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Walter; Leer, Kristoffer; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Bartlett, Paul; Basso, Brandon; Bell, Jim; Bertelsen, Preben; Binau, Charlotte S.; Chu, Phillip C.; Gorevan, S.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Kinch, Kjartan M.; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Kusack, Alastair; Madsen, Morten B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Mumm, Erik; Myrick, Tom; Olsen, Malte; Squyres, Steven W.; Wilson, Jack; Yen, Albert

    2008-05-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting substantial amounts of magnetic material during RAT activities from rocks throughout both rover missions. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Spirit demonstrates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in Gusev crater rocks, which based on Mössbauer and visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra is interpreted as magnetite. The amount of abraded rock material adhering to the magnets varied strongly during the mission and is correlated in a consistent way to the amount of magnetite inferred from Mössbauer spectra for the corresponding rock. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Opportunity also indicates the presence of a strongly ferrimagnetic phase in outcrops, such as magnetite or an altered version of magnetite. However, the evidence is weaker than in the case of Spirit. According to data from the α particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) and the Mössbauer spectrometer (MB), the Eagle crater outcrops should not contain magnetite and their magnetization should not exceed 0.03 A m2 kg-1. However, this assertion seems to be in contradiction with the results of the RAT magnet experiment. The evidence for a strongly ferrimagnetic phase at low abundance in the Meridiani outcrops is discussed.

  2. Dissolution wear: Decomposition of tool material, and concentration profile into chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tim Kong-Ping

    The predictive capability of Kramer's theory of dissolution wear has raised questions as to whether dissolution or diffusion is the dominant mechanism underlying tool wear. The diffusion mechanism finds support in experimentation and modeling of mass transfer (e.g., the Molinari-Nouari model of the experimental findings of Subramanian et al.), and fits more naturally in the setting of the irreversibilities of turning processes. Kramer's dissolution mechanism, by contrast, is based on equilibrium thermodynamics. Our present aim is to re-phrase the dissolution hypothesis of tool wear as a boundary condition for species transfer within the chip's bulk via diffusion. In this setting, dissolution is defined as the combined events of tool decomposition at the interface and the subsequent mass transfer of decomposed elements into the chip region. A set of equations is constructed wherein the tool is treated as a mechanically rigid, but chemically active, thermal conductor; the chip is treated as a rigid-perfectly plastic, thermally conducting material; and the behavior of the frictional-contact interface between tool and chip is described by a weak coupling of thermal and mass transfer. Chemical equilibrium is invoked for the distribution of tool species at the tool-chip interface. The Frank-Turnbull mechanism of molecular reaction (between interstitial impurities and vacancies to form substitutional impurities) is used as a hypothesis to explain the concentration profile of tool constituents into the chip as found by Subramanian et al. in 1993. The present interpretation of the Frank-Turnbull mechanism is illustrated by finite-element simulations. Physical parameters have either been estimated or curve-fitted to observed data, and the level of inexactness inherent in the curve-fit process limits the present work to a demonstration of only the sufficiency of the model. The assumptions made, their implications, parameters varied, and quantities calculated are summarized in

  3. Diffusion-controlled wear of steel friction stir welding tools used on aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Kalashnikov, K. N.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The worn surfaces of steel instruments used for friction stir welding on AMg5M aluminum alloy have been examined. An adhesion transfer layer resulted on the steel tool surface from welding the aluminum-magnesium alloy. Diffusion between this layer and steel base metal resulted in formation of an intermetallic Fe-Al layer (IMC). The hardness of the IMC has been measured using a nanohardness tester. It was found that the IMC layers maximum hardness changed from 998 to 1698 HV. The continuous IMC layers may serve as a wear-resistant coating, however, the IMC were also found in the shape of spikes directed into the tool's body, which created conditions for wear particle formation by fracture.

  4. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  5. Tool wear detection in milling—An original approach with a non-dedicated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardin, François; Rémond, Didier; Rigal, Jean-François

    2010-08-01

    The aim of increasing productivity often makes optimising processes a priority and a means of anticipating defects. Metal cutting conditions are monitored to detect tool wear or breaks, so as to protect both machines and workpieces. Such monitoring relies on many different signals though two main approaches can be considered. The first consists in adding numerous sensors to the machine to obtain specific information, such as vibrations and cutting forces. The second consists in using information, often current or shaft power consumption, that can already be obtained from the machine and detected by standard sensors. This work focuses on the second approach that relies on using the sensors already installed, but optimising their capacities to the maximum for use under industrial conditions. The spindle rotary encoder signal is acquired through two systems: the first uses classical time-sampling while the second uses specific angular-sampling methodology. The differences between the two rotational frequency calculation technologies are described and discussed before focusing on the second methodology. Comparisons of cutting forces and variations in spindle rotational frequency reveal considerable similarities. Thus the occurrence of tool wear can be observed by monitoring variations in rotational frequency, and the genesis of tool tooth breaks can be established. Finally, we establish criteria for critical wear detection in both time and frequency domains.

  6. Tool wear monitoring by machine learning techniques and singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilundu, Bovic; Dehombreux, Pierre; Chiementin, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of data mining techniques for tool condition monitoring in metal cutting. Pseudo-local singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is performed on vibration signals measured on the toolholder. This is coupled to a band-pass filter to allow definition and extraction of features which are sensitive to tool wear. These features are defined, in some frequency bands, from sums of Fourier coefficients of reconstructed and residual signals obtained by SSA. This study highlights two important aspects: strong relevance of information in high frequency vibration components and benefits of the combination of SSA and band-pass filtering to get rid of useless components (noise).

  7. Contribution of human osteoblasts and macrophages to bone matrix degradation and proinflammatory cytokine release after exposure to abrasive endoprosthetic wear particles

    PubMed Central

    Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Lochner, Katrin; Schulze, Christoph; Pohle, Diana; Pustlauk, Wera; Hansmann, Doris; Bader, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    One of the major reasons for failure after total joint arthroplasty is aseptic loosening of the implant. At articulating surfaces, defined as the interface between implant and surrounding bone cement, wear particles can be generated and released into the periprosthetic tissue, resulting in inflammation and osteolysis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which osteoblasts and macrophages are responsible for the osteolytic and inflammatory reactions following contact with generated wear particles from Ti-6Al-7Nb and Co-28Cr-6Mo hip stems. To this end, human osteoblasts and THP-1 monocytic cells were incubated with the experimentally generated wear particles as well as reference particles (0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml) for 48 h under standard culture conditions. To evaluate the impact of these particles on the two cell types, the release of different bone matrix degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), and relevant cytokines were determined by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Following incubation with wear particles, human osteoblasts showed a significant upregulation of MMP1 and MMP8, whereas macrophages reacted with enhanced MMP3, MMP8 and MMP10 production. Moreover, the synthesis of TIMPs 1 and 2 was inhibited. The osteoblasts and macrophages also responded with modified expression of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. These results demonstrate that the release of wear particles affects the release of proinflammatory cytokines and has a negative impact on bone matrix formation during the first 48 h of particle exposure. Human osteoblasts are directly involved in the proinflammatory cascade of bone matrix degradation. The simultaneous activation and recruitment of monocytes/macrophages boosted osteolytic processes in the periprosthetic tissue. By the downregulation of TIMP production and the concomitant

  8. Hardening effect on machined surface for precise hard cutting process with consideration of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Liu, Xianli; Ma, Jing; Liu, Zhaojing; Liu, Fei; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-11-01

    During hard cutting process there is severe thermodynamic coupling effect between cutting tool and workpiece, which causes quenching effect on finished surfaces under certain conditions. However, material phase transformation mechanism of heat treatment in cutting process is different from the one in traditional process, which leads to changes of the formation mechanism of damaged layer on machined workpiece surface. This paper researches on the generation mechanism of damaged layer on machined surface in the process of PCBN tool hard cutting hardened steel Cr12MoV. Rules of temperature change on machined surface and subsurface are got by means of finite element simulation. In phase transformation temperature experiments rapid transformation instrument is employed, and the effect of quenching under cutting conditions on generation of damaged layer is revealed. Based on that, the phase transformation points of temperature under cutting conditions are determined. By experiment, the effects of cutting speed and tool wear on white layer thickness in damaged layer are revealed. The temperature distribution law of third deformation zone is got by establishing the numerical prediction model, and thickness of white layer in damaged layer is predicted, taking the tool wear effect into consideration. The experimental results show that the model prediction is accurate, and the establishment of prediction model provides a reference for wise selection of parameters in precise hard cutting process. For the machining process with high demanding on surface integrity, the generation of damaged layer on machined surface can be controlled precisely by using the prediction model.

  9. Tool wear modelling/life prediction: Final report for the period September 1, 1986--February 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1988-12-01

    A calibrated analytical model of cutting tool wear has been developed to allow for the prediction of the wear rates of potential coatings for cutting tool materials. The model has been used to select coating compositions which may provide improved performance, as compared to existing titanium nitride based coatings. The model predicts that the wear resistance of the IVB nitrides will increase in the order TiN, ZrN and HfN. In addition, it predicts that the wear resistance of the binary nitride (Ti,Hf)N will be greater than that of either of the component mononitrides under the cutting conditions which are commonly used in the machining of steel with high speed steel tooling. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S. )

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alternatives to high-tensile-strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine-tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive-contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and microhardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of ductile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricant sliding wear tests on specimens and components for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylindrical unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine-tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  11. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokusová, Marcela; Berta, Igor; Šooš, Ľubomír

    2014-12-01

    High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.%) 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  12. Review of scratch test studies of abrasion mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of scratch tests to simulate the material removal mechanisms which occur during abrasion is reviewed. Although useful studies of the effect of the rake angle on material removal have been carried out using diamond tools, closer simulation of the mechanisms of material removal can be obtained using actual irregular individual abrasive particles as scratch tools. Previous studies are reviewed in which scratch tests have been performed with both conventional scratch test instruments and a specially designed system used for )ital in situ) scratch tests in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Multiple-pass scratch tests over the same scratch path have been shown to create surface features and wear debris particles which are very similar to those produced by low-stress abrasion. Alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) particles have been shown to produce continuous micromachining chips from the hard, brittle carbide phase of Stellite alloys, establishing direct cutting as the important mechanism of material removal for this type of abrasive. An )ital in situ) study of material removal from white cast irons by quartz particles has provided conclusive evidence that carbide removal does not occur by direct cutting but rather always involves microfracture. Previously unpublished work which has compared scratch tests with crushed quartz and alumina particles is included. Also described is a new scratch test system which controls the depth of cut rather than the scratch load in order to simulate high-stress abrasion, in which abrasive particles are constrained to a fixed depth of cut. Preliminary new results show substantially different carbide fracture behavior under fixed-depth conditions. 8 figs., 20 refs.

  13. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the coefficient of friction and groove height (corresponding to the wear volume) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. A separate correlation exists between the solute to iron atomic radius ratio and the decreasing rates of change of coefficient of friction and groove height with increasing solute content. These rates of change are minimum at a solute to iron radius ratio of unity. They increase as the atomic ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity. The correlations indicate that atomic size is an important parameter in controlling friction and wear of alloys.

  14. Multiscale Multiphysics-Based Modeling and Analysis on the Tool Wear in Micro Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhichao; Cheng, Kai

    2016-02-01

    In micro-cutting processes, process variables including cutting force, cutting temperature and drill-workpiece interfacing conditions (lubrication and interaction, etc.) significantly affect the tool wear in a dynamic interactive in-process manner. The resultant tool life and cutting performance directly affect the component surface roughness, material removal rate and form accuracy control, etc. In this paper, a multiscale multiphysics oriented approach to modeling and analysis is presented particularly on tooling performance in micro drilling processes. The process optimization is also taken account based on establishing the intrinsic relationship between process parameters and cutting performance. The modeling and analysis are evaluated and validated through well-designed machining trials, and further supported by metrology measurements and simulations. The paper is concluded with a further discussion on the potential and application of the approach for broad micro manufacturing purposes.

  15. Contribution of human osteoblasts and macrophages to bone matrix degradation and proinflammatory cytokine release after exposure to abrasive endoprosthetic wear particles.

    PubMed

    Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Lochner, Katrin; Schulze, Christoph; Pohle, Diana; Pustlauk, Wera; Hansmann, Doris; Bader, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    One of the major reasons for failure after total joint arthroplasty is aseptic loosening of the implant. At articulating surfaces, defined as the interface between implant and surrounding bone cement, wear particles can be generated and released into the periprosthetic tissue, resulting in inflammation and osteolysis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which osteoblasts and macrophages are responsible for the osteolytic and inflammatory reactions following contact with generated wear particles from Ti‑6Al‑7Nb and Co‑28Cr‑6Mo hip stems. To this end, human osteoblasts and THP‑1 monocytic cells were incubated with the experimentally generated wear particles as well as reference particles (0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml) for 48 h under standard culture conditions. To evaluate the impact of these particles on the two cell types, the release of different bone matrix degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), and relevant cytokines were determined by multiplex enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays. Following incubation with wear particles, human osteoblasts showed a significant upregulation of MMP1 and MMP8, whereas macrophages reacted with enhanced MMP3, MMP8 and MMP10 production. Moreover, the synthesis of TIMPs 1 and 2 was inhibited. The osteoblasts and macrophages also responded with modified expression of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑8, monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. These results demonstrate that the release of wear particles affects the release of proinflammatory cytokines and has a negative impact on bone matrix formation during the first 48 h of particle exposure. Human osteoblasts are directly involved in the proinflammatory cascade of bone matrix degradation. The simultaneous activation and recruitment of monocytes/macrophages boosted osteolytic processes in the periprosthetic tissue. By the downregulation of TIMP production and the

  16. Application of surface analysis to solve problems of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented for the use of surface analytical tools including field ion microscopy, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis (AES), cylindrical mirror Auger analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data from the field ion microscope reveal adhesive transfer (wear) at the atomic level with the formation of surface compounds not found in the bulk, and AES reveals that this transfer will occur even in the presence of surface oxides. Both AES and XPS reveal that in abrasive wear with silicon carbide and diamond contacting the transition metals, the surface and the abrasive undergo a chemical or structural change which effects wear. With silicon carbide, silicon volatilizes leaving behind a pseudo-graphitic surface and the surface of diamond is observed to graphitize.

  17. Solidification Structure and Abrasion Resistance of High Chromium White Irons

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Laird, George, II

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  18. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Laird, G. II

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  19. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent injuries by wearing eye protection (such as goggles or a facemask) when you're enjoying sports like skiing, snowboarding, hockey, and lacrosse. Safety goggles can protect your eyes when you're using ...

  20. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 5; Abrasion: Plowing and Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5 discusses abrasion, a common wear phenomenon of great economic importance. It has been estimated that 50% of the wear encountered in industry is due to abrasion. Also, it is the mechanism involved in the finishing of many surfaces. Experiments are described to help in understanding the complex abrasion process and in predicting friction and wear behavior in plowing and/or cutting. These experimental modelings and measurements used a single spherical pin (asperity) and a single wedge pin (asperity). Other two-body and three-body abrasion studies used hard abrasive particles.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of the Wear Resistance of Various Tool Materials in Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, T.; Strauss, Alvin; Cook, George; Gibson, Brian; Cox, Chase

    2013-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is the preferred joining method for metal-matrix composites (MMCs). As a solid-state process, it precludes formation of the intermetallic precipitates responsible for degradation of mechanical properties in fusion welds of MMCs. The major barrier to FSW of MMCs is the rapid and severe wear of the welding pin tool, a consequence of prolonged contact between the tool and the harder reinforcements which give the material its enhanced strength. This study evaluates the effectiveness of harder tool materials to combat wear in the FSW of MMCs. The tool materials considered are O1 steel, cemented carbide (WC-Co) of the micrograin and submicrograin varieties, and WC-Co coated with diamond. The challenges which accompany the application of harder tool materials and diamond coatings in FSW are also discussed. This study represents the first use of diamond-coated tools in FSW and the first comparative evaluation of tool materials for this application.

  2. Influence of the tribological phenomenon on the tool wear in dry drilling of aluminum alloy AA2024 T351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouari, M.; List, G.; Girot, F.

    2003-09-01

    In machining, the formation of chip and tool wear is controlled by the tribological phenomenon at the tool-chip interface. Investigations show that the contact between the tool and the chip tends to change from a sliding contact to a sticking contact. When the cutting speed is increased, the tool rake face temperature can attain large values (sometimes of the order of 1000 °C in the case of machining steels). Without the use of coolants and lubricants, this temperature can be higher. These high temperatures are due to the important deformation work associated with large shear strains in the primary shear zone, and to the friction effects along the tool-chip interface. An experimental analysis of the tool wear for dry machining of aeronautic aluminum alloy AA2024 T351 is proposed. The change in the tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface is discussed.

  3. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with single crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the friction force in the plowing of metal and the groove height (corresponding to the wear volume of the groove) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease, and the contact pressure increases with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic ratio with the decreasing rate of change of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of change of groove height and the increasing rate of change of contact pressure with increasing solute content. These rates of change increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  4. Predicted wear resistances of binary carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1986-11-01

    A mechanistic model of the tool wear process has been presented (B. M. Kramer and P. K. Judd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3, 2439 (1985)) that includes the effects of both the abrasion of the tool material by inclusions within the workpiece and the chemical dissolution of the tool material into the matrix of the workpiece. Machining tests have been run on steel with titanium carbide coated tooling and the resulting test data have been employed to produce a rough calibration of the proposed model. This model has been used to predict the wear resistances of the other group IV B carbides and of the (Ti,Hf)C system in the machining of steel.

  5. Monitoring of Burr and Prefailure Phase Caused by Tool Wear in Micro-Drilling Operations Using Thrust Force Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Eiji; Kamo, Ryoga; Murakami, Hiroshi

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of thrust force signals for estimation of the burr occurring at the outlet of a drilled hole and the prefailure phase caused by tool wear in drilling holes through thin stainless steel plate (JIS SUS304). Micro-drilling tests, using feed rate, step feed length, and the micro-drill diameter as experimental parameters, were carried out to measure the thrust force during peck drilling operations. Tool wear of the cutting edge and burr occurring at the outlet of drilled holes were measured at intervals of a constant number of drilled holes to consider their relationships to thrust force. As a result, the thrust force caused by tool wear during peck micro-drilling is related to the height of the burr occurring at the outlet of the drilled hole and the prefailure phase of micro-drills.

  6. Effect of biomimetic coupling units' morphologies on rolling contact fatigue wear resistance of steel from machine tool rolling tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanshi; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Liang; Wang, Chuanwei; Chen, Zhikai

    2014-04-01

    The rolling contact fatigue wear resistance plays an important role on ensuring machining precision of machine tool using rolling tracks. Bio-inspired wearable surfaces with the alternated hardness were prepared on the specimen of steel material from machine tool rolling tracks by biomimetic coupling laser remelting method to imitate biological coupling principle. The microstructures and micromorphologies of bionic units in different sizes were characterized by optical microscope. The specimens with bionic units in different sizes and distributions were tested for rolling contact fatigue wear resistance. Combining the finite element analysis and the results of wear tests, a discussion on rolling contact fatigue wear was had. The specimens with bionic units had better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the untreated one, while the specimens with bionic units in the alternative depth's distributions present a better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the ones with bionic units in the single depth's distribution. It attributed to the alternative distribution made further improvement on the dispersion of depth of stress concentration.

  7. CAD/CAM-based Position/Force Control for a Ball-End Abrasive Tool and Its Application to an Industrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Fusaomi; Hase, Tetsuo; Haga, Zenku; Omoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Keigo

    Control of robotic mold polishing is considered in this paper. CAD/CAM-based position/force controller that simultaneously performs stable force control and exact pick feed control along curved surface is presented for articulated-type industrial robots. The force feedback loop controls the polishing force consisting of the contact force and the kinetic friction force. During mold polishing, the position feedback loop has a delicate contribution to the force feedback loop in Cartesian space so that the abrasive tool does not deviate from the desired trajectory but keeps a constant pick feed. When a mold polishing robot runs, cutter location (CL) data with normal vectors are used for not only a desired trajectory of tool translational motion but also desired contact directions given to a mold. The CL data allow the robot to realize a complete non-taught operation of the position and the contact direction. In this paper, a simple experiment is conducted by using an industrial robot with a ball-end abrasive tool in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The target workpiece is an aluminum PET bottle blow mold after NC machining, whose curved surface has small cusp marks with each pick feed of about 0.3 mm height. The results show that the proposed mold polishing robot with the CAD/CAM-based position/force controller can uniformly remove the cusp marks and further achieve mirror-like surface quality without undesirable over-polishing.

  8. Modeling of Principal Flank Wear: An Empirical Approach Combining the Effect of Tool, Environment and Workpiece Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Mozammel; Al Bashir, Mahmood; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    Hard turning is increasingly employed in machining, lately, to replace time-consuming conventional turning followed by grinding process. An excessive amount of tool wear in hard turning is one of the main hurdles to be overcome. Many researchers have developed tool wear model, but most of them developed it for a particular work-tool-environment combination. No aggregate model is developed that can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. An empirical model of principal flank wear (VB) has been developed for the different hardness of workpiece (HRC40, HRC48 and HRC56) while turning by coated carbide insert with different configurations (SNMM and SNMG) under both dry and high pressure coolant conditions. Unlike other developed model, this model includes the use of dummy variables along with the base empirical equation to entail the effect of any changes in the input conditions on the response. The base empirical equation for principal flank wear is formulated adopting the Exponential Associate Function using the experimental results. The coefficient of dummy variable reflects the shifting of the response from one set of machining condition to another set of machining condition which is determined by simple linear regression. The independent cutting parameters (speed, rate, depth of cut) are kept constant while formulating and analyzing this model. The developed model is validated with different sets of machining responses in turning hardened medium carbon steel by coated carbide inserts. For any particular set, the model can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. Since the predicted results exhibit good resemblance with experimental data and the average percentage error is <10 %, this model can be used to predict the principal flank wear for stated conditions.

  9. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins. PMID:25805253

  10. Applying the self-organization feature map (SOM) algorithm to AE-based tool wear monitoring in micro-cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chia-Liang; Lu, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Jau-Liang

    2013-01-01

    This study applies a self-organization feature map (SOM) neural network to acoustic emission (AE) signal-based tool wear monitoring for a micro-milling process. An experiment was set up to collect the signal during cutting for the system development and performance analysis. The AE signal generated on the workpiece was first transformed to the frequency domain by Fast Fourier transformation (FFT), followed by feature extraction processing using the SOM algorithm. The performance verification in this study adopts a learning vector quantification (LVQ) network to evaluate the effects of the SOM algorithm on the classification performance for tool wear monitoring. To investigate the improvement achieved by the SOM algorithms, this study also investigates cases applying only the LVQ classifier and based on the class mean scatter feature selection (CMSFS) criterion and LVQ. Results show that accurate classification of the tool wear can be obtained by properly selecting features closely related to the tool wear based on the CMSFS and frequency resolution of spectral features. However, the SOM algorithms provide a more reliable methodology of reducing the effect on the system performance contributed by noise or variations in the cutting system.

  11. SintClad: A New Approach for the Production of Wear-Resistant Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüm, M.; Hill, H.; Moll, H.; Weber, S.; Theisen, W.

    2012-05-01

    Tools used in the mineral processing industry are required to feature high wear resistance to facilitate an adequate cost efficiency. These kinds of tools are made of composite materials based on a low-alloyed substrate material and a high-alloyed coating. The coatings can be applied in different ways using production processes like HIP cladding, deposit welding, and composite casting. The article is concerned with the problem of a novel and cost-effective coating alternative: sinter cladding, using the principle of super-solidus liquid-phase sintering (SLPS). Usually SLPS represents a sintering technique, which is used for the compaction of high-alloyed metal powders. However, no recognizable efforts were made to use the SLPS-process for applying a PM-coating on a bulk substrate material. Sinter cladding for the first time uses SLPS to combine the process of powder compaction with the application of a coating to a solid steel substrate into one single step. Another advantage of the process is the possibility to produce massive bulk coatings with thicknesses exceeding 20 mm. This article is original in the scope of question and investigation methods in terms of microstructure, hardness profiles, EDX measurements, diffusion calculations, and computational thermodynamics.

  12. A comparison of the abrasiveness of six ceramic surfaces and gold.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, R; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G

    1991-09-01

    A type III gold alloy and six different ceramic surfaces were secured in an abrasion machine opposing extracted teeth to determine their relative abrasiveness and resistance to wear. The rankings of restorative materials from least abrasive to most abrasive were: gold alloy, polished; cast ceramic, polished; porcelain, polished; cast ceramic, polished and shaded; porcelain, polished and glazed; cast ceramic, cerammed skin shaded; and cast ceramic, cerammed skin unshaded. The ranking of materials from most wear-resistant to least wear-resistant was: gold alloy, cast ceramic cerammed, cast ceramic cerammed and shaded, porcelain polished, porcelain glazed, cast ceramic polished and shaded, and cast ceramic polished. PMID:1800724

  13. Wear Characteristics of Sintered Cermets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidulský, Róbert; Bidulská, Jana; Arenas, Freddy; Grande, Marco Actis

    2012-02-01

    The present paper deals with the tribological behaviour of the boride and carbide hardmetals evaluated by performing comparative dry sliding pin-on-disc experiments using normal contact loads. Analyses of the wear performance results, microstructural evaluation and processing conditions effect indicate that microstructure inhomogenities play an important role in abrasive wear behaviour of cermets. In term of grain size and chemical composition, the addition of VC also play an important role in increasing the wear resistance.

  14. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  15. The function of prehistoric lithic tools: a combined study of use-wear analysis and FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunziante Cesaro, Stella; Lemorini, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    The application of combined use-wear analysis and FTIR micro spectroscopy for the investigation of the flint and obsidian tools from the archaeological sites of Masseria Candelaro (Foggia, Italy) and Sant'Anna di Oria (Brindisi, Italy) aiming to clarify their functional use is described. The tools excavated in the former site showed in a very high percentage spectroscopically detectable residues on their working edges. The identification of micro deposits is based on comparison with a great number of replicas studied in the same experimental conditions. FTIR data confirmed in almost all cases the use-wear analysis suggestions and added details about the material processed and about the working procedures. PMID:22074884

  16. Modeling the milling tool wear by using an evolutionary SVM-based model from milling runs experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; Robleda, Abraham Segade

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research work is to build a new practical hybrid regression model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut as well as entry cut and exit cut of a milling tool. The model was based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in combination with support vector machines (SVMs). This optimization mechanism involved kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Bearing this in mind, a PSO-SVM-based model, which is based on the statistical learning theory, was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset represents experiments from runs on a milling machine under various operating conditions. In this way, data sampled by three different types of sensors (acoustic emission sensor, vibration sensor and current sensor) were acquired at several positions. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Firstly, this hybrid PSO-SVM-based regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the flank wear (output variable) and input variables (time, depth of cut, feed, etc.). Indeed, regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.95 was obtained. The agreement of this model with experimental data confirmed its good performance. Secondly, the main advantages of this PSO-SVM-based model are its capacity to produce a simple, easy-to-interpret model, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, the main conclusions of this study are exposed.

  17. Use of slide presentation software as a tool to measure hip arthroplasty wear.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Jajodia, Nirmal K; Myung, Jae Sung; Oh, Jong Keon; Park, Sang Won; Shon, Won Yong

    2009-12-01

    The authors propose a manual measurement method for wear in total hip arthroplasty (PowerPoint method) based on the well-known Microsoft PowerPoint software (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Wash). In addition, the accuracy and reproducibility of the devised method were quantified and compared with two methods previously described by Livermore and Dorr, and accuracies were determined at different degrees of wear. The 57 hips recruited were allocated to: class 1 (retrieval series), class 2 (clinical series), and class 3 (a repeat film analysis series). The PowerPoint method was found to have good reproducibility and to better detect wear differences between classes. The devised method can be easily used for recording wear at follow-up visits and could be used as a supplementary method when computerized methods cannot be employed. PMID:19896061

  18. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the formation of nano-sized carbides and the wear behavior of D2 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kamran; Akhbarizadeh, Amin; Javadpour, Sirus

    2012-09-01

    The effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, hardness, and wear behavior of D2 tool steel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness test, pin-on-disk wear test, and the reciprocating pin-on-flat wear test. The results show that deep cryogenic treatment eliminates retained austenite, makes a better carbide distribution, and increases the carbide content. Furthermore, some new nano-sized carbides form during the deep cryogenic treatment, thereby increasing the hardness and improving the wear behavior of the samples.

  19. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  20. P/M Materials for Wear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2000-10-01

    Wear resistant materials usually consist of either very hard homogeneous single phase materials (e.g., ceramics like Al2O3, SiC, etc.) or heterogenous materials (e.g., white cast irons, composites or cermets, or composite-type materials), typically with a hard reinforcing phase dispersed in a softer matrix. In both instances, the result is the same, less penetration of the abrasive into the surface of the material being worn. Composite type materials can be produced using either a melting/solidification scheme or through powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques. In either case the result is the same, a microstructure that consists of a high volume fraction of hard, usually brittle, second phase particles in a softer matrix. However, P/M can be used to create a wider range of these materials than can melting/solidification, because in P/M processing, the desired phase does not have to be precipitated during solidification. Thus, more materials can be produced with higher volume fractions of reinforcing phases. Obviously, other factors like reinforcement size, matrix-particle interfacial strength, plastic accommodation of the matrix, etc. become important in the wear behavior of these materials. Various categories of P/M wear resistant materials will be discussed, and their wear behavior will be compared against traditional wear resistant cast materials like white cast iron and tool steels.

  1. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S.; Kingsbury, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  2. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  3. Wear resistant alloys for coal handling equipment. Final technical report, October 1, 1977-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.; Parker, E.R.; Misra, A.; Finnie, I.

    1981-01-01

    In the progress report for 1977-1979, an extensive literature survey was completed in the areas of abrasive wear mechanisms, wear testing and microstructural effects on abrasive wear. Definitions of the various abrasive wear processes were clarified. A laboratory wear tester capable of simulating high stress two-body abrasive wear and low stress three-body wear was designed, constructed and calibrated. Experiments were run on some standard metals and alloys in the annealed, work hardened, and heat treated conditions under both two-body and three-body wear. In the 1979 to 1980 period, a detailed analysis of the abrasive size effect was performed based on the observations made on two- and three-body abrasion and erosion. It was concluded that the size effect was due to a shallow surface layer exhibiting higher flow stress than the bulk material when the material is abraded or eroded. The effect of certain variables on the wear resistance of different pure metals was compared for two-body abrasion, three-body abrasion and erosion. The variables studied are annealed hardness of the worn metal, the increase in hardness of the worn metal before the wear process due to work hardening and heat treatment, applied load, distance travelled, the abrasive particle size and abrasive hardness. The effect of most of these variables is similar for the three different wear processes. The existing low-stress, open three-body abrasive wear tester was modified and calibrated for testing abrasive wear up to 600/sup 0/C. Some standard materials were tested and in the case of pure aluminum it was found that the wear rate decreased with increase in temperature.

  4. Discrimination of surface wear on obsidian tools using LSCM and RelA: pilot study results (area-scale analysis of obsidian tool surfaces).

    PubMed

    Stemp, W James; Chung, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study tests the reliability of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to quantitatively measure wear on experimental obsidian tools. To our knowledge, this is the first use of confocal microscopy to study wear on stone flakes made from an amorphous silicate like obsidian. Three-dimensional surface roughness or texture area scans on three obsidian flakes used on different contact materials (hide, shell, wood) were documented using the LSCM to determine whether the worn surfaces could be discriminated using area-scale analysis, specifically relative area (RelA). When coupled with the F-test, this scale-sensitive fractal analysis could not only discriminate the used from unused surfaces on individual tools, but was also capable of discriminating the wear histories of tools used on different contact materials. Results indicate that such discriminations occur at different scales. Confidence levels for the discriminations at different scales were established using the F-test (mean square ratios or MSRs). In instances where discrimination of surface roughness or texture was not possible above the established confidence level based on MSRs, photomicrographs and RelA assisted in hypothesizing why this was so. PMID:21674537

  5. Wear of hard materials by hard particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-10-01

    Hard materials, such as WC-Co, boron carbide, titanium diboride and composite carbide made up of Mo2C and WC, have been tested in abrasion and erosion conditions. These hard materials showed negligible wear in abrasion against SiC particles and erosion using Al2O3 particles. The WC-Co materials have the highest wear rate of these hard materials and a very different material removal mechanism. Wear mechanisms for these materials were different for each material with the overall wear rate controlled by binder composition and content and material grain size.

  6. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  7. High-Temperature Sliding Wear Testing of Cathodic Arc Physical Vapor Deposition AlTiN- and AlTiON-Coated Hot Work Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Isler, Duygu; Urgen, Mustafa

    2011-11-01

    Thin hard coatings provide the much needed protection for steel thixoforming tools that must resist wear at high temperatures. The wear resistance of AlTiN- and AlTiON-coated hot work tool steel was investigated at 1023 K (750 °C), measured to be the cavity surface temperature shortly after the steel slurry was forced into the thixoforming die. The wear tests were repeated in exactly the same fashion with uncoated tool steel samples to identify the impact of AlTiN and AlTiON coatings on the high-temperature wear performance of X32CrMoV33 tool steel. The nature, the thickness, and the adherence of the oxide scales impact the tribological behavior. The poor adherence and limited ductility of ferrous oxides promote the failure of the oxide scale impairing the resistance to wear of the hot work tool steel at elevated temperatures. The substantial softening in the X32CrMoV33 hot work tool steel is also critical in the wear volume loss it suffers. AlTiN and AlTiON coatings, on the other hand, form a stable and protective oxide surface layer at high temperatures and therefore provide an enhanced resistance to oxidation. The latter is relatively more resistant to oxidation and is thus the better of the two coatings tested in the present work.

  8. Multi-sensor integration for on-line tool wear estimation through radial basis function networks and fuzzy neural network.

    PubMed

    Kuo, R J.; Cohen, P H.

    1999-03-01

    On-line tool wear estimation plays a very critical role in industry automation for higher productivity and product quality. In addition, appropriate and timely decision for tool change is significantly required in the machining systems. Thus, this paper is dedicated to develop an estimation system through integration of two promising technologies, artificial neural networks (ANN) and fuzzy logic. An on-line estimation system consisting of five components: (1) data collection; (2) feature extraction; (3) pattern recognition; (4) multi-sensor integration; and (5) tool/work distance compensation for tool flank wear, is proposed herein. For each sensor, a radial basis function (RBF) network is employed to recognize the extracted features. Thereafter, the decisions from multiple sensors are integrated through a proposed fuzzy neural network (FNN) model. Such a model is self-organizing and self-adjusting, and is able to learn from the experience. Physical experiments for the metal cutting process are implemented to evaluate the proposed system. The results show that the proposed system can significantly increase the accuracy of the product profile. PMID:12662710

  9. Computer Simulation of Stress-Strain State of Pipeline Section Affected by Abrasion Due to Mechanical Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P. V.; Afanas’ev, R. G.; Burkova, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the effect of abrasive wear of the pipeline section occurred due to mechanical impurities in the transported gas flow. The approaches to the detection of the maximum specific wear of the pipeline wall and the geometry of abrasion are the main problems of computer simulation described in this paper.

  10. Mechanical modelling of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Karme, Aleksis; Rannikko, Janina; Kallonen, Aki; Clauss, Marcus; Fortelius, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    Different diets wear teeth in different ways and generate distinguishable wear and microwear patterns that have long been the basis of palaeodiet reconstructions. Little experimental research has been performed to study them together. Here, we show that an artificial mechanical masticator, a chewing machine, occluding real horse teeth in continuous simulated chewing (of 100 000 chewing cycles) is capable of replicating microscopic wear features and gross wear on teeth that resemble wear in specimens collected from nature. Simulating pure attrition (chewing without food) and four plant material diets of different abrasives content (at n = 5 tooth pairs per group), we detected differences in microscopic wear features by stereomicroscopy of the chewing surface in the number and quality of pits and scratches that were not always as expected. Using computed tomography scanning in one tooth per diet, absolute wear was quantified as the mean height change after the simulated chewing. Absolute wear increased with diet abrasiveness, originating from phytoliths and grit. In combination, our findings highlight that differences in actual dental tissue loss can occur at similar microwear patterns, cautioning against a direct transformation of microwear results into predictions about diet or tooth wear rate. PMID:27411727

  11. Wear Independent Similarity.

    PubMed

    Steele, Adam; Davis, Alexander; Kim, Joohyung; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2015-06-17

    This study presents a new factor that can be used to design materials where desired surface properties must be retained under in-system wear and abrasion. To demonstrate this factor, a synthetic nonwetting coating is presented that retains chemical and geometric performance as material is removed under multiple wear conditions: a coarse vitrified abradant (similar to sanding), a smooth abradant (similar to rubbing), and a mild abradant (a blend of sanding and rubbing). With this approach, such a nonwetting material displays unprecedented mechanical durability while maintaining desired performance under a range of demanding conditions. This performance, herein termed wear independent similarity performance (WISP), is critical because multiple mechanisms and/or modes of wear can be expected to occur in many typical applications, e.g., combinations of abrasion, rubbing, contact fatigue, weathering, particle impact, etc. Furthermore, these multiple wear mechanisms tend to quickly degrade a novel surface's unique performance, and thus many promising surfaces and materials never scale out of research laboratories. Dynamic goniometry and scanning electron microscopy results presented herein provide insight into these underlying mechanisms, which may also be applied to other coatings and materials. PMID:26018058

  12. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  13. Characterization of Wear Mechanisms in Distorted Conical Picks After Coal Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    The interest in understanding the wear mechanisms of cemented carbide (CC) is not a new development. For a long time, there have been studies on different wear mechanisms under different coal/rock cutting conditions. These studies have helped improving the quality of CC, thereby preventing such wearing of tools. Due to highly unpredictable character of coal/rock, the wearing phenomena cannot be attributed to one single domain of conditions. However, one conclusion that can be drawn in this context is that, under similar working conditions, similar types of CC undergo similar nature of wearing process. An optimum combination of high wear resistance, strength and hardness has facilitated widespread application of CC in the field of mining engineering. The abrasive parts of the mining tools are made of CC materials. The current study is focussed on a detailed characterization of the wear mechanisms of conical picks, which are used for coal mining. Conical picks consist of a steel body with an inserted cone-shaped CC tip. After being used for a certain period of time, both, the CC tip and the steel body get distorted. In this study, selection of appropriate samples was followed by critical observation of them through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the previous study, we explained the distortion process of both, the tip as well as the body, using the SEM images. For the present study, two samples were taken from our previous investigation for further analysis. Three other samples were also included in the present study. Seven different types of wear mechanisms, such as, cracking and crushing, cavity formation, coal intermixing, chemical degradation along with abrasion, long and deep cracks, heating effect and body deformation were observed in the five tool samples.

  14. Cutting force-based real-time estimation of tool wear in face milling using a combination of signal processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Sengupta, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, combinations of signal processing techniques for real-time estimation of tool wear in face milling using cutting force signals are presented. Three different strategies based on linear filtering, time-domain averaging and wavelet transformation techniques are adopted for extracting relevant features from the measured signals. Sensor fusion at feature level is used in search of an improved and robust tool wear model. Isotonic regression and exponential smoothing techniques are introduced to enforce monotonicity and smoothness of the extracted features. At the first stage, multiple linear regression models are developed for specific cutting conditions using the extracted features. The best features are identified on the basis of a statistical model selection criterion. At the second stage, the first-stage models are combined, in accordance with proven theory, into a single tool wear model, including the effect of cutting parameters. The three chosen strategies show improvements over those reported in the literature, in the case of training data as well as test data used for validation—for both laboratory and industrial experiments. A method for calculating the probabilistic worst-case prediction of tool wear is also developed for the final tool wear model.

  15. The effects of weathering on the strength and chemistry of Columbia River Basalts and their implications for Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, B. J.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Baker, L. L.; Bridges, N. T.; Lennon, A. M.; Paulsen, G.; Zacny, K.

    2014-08-01

    Basalt physical properties such as compressive strength and density are directly linked to their chemistry and constitution; as weathering progresses, basalts gradually become weaker and transition from intact rock to saprolite and ultimately, to soil. Here we quantify the degree of weathering experienced by the Adirondack-class basalts at the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit site by performing comparative analyses on the strength and chemistry of a series of progressively weathered Columbia River Basalt (CRB) from western Idaho and eastern Washington. CRB samples were subjected to compressive strength tests, Rock Abrasion Tool grinds, neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Analyses of terrestrial basalts indicate linked strength-chemical changes, as expected. Weathering sufficient to induce the loss of more than 50% of some cations (including >50% of MgO and MnO as well as ∼38% of Fe2O3 and 34% of CaO) was observed to weaken these samples by as much as 50% of their original strength. In comparison with the terrestrial samples, Adirondack-class basalts are most similar to the weakest basalt samples measured in terms of compressive strength, yet they do not exhibit a commensurate amount of chemical alteration. Since fluvial and lacustrine activity in Gusev crater appears to have been limited after the emplacement of flood basalt lavas, the observed weakness is likely attributable to thin-film weathering on exposed, displaced rocks in the Gusev plains (in addition to some likely shock effects). The results indicate that Adirondack-class basalts may possess a several mm-thick weak outer rind encasing an interior that is more pristine than otherwise indicated, and also suggest that long rock residence times may be the norm.

  16. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the current work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.

  17. Response Surface Methodology Approach on Effect of Cutting Parameter on Tool Wear during End Milling of High Thermal Conductivity Steel -150 (HTCS-150)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Hadzley, A. B.; Mohd Azahar, W. M. Y. Wan; Izamshah, R.; Mohd Shahir, K.; Mohd Amran, A.; Anis Afuza, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of development the tool life's mathematical model during the milling process on High Thermal Conductivity Steel 150 (HTCS-150) 56 HRC. Using response surface methodology, the mathematical models for tool life have been developed in terms of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Box-Behnken techniques is a part of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to carry out the work plan to predict, the tool wear and generate the numerical equation in relation to independent variable parameters by Design Expert software. Dry milling experiments were conducted by using two levels of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. In this study, the variable for the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were in the range of 484-553 m/min, 0.31-0.36 mm/tooth, and 0.1-0.5 mm, width of cut is constantly 0.01mm per passes. The tool wear was measured using tool maker microscope. The effect of input factors that on the responds were identified by using mean of ANOVA. The responds of tool wear then simultaneously optimized. The validation of the test reveals the model accuracy 5% and low tool wear under same experimental condition.

  18. Investigation of surface roughness and tool wear length with varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate of Aluminium alloy and P20 steel machining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varmma a/l Suparmaniam, Madan; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    High-speed milling technique is often used in many industries to boost productivity of the manufacturing of high-technology components. The occurrence of wear highly limits the efficiency and accuracy of high- speed milling operations. In this paper, analysis of high-speed milling process parameters such as material removal rate, cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut carried out by implemented to conventional milling. This experiment investigate the effects of varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate to tool wear rate length using metallurgical microscope and surface roughness using portable surface roughness tester after end milling of Aluminium and P20 steel. Results showed that feed rate significantly influences the surface roughness value while depth of cut does not as the surface roughness value keep increasing with the increase of feed rate and decreasing depth of cut. Whereas, tool wear rate almost remain unchanged indicates that material removal rate strongly contribute the wear rate. It believe that with no significant tool wear rate the results of this experiment are useful by showing that HSM technique is possible to be applied in conventional machine with extra benefits of high productivity, eliminating semi-finishing operation and reducing tool load for finishing.

  19. Wear processes in manufacturing. ASTM special technical publication 1362

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, S.B.; Magee, J.

    1998-07-01

    The importance of tribological phenomena in engineering has long been recognized. The evidence for this lies in the extensive studies on tool wear performed over many decades. The same is the case with studies related to the friction and lubrication in deformation processing as evidenced by a number of conferences and related publications. In spite of this, the interaction between the tribologists and manufacturing researchers has not been great. The objective of this symposium was to provide a forum for these researchers for a mutually beneficial interaction. The collection of papers published in this volume may be grouped into the following categories. These categories are: abrasion in ceramic grinding, wear of cutting tools, friction in vibratory conveyers, and erosion in manufacturing. Separate abstracts were prepared for 11 papers.

  20. Effects of Deep Cryogenic Treatment on the Wear Resistance and Mechanical Properties of AISI H13 Hot-Work Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiçek, Adem; Kara, Fuat; Kıvak, Turgay; Ekici, Ergün; Uygur, İlyas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a number of wear and tensile tests were performed to elucidate the effects of deep cryogenic treatment on the wear behavior and mechanical properties (hardness and tensile strength) of AISI H13 tool steel. In accordance with this purpose, three different heat treatments (conventional heat treatment (CHT), deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), and deep cryogenic treatment and tempering (DCTT)) were applied to tool steel samples. DCT and DCTT samples were held in nitrogen gas at -145 °C for 24 h. Wear tests were conducted on a dry pin-on-disk device using two loads of 60 and 80 N, two sliding velocities of 0.8 and 1 m/s, and a wear distance of 1000 m. All test results showed that DCT improved the adhesive wear resistance and mechanical properties of AISI H13 steel. The formation of small-sized and uniformly distributed carbide particles and the transformation of retained austenite to martensite played an important role in the improvements in the wear resistance and mechanical properties. After cleavage fracture, the surfaces of all samples were characterized by the cracking of primary carbides, while the DCT and DCTT samples displayed microvoid formation by decohesion of the fine carbides precipitated during the cryo-tempering process.

  1. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  2. Laser Cladding of CPM Tool Steels on Hardened H13 Hot-Work Steel for Low-Cost High-Performance Automotive Tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Xue, L.

    2012-06-01

    This paper summarizes our research on laser cladding of high-vanadium CPM® tool steels (3V, 9V, and 15V) onto the surfaces of low-cost hardened H13 hot-work tool steel to substantially enhance resistance against abrasive wear. The results provide great potential for fabricating high-performance automotive tooling (including molds and dies) at affordable cost. The microstructure and hardness development of the laser-clad tool steels so obtained are presented as well.

  3. Discrete element thermomechanical modelling of rock cutting with valuation of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a thermomechanical discrete element model of rock cutting process. The thermomechanical formulation of the discrete element method considers mechanical and thermal phenomena and their reciprocal influence. The thermal model developed for transient heat conduction problems takes into account conductive heat transfer at the contact between particles and convection on the free surface. The thermal and mechanical problems are coupled by consideration of: (1) heat generated due to friction which is calculated in the mechanical problem and passed to the thermal solution, (2) influence of thermal expansion on mechanical interaction between particles. Estimation of temperature dependent wear has been included into the contact model. The coupled problem is solved using the staggered scheme.The thermomechanical algorithm has been implemented in a discrete element program and applied to simulation of rock cutting with single pick of a dredge cutter head. Numerical results confirm good performance of the developed algorithm.

  4. Microstructural characterization of diamond-turned aluminum substrates of memory disks: effects of inclusions on the surface finish and tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.

    1986-07-31

    Diamond-turned substrates of computer memory disks of Al-Mg alloys of 5086 and 5186 grades and a worn diamond tool usd in machining 5086 alloy were examined by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy. Detailed analysis of the examination results showed that the undesirable ''orange peel'' finish and accelerated tool wear that occurred in machining 5086 grade alloy disks could be traced to high inclusion content in the material. The iron-containing inclusion particles were shown to be detrimental to the tool life since they could chemically react with the tool material and induce machine tool chatter. The tool wear induced by the inclusion particles then contributed to the ''orange peel'' finish by creating an unevenly cut, rough surface on the disks.

  5. Abrasive drill for resilient materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Resilient materials normally present problem in obtaining accurate and uniform hole size and position. Tool is fabricated from stiff metal rod such as tungsten or carbon steel that has diameter slightly smaller than required hole. Piercing/centering point is ground on one end of rod. Rod is then plasma-sprayed (flame-sprayed) with suitable hard abrasive coating. High-speed, slow-feed operation of tool is necessary for accurate holes, and this can be done with drill press, hard drill, or similar machines.

  6. A Multiple-Regression Model for Monitoring Tool Wear with a Dynamometer in Milling Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jacob C.; Chen, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    A major goal of the manufacturing industry is increasing product quality. The quality of a product is strongly associated with the condition of the cutting tool that produced it. Catching poor tool conditions early in the production will help reduce defects. However, with current CNC technology, manufacturers still rely mainly on the operator's…

  7. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Conducted on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1998-01-01

    Sojourner rover showing Lewis' wheel abrasion experiment. The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft soft-landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. Among the many experiments on its small Sojourner rover are three technology experiments from the NASA Lewis Research Center, including the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The WAE was designed, built, delivered, and operated on Mars by a team of engineers and scientists from Lewis' Photovoltaics and Space Environments Branch. This experiment collected data to assess wheel surface wear on the Sojourner. It used a specially designed rover wheel, with thin films (200 to 1000 angstroms) of aluminum, nickel, and platinum deposited on black, anodized aluminum strips attached to the rover's right center wheel. As the wheel spun in the Martian soil, a photovoltaic sensor monitored changes in film reflectivity. These changes indicated abrasion of the metal films by Martian surface material. Rolling wear data were accumulated by the WAE. Also, at frequent intervals, all the rover wheels, except the WAE test wheel, were locked to hold the rover stationary while the test wheel alone was spun and dug into the Martian regolith. These tests created wear conditions more severe than simple rolling. The WAE will contribute substantially to our knowledge of Martian surface characteristics. Marked abrasion would indicate a surface composed of hard, possibly sharply edged grains, whereas lack of abrasion would suggest a somewhat softer surface. WAE results will be correlated with ground simulations to determine which terrestrial materials behave most like those on Mars. This knowledge will enable a deeper understanding of erosion processes on Mars and the role they play in Martian surface evolution. Preliminary results show that electrostatic charging of the rover wheels sometimes caused dust to accumulate on the WAE wheel, making interpretation of the reflectance data problematic. If electrostatic charging is the mechanism for dust attraction, this indicates

  8. Wear Behavior of a Novel Aluminum-Based Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Show, Bijay Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-02-01

    In the current research, the dry sliding wear behaviors of 6351 Al alloy and its composite with hybrid reinforcement ( ex situ SiC and in situ Al4SiC4) were investigated at low sliding speed (1 m s-1) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. The wear mechanism involved adhesion and microcutting-abrasion at lower load. On the other hand, at higher load, abrasive wear involving microcutting and microplowing along with adherent oxide formation was observed. Initially, under higher load, the abrasive wear mechanism caused rapid wear loss up to a certain sliding distance. Afterward, by virtue of frictional heat generation and associated temperature rise, an adherent oxide layer was developed at the pin surface which drastically reduced the wear loss. The overall wear rate increased with load in alloy as well as in composite. Moreover, the overall wear rate of the composite was found lower than that of the 6351 Al alloy at all applied loads. The ex situ SiC particles were found to resist abrasive wear, while, in situ Al4SiC4 particles offered resistance to adhesive wear. Accordingly, the 6351 Al (SiC + Al4SiC4) hybrid composite exhibited superior wear resistance relative to the 6351 Al alloy.

  9. WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings in Low- and High-Stress Abrasive Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašparová, Michaela; Zahálka, František; Houdková, Šárka

    2011-03-01

    The article deals with the evaluation of abrasive wear resistance and adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings. The main attention was paid to differences between low- and high-stress abrasive conditions of the measuring. Conclusions include the evaluation of specific properties of the WC-Co and the Cr3C2-NiCr High Velocity Oxygen Fuel coatings and the evaluation of the changes in the behavior of the abrasive media. Mainly, the relationship between the low- and high-stress abrasion conditions and the wear mechanism in the tested materials was described. For the wear test, the abrasive media of Al2O3 and SiO2 sands were chosen. During wear tests, the volume loss of the tested materials and the surface roughness of the wear tracks were measured. The wear tracks on the tested materials and abrasive sands' morphologies were observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It was found that high-stress abrasive conditions change the coatings' behavior very significantly, particularly that of the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. Adhesive-cohesive properties of the coatings and relationships among individual structure particles were evaluated using tensile testing. It was found that the weak bond strength among the individual splats, structure particles, and phases plays a role in the poor wear resistance of the coatings.

  10. Measurement of friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Report reviews various techniques and surface tools available for study of wear of materials. Atomic nature of solid surfaces plays important role in wear behavior for materials in solid-state contact.

  11. Wear prediction in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Rogers, W.A.

    1993-06-01

    A procedure to model the wear of surfaces exposed to a fluidized bed is formulated. A stochastic methodology adapting the kinetic theory of gases to granular flows is used to develop an impact wear model. This uses a single-particle wear model to account for impact wear from all possible-particle collisions. An adaptation of a single-particle abrasion model to describe the effects of many abrading particles is used to account for abrasive wear. Parameters describing granular flow within the fluidized bed, necessary for evaluation of the wear expressions, are determined by numerical solution of the fluidized bed hydrodynamic equations. Additional parameters, describing the contact between fluidized particles and the wearing surface, are determined by optimization based on wear measurements. The modeling procedure was used to analyze several bubbling and turbulent fluidized bed experiments with single-tube and tube bundle configurations. Quantitative agreement between the measured and predicted wear rates was found, with some exceptions for local wear predictions. This work demonstrates a methodology for wear predictions in fluidized beds.

  12. Characterization of tool wear and weld optimization in the friction-stir welding of cast aluminum 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.J.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    Tool wear for threaded steel pin tools declines with decreasing rotation speed and increasing traverse or weld speeds for the friction-stir welding (FSW) of Al 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite (MMC). Less than 10% tool wear occurs when the threaded tool erodes to a self-optimized shape resembling a pseudo-hour glass at weld traverse distances in excess of 3 m. There is only a 7% reduction in the SiC mean particle size in the weld zone for self-optimized pin tools with no threads as compared with a 25% variation for threaded tools wearing significantly at the start of welding. The weld zone becomes more homogeneous for efficient welding with self-optimized tools, and there is a reduction in the weld zone grain size due to dynamic recrystallization, which facilitates the solid-state flow. Transmission electron microscopy shows little difference in the dislocation density from the base material to the weld zone, but there is a propensity of dislocation loops in the weld zone. The weld zone is observed to harden by as much as 30%, in contrast to the base material, as a consequence of the recrystallized grain size reduction and the SiC particles distributed therein.

  13. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  14. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  15. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  16. The dollars and sense of selecting abrasion-resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1988-05-01

    Sliding abrasion and impact damage affect mine and plant operating costs on a month-to-month, or, in some cases, day-to-day basis. Modern technology has given us the tools necessary to fight abrasion on every front - materials and techniques that are cost-effective, long-lasting, and easy to use. An inspection of abrasion-resistant materials and processes - metals; ceramics; sprayable and trowelable compounds; polyethylene; urethane; rubber; epoxy - may well provide information that could help improve your company's balance sheet. The following is a compilation of product releases, literature, and manuals offered by manufacturers of abrasion-resistant materials.

  17. Resistance of dentin coating materials against abrasion by toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Gando, Iori; Ariyoshi, Meu; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Thin-film coating of root dentin surface by all-in-one adhesives has been shown to be an effective option to prevent root surface caries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear resistance against toothbrush abrasion of two all-in-one coating materials; Shield Force (SF) and Hybrid Coat (HC). Bovine dentin surfaces were covered with one of the coating materials; SF or HC. After storage in water for 24 h, the testing surface was subjected to the toothbrush abrasion test up to 50,000 cycles either in water or toothpaste slurry. The remaining thickness of the coating material was measured using SEM. Toothpaste slurry significantly increased rate of tooth brush abrasion of the coating materials. While SF and HC wore at a similar pace under toothbrush abrasion, SF had a thicker coat and could protect dentin longer, up to 50,000 cycles. PMID:23370872

  18. Development of combinatorial chemistry methods for coatings: high-throughput screening of abrasion resistance of coatings libraries.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Chisholm, Bret J; Olson, Daniel R; Brennan, Michael J; Molaison, Chris A

    2002-10-01

    Design, validation, and implementation of an optical spectroscopic system for high-throughput analysis of combinatorially developed protective organic coatings are reported. Our approach replaces labor-intensive coating evaluation steps with an automated system that rapidly analyzes 8 x 6 arrays of coating elements that are discretely deposited on a single plastic substrate. Each coating element of the library is 10 mm in diameter and 2-5 microm thick. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their resistance to wear abrasion because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use applications. Upon testing, the coating materials undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Coatings are abraded using industry-accepted abrasion test methods at a single or multiple abrasion conditions followed by the high-throughput analysis of abrasion-induced light scatter. The developed automated system is optimized for the analysis of diffusively scattered light that corresponds to 0-30% haze. System precision of 0.1-2.5% relative standard deviation provides capability for the reliable ranking of coatings performance. Although the system was implemented for high-throughput screening of combinatorially developed organic protective coatings for automotive applications, it can be applied for a variety of other applications for which materials ranking can be achieved using optical spectroscopic tools. PMID:12380837

  19. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  20. Modeling and Adhesive Tool Wear in Dry Drilling of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    One of the challenges in aeronautic drilling operations is the elimination of cutting fluids while maintaining the quality of drilled parts. This paper therefore aims to increase the tool life and process quality by working on relationships existing between drilling parameters (cutting speed and feed rate), coatings and tool geometry. In dry drilling, the phenomenon of Built-Up Layer is the predominant damage mechanism. A model fitting the axial force with the cutting parameters and the damage has been developed. The burr thickness and its dispersion decrease with the feed rate. The current diamond coatings which exhibit a strong adhesion to the carbide substrate can limit this adhesive layer phenomenon. A relatively smooth nano-structured coating strongly limits the development of this layer.

  1. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  2. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used. PMID:15146320

  3. Simulated oral wear of packable composites.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Nancy L; Villarroel, Soraya C; Knobloch, Lisa A; Seghi, Robert R

    2003-01-01

    Wear resistance has been a problem for the posterior application of resin composites. This study evaluated and compared the wear characteristics of two conventional and two packable composites. Opposing enamel wear was also measured. One traditional hybrid composite-Herculite XR (HXR), one micro-filled composite-Heliomolar (HM) and two packable composites-Filtek P60 (P60) and Surefil (SF) were formed into disks (n = 10) and used as substrates for the wear test. Enamel was harvested from extracted human third molars and machined into cusps with a 5-mm spherical radius (n = 40). The Oregon Health Sciences University oral wear simulator was used to evaluate abrasive wear and attrition of the composite materials and wear of the opposing enamel. The resulting enamel wear facets were measured and recorded in mm2 using optical scanning methods and a computer graphics program. Abrasion and attrition of the composite substrates were measured using a profilometer. Both sets of data were subjected to ANOVA and multiple comparison tests to determine significant differences. After wear testing, scanning electron micrographs were made using representative composite samples from each group. The packable composites showed significantly less attrition and abrasive wear (p < 0.001) than the conventional controls. The microfilled composite HM resulted in significantly lower enamel wear (p < 0.001) than the materials HXR and P60 but was not significantly different from the packable composite SF at the alpha = 0.05 level. The results of this in-vitro study suggest that packable composites may have improved wear resistance over some conventional composites. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate packable composites over time. PMID:14653301

  4. Effect of Al2O3 nanolubrication with Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate (SDBS) on surface roughness and tool wear under MQL during turning of Ti-6AL-4T.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. A. M.; Khalil, A. N. M.; Azmi, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    The application of coolant reduces the friction and heat generation, which affect the surface finish and tool life, during machining. Recently, nanolubricant opens a new ways of coolant strategy in machining operation. It is well known that suspended nanoparticles without surfactant in base oil tend to agglomerate after a period of time. This paper presents the effects of AEO3 nanolubricant with surfactant, Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate (SDBS) on surface roughness and tool wear during turning of titanium alloy, Ti-6AL-4T. The comparison of different coolant strategies, dry cutting, flooding, minimum quantity lubricant (MQL), nanolubricant with and without surfactant are also presented. The results showed that Al2O3 nanolubricant with surfactant, Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate (SDBS) under MQL exhibits low surface roughness and tool wear rate compared to others. This proved that the addition of surfactant not only improved nanolubricant stability but also machining performance.

  5. An empirical survey on the influence of machining parameters on tool wear in diamond turning of large single crystal silicon optics

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Carr, J W; Davis, P J; Goodman, W; Haack, J K; Krulewich, D; McClellan, M; Syn, C K; Zimmermann, M.

    1999-07-01

    The research described in this paper is a continuation of the collaborative efforts by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Schafer Corporation and TRW to develop a process for single point diamond turning (SPDT) of large single crystal silicon (SCSi) optical substrates on the Large Optic Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM). The principal challenge to obtaining long track lengths in SCSi has been to identify a set of machining parameters which yield a process that provides both low and predictable tool wear. Identifying such a process for SCSi has proven to be a formidable task because multiple crystallographic orientations with a range of hardness values are encountered when machining conical and annular optical substrates. The LODTM cutting program can compensate for tool wear if it is predictable. However, if the tool wear is not predictable then the figured area of the optical substrate may have unacceptably high error that can not be removed by post-polishing. The emphasis of this survey was limited to elucidating the influence of cutting parameters on the tool wear. We present two preliminary models that can be used to predict tool wear over the parameter space investigated. During the past two and one-half years a series of three evolutionary investigations were performed. The first investigation, the Parameter Assessment Study (PAS), was designed to survey fundamental machining parameters and assess their influence on tool wear [1]. The results of the PAS were used as a point-of-departure for designing the second investigation, the Parameter Selection Study (PSS). The goal of the PSS was to explore the trends identified in the PAS in more detail, to determine if the experimental results obtained in the PAS could be repeated on a different diamond turning machine (DTM), and to select a more optimal set of machining parameters that could be used in subsequent investigations such as the Fluid Down-Select Study (FDS). The goal of the FDS was to compare

  6. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related...

  8. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  9. Research on the Friction and Wear Behavior at Elevated Temperature of Plasma-Sprayed Nanostructured WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Gou, Guoqing; Tu, Mingjing; Liu, Yan

    2010-02-01

    Nanostructured and ultra-fine WC-Co coatings were prepared by plasma spray. The friction and wear behavior at elevated temperature and failure mechanism were investigated. The results indicated that the sliding wear resistance of nanostructured coating is better than that of ultra-fine coating at high temperature. The wear mechanism is different between ultra-fine coating and nanostructured coating. Brittle fracture and adhesive wear dominate in ultra-fine coating followed with abrasive wear. Toughness fracture and abrasive wear dominate in nanostructured coating followed with adhesive wear.

  10. The development of plant food processing in the Levant: insights from use-wear analysis of Early Epipalaeolithic ground stone tools.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Laure; Nadel, Dani

    2015-11-19

    In recent years, the study of percussive, pounding and grinding tools has provided new insights into human evolution, more particularly regarding the development of technology enabling the processing and exploitation of plant resources. Some of these studies focus on early evidence for flour production, an activity frequently perceived as an important step in the evolution of plant exploitation. The present paper investigates plant food preparation in mobile hunter-gatherer societies from the Southern Levant. The analysis consists of a use-wear study of 18 tools recovered from Ohalo II, a 23 000-year-old site in Israel showing an exceptional level of preservation. Our sample includes a slab previously interpreted as a lower implement used for producing flour, based on the presence of cereal starch residues. The use-wear data we have obtained provide crucial information about the function of this and other percussive tools at Ohalo II, as well as on investment in tool manufacture, discard strategies and evidence for plant processing in the Late Pleistocene. The use-wear analysis indicates that the production of flour was a sporadic activity at Ohalo II, predating by thousands of years the onset of routine processing of plant foods. PMID:26483535

  11. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  12. Abrasion, erosion and scuffing resistance of carbide and oxide ceramic thermal sprayed coatings for different applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbezat, G.; Nicoll, A. R.; Sickinger, A.

    1993-04-01

    In the area of antiwear coatings, carbide-containing coatings and oxide ceramic coatings are applied using different thermal spray processes in the form of individual layers. In many industries these coatings have become technically significant on components where wear and friction can cause critical damage in the form of abrasion, erosion and scuffing together with corrosion. Carbide-containing and ceramic coatings have been produced with different thermal spray processes for the determination of abrasive, adhesive and erosive wear resistance. Two types of abrasion test, namely an adhesion wear test and an erosion test in water at a high velocity, were used for the characterization of wear resistance under different conditions. The coatings were also characterized with regard to microstructure, composition and fracture toughness. The influence of the thermal spraying process parameters on the microstructure is presented together with the influence of the microstructure on the behavior of the coatings under simulated service conditions.

  13. Erosive tooth wear in children.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thiago S; Lussi, Adrian; Jaeggi, Thomas; Gambon, Dein L

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are more liable to erosive wear than permanent teeth. However, results from epidemiological studies imply that the primary dentition is less wear resistant than permanent teeth, possibly due to the overlapping of erosion with mechanical forces (like attrition or abrasion). Although low severity of tooth wear in children does not cause a significant impact on their quality of life, early erosive damage to their permanent teeth may compromise their dentition for their entire lifetime and require extensive restorative procedures. Therefore, early diagnosis of erosive wear and adequate preventive measures are important. Knowledge on the aetiological factors of erosive wear is a prerequisite for preventive strategies. Like in adults, extrinsic and intrinsic factors, or a combination of them, are possible reasons for erosive tooth wear in children and adolescents. Several factors directly related to erosive tooth wear in children are presently discussed, such as socio-economic aspects, gastroesophageal reflux or vomiting, and intake of some medicaments, as well as behavioural factors such as unusual eating and drinking habits. Additionally, frequent and excessive consumption of erosive foodstuffs and drinks are of importance. PMID:24993274

  14. Modeling and Simulation of a Donor Material Concept to Reduce Tool Wear in Friction Stir Welding of High-Strength Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Rice, J.; Hou, G.; Williamson, K. M.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    This research proposes the "donor material" concept for reduction of tool's wear at the plunge phase by providing localized preheating at the plunge area using a softer material as a "donor." This process generates heat in a relatively soft "donor" material, which is transferred to the much harder workpiece material by conduction. This research includes several numerical simulations of the donor material concept with different donor materials and plain carbon steel as the workpiece. A Significant decreases in both axial force and contact pressure were observed when a donor material was used in the plunge area. The decreases in both axial force and contact pressure are very likely to contribute to decreasing tool's wear.

  15. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  16. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  17. Analysis of wear mechanism and influence factors of drum segment of hot rolling coiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Peng, Yan; Liu, Hongmin; Liu, Yunfei

    2013-03-01

    Because the work environment of segment is complex, and the wear failures usually happen, the wear mechanism corresponding to the load is a key factor for the solution of this problem. At present, many researchers have investigated the failure of segment, but have not taken into account the compositive influences of matching and coiling process. To investigate the wear failure of the drum segment of the hot rolling coiler, the MMU-5G abrasion tester is applied to simulate the wear behavior under different temperatures, different loads and different stages, and the friction coefficients and wear rates are acquired. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) is used to observe the micro-morphology of worn surface, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS) is used to analyze the chemical composition of worn surface, finally the wear mechanism of segment in working process is judged and the influence regulars of the environmental factors on the material wear behaviors are found. The test and analysis results show that under certain load, the wear of the segment changes into oxidation wear from abrasive wear step by step with the temperature increases, and the wear degree reduces; under certain temperature, the main wear mechanism of segment changes into spalling wear from abrasive wear with the load increases, and the wear degree slightly increases. The proposed research provides a theoretical foundation and a practical reference for optimizing the wear behavior and extending the working life of segment.

  18. A modified ASTM G-75 abrasion test helps select candidate alloys for service in a corrosive and abrasive slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A.; Morrison, W.S.; Jenkins, C.F.; Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC )

    1989-01-01

    The design of a hazardous waste immobilization facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) set material requirements for both abrasion resistance and corrosion resistance in process equipment. Standard ASTM slurry wear test G75 was modified to permit evaluation and comparison of abrasive resistance of candidate materials of construction in the laboratory. However, corrosion was found to contribute significantly to overall metal loss during the testing. Consequently, the abrasive slurry used for the testing was modified by adjusting its chemistry to include appropriate corrosive species. The Miller numbers obtained in the modified G75 Miller abrasion test are described. Pilot plant observations for Type 304L austenitic stainless steel were available. These data were used to generate a Morrison-Miller Ratio'' in order to determine anticipated field abrasion properties for other alloys. Hardness for many of the alloys fell in a narrow range about Rockwell B90, but performance varied significantly in response to slurry chemistry. This effect if synergistic may often be overlooked in the selection process, and it needs to be addressed. Some pilot plant testing of other alloys is essential to confirm the calculated abrasion rates and the approach of using the Morrison-Miller ratio. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  20. Dentifrice fluoride and abrasivity interplay on artificial caries lesions.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Hani M; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    Incipient caries lesions on smooth surfaces may be subjected to toothbrushing, potentially leading to remineralization and/or abrasive wear. The interplay of dentifrice abrasivity and fluoride on this process is largely unknown and was investigated on three artificially created lesions with different mineral content/distribution. 120 bovine enamel specimens were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n = 10), resulting from the association of (1) lesion type [methylcellulose acid gel (MeC); carboxymethylcellulose solution (CMC); hydroxyethylcellulose gel (HEC)], (2) slurry abrasive level [low (REA 4/ RDA 69); high (REA 7/RDA 208)], and (3) fluoride concentration [0/275 ppm (14.5 mM) F as NaF]. After lesion creation, specimens were brushed in an automated brushing machine with the test slurries (50 strokes 2×/day). Specimens were kept in artificial saliva in between brushings and overnight. Enamel surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry after lesion creation, 1, 3 and 5 days. Two enamel sections (from baseline and post-brushing areas) were obtained and analyzed microradiographically. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 5%). Brushing with high-abrasive slurry caused more SL than brushing with low-abrasive slurry. For MeC and CMC lesions, fluoride had a protective effect on SL from day 3 on. Furthermore, for MeC and CMC, there was a significant mineral gain in the remaining lesions except when brushed with high-abrasive slurries and 0 ppm F. For HEC, a significant mineral gain took place when low-abrasive slurry was used with fluoride. The tested lesions responded differently to the toothbrushing procedures. Both slurry fluoride content and abrasivity directly impacted SL and mineral gain of enamel caries lesions. PMID:24993884

  1. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    PubMed Central

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  2. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  3. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  4. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  5. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  6. Assessment HVOF sprayed coatings for reducing wear on pump components

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufold, R.; McCaul, C.; Brunhouse, S.

    1994-12-31

    Long-term pump efficiency and durability are directly related to the wear and corrosion resistance of materials used to manufacture pump components. Conventional OEM design materials often do not provide long-term resistance to wear caused by abrasive grains, particle erosion, corrosion, and cavitation. As a result, pump components can fail prematurely causing pump downtime and interrupting service life. Thermal-sprayed coatings, in particular, those deposited by HVOF, can help prevent this loss by reducing premature pump failure resulting from accelerated wear. The intent of this paper is to assess the degree of wear protection provided by various materials deposited by HVOF as compared to those coatings accepted by pump manufacturers. The materials tested ranged from tungsten carbide to chromium carbide to nickel-base alloys. The coating properties were analyzed by metallographic characterization, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, and anti-galling.

  7. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  8. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior.

  9. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  10. Single-asperity contributions to multi-asperity wear simulated with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Bianchi, D.

    2016-03-01

    We use a molecular dynamics approach to simulate the wear of a rough ferrite surface due to multiple hard, abrasive particles under variation of normal pressure, grinding direction, and particle geometry. By employing a clustering algorithm that incorporates some knowledge about the grinding process such as the main grinding direction, we can break down the total wear volume into contributions from the individual abrasive particles in a time-resolved fashion. The resulting analysis of the simulated grinding process allows statements on wear particle generation, distribution, and stability depending on the initial topography, the grinding angle, the normal pressure, as well as the abrasive shape and orientation with respect to the surface.

  11. Laser-dispersing of forging tools using AlN-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noelke, C.; Luecke, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.

    2014-02-01

    Forging tools for aluminum work pieces show an increased adhesive wear due to cold welding during the forging process. Laser dispersing offers at this point a great potential to fabricate protective layers or tracks with tailored properties that reduce abrasive or adhesive wear at the surface of highly stressed components. Using different process strategies, four metal ceramic compounds applied on two substrate geometries were investigated regarding their structural and mechanical properties and their performance level. The subsequent forging tests have pointed out a positive effect and less adhesive residuals on the laser dispersed tool surface.

  12. A correlation between abrasion resistance and other properties of some acrylic resins used in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Handley, R W

    1979-01-01

    This investigation studies the relationship of hardness, elastic modulus and scratch width as dependent variables to the abrasion resistance of twenty-three dental acrylic resins. The multiple correlation R, when all three variables are used as predictors, is 0.727. Because of the significant intercorrelations between the variables themselves a stepwise multiple regression analysis showed hardness as a redundant variable. Abrasive wear can be estimated from the following equation Abrasive wear = 806.1 - 0.1498 modulus + 0.681 scratch width (R = 0.725; standard deviation of estimate +/- 50.8) The deletion of scratch width does not appreciably reduce the standard deviation of the estimate: Abrasive wear = 1063.4 - 0.2055 modulus (r = 0.683; standard deviation of estimate +/- 50.3) The method of curing the specimens conformed to the respective manufacturers' instructions. Abrasion and scratch tests were performed using methods developed by the authors and previously described in the literature, whereas the hardness and elastic modulus results were devised from standard test procedures. Further research is currently in progress to improve the predictive power of abrasion resistance with additional new variables. PMID:429382

  13. Abrasion protection in process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, J.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

  14. Effect of surface hardness on the wear resistance of steel 40Kh under hydroabrasive wear

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor'ev, E.S.

    1984-03-01

    This article presents equations which can be used in the selection of optimal correlations of the hardness of the surface layer of steel 40Kh and the abrasive filler in the design and manufacture of components of oil-well equipment operating under conditions of hydroabrasive wear. An experiment was conducted to determine the relation of the surface hardness of steel 40Kh to wear resistance under hydroabrasive wear in a slurry stream. The test conditions were: velocity of the hydroabrasive stream of 15 m/sec, abrasive concentration in the slurry of 50 g/liter, quartz abrasive sand from the Karadag sand pit with a grain size of 0.2-0.315 mm and microhardness of 11,000 N/mm/sup 2/, medium of technical water, and test duration of 5 h. It is determined that the approximation of the relation of the amount of wear of steel 40Kh to the surface hardness by means of a curvilinearregression equation makes it possible to determine more accurately the nature and amount of wear of steel 40Kh under hydorabrasive wear in a slurry stream.

  15. Abrasion resistant composition

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  16. Linear abrasion of a titanium superhydrophobic surface prepared by ultrafast laser microtexturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Adam; Nayak, Barada K.; Davis, Alexander; Gupta, Mool C.; Loth, Eric

    2013-11-01

    A novel method of fabricating titanium superhydrophobic surfaces by ultrafast laser irradiation is reported. The ultrafast laser irradiation creates self-organized microstructure superimposed with nano-scale roughness, after which a fluoropolymer coating is applied to lower the surface energy of the textured surface and achieve superhydrophobicity. The focus of this study is to investigate abrasion effects on this mechanically durable superhydrophobic surface. The mechanical durability is analyzed with linear abrasion testing and microscopy imaging. Linear abrasion tests indicate that these surfaces can resist complete microstructure failure up to 200 abrasion cycles and avoid droplet pinning up to ten abrasion cycles at 108.4 kPa applied pressure, which roughly corresponds to moderate to heavy sanding or rubbing in the presence of abrasive particles. The wear mechanisms are also investigated and the primary mechanism for this system is shown to be abrasive wear with fatigue by repeated plowing. Although these results demonstrate an advancement in mechanical durability over the majority of existing superhydrophobic surfaces, it exemplifies the challenge in creating superhydrophobic surfaces with suitable mechanical durability for harsh applications, even when using titanium.

  17. Design of an impact abrasion testing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Beeley, P. R.; Baker, A. J.

    1994-04-01

    By using a cam-flat follower-impact shaft with a crank-flat rotating anvil system, the machine to be described can create various impact abrasion conditions to simulate a large range of industrial situations encountered in this field. The main features of the machine are the long working life of the flat rotating anvil, which works in the same way as that of the disk in a pin-on-disk wear tester, and the accurate control of both the impact energy delivered to the specimen and the total sliding distance of the specimen on the anvil. Statistical analysis of test results on the machine with EN24 steel and cast high manganese steel shows that the uncertainty of the population mean is within +/- 4.7% of the sample mean under a 95% confidence level of student distribution, which indicates a very good accuracy of test.

  18. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  19. Effect of resin monomer composition on toothbrush wear resistance.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Iwami, Y; Ebisu, S

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the toothbrush abrasion resistance of seven different experimental resins which were made by changing the composition of resin monomers. The experimental resins were made by mixing four kinds of dental resin monomers (Bis-GMA, UDMA, TMPT and TEGDMA), camphorquinone (1 wt%), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (2 wt%) and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (0.05 wt%). The resin specimens were stored in air for 2 weeks, and then put on a toothbrush abrasion testing machine. After 100000 strokes, the wear loss of each specimen was determined by weight change during the wear test. TMPT-TEGDMA resin showed the most wear resistance, while Bis-GMA- and UDMA-based resins showed increased wear resistance with an increased content of TEGDMA. Also, a inverse relationship between the microhardness number and the amount of wear of the respective resins was confirmed. PMID:9610853

  20. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-02-01

    Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  1. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  2. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016. PMID:25980530

  3. FPGA-based fused smart-sensor for tool-wear area quantitative estimation in CNC machine inserts.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used. PMID:22319304

  4. FPGA-Based Fused Smart-Sensor for Tool-Wear Area Quantitative Estimation in CNC Machine Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used. PMID:22319304

  5. Process Monitoring Evaluation and Implementation for the Wood Abrasive Machining Process

    PubMed Central

    Saloni, Daniel E.; Lemaster, Richard L.; Jackson, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading. PMID:22163477

  6. Dental abrasion as a cutting process.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter W; Wagner, Mark; Al-Fadhalah, Khaled; Almusallam, Abdulwahab S; Michael, Shaji; Thai, Lidia A; Strait, David S; Swain, Michael V; van Casteren, Adam; Renno, Waleed M; Shekeban, Ali; Philip, Swapna M; Saji, Sreeja; Atkins, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    A mammalian tooth is abraded when a sliding contact between a particle and the tooth surface leads to an immediate loss of tooth tissue. Over time, these contacts can lead to wear serious enough to impair the oral processing of food. Both anatomical and physiological mechanisms have evolved in mammals to try to prevent wear, indicating its evolutionary importance, but it is still an established survival threat. Here we consider that many wear marks result from a cutting action whereby the contacting tip(s) of such wear particles acts akin to a tool tip. Recent theoretical developments show that it is possible to estimate the toughness of abraded materials via cutting tests. Here, we report experiments intended to establish the wear resistance of enamel in terms of its toughness and how friction varies. Imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to assess the damage involved. Damage ranged from pure plastic deformation to fracture with and without lateral microcracks. Grooves cut with a Berkovich diamond were the most consistent, suggesting that the toughness of enamel in cutting is 244 J m(-2), which is very high. Friction was higher in the presence of a polyphenolic compound, indicating that this could increase wear potential. PMID:27274807

  7. Three-Body Abrasion Testing Using Lunar Dust Simulants to Evaluate Surface System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Budinski, Kenneth G.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Klaus, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous unexpected operational issues relating to the abrasive nature of lunar dust, such as scratched visors and spacesuit pressure seal leaks, were encountered during the Apollo missions. To avoid reoccurrence of these unexpected detrimental equipment problems on future missions to the Moon, a series of two- and three-body abrasion tests were developed and conducted in order to begin rigorously characterizing the effect of lunar dust abrasiveness on candidate surface system materials. Two-body scratch tests were initially performed to examine fundamental interactions of a single particle on a flat surface. These simple and robust tests were used to establish standardized measurement techniques for quantifying controlled volumetric wear. Subsequent efforts described in the paper involved three-body abrasion testing designed to be more representative of actual lunar interactions. For these tests, a new tribotester was developed to expose samples to a variety of industrial abrasives and lunar simulants. The work discussed in this paper describes the three-body hardware setup consisting of a rotating rubber wheel that applies a load on a specimen as a loose abrasive is fed into the system. The test methodology is based on ASTM International (ASTM) B611, except it does not mix water with the abrasive. All tests were run under identical conditions. Abraded material specimens included poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), hardened 1045 steel, 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and 1018 steel. Abrasives included lunar mare simulant JSC- 1A-F (nominal size distribution), sieved JSC-1A-F (<25 m particle diameter), lunar highland simulant NU-LHT-2M, alumina (average diameter of 50 m used per ASTM G76), and silica (50/70 mesh used per ASTM G65). The measured mass loss from each specimen was converted using standard densities to determine total wear volume in cm3. Abrasion was dominated by the alumina and the simulants were only similar to the silica (i.e., sand) on the softer materials of

  8. Friction and Wear Behavior of 30CrMnSiA Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Sheng-guan; Lai, Fu-qiang; Wang, Guang-hong; Yuan, Zhi-min; Li, Xiao-qiang; Guo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The friction and wear properties of 30CrMnSiA steel were investigated at elevated temperature from 100 to 600 °C. Thereafter, the wear debris and worn surfaces were examined to understand the wear mechanisms. The remained debris with relatively high hardness created three-body abrasion at lower temperatures (100-300 °C). Abrasive wear prevailed at the conditions with high friction coefficients and wear rates. A significant change in friction and wear behavior occurred at 400 °C. At the temperature of 400 °C, oxidation induced mild wear was found because of the formation of load-bearing oxide film. Both the friction coefficients and wear rates of the steel were lowest at 400 °C. At the temperatures of 500-600 °C, a mild-to-severe wear transition occurred which resulted in an increase in the friction coefficients and wear rates of the steel. This is related to the decrease in the strength of matrix and hardness of worn surfaces and subsurfaces. The predominant wear mechanism is considered to be severe abrasive, adhesive wear and a fatigue delamination of the oxide film.

  9. Friction and wear behaviors of compacted graphite iron with different biomimetic units fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Na; Shan, Hongyu; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Darong; Li, Xiaoyan; Xia, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-07-01

    Mimicking the biological characters on the cuticles of pangolin scales, biomimetic units were fabricated on the surfaces of compacted graphite cast iron (CGI) with different unit materials using laser cladding process. The influences of various unit materials including TiC, WC, B4C and Al2O3 powders on the friction and wear behaviors of CGI were investigated. The wear resistance mechanism of biomimetic specimens was discussed. The results indicated that the wear resistance of biomimetic specimens cladding TiC was the best; the specimens cladding WC or B4C were in the middle; and the specimens cladding Al2O3 was the worst. The sequence of friction coefficient values of biomimetic specimens cladding different ceramic powders from high to low was B4C, TiC, WC and Al2O3. The wear mechanism of untreated specimen was mainly adhesion wear, abrasive wear as well as the oxidation wear, whereas the adhesive wear and abrasive wear was the main wear mechanism of the regions of substrate in biomimetic specimens and slight adhesion, abrasive wear and fatigue wear on the regions of biomimetic units.

  10. The nature of surfaces and their influence in wear mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The wear of materials is strongly dependent upon the nature of the solid surfaces in contact, their properties and the nature of their films. Oxide films, orientation, crystal transformations, adhesive binding, crystal structure, hardness, and the presence of alloying agents are all shown to affect one or more of the forms of wear. The three most common forms of wear, adhesive, abrasive, and corrosive, are discussed in terms of the way each is affected by various material properties. Results presented indicate how wear can be optimized by concern for properties of materials.

  11. Ultra-short Pulse Laser Structuring of Molding Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Richter, Lars

    The machining of highly filled abrasive polymer plastics in injection molding processes determines high resistant tools in the industrial production. One of the most important points is a long durability of the molding tools to reduce the costs of production. Thus, the adhesion force and abrasion will be reduced with the help of defined surface properties. To achieve appropriate surface conditions, an ultra-short pulse laser is used for a micro structuring. Additional a laser polishing of the micro-structured surfaces to optimize the frictional properties is presented. This paper shows the research results of investigations on the laser modification of steel surfaces, to generate high-quality and wear-resistant surfaces for injection molding tools.

  12. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  13. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  14. Eye Wear

    MedlinePlus

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  15. Abrasion-resistant antireflective coating for polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Following plasma-polymerization technique, treatment in oxygen glow discharge further enhances abrasion resistance and transmission. Improvement in abrasion resistance was shown by measuring percentage of haze resulting from abrasion. Coating samples were analyzed for abrasion using standard fresh rubber eraser. Other tests included spectra measurements and elemental analysis with spectrometers and spectrophotometers.

  16. A nonmineralized approach to abrasion-resistant biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Pontin, Michael G.; Moses, Dana N.; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-01-01

    The tooth-like mouthparts of some animals consist of biomacromolecular scaffolds with few mineral components, making them intriguing paradigms of biostructural materials. In this study, the abrasion resistance of the jaws of one such animal, the bloodworm Glycera dibranchiata, has been evaluated by nanoindentation, nanoscratching, and wear testing. The hardest, stiffest, and most abrasion-resistant materials are found within a thin (<3 μm) surface layer near the jaw tip and a thicker (10–20 μm) subsurface layer, both rich in unmineralized Cu. These results are consistent with the supposition that Cu ions are involved in the formation of intermolecular coordination complexes between proteins, creating a highly cross-linked molecular network. The intervening layer contains aligned atacamite [Cu2(OH)3Cl] fibers and exhibits hardness and stiffness (transverse to the alignment direction) that are only slightly higher than those of the bulk material but lower than those of the two Cu-rich layers. Furthermore, the atacamite-containing layer is the least abrasion-resistant, by a factor of ≈3, even relative to the bulk material. These observations are broadly consistent with the behavior of engineering polymer composites with hard fiber or particulate reinforcements. The alignment of fibers parallel to the jaw surface, and the fiber proximity to the surface, are both suggestive of a natural adaptation to enhance bending stiffness and strength rather than to endow the surface regions with enhanced abrasion resistance. PMID:17702868

  17. Surface carbonization of titanium for abrasion-resistant implant materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuhe; Watari, Fumio

    2007-03-01

    Carbide layer was formed on the surface of Ti by heating in hydrocarbon atmosphere (benzene C6H6) at 1000-1400 degrees C using a high frequency induction heating method. Physical and mechanical properties of carbide-coated Ti were investigated to examine its potential as an abrasion-resistant implant material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the surface of Ti was covered with fine grains of 1-4 microm diameter, depending on heating conditions. In addition, carbide layer of about 1-25 microm thickness was observed on the cross-section of specimens by SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Vickers hardness of surface carbide was found to be more than 2000. Further, Martens scratch test and ultrasonic scaler abrasion test showed that the indentation depth and width of carbide-coated Ti were much smaller than pure Ti, thereby confirming its high abrasion resistance. These results showed that for Ti implant materials that require high abrasion resistance, such as the abutment for dental implants, surface carbide coatings would be an effective means to improve their wear properties. PMID:17621941

  18. Backside wear in modern total knee designs.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Furman, Bridgette D; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-02-01

    Although modularity affords various options to the orthopedic surgeon, these benefits come at a price. The unintended bearing surface between the back surface of the tibial insert and the metallic tray results in micromotion leading to polyethylene wear debris. The objective of this study was to examine the backside wear of tibial inserts from three modern total knee designs with very different locking mechanisms: Insall-Burstein II (IB II), Optetrak, and Advance. A random sample of 71 inserts were obtained from our institution's retrieval collection and examined to assess the extent of wear, depth of wear, and wear damage modes. Patient records were also obtained to determine patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and reason for revision. Modes of wear damage (abrasion, burnishing, scratching, delamination, third body debris, surface deformation, and pitting) were then scored in each zone from 0 to 3 (0 = 0%, 1 = 0-10%, 2 = 10-50%, and 3 = >50%). The depth of wear was subjectively identified as removal of manufacturing identification markings stamped onto the inferior surface of the polyethylene. Both Advance and IB II polyethylene inserts showed significantly higher scores for backside wear than the Optetrak inserts. All IB II and Advance implants showed evidence of backside wear, whereas 17% (5 out of 30) of the retrieved Optetrak implants had no observable wear. There were no significant differences when comparing the depth of wear score between designs. The locking mechanism greatly affects the propensity for wear and should be considered when choosing a knee implant system. PMID:18751767

  19. Mobile-bearing knees reduce rotational asymmetric wear.

    PubMed

    Ho, Fang-Yuan; Ma, Hon-Ming; Liau, Jiann-Jong; Yeh, Chuan-Ren; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2007-09-01

    Polyethylene wear of bearing components is the most common long-term complication in total knee arthroplasty. One would anticipate differing kinematics would generate different wear patterns (including wear type, degree, and symmetry) on the articulating surface of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing inserts. Because mobile-bearing designs facilitate movement of the insert relative to the tray when the knee rotates, we hypothesized mobile-bearing designs would reduce the incidence of rotational asymmetric wear. We examined 51 worn tibial inserts, including 15 from mobile-bearing rotating-platform posterior-cruciate-sacrificing dished prostheses and 36 from fixed-bearing posterior-cruciate-retaining flat prostheses, which were retrieved at revision surgery with an average implantation time of 115 months. We divided wear types into low-grade wear (burnishing, abrasion, and cold flow) and high-grade wear (scratching, pitting, metal embedding, and delamination) to assess wear degree of polyethylene. To assess symmetry of wear, the insert surface was divided into medial and lateral sides and each side was further divided into three equal zones along the anteroposterior direction. Low-grade wear was more common in mobile-bearing knees, whereas high-grade wear was more common in fixed-bearing knees. We identified no internal/external rotational asymmetric wear or anteroposterior asymmetric wear in mobile-bearing knees. PMID:17483732

  20. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  1. Abrasives in snuff?

    PubMed

    Dahl, B L; Stølen, S O; Oilo, G

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and calculate the inorganic contents of four brands of snuff. Visual inspection of wet snuff showed fairly large, yellow crystal-like particles. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dispersive (EDX) analyses were used to study both wet snuff and ashes of snuff, whereas light emission spectrography was used to determine elements in the ashes. The crystal-like particles did not dissolve in distilled water or in ethanol heated to 60 degrees C. EDX analyses showed that most elements remained in the particles after washing. The total weight percentage of inorganic material in snuff was calculated after burning dried snuff until constant weight was obtained. The ashes of snuff did not contain any crystal-like particles but consisted of a small-grained amorphous mass. The following elements were detected: Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Si, Sr, Ti, Va, and Zr. Other elements such as rare earths were not searched for. The weight percentage of inorganic elements ranged between 12.35 +/- 0.69 and 20.95 +/- 0.81. Provided snuff is used in the same manner as chewing tobacco, and some people admit to doing so, there is a risk that its relatively high contents of inorganic material and heavily soluble salts may be conducive to excessive abrasion of teeth and restorations. PMID:2782061

  2. A comparison of the tribological behaviour of Y-TZP in tea and coffee under micro-abrasion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, S.; Stack, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    The micro-abrasion of Y-TZP, a candidate dental restorative material, was investigated in a range of caffeine-containing solutions which included tea and coffee. Additions of sugar and milk were used to test the effects of viscosity and pH on the wear rate. The results indicated a significant increase in wear rate in the various solutions, with some correlation between wear rate and increases in viscosity and this was linked to enhance particle entrainment in the more viscous solutions. The generally lower wear rate in tea compared to coffee was associated with a longer ageing period in this solution before uniform wear was observed. Micro-abrasion maps were used to characterize the differences in performance for the material in the environments studied.

  3. Dental wear, wear rate, and dental disease in the African apes.

    PubMed

    Elgart, Alison A

    2010-06-01

    The African apes possess thinner enamel than do other hominoids, and a certain amount of dentin exposure may be advantageous in the processing of tough diets eaten by Gorilla. Dental wear (attrition plus abrasion) that erodes the enamel exposes the underlying dentin and creates additional cutting edges at the dentin-enamel junction. Hypothetically, efficiency of food processing increases with junction formation until an optimal amount is reached, but excessive wear hinders efficient food processing and may lead to sickness, reduced fecundity, and death. Occlusal surfaces of molars and incisors in three populations each of Gorilla and Pan were videotaped and digitized. The quantity of incisal and molar occlusal dental wear and the lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were measured in 220 adult and 31 juvenile gorilla and chimpanzee skulls. Rates of dental wear were calculated in juveniles by scoring the degree of wear between adjacent molars M1 and M2. Differences were compared by principal (major) axis analysis. ANOVAs compared means of wear amounts. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the relationship between molar wear and incidence of dental disease. Results indicate that quantities of wear are significantly greater in permanent incisors and molars and juvenile molars of gorillas compared to chimpanzees. The lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were predominantly suboptimal. Western lowland gorillas have the highest quantities of wear and the most molars with suboptimal wear. The highest rates of wear are seen in Pan paniscus and Pan t. troglodytes, and the lowest rates are found in P.t. schweinfurthii and G. g. graueri. Among gorillas, G. b. beringei have the highest rates but low amounts of wear. Coefficients between wear and dental disease were low, but significant when all teeth were combined. Gorilla teeth are durable, and wear does not lead to mechanical senescence in this sample. PMID:20077466

  4. A Study on Tactile Friction and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugishita, Junji; Usami, Hatsuhiko; Hattori, Tomokazu

    The tactile wear (“tezure” in Japanese) is an abrasion phenomenon of material surfaces caused by the contact of human hand over a long period of time. Though this phenomenon has been the focus of various articles, an extensive study with regard to the wear characteristics is of a profound importance. To date, we have several remarkable examples such as the statue of Pindola Bharadvaja (Buddhist) and the St. Peter statue (Christian). Followers of the respective religions who are deeply attached and rooted have been touching the statues as part of their rituals for many generations over centuries. In this study, an attempt is done to verify the friction and wear characteristics of various soft metals with contact of human finger. The results of our experiments show that the friction coefficient upon the contact of the human finger and pure copper are very high and thus proving tactile wear of soft metals can be generated easily.

  5. Wear-resistant polytetrafluoroethylene via electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, T.A.; Peng, Y.L.

    1996-06-01

    The sliding wear and friction behavior of irradiation-modified PTFE (by 10 MeV electrons in ambient air) against polished stainless steel is studied. Steady-state wear rate is shown to decrease monotonically by more than three orders of magnitude as the dose of the irradiation is increased from 0 to 30 Mrad. Friction initially increases with increasing dose, reaching a miximum value at 5 Mrad, then decreases with subsequent increases in dose, attaining a value similar to that of unirradiated PTFE at 30 Mrad. Hardness monotonically increases with increasing dose; however, irradiated PTFE was not found to abrasively damage the steel countersurface as many wear-resistant particle-filled PTFE composites do. Wear reduction is accomplished as debris production transforms from that of numerous large plate-like debris for unirradiated PTFE to that of very fine debris for irradiated PTFE. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Wear Modalities and Mechanisms of the Mining Non-asbestos Composite Brake Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiusheng; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Zhencai; Tong, Minming; Lu, Yuhao; Peng, Yuxing

    2013-08-01

    The mining brake material is generally made of composite materials and its wear has important influences on the braking performance of disc brakes. In order to improve the braking reliability of mine hoisters, this paper did some tribological investigations on the mining brake material to reveal its wear modalities and mechanisms. The mining non-asbestos brake shoe and 16Mn steel were selected as braking pairs and tested on a pad-on-disc friction tester. And a SEM was used to observe the worn surface of the brake shoe. It is shown that the non-asbestos brake material has mainly five wear modalities: adhesive wear, abrasive wear, cutting wear, fatigue wear and high heat wear. At the front period of a single braking the wear modality is mainly composed of some light mechanical wear such as abrasive, cutting and point adhesive. With the temperature rising at the back period it transforms to some heavy mechanical wear such as piece adhesive and fatigue. While in several repeated brakings once the surface temperature rises beyond the thermal-decomposition point of the bonding material, the strong destructive high heat wear takes leading roles on the surface. And a phenomenon called friction catastrophe (FC) occurs easily, which as a result causes a braking failure. It is considered that the friction heat has important influences on the wear modalities of the brake material. And the reduction of friction heat must be an effective technical method for decreasing wear and avoiding braking failures.

  7. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  8. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  9. A Laser Processing Technique for Improving the Wear Resistance of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, J. D.; Schaefer, R. J.; Robey, W. P.

    1981-08-01

    This paper describes a process whereby the surface of a wide variety of metals and alloys can be impregnated with hard, wear-resisting particles. In experiments to date, particles of TiC or WC have been injected into thin laser melted surface layers of iron, nickel, titanium, aluminum, and copper base alloys. Many other metal/particle combinations appear to be feasible, for the only fundamental limitation on the process evident to date is that the metal must not exhibit an excessive vapor pressure under the conditions of laser melting. Despite the wide range of alloy compositions experimented with, the processing conditions necessary to achieve good volume fractions of carbide are surprisingly constant. This similarity in processing conditions results in part from carrying out the carbide injection under soft vacuum conditions, thus eliminating oxidation problems without introducing problems associated with the use of shielding gases. Work in progress1 has demonstrated that several of the metal/carbide combinations produced to date exhibit good resistance to abrasive wear. It is expected that resistance to most other types of wear will also be good. Preliminary results suggest that in addition to applications involving the production of wear-resisting metal surfaces, the process may be suited to the manufacture of carbide hardened cutting tools. Furthermore, the simplicity of the process recommends it for surface alloying applications.

  10. Effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Sun, Jialin; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Yayun; Chen, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    In cutting of stainless steel with coated tool, the steel chip adhering to tool surface is usually severe and consequently causes serious adhesive and frictional problems, which is the major reason for the failure of coated tool. To solve the problem, a surface engineering approach, namely, a highly functionalization of tool surfaces by textures may be of great importance. Thus, the effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting was investigated. For this purpose, two types of surface textures were fabricated on the rake faces of WC/Co carbide tools: (i) micro-scale textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser, (ii) micro/nano-scales textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser and femtosecond laser. Then, these textured tools were deposited with TiAlN coatings using cathode arc-evaporation technique. Wet cutting experiments were carried out with the micro-scale textured coated tool (MCT), micro/nano-scale textured coated tool (MNCT), and the conventional coated tool (CCT). Results obtained in this work demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating micro- or micro/nano-scale textures on tools substrate surfaces to improve the anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tool. The rake face micro/nano-scale textured tool was the most effective. Moreover, mechanisms for the anti-adhesive properties enhancement were proposed.

  11. The Relationship between the Microstructure and Abrasive Resistance of a Hardfacing Alloy in the Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, E. O.; Alcântara, N. G.; Tecco, D. G.; Kumar, R. V.

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between abrasive wear resistance and microstructure of a hardfacing alloy based on the Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V system was investigated. This material was developed for cladding, by an open arc welding technique, of components subjected to severe abrasive wear. The work undertaken included the solidification study, microstructural characterization, and abrasion testing. Microstructural examinations of hardfaced layer showed that the microstructure of the alloy consisted of a large volume fraction of primary niobium carbides randomly dispersed in a metastable austenitic matrix containing fine M3C carbides and “islands” of eutectic mixture of γ/M7C3. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis results showed that V preferentially partitioned into the NbC and M3C phases. In comparison with the conventional high carbon/high chromium hardfacing alloy with higher hardness, a Fe-Cr-C-Nb-V hardfacing alloy exhibited improved abrasive wear resistance and a microstructure with higher toughness.

  12. The lexicon of polyethylene wear in artificial joints.

    PubMed

    McKellop, Harry A

    2007-12-01

    The analysis of wear on polyethylene components that have been retrieved after use in patients has provided invaluable understanding of how wear occurs in vivo, and how it may be minimized through improved materials and implant design. The great number of such studies that have been published over the past three decades has lead to an extensive vocabulary to describe the tribology of prosthetic joints. However, these also have led to some confusion, due to the occasional misuse of terms from classical tribology, along with the use of multiple terms to describe the same wear phenomenon, and vice versa. The author has proposed that our understanding of wear in artificial joints may be enhanced by recognizing that there are four general subject areas: Modes, Mechanisms, Damage and Debris. Wear Mode 1 occurs when the two bearing surfaces are articulating against each other in the manner intended by the implant designer. Mode 2 occurs when a bearing surface articulates against a non-bearing surface. Mode 3 occurs when third-body abrasive particles have become entrapped between the two bearing surfaces, and Mode 4 occurs when two non-bearing surfaces are wearing against each other. The least wear occurs in Mode 1, whereas severe wear typically occurs in Modes 2, 3 and 4. The classical wear mechanisms that apply to prosthetic joints include adhesion, abrasion and fatigue. These can occur in varying amounts in either of the four wear modes. As used in the literature for the past three decades, wear "damage" can best be defined as the change surface texture or morphology that is caused by the action of the wear mechanisms. Although a wide variety of terms have been used, an overview of the literature indicates that about eight terms have been sufficient to describe the types of damage that occur on retrieved polyethylene components, i.e., burnishing, abrasion, scratches, plastic deformation, cracks, pits, delamination, and embedded third bodies. The author suggests that, as

  13. Friction Stir Welding of HSLA-65 Steel: Part II. The Influence of Weld Speed and Tool Material on the Residual Stress Distribution and Tool Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuwer, A.; Barnes, S. J.; Altenkirch, J.; Johnson, R.; Withers, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    A set of single pass full penetration friction stir bead-on-plate and butt welds in HSLA-65 steel were produced using a range of traverse speeds (50 to 500 mm/min) and two tool materials (W-Re and PCBN). Part I described the influence of process and tool parameters on the microstructure in the weld region. This article focuses on the influence of these parameters on residual stress, but the presence of retained austenite evident in the diffraction pattern and X-ray tomographic investigations of tool material depositions are also discussed. The residual stress measurements were made using white beam synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). The residual stresses are affected by the traverse speed as well as the weld tool material. While the peak residual stress at the tool shoulders remained largely unchanged (approximately equal to the nominal yield stress (450 MPa)) irrespective of weld speed or tool type, for the W-Re welds, the width of the tensile section of the residual stress profile decreased with increasing traverse speed (thus decreasing line energy). The effect of increasing traverse speed on the width of the tensile zone was much less pronounced for the PCBN tool material.

  14. Microstructure and abrasion resistance of plasma sprayed titania coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctibor, P.; Neufuss, K.; Chraska, P.

    2006-12-01

    Agglomerated titania nanopowder and a “classical” titania were sprayed by the high throughput water-stabilized plasma (WSP) and thoroughly compared. Optical microscopy with image analysis as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for quantification of porosity. Results indicate that the “nano” coatings in general exhibit finer pores than coatings of the “conventional” micron-sized powders. Mechanical properties such as Vickers microhardness and slurry abrasion response were measured and linked to the structural investigation. Impact of the variation in the slurry composition on wear resistance of tested coatings and on character of the wear damage is discussed. The overall results, however, suggest that the “nano” coatings properties are better only for carefully selected sets of spraying parameters, which seem to have a very important impact.

  15. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  16. Effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, mechanical and wear behaviors of AISI H13 hot work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneshlou, Mahdi; Meshinchi Asl, Kaveh; Khomamizadeh, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of low temperature (subzero) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of H13 hot work tool steel. Cryogenic treatment at -72 °C and deep cryogenic treatment at -196 °C were applied and it was found that by applying the subzero treatments, the retained austenite was transformed to martensite. As the temperature was decreased more retained austenite was transformed to martensite and it also led to smaller and more uniform martensite laths distributed in the microstructure. The deep cryogenic treatment also resulted in precipitation of more uniform and very fine carbide particles. The microstructural modification resulted in a significant improvement on the mechanical properties of the H13 tool steel.

  17. [Grinding of titanium. 1. Commercial and experimental wheels made of silicon carbide abrasives].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Shiokawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Tamura, H

    1990-01-01

    Cast titanium was ground with commercial and experimental wheels made of silicon carbide abrasives, and their grinding performance was investigated. With the vitrified wheels made of the GC abrasive, at a higher the wheel circumferential speed and heavier the grinding pressure, the cutting rate was greater, accompanied by violent wear of the wheel. Being independent of the wheel speed, the grinding ratio reached about 1 under pressure heavier than 100 gf. The MgO-MgCl2-bonded wheels of the C abrasive exhibited a similar tendency. The manner in which the wheel was moved over the work during grinding proved to be very important, compared with the Ni-Cr alloy as reported previously. Only depression of the wheel against the work resulted in chemical attrition of the abrasive and discoloration of the work surface, or grinding burn, due to oxidation of titanium. Even when the wheel was moved over the work, chip-formation process of the cutting edge was far from ideal, and the work surface was contaminated due to reaction of titanium with the abrasive. At a higher wheel circumferential speed, more chips were loaded or built-up in the wheel and strongly rubbed the work surface, resulting in violent wear of the wheel; loading and dislodging of such chips were repeated. PMID:2134811

  18. Cover and Erosion Asymmetry in Saltation-Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. P.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion in bedrock-floored rivers is both driven and limited by the amount of sediment transported along the bed. Some sediment boosts wear rates, whereas too much generates a protective cover. This phenomenon determines the shape of river channels in a variety of landscapes and limits how fast they evolve. Here we reevaluate data from a well-known bedrock wear experiment to throw new light on how the saltation-abrasion process. Instead of a symmetric form for erosion versus sediment flux relative to transport capacity, we find the erosion rate peak shifts towards lower sediment fluxes when blocking of oblique saltation trajectories is taken into account. The theoretical context for this reevaluation is a cover-saltation-abrasion model, based on queueing theory (QT), for bedload transport over a planar bedrock bed. The QT approach provides some clarity in the stochastic treatment of granular impacts and cover, and generates closed-form solutions for wear rate in terms of sediment flux and simplified saltation geometry. Applied to the Sklar & Dietrich (2001) experiments in a very small recirculating flume, the two-parameter QT model fits the observed relation between erosion rate and sediment load, infers sediment flux as a function of load, admits non-negligible wear rates for a mean sediment depth of one grain, i.e., for full cover on average, but also suggests that bedrock erosion is blocked at >=50% instantaneous cover. The QT model makes testable predictions for future laboratory experiments and highlights the need for specific improvements in more comprehensive treatments of bedrock erosion and cover.

  19. Dry sliding wear behavior of Al 2219/SiCp-Gr hybrid metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavarajappa, S.; Chandramohan, G.; Mukund, K.; Ashwin, M.; Prabu, M.

    2006-12-01

    The dry sliding wear behavior of Al 2219 alloy and Al 2219/SiCp/Gr hybrid composites are investigated under similar conditions. The composites are fabricated using the liquid metallurgy technique. The dry sliding wear test is carried out for sliding speeds up to 6 m/s and for normal loads up to 60 N using a pin on disc apparatus. It is found that the addition of SiCp and graphite reinforcements increases the wear resistance of the composites. The wear rate decreases with the increase in SiCp reinforcement content. As speed increases, the wear rate decreases initially and then increases. The wear rate increases with the increase in load. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of the worn surface are used to predict the nature of the wear mechanism. Abrasion is the principle wear mechanism for the composites at low sliding speeds and loads. At higher loads, the wear mechanism changes to delamination.

  20. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  1. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were severely abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub-layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

  2. Brushing abrasion of eroded dentin after application of sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Zirkel, C; Hellwig, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of sodium fluoride solutions on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin. Dentin specimens were prepared from 60 bovine incisors. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin, ground flat, polished and subsequently covered with tape exposing an area of 1.8 mm x 10.0 mm in the center of the exposed dentin. The samples were alternatingly stored in a demineralizing solution (5 min) and a remineralizing solution (1 min) for 5 times. The erosive soft drink Sprite light(R) served as a demineralizing solution and artificial saliva was used as a remineralizing solution. Prior to storage in artificial saliva 15 specimens were each treated for 1 min with 250 and 2,000 ppm fluoride solution, respectively. Fifteen specimens were treated with distilled water instead of the fluoride solution (= eroded controls). The remaining samples were neither eroded with the soft drink nor fluoridated (= uneroded controls). After each immersion in artificial saliva the specimens were submitted to abrasion in a toothbrushing machine. After 5 demineralization-remineralization brushing cycles the total amount of tooth wear due to erosion and subsequent abrasion was profilometrically evaluated. Statistical analysis revealed the significantly lowest wear in the uneroded controls and the highest amount of abrasion in the eroded controls. Application of the fluoride solutions increased the wear resistance of the eroded dentin specimens, showing significantly better protection by the high-concentration compared to the low-concentration solution. The susceptibility to abrasion of the eroded dentin specimens treated with the high-concentration fluoride solution did not differ significantly from the uneroded dentin samples. It is concluded that application of 2,000 ppm sodium fluoride solutions immediately before toothbrushing significantly reduces abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro. PMID:9701659

  3. Anti-wear properties of Cr C and Ni Co alloy coatings as substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhang, Junyan

    2008-09-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Co, amorphous Cr-C alloy and nanocrystalline Cr-C coatings were electrodeposited from 'environmentally acceptable' electrolytes as potential substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings electrodeposited from noxious hexavalent chromium. The structure, morphology and hardness of coatings are investigated using a transmission electron microscope, a scanning electronic microscope and a Vickers hardness tester, respectively. Anti-wear properties are tested on a pin-on-plate vibrant wear tester. The correlation between the wear resistance, hardness, brittleness and the lubricated state is investigated. The results show that the wear behaviour of specimens significantly depends on their lubricated state, hardness and brittleness. Under the lubricated sliding condition, abrasive wear is the primary wear mechanism for all specimens. With respect to the abrasive wear mechanism, both the elastic and plastic deformations play important roles during the lubricated sliding process. Thus, the amorphous and nanocrystalline Cr-C alloy coatings, with both high brittleness and high hardness, exhibit a lower wear rate than the conventional Cr and Ni-Co coatings. On the other hand, under the dry sliding condition, the annealed Ni-Co coating, with an excellent compromise between high hardness and toughness, exhibits an abrasive wear mechanism and a relatively low wear rate; in contrast, the brittle Cr-matrix coatings exhibit a severe fatigue/delamination wear mechanism and high wear rate.

  4. NASA interdisciplinary collaboration in tribology. A review of oxidational wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, T. F. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth review of oxidational wear of metals is presented. Special emphasis is given to a description of the concept of oxidational wear and the formulation of an Oxidational Wear Theory. The parallelism between the formation of an oxide film for dry contact conditions and the formation of other surface films for a lubricated contact is discussed. The description of oxidational wear is prefaced with a unification of wear modes into two major classes of mild and severe wear including both lubricated and dry contacts. Oxidational wear of metals is a class of mild wear where protective oxide films are formed at real areas of contact and during the time of contact at temperataure T sub c. When the oxide reaches a critical thickness, frequently in the range of 1 to 3 microns, the oxide breaks up and eventually appears as a wear particle. These oxides are preferentially formed on plateaux which alternately carry the load as they reach their critical thickness and are removed. If the system is operated at elevated temperatures, thick oxides can form both out of contact and between the plateaux. Temperature is important in determining the structure of the oxide film present. Spinel oxide (Fe3O4) which forms above 300 C is more protective than the lower temperature rhomobohedral (alpha-Fe2O3) oxide which is abrasive. An Oxidational Wear Theory is derived using a modified Archard wear law expressed in terms of activation energy (Qp) and Arrhenius constant (Ap).

  5. Corrosion and wear resistance of chrome white irons—A correlation to their composition and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Baotong; Luo, Jingli; Chiovelli, Stefano

    2006-10-01

    The corrosion and wear resistances of a series of cast chromium white irons (CWIs) were evaluated using electrochemical and low stress sliding abrasion tests. The results show clearly that corrosion resistance of these materials is largely dependent on the quantity of chromium in the matrix, while wear resistance is mainly controlled by the volume fraction of chromium carbides. Based on theoretical analysis, a wear/corrosion performance map is established to identify alloy compositions that may be suited for erosion/corrosion conditions.

  6. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R.; Suan, T. Nguen

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  7. A study of the influence of cutting parameters on micromilling of steel with cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klocke, Fritz; Quito, Fernando; Arntz, Kristian; Souza, Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    It has been concluded in previous studies that Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) tools have greater wear resistance and superior tool life than other tool materials used in conventional milling, due to chemically stability at high temperatures, high abrasive wear resistance and high degree of hardness; however no research has been conducted about its performance on micro milling. Burr formation has a direct negative effect on product quality and assembly automation in micro milling, therefore adoption of machining strategies and influencing factors were investigated intending to reduce burr formation. This paper also aims at analyzing the interference of cutting parameters on micro milling with CBN tools, such as the influence of cutting speed and feed per tooth on the surface quality and tool life. These outcomes enable us to know which parameters and strategies must be used to achieve better results when micro milling steel with CBN tools.

  8. A fundamental review of the friction and wear behavior of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The basic concepts associated with the friction and wear of materials are discussed as they relate to ceramics. Properties of ceramics such as crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mechanical deformation, and surface chemistry are reviewed as they influence friction and wear. Both adhesive and abrasive wear of ceramics are discussed. The friction and wear of ceramics are examined in contact with themselves and when in contact with metals. The influences of environmental constituents such as water and hydrocarbons on friction and wear are reviewed. Materials discussed, by way of example, include aluminum oxide, rutile, calcium fluoride, and lithium fluoride.

  9. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  10. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar(Registered TradeMark), Vectran(Registered TradeMark), Orthofabric, and Tyvek(Registered TradeMark)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran(Registered TradeMark)) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek , the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek(Registered TradeMark). This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran(Registered TradeMark) and Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  11. The impact of layer thickness on the performance of additively manufactured lapping tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wesley B.

    2015-10-01

    Lower cost additive manufacturing (AM) machines which have emerged in recent years are capable of producing tools, jigs, and fixtures that are useful in optical fabrication. In particular, AM tooling has been shown to be useful in lapping glass workpieces. Various AM machines are distinguished by the processes, materials, build times, and build resolution they provide. This research investigates the impact of varied build resolution (specifically layer resolution) on the lapping performance of tools built using the stereolithographic assembly (SLA) process in 50 μm and 100 μm layer thicknesses with a methacrylate photopolymer resin on a high resolution desktop printer. As with previous work, the lapping tools were shown to remove workpiece material during the lapping process, but the tools themselves also experienced significant wear on the order of 2-3 times the mass loss of the glass workpieces. The tool wear rates for the 100 μm and 50 μm layer tools were comparable, but the 50 μm layer tool was 74% more effective at removing material from the glass workpiece, which is attributed to some abrasive particles being trapped in the coarser surface of the 100 um layer tooling and not being available to interact with the glass workpiece. Considering the tool wear, these additively manufactured tools are most appropriate for prototype tooling where the low cost (<$45) and quick turnaround make them attractive when compared to a machined tool.

  12. Two-body wear resistance of some indirect composite resins.

    PubMed

    Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Shabanian, Mitra; Anbari, Zahra

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two-body wear of five indirect composites and compare them with enamel. Signum, belleGlass HP, SR Adoro, Dialog, GC Gradia and enamel were formed into cylinders (n = 10). Two-body abrasive wear rates were determined using a porcelain disk and a pin on disk apparatus. The height and weight loss of the specimens were measured by stereomicroscope and digital scale. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests to determine significant differences (alpha = 0.05). GC Gradia showed significantly less wear resistance than the other materials. Enamel was more resistant than any of the tested composites. Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that the type of resin, filler size and method of polymerization could have affect the two-body abrasion resistance of indirect composites. PMID:21780731

  13. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for small skin specimens under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during emergency belly landing. A test apparatus consisting of a standard belt sander provided the sliding surface. Small test specimens constructed of aluminum, standard graphite-epoxy composite, aramid-epoxy composite, and toughened-resin composites were tested undar a range of pressures, belt velocities, and belt-surface textures. The effects of these test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. The effect of fiber orientation in the composite materials on wear rate was also investigated. In addition, tests were performed in which thermocouples were imbedded into the various test specimens to obtain temperature-time histories during abrasion.

  14. A rotary-airlock valve resists abrasive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Hill and Griffith (H and G, Cincinnati, Ohio) is a leading supplier of custom-blended additives to founderies. Thousands of tons of clay and carbon blends such as bentonite, gilsonite and pulverized coal, pass through the company's rotary-airlock feeding system each month. H and G's original rotary valves had cylinders lined with chrome, and closed-end rotors with tips made from nickel-chromium alloys. These valves remained in service for a maximum of only three months each. During that time, the abrasive mixtures passing through the valves virtually eroded them, increasing tolerances and causing significant air leakage. The leaks caused the pneumatic line to plug up, reducing the velocity of the line below the minimum level needed to carry any material. To overcome the leakage, a second blower was added to the system. This unit supplied an additional 40 brake hp to the pneumatic-conveying line. With constant maintenance of the valve and the continuous operation of both blowers, H and G was able to extend the valve's life by nine months. After 20 years of trying valves with various configuration, H and G installed a Smoot Type 6 rotary-airlock valve in September of 1985. The new valve's internals were made from abrasion-resistant grades of NiHard and Stellite. This combination of alloys prolonged the active life of the valve by improving its abrasion resistance. During its first year, the Smoot valve did not break down, leak air or require use of the secondary blower. After its first year of service no wear was found on the valve's internal surfaces. Another mechanical analysis was performed in 1991, after five additional years of valve operation. The valve, which had now handled more than 250,000 tons of product, showed minimal wear. H and G's capital costs had been reduced from 25[cents]/ton to 3[cents]/ton by the new valve.

  15. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  16. Wear and wear mechanism simulation of heavy-duty engine intake valve and seat inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.S.; Narasimhan, S.; Larson, J.M.; Schaefer, S.K.

    1998-02-01

    A silicon-chromium alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a cast iron insert produced in the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an iron-base chromium-nickel alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base alloy, cast iron, and nickel-base alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. The prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

  17. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1990-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, a swivel assembly for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and a tubular end section for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  18. Abrasive swivel assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Hashish, Mohamed; Marvin, Mark

    1989-01-01

    An abrasive swivel assembly for providing a rotating, particle-laden fluid stream and, ultimately, a rotating particle-laden fluid jet is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a tubular arrangement for providing a particle-free stream of fluid, means for rotating a section of the tubular arrangement, and means for introducing solid particles into the particle-free fluid stream at a point along the rotating tubular section, whereby to produce a particle-laden fluid stream. This last-mentioned stream can then be used in combination with a cooperating nozzle arrangement for providing a rotating particle-laden fluid jet. In an actual working embodiment, the fluid stream is of sufficiently high pressure so that the abrasive jet can be used as a cutting jet.

  19. [Composites versus amalgam: comparative measurements of abrasion resistance in vivo: 1-year results].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Lutz, F

    1979-03-01

    A method for the in-vivo measurement of wear resistance of restorative materials is described. A profilometer is used to record the reduction in vertical dimension of the test material's occlusal surface. This loss of substance is calculated as the wear resistance index. The technique was used in a 13 month clinical evaluation of 3 different restorative materials, Adaptic, Amalgam (Dispersalloy) and Estic microfill. The procedure is simple in execution and very accurate. Statistical analysis has shown significant differences in wear resistance of the examined materials independent of patient variation. Attrition and abrasion were definitely greater with a standard composite material (Adaptic) than with amalgam and a test composite (Estic microfill). The newly developed composite material utilizing extremely fine filler particles of pyrogenic SiO2 (Estic microfill) was shown to be comparable to amalgam in wear resistance during the 13-month test period. PMID:293032

  20. Abrasive resistance of arc sprayed carbonitride alloying self-shielded coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu; Yu, Shengfu; Xing, Shule; Huang, Linbing; Lu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    Wear-resistant coatings were prepared on the surface of the Q235 low-carbon steel plate by HVAS with the carbonitride alloying self-shielded flux-cored wire. Detection and analysis on the microstructure and properties of the coatings were carried out by using scanning electron microscope, microhardness tester and wear tester. The forming, the wear resistance and its mechanism of the coatings were studied. The results show that the coatings have good forming, homogeneous microstructure and compact structure. The coatings have good hardness, the average microhardness value reaches 520 HV 0.1, and the highest value is up to about 560 HV 0.1. As a result, the coatings have good abrasive wear performance and adhesion strength.

  1. CFD Based Erosion Modelling of Abrasive Waterjet Nozzle using Discrete Phase Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim Kamarudin, Naqib; Prasada Rao, A. K.; Azhari, Azmir

    2016-02-01

    In Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) machining, the nozzle is the most critical component that influences the performance, precision and economy. Exposure to a high speed jet and abrasives makes it susceptible to wear erosion which requires for frequent replacement. The present works attempts to simulate the erosion of the nozzle wall using computational fluid dynamics. The erosion rate of the nozzle was simulated under different operating conditions. The simulation was carried out in several steps which is flow modelling, particle tracking and erosion rate calculation. Discrete Phase Method (DPM) and K-ε turbulence model was used for the simulation. Result shows that different operating conditions affect the erosion rate as well as the flow interaction of water, air and abrasives. The simulation results correlates well with past work.

  2. Dental Surface Texture Characterization Based on Erosive Tooth Wear Processes.

    PubMed

    Hara, A T; Livengood, S V; Lippert, F; Eckert, G J; Ungar, P S

    2016-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of dental wear lesions affects their clinical management. We hypothesized that surface texture parameters can differentiate simulated erosion, abrasion, and erosion-abrasion lesions on human enamel and dentin. This in vitro study comprised 2 parts (both factorial 4 × 2), with 4 lesion types (erosion, abrasion, erosion-abrasion, and sound [no lesion; control]) and 2 substrates (enamel and dentin). Flattened/polished dental specimens were used in part 1, whereas natural dental surfaces were used in part 2. Testing surfaces were evaluated in blind conditions, using average surface roughness (Sa) and the following scale-sensitive fractal analysis parameters: area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc), exact proportion length-scale anisotropy of relief (eplsar), scale of maximum complexity (Smc), and textural fill volume (Tfv). Two-way analyses of variance, followed by Fisher's protected least significant difference tests (α = 0.05), were used to evaluate the effects of lesion and substrate. Classification trees were constructed to verify the strength of potential associations of the tested parameters. In part 1,Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates; only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion enamel lesions (allP< 0.05). The best association of parameters correctly classified up to 84% and 94% of the lesions on enamel and dentin, respectively. In part 2, only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates, whereas eplsar was able to differentiate erosion from erosion-abrasion (allP< 0.05). The association of parameters correctly classified up to 81% and 91% of the lesions in enamel and dentin, respectively.Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions, despite their complicated surface textures. The association of parameters improved the

  3. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior

  4. Abrasion resistance of restorative glass-ionomer cements with a light-cured surface coating.

    PubMed

    Hotta, M; Hirukawa, H

    1994-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the Knoop hardness number and the toothbrush wear of a surface coating agent applied to the surface of a glass-ionomer restorative cement. A reduction in surface hardness of the coating agent resulted in an increase in brush wear. The light-cured glazing agent (Bellfeel Brightener) proved to be significantly harder than those coated with a light-cured bonding agent (Occlusin). Occlusin bonding agent was removed by comparatively rapid abrasion; however, the Bellfeel Brightener was significantly more resistant to such abrasion. The analysis of the surface hardness and scanning electron microscopy observations of the brushed surfaces of the samples suggested that Bellfeel Brightener was effective as a glazing material for glass-ionomer cement restorations. PMID:8008609

  5. Determination of significant variables in compound wear using a statistical model

    SciTech Connect

    Pumwa, J.; Griffin, R.B.; Smith, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper will report on a study of dry compound wear of normalized 1018 steel on A2 tool steel. Compound wear is a combination of sliding and impact wear. The compound wear machine consisted of an A2 tool steel wear plate that could be rotated, and an indentor head that held the 1018 carbon steel wear pins. The variables in the system were the rpm of the wear plate, the force with which the indentor strikes the wear plate, and the frequency with which the indentor strikes the wear plate. A statistically designed experiment was used to analyze the effects of the different variables on the compound wear process. The model developed showed that wear could be reasonably well predicted using a defined variable that was called the workrate. The paper will discuss the results of the modeling and the metallurgical changes that occurred at the indentor interface, with the wear plate, during the wear process.

  6. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-12-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5-6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance.

  7. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance. PMID:26656260

  8. Development of intermetallic-hardened abrasion-resistant weld hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    School, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium and cobalt are strategic materials in the US and both are major constituents in many weld hardfacing alloys. Substitution for these materials or alternatives to their use was a primary direction of this investigation which was conducted in conjunction with the US Bureau of Mines. Minimization of the use of strategic materials was the criteria guiding the development of intermetallic-hardened abrasion resistant weld hardfacing materials. Other criteria were that the new alloy contain a hard intermetallic compound in an FCC matrix, and that these intermetallic compounds be stable at room temperature. A survey of ternary systems was made and the Fe-Mo-Ni system was selected to provide a basis for alloy development. Fe-Mo-Ni alloys synthesized by arc-melting and similar alloys made by welding possessed similar microstructures, a (Fe, Ni){sub 7}Mo{sub 6} intermetallic plus austenite eutectic in an austenitic matrix. These materials exhibited poor abrasive resistance. Silicon additions to the alloy promoted formation of a Laves phase FeMoSi intermetallic which helped increase the abrasive wear resistance. Through a series of alloy chemistry iterations a final composition of Fe-20Mo-15Ni-5Si was selected. Heat treatment of this alloy at 550 to 650 C caused second phase precipitation in the matrix and raised the hardness about 14 points HRC to 50 HRC. The alloy's wear rate, measured with the pin-on-drum abrasive wear test, was 6.3 to 6.5 mg/m. However this was twice the wear rate observed in commercial high-carbon high-chromium alloys. Based on examination of the alloy microstructures, their chemistry, and an analysis of the Fe-Mo-Si phase system; directions for further research are to increase the molybdenum and silicon content to produce a Fe-20Mo-10Ni-15Si composition.

  9. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  10. Detecting Inter-Cusp and Inter-Tooth Wear Patterns in Rhinocerotids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lucy A.; Kaiser, Thomas M.; Schwitzer, Christoph; Müller, Dennis W. H.; Codron, Daryl; Clauss, Marcus; Schulz, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Extant rhinos are the largest extant herbivores exhibiting dietary specialisations for both browse and grass. However, the adaptive value of the wear-induced tooth morphology in rhinos has not been widely studied, and data on individual cusp and tooth positions have rarely been published. We evaluated upper cheek dentition of browsing Diceros bicornis and Rhinoceros sondaicus, mixed-feeding R. unicornis and grazing Ceratotherium simum using an extended mesowear method adapted for rhinos. We included single cusp scoring (EM(R)-S) to investigate inter-cusp and inter-tooth wear patterns. In accordance with previous reports, general mesowear patterns in D. bicornis and R. sondaicus were attrition-dominated and C. simum abrasion-dominated, reflecting their respective diets. Mesowear patterns for R. unicornis were more attrition-dominated than anticipated by the grass-dominated diet, which may indicate a low intake of environmental abrasives. EM(R)-S increased differentiation power compared to classical mesowear, with significant inter-cusp and inter-tooth differences detected. In D. bicornis, the anterior cusp was consistently more abrasion-dominated than the posterior. Wear differences in cusp position may relate to morphological adaptations to dietary regimes. Heterogeneous occlusal surfaces may facilitate the comminution of heterogeneous browse, whereas uniform, broad grinding surfaces may enhance the comminution of physically more homogeneous grass. A negative tooth wear gradient was found in D. bicornis, R. sondaicus and R. unicornis, with wear patterns becoming less abrasion-dominated from premolars to molars. No such gradients were evident in C. simum which displayed a uniform wear pattern. In browsers, premolars may be exposed to higher relative grit loads, which may result in the development of wear gradients. The second premolar may also have a role in food cropping. In grazers, high absolute amounts of ingested abrasives may override other signals, leading to

  11. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of a Novel 6351 Al-(Al4SiC4 + SiC) Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Show, Bijay Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-03-01

    In this research study, the dry sliding wear behaviors of 6351 Al alloy and its composites with single and hybrid reinforcements (ex situ SiC and in situ Al4SiC4) were investigated at low sliding speed (1 ms-1) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. In general, the wear mechanism involved adhesion (coupled with subsurface cracking) and microcutting-abrasion at lower loads. With higher loads, abrasive wear involving microcutting and microplowing along with adherent oxide formation was observed. At higher loads, the abrasive wear mechanism caused rapid wear loss initially up to a certain sliding distance beyond which, by virtue of frictional heat generation and associated temperature rise, an adherent oxide layer was developed at the pin surface, which drastically reduced the wear loss. Moreover, the overall wear rates of all the composites (either single or hybrid reinforcement) were found to be lower than that of the 6351 Al alloy at all applied loads. The ex situ SiC particles were found to resist abrasive wear; while, in situ Al4SiC4 particles offered resistance to adhesive wear. Accordingly, the 6351 Al-(SiC + Al4SiC4) hybrid composite exhibited the best wear resistance among all composites.

  12. Fretting Wear of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lerch, Bradley A.; Draper, Susan L.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the wear behavior of gamma titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb in atomic percent) in contact with a typical nickel-base superalloy under repeated microscopic vibratory motion in air at temperatures from 296-823 K. The surface damage observed on the interacting surfaces of both Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and superalloy consisted of fracture pits, oxides, metallic debris, scratches, craters, plastic deformation, and cracks. The Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb transferred to the superalloy at all fretting conditions and caused scuffing or galling. The increasing rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures led to a drop in Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear at 473 K. Mild oxidative wear was observed at 473 K. However, fretting wear increased as the temperature was increased from 473-823 K. At 723 and 823 K, oxide disruption generated cracks, loose wear debris, and pits on the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear surface. Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear generally decreased with increasing fretting frequency. Both increasing slip amplitude and increasing load tended to produce more metallic wear debris, causing severe abrasive wear in the contacting metals. Keywords

  13. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  14. Abrasion-resistant coatings for plastic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Hollahan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Optically clear composition of organosilicon compounds insulates plastic surfaces and protects them from abrasion. Plasma polymerization process produces superior uniformity and clarity than previous coating techniques.

  15. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  16. The effect of erosion and abrasion on surface properties of composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Munteanu, A.; Balan, A.; Iovan, G.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the surface roughness of two commercial composite resins submitted to erosive attack, to abrasive wear and to association of erosive and abrasive challenge. Standardized samples of G-snial anterior (GC Company) and Essentia (GC Company) composite resins were randomly split in 6 groups. In group 1 the samples were maintained in artificial saliva until the evaluation of surface roughness. In group 2 the samples were submitted only to erosive attack, in group 3 only to abrasive challenge and in groups 4,5, and 6 the erosive attack was followed by abrasive challenge immediately (group 4), 30 minutes after the erosive attack (group 5) and one hour after the erosive attack (group 6). The specimens were evaluated using surface roughness measuring tester SJ-210 (Mitutoyo Corporation, Japan) and the mean surface roughness values (Ra, μm) of each specimen were registered. A significantly increase of both composite resins surface roughness was recorded after erosive attack and abrasive challenge. Toothbrushing 60 minutes after acidic contact determined no significant differences in surface roughness of composite resins.

  17. Surface Analysis and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    This article is a chapter of the book entitled, "Tribology of Mechanical Systems," to be published by ASME Press, New York, NY. It describes selected analytical techniques, which are being used in understanding phenomena and mechanisms of oxidation, adhesion, bonding, friction, erosion, abrasion, and wear, and in defining the problems. The primary emphasis is on microanalytical approaches to engineering surfaces.

  18. An analysis of the physiologic parameters of intraoral wear: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Janyavula, Sridhar; Cakir, Deniz; Burgess, John O.

    2013-10-01

    This paper reviews the conditions of in vivo mastication and describes a novel method of measuring in vitro wear. Methods: parameters of intraoral wear are reviewed in this analysis, including chewing force, tooth sliding distance, food abrasivity, saliva lubrication, and antagonist properties. Results: clinical measurement of mastication forces indicates a range of normal forces between 20 and 140 N for a single molar. During the sliding phase of mastication, horizontal movement has been measured between 0.9 and 2.86 mm. In vivo wear occurs by three-body abrasion when food particles are interposed between teeth and by two-body abrasion after food clearance. Analysis of food particles used in wear testing reveals that food particles are softer than enamel and large enough to separate enamel and restoration surfaces and act as a solid lubricant. In two-body wear, saliva acts as a boundary lubricant with a viscosity of 3 cP. Enamel is the most relevant antagonist material for wear testing. The shape of a palatal cusp has been estimated as a 0.6 mm diameter ball and the hardest region of a tooth is its enamel surface. pH values and temperatures have been shown to range between 2-7 and 5-55 °C in intraoral fluids, respectively. These intraoral parameters have been used to modify the Alabama wear testing method.

  19. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  20. Comparison of wear behaviors for an artificial cervical disc under flexion/extension and axial rotation motions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Song, Jian; Liao, Zhenhua; Feng, Pingfa; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-06-01

    The wear behaviors of a ball-on-socket (UHMWPE-on-Ti6Al4V) artificial cervical disc were studied with 1.5MC (million cycles) wear simulation under single flexion/extension and axial rotation motion and their composite motion. The wear rates, wear traces, and contact stress were analyzed and contrasted based on mass loss, optical microscopy and SEM as well as 3D profilometer, and ANSYS software, respectively. A much higher wear rate and more severe wear scars appeared under multi-directional motion. Flexion/extension motion of 7.5° lead to more severe wear than that under axial rotation motion of 4°. The above results were closely related to the contact compression stress and shear stress. The wear surface in FE motion showed typical linear wear scratches while revealing obvious arc-shaped wear tracks in AR motion. However, the central zone of both ball and socket components revealed more severe wear tracks than that in the edge zone under these two different motions. The dominant wear mechanism was plowing/scratching and abrasive wear as well as a little oxidation wear for the titanium socket while it was scratching damage with adhesive wear and fatigue wear due to plastic deformation under cyclic load and motion profiles for the UHMWPE ball. PMID:27040218

  1. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of 6351 Al-(4 vol.% SiC + 4 vol.% Al2O3) Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Show, Bijay Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-09-01

    In this research work, the dry sliding wear behavior of 6351 Al-(4 vol.% SiC + 4 vol.% Al2O3) hybrid composite was investigated at low sliding speed (1 m/s) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. In general, the wear mechanism involved adhesion (along with associated subsurface cracking and delamination) and microcutting abrasion at lower load. While at higher load, abrasive wear involving microcutting and microploughing along with adherent oxide formation was observed. The overall wear rate increased with increasing normal load. The massive particle clusters as well as individual reinforcement particles were found to stand tall to resist abrasive wear. Besides, at higher load, the generation of adherent nodular tribo-oxide through nucleation and epitaxial growth on existing Al2O3 particles lowered down the wear rate. Accordingly, at any normal load, 6351 Al-(4 vol.% SiC + 4 vol.% Al2O3) hybrid composite exhibited superior wear resistance (lower overall wear rate) than the reported wear resistance of monolithic 6351 Al alloy.

  2. Wear resistance of boron nitride coated metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yasunori; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Sakai, Shigeki; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Fuminori

    1993-06-01

    The wear resistance of boron nitride films was studied. The films of 1 μm thickness were prepared on the surface of a cutting tool by simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation and vapor depositon of boron; the Vickers hardness of the films was between 3000 and 5000 kg/mm 2. The test was performed by the cutting of steel. On the tool deposited directly, the wear of the surface is large and this could not be improved greatly. However, the tools prepared after nitridation of the surface layer by ion implantation and the one with another nitride layer in the interface showed decreasing wear, and the wear of the tool with an interlayer of silicon nitride could be decreased to about 15%. As a result, it became clear that boron nitride could be effectively used as a highly hard film by the optimization of the interface between the film and the matrix.

  3. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  4. Surgery to improve contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Buckley, R J; Woodward, E G

    1991-04-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone that gives rise to contact lens related abrasions. These nebulae do not flatten when contact lens wear is discontinued. We describe a simple technique of superficial keratectomy to remove proud nebulae in which the resulting defect healed quickly under a therapeutic hydrogel lens. In all of the six cases described patients were able to resume contact lens wear within one month of the procedure. One case was lost to follow-up. Of the remaining five (follow-up 3-9 months), all achieved comfortable wearing times of 8 hours or more and visual acuities of 20/40 or better. One patient developed a recurrent epithelial defect that resolved on discontinuing lens wear for one week. Corneal transplantation was thus avoided. PMID:2049822

  5. Bendable Extension For Abrasive-Jet Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Hard-to-reach places cleaned more easily. Extension for abrasive-jet apparatus bent to provide controlled abrasive cleaning of walls in deep cavities or other hard-to-reach places. Designed for controlled removal of penetrant inspection dyes from inside castings, extension tube also used for such general grit-blasting work as removal of scratches.

  6. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  7. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  8. Tooth wear in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis): mesowear analysis classifies free-ranging specimens as browsers but captive ones as grazers.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Brasch, Juliane; Castell, Johanna C; Kaiser, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) mostly do not attain the longevity possible for this species and frequently have problems associated with low energy intake and fat storage mobilization. Abnormal tooth wear has been among the causes suggested as an underlying problem. This study utilizes a tooth wear scoring method ("mesowear") primarily used in paleobiology. This scoring method was applied to museum specimens of free-ranging (n=20) and captive (n=41) giraffes. The scoring system allows for the differentiation between attrition--(typical for browsers, as browse contains little abrasive silica) and abrasion--(typical for grazers, as grass contains abrasive silica) dominated tooth wear. The dental wear pattern of the free-ranging population is dominated by attrition, resembles that previously published for free-ranging giraffe, and clusters within browsing herbivores in comparative analysis. In contrast, the wear pattern of the captive population is dominated by abrasion and clusters among grazing herbivores in comparative analyses. A potential explanation for this difference in tooth wear is likely related to the content of abrasive elements in zoo diets. Silica content (measured as acid insoluble ash) is low in browse and alfalfa. However, grass hay and the majority of pelleted compound feeds contain higher amounts of silica. It can be speculated that the abnormal wear pattern in captivity compromises tooth function in captive giraffe, with deleterious long-term consequences. PMID:17939353

  9. Corneal abrasions associated with pepper spray exposure.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Takeuchi, D; Challoner, K

    2000-05-01

    Pepper spray containing oleoresin capsicum is used by law enforcement and the public as a form of nonlethal deterrent. Stimulated by the identification of a case of a corneal abrasion associated with pepper spray exposure, a descriptive retrospective review of a physician-maintained log of patients presenting to a jail ward emergency area over a 3-year period was performed. The objective was to give some quantification to the frequency with which an emergency physician could expect to see corneal abrasions associated with pepper spray exposure. Of 100 cases of pepper spray exposure identified, seven patients had sustained corneal abrasions. We conclude that corneal abrasions are not rare events when patients are exposed to pepper spray and that fluorescein staining and slit lamp or Wood's lamp examination should be performed on all exposed patients in whom corneal abrasions cannot be excluded on clinical grounds. PMID:10830682

  10. Evaluation of coal pulverizer materials: Effect of coal characteristics on wear performance and reliability: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Donais, R.T.; Tyler, A.L.; Dufrane, K.F.; Glaeser, W.R.; Merriman, T.L.; Wright, I.G.

    1988-08-01

    This report deals mainly with abrasive wear in coal pulverizers. Eight coals, including bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite, were analyzed in the laboratory to determine their quartz (SiO/sub 2/) and pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) content. The size distribution of these two minerals was also determined. The wear of Ni-Hard rolls from pulverizers, used to grind the above coals at various utilities, was determined. It was found that wear expressed as mils/1000 ton coal correlated much better with the quartz and pyrite content of the coal than wear expressed as mils/hr. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that the effect of quartz on mill wear is much larger than that of pyrite. Coarser size fractions of both materials also increase wear. Based on the data obtained, an analytical procedure to predict the abrasiveness of coals on their quartz and pyrite content was developed. Laboratory studies were also carried out to compare the wear resistance of various commercially available castings and weld overlays. Little difference was found between two grades of Ni-Hard coatings. The wear resistance of higher chromium weld overlays or cast white irons was found to be about twice as high as that of Ni-Hard castings. This is in good agreement with wear of high chromium weld overlays observed by many utilities. 37 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

  11. The role of near-surface plastic deformation in the wear of lamellar solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E.; Hartman, L. A.; Hauck, K. E.; Surprenant, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown in this paper that the role of surface and near-surface plastic deformation is especially significant in both sliding and abrasive wear of lamellar composites. Lamellar structures were produced artificially from alternate layers of pure copper and pure tin or lead foils. The resulting composites were tested in three different wear tests: single-pass abrasion by a sharp, hard abrader; multiple-pass rubbing by a hard, rounded abrader; and pin-on-disk sliding. In each case the counterface was a hard alloy steel. Tests were run with the composite lamellae in two orientations: perpendicular and parallel to the sliding direction. It was found that the composites had much less wear resistance and greater abradability when oriented perpendicular to the rub direction. The mechanisms for wear particle removal and the role of plastic deformation in the process were studied by plasticity analysis and by microscopic (SEM and optical) observation.

  12. Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

    PubMed

    Kaidonis, John A

    2008-03-01

    Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment. PMID:17938977

  13. Early abrasion of outer silicone insulation after intracardiac lead friction in a patient with cardiac device-related infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, Andrej; Małecka, Barbara; Kołodzińska, Agnieszka; Maziarz, Andrej; Lelakowski, Jacek; Kutarski, Andrej

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a 76-year-old woman on a permanent pacing device, with early abrasion of silicone endocardial lead insulations complicated by lead-dependent infective endocarditis 13 months after placement of an implantable pulse generator. The leads were removed using transvenous technique with direct traction, and with no additional tools. In the previous report, a set of additional tools was used, and therefore intraoperative endocardial lead abrasions or mechanical damage of leads could have not been excluded. The present case undoubtedly proves that the friction of leads against each other may result in abrasions of insulation of the intracardiac section of the lead. PMID:21070260

  14. Structural changes in and the wear of the rock cutting element of a bulldozer during operation under the North conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, G. G.; Yakovleva, S. P.; Kychkin, A. K.; Vasil'Eva, M. I.; Struchkov, N. F.; Fedorov, M. V.

    2009-10-01

    The phenomenon of accelerated wear of a ripper crown in a digging machine (bulldozer) under the North operating conditions is studied. The elemental composition, microstructure, microhardness of the crown metal and the wear surface relief characteristics are determined. It is found that, under complex heat-force conditions of loading during the exploitation of cryolite rocks, the metal in the active surface of the rock cutting element undergoes intense softening as a result of the formation of a secondary structure, namely, frictioninduced sorbite. As a result of an insufficient level of the wear resistance of the crown metal and its plasticization, the traces of abrasive wear become deeper and plastic impact-abrasive wear takes place.

  15. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Qiu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Minhao; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains. Methods Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated. Results The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes. Significance Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings. PMID:26368532

  16. Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

    2013-04-23

    A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

  17. Sliding Wear Properties of HVOF Thermally Sprayed Nylon-11 and Nylon-11/Ceramic Composites on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L.; Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Cairncross, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Polymer and polymer/ceramic composite coatings were produced by ball-milling 60 μm Nylon-11 together with nominal 10 vol.% of nano and multiscale ceramic reinforcements and by HVOF spraying these composite feedstocks onto steel substrates to produce semicrystalline micron and nanoscale reinforced polymer matrix composites. Room temperature dry sliding wear performance of pure Nylon-11, Nylon-11 reinforced with 7 nm silica, and multiscale Nylon-11/silica composite coatings incorporating 7-40 nm and 10 μm ceramic particles were characterized using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficient of friction and wear rate were determined as a function of applied load and coating composition. Surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize and analyze the coatings and wear scars. The pure Nylon-11 coating experienced less wear than the composites due to the occurrence of two additional wear mechanisms: abrasive and fatigue wear.

  18. Evaluation of hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Fathi, Mohamad Hossein; Navabi, Amir Arsalan; Savabi, Ghazal

    2013-01-01

    Background: The interim restorative materials should have certain mechanical properties to withstand in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Fifteen identical rectangular shape specimens with dimensions of 2 mm × 10 mm × 30 mm were made from 7 interim materials (TempSpan, Protemp 3 Garant, Revotek, Unifast LC, Tempron, Duralay, and Acropars). The Vickers hardness and abrasive wear of specimens were tested in dry conditions and after 1 week storage in artificial saliva. The depth of wear was measured using surface roughness inspection device. Data were subjected to Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between hardness and wear (α =0.05). Results: TempSpan had the highest hardness. The wear resistance of TempSpan (in dry condition) and Revotek (after conditioning in artificial saliva) was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant correlation between degree of wear and hardness of the materials (P = 0.281, r = −0.31). Conclusion: Hardness and wear resistance of interim resins are material related rather than category specified. PMID:23946734

  19. Influence of Fretting Wear on Lifetime of Tin Plated Connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hirosaka; Ito, Tetsuya; Sawada, Shigeru; Hattori, Yasuhiro; Saitoh, Yasushi; Tamai, Terutaka; Iida, Kazuo

    Due to the recent increase in electronic devices mounted on automobiles, a large number of connectors, especially low-cost tin plated connectors are being used. As a result, their contact reliability has become problematic. Furthermore, for the connectors which are subjected to fretting wear caused by heat cycle and vibrations, the contact resistance increases because of wear of tin and deposition of oxides, which generates problems of poor contact. This study is intended to analyze the change in contact resistance of tin plated connectors from the start of fretting wear to the end of their lifetime from the viewpoint of practical reliability, and to observe the trace and the characteristics of fretting wear microscopically. This study found that wear and oxidation of tin plated connectors start immediately with fretting wear, and thus accumulation of abrasion powder on fretting areas causes connectors to reach to the end of their useful lifetime quickly. Especially, it was demonstrated that amplitude of fretting has a considerable influence on a connector's lifetime. It is made clear that air-tightness, so-called “gas-tight” of tin in a fretting area influences fretting wear considerably.

  20. Wear resistance of TiAlSiN thin coatings.

    PubMed

    Silva, F J G; Martinho, R P; Alexandre, R J D; Baptista, A P M

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades TiAIN coatings deposited by PVD techniques have been extensively investigated but, nowadays, their potential development for tribological applications is relatively low. However, new coatings are emerging based on them, trying to improve wear behavior. TiAlSiN thin coatings are now investigated, analyzing if Si introduction increases the wear resistance of PVD films. Attending to the application, several wear test configurations has been recently used by some researchers. In this work, TiAISiN thin coatings were produced by PVD Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering technique and they were conveniently characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) provided with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA), Micro Hardness (MH) and Scratch Test Analysis. Properties as morphology, thickness, roughness, chemical composition and structure, hardness and film adhesion to the substrate were investigated. Concerning to wear characterization, two very different ways were chosen: micro-abrasion with ball-on-flat configuration and industrial non-standardized tests based on samples inserted in a feed channel of a selected plastic injection mould working with 30% (wt.) glass fiber reinforced polypropylene. TiAISiN coatings with a small amount of about 5% (wt.) Si showed a similar wear behavior when compared with TiAIN reported performances, denoting that Si addition does not improve the wear performance of the TiAIN coatings in these wear test conditions. PMID:23447962

  1. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various abrasives... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various abrasives... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various abrasives... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010...

  4. Spectroscopic wear detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The elemental composition of a material exposed to hot gases and subjected to wear is determined. Atoms of an elemental species not appearing in this material are implanted in a surface at a depth based on the maximum allowable wear. The exhaust gases are spectroscopically monitored to determine the exposure of these atoms when the maximum allowable wear is reached.

  5. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  6. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  7. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  8. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  9. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups. PMID:1090642

  11. The measurement of abrasive particles velocities in the process of abrasive water jet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Říha, Zdeněk

    2014-08-01

    An optimization of the design of the abrasive cutting head using the numerical simulation requires gathering as much information about processes occurring in the cutting head as possible. Detailed knowledge of velocities of abrasive particles in the process of abrasive water jet generation is vital for the verification of the numerical model. A method of measurement of abrasive particles at the exit of focusing tube using the FPIV technique was proposed and preliminary tests are described in the paper. Results of analysis of measured velocity fields are presented in the paper.

  12. New iron-based SiC spherical composite magnetic abrasive for magnetic abrasive finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guixiang; Zhao, Yugang; Zhao, Dongbiao; Zuo, Dunwen; Yin, Fengshi

    2013-03-01

    SiC magnetic abrasive is used to polish surfaces of precise, complex parts which are hard, brittle and highly corrosion-resistant in magnetic abrasive finishing(MAF). Various techniques are employed to produce this magnetic abrasive, but few can meet production demands because they are usually time-consuming, complex with high cost, and the magnetic abrasives made by these techniques have irregular shape and low bonding strength that result in low processing efficiency and shorter service life. Therefore, an attempt is made by combining gas atomization and rapid solidification to fabricate a new iron-based SiC spherical composite magnetic abrasive. The experimental system to prepare this new magnetic abrasive is constructed according to the characteristics of gas atomization and rapid solidification process and the performance requirements of magnetic abrasive. The new iron-based SiC spherical composite magnetic abrasive is prepared successfully when the machining parameters and the composition proportion of the raw materials are controlled properly. Its morphology, microstructure, phase composition are characterized by scanning electron microscope(SEM) and X-ray diffraction(XRD) analysis. The MAF tests on plate of mold steel S136 are carried out without grinding lubricant to assess the finishing performance and service life of this new SiC magnetic abrasive. The surface roughness( R a) of the plate worked is rapidly reduced to 0.051 μm from an initial value of 0.372 μm within 5 min. The MAF test is carried on to find that the service life of this new SiC magnetic abrasive reaches to 155 min. The results indicate that this process presented is feasible to prepare the new SiC magnetic abrasive; and compared with previous magnetic abrasives, the new SiC spherical composite magnetic abrasive has excellent finishing performance, high processing efficiency and longer service life. The presented method to fabricate magnetic abrasive through gas atomization and rapid

  13. Friction and wear behaviors of MoS2/Zr coated HSS in sliding wear and in drilling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianxin; Yan, Pei; Wu, Ze

    2012-11-01

    MoS2 metal composite coatings have been successful used in dry turning, but its suitability for dry drilling has not been yet established. Therefore, it is necessary to study the friction and wear behaviors of MoS2/Zr coated HSS in sliding wear and in drilling processes. In the present study, MoS2/Zr composite coatings are deposited on the surface of W6Mo5Cr4V2 high speed steel(HSS). Microstructural and fundamental properties of these coatings are examined. Ball-on-disc sliding wear tests on the coated discs are carried out, and the drilling performance of the coated drills is tested. Test results show that the MoS2/Zr composite coatings exhibit decreases friction coefficient to that of the uncoated HSS in sliding wear tests. Energy dispersive X-ray(EDX) analysis on the wear surface indicates that there is a transfer layer formed on the counterpart ball during sliding wear processes, which contributes to the decreasing of the friction coefficient between the sliding couple. Drilling tests indicate that the MoS2/Zr coated drills show better cutting performance compared to the uncoated HSS drills, coating delamination and abrasive are found to be the main flank and rake wear mode of the coated drills. The proposed research founds the base of the application of MoS2 metal composite coatings on dry drilling.

  14. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test. PMID:14530920

  15. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Mild Steel and 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arpita; Tungala, Vedavyas; Sala, Kasturi; Biswas, Koushik; Maity, Joydeep

    2015-06-01

    Alumina-steel sliding contacts are often encountered in industrial applications. Aluminum metal matrix composite (AlMMC) is considered as a suitable replacement for ferrous materials. However, Alumina-steel/AlMMC tribological system has not been readily investigated. Accordingly, in this research work, the dry sliding wear characteristic of 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp composite and mild steel against an alumina disk is investigated and compared at three loads (10, 30, and 50 N). In mild steel, the wear mechanism envisages a mild adhesive wear at low load (10 N), while abrasive wear and oxidative wear at higher loads (30 and 50 N). The overall wear rate linearly increased with increasing load. In 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp composite, at all loads, the basic wear mechanism involves abrasive wear with de-bonding of SiC particles and oxidative wear. A non-linear relationship between wear rate and load indicates higher severity of wear loss. Particularly at higher load, the 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp composite suffers from extensive wear loss (26 times higher wear rate at 50 N load) as compared to mild steel. This indicates the unsuitability of using 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp composite as a replacement for mild steel under severe abrasive wear situation. The higher wear severity of 6061Al-15wt.%SiCp composite is attributed to the following: (i) de-bonding of reinforcement (SiC) particles reducing the material strength and subsequent removal of matrix material by micro-chipping mechanism; and (ii) an intense oxidation of 6061Al matrix under frictional heat and subsequent removal of oxide layer.

  17. [The application of air abrasion in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Mandinić, Zoran; Vulićević, Zoran R; Beloica, Milos; Radović, Ivana; Mandić, Jelena; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip's size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist. PMID:24684041

  18. Microstructures and Abrasive Properties of the Oxide Coatings on Al6061 Alloys Prepared by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in Different Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Byun, Sangsik; Lee, Chan Gyu; Koo, Bon Heun; Wang, Yi Qi; Song, Jung Il

    Al2O3 coatings were prepared on T6-tempered Al6061 alloys substrate under a hybrid voltage (AC 200 V-60 Hz and DC 260 V value) by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in 30 min. The effects of different electrolytes on the abrasive behaviors of the coatings were studied by conducting dry ball-on-disk wear tests. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the coating microstructure. XRD analysis results show that the coatings mainly consist of α- and γ-Al2O3, and some mullite and AlPO4 phase in Na2SiO3 and Na3PO4 containing electrolytes, respectively. The wear test results show that the coatings which were PEO-treated in Na3PO4 containing electrolyte presented the most excellent abrasive resistance property.

  19. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  20. Abrasive resistance of metastable V-Cr-Mn-Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons using the factorial design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Shimizu, K.; Cheiliakh, A. P.; Pastukhova, T. V.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Kusumoto, K.

    2016-06-01

    Full factorial design was used to evaluate the two-body abrasive resistance of 3wt%C-4wt%Mn-1.5wt%Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons with varying vanadium (5.0wt%-10.0wt%) and chromium (up to 9.0wt%) contents. The alloys were quenched at 920°C. The regression equation of wear rate as a function of V and Cr contents was proposed. This regression equation shows that the wear rate decreases with increasing V content because of the growth of spheroidal VC carbide amount. Cr influences the overall response in a complex manner both by reducing the wear rate owing to eutectic carbides (M7C3) and by increasing the wear rate though stabilizing austenite to deformation-induced martensite transformation. This transformation is recognized as an important factor in increasing the abrasive response of the alloys. By analyzing the regression equation, the optimal content ranges are found to be 7.5wt%-10.0wt% for V and 2.5wt%-4.5wt% for Cr, which corresponds to the alloys containing 9vol%-15vol% spheroidal VC carbides, 8vol%-16vol% M7C3, and a metastable austenite/martensite matrix. The wear resistance is 1.9-2.3 times that of the traditional 12wt% V-13wt% Mn spheroidal carbide cast iron.

  1. Resistance of nanofill and nanohybrid resin composites to toothbrush abrasion with calcium carbonate slurry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Kyoizumi, Hideaki; Finger, Werner J; Kanehira, Masafumi; Endo, Tatsuo; Utterodt, Andreas; Hisamitsu, Hisashi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the wear of four nanofilled resin composites using simulated toothbrushing for 50,000 cycles with calcium carbonate slurry. The depth of abrasion and roughness (Ra) were measured after each 10,000 brushing cycle. The surface texture of the worn samples was examined by SEM.The wear depths of the nanofill Filtek Supreme XT (FIL), the nanohybrides Grandio (GRA), Tetric EvoCeram (TET), and Venus Diamond (VED) increased linearly with numbers of brushing cycles or approximately 80, 12, 600, and 60 mum, respectively after 50,000 strokes. Surface roughness showed virtually no change between 10,000 and 50,000 brushing cycles; the ranking order was TET < FIL < GRA < VED. FIL showed rather uniform abrasion with nanoclusters protruding from the surface. TET was very smoothly abraded without signs of debonding of the prepolymerized particles, whereas GRA and VED showed pronounced wear of the matrix polymer surrounding larger glass filler particles. PMID:20019422

  2. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  3. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  4. In vitro wear of composite with varied cure, filler level, and filler treatment.

    PubMed

    Condon, J R; Ferracane, J L

    1997-07-01

    For the clinical wear of composite filing materials to be reduced, compositional factors such as degree of cure, filler level, and silanation level should be optimized. An oral-wear-stimulating machine was used to explore the effects of these factors on abrasion and attrition wear as well as on opposing enamel wear. The composites were made from Sr glass (1-2 micron avg) and a 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin. Series I (A-D, E) were light-cured (Triad II) for 9, 12, 25, and 40 sec/side to produce degree of cure (DC) as measured by FTIR of 56, 60, 61, and 63%, respectively. E received an additional heat cure (120 degrees C for 10 min) to reach a DC of 66%. Series II (D, F-I) were filled to 62, 53, 48, 37, and 28 vol%, respectively. In series III (D, J-M), the portion of fillers treated with a silane coupler (MPS) was 100, 80, 60, 40, and 20%, respectively. Samples were cycled 50,000 times against an enamel antagonist in a poppy seed/PMMA slurry in the oral wear simulator to produce abrasion (load = 20 N) and attrition (load = 70 N) simultaneously. Wear depth (micron: n = 5) was measured by profilometry. Results for each series were analysed by ANOVA/Turkey's (p < or = 0.05). The wear depths did reflect cure values, though only the abrasion difference for E < A was significant. Greater wear was correlated with lower filler levels (r2 = 0.88; p < 0.05), significantly increasing below 48 vol% (G). Wear increased linearly as the percent of silane-treated fillers was reduced (r2 = 0.99; p < 0.05). Abrasion and attrition did not differ significantly for any composite. Wear of the opposing enamel was largely unchanged by these factors. Compositional factors including degree of cure, filler level, and silanation directly affected the wear resistance of dental composites evaluated in an oral wear simulator. PMID:9207774

  5. Improved Hardfacing for Drill Bits and Drilling Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sue, Albert; Sreshta, Harry; Qiu, Bao He

    2011-01-01

    New flame spray hardfacing, DSH (DuraShell® Steel Hardfacing, US patent pending), was developed to improve thermal conductivity, abrasion wear, and erosion resistance for subterranean drilling application. The materials consisted of spherical cast WC/W2C and Ni-Si-B alloy powders. The hardfacing compositions were tailored for various processes such as flame spray and laser cladding. Typically, the hardfacing comprised hard tungsten carbide particles being uniformly distributed in a tough Ni-alloy matrix. The hardness of WC/W2C exceeded 2300 Hv.3 and that of Ni-alloy matrix varied from about 400 to 700 Hv.3. High- and low-stress abrasion resistances of these hardfacing materials were characterized and compared to the conventional hard coatings of cast WC/W2C and Ni-Cr-Si-B-Fe. The increase in thermal, wear, and erosion resistances of the hardfacing improved the durability of PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) steel body bit and drilling tools and their cost-effective performance. Several case studies of DSH hardfacings on drill bits were described.

  6. Air abrasion: an old technology reborn.

    PubMed

    Berry, E A; Eakle, W S; Summitt, J B

    1999-08-01

    Recently, air abrasion has experienced a rebirth in restorative dentistry. Originally developed in the late 1940s, the principle of air abrasion is the imparting of kinetic energy to tiny aluminum oxide particles that are projected by a stream of compressed air or gas and expelled from a small nozzle. The force generated by the relatively hard particles striking a relatively hard surface is sufficient to cut into that surface. In the last decade, more than a dozen models of air abrasion units have been introduced into the marketplace and more are on the way. Manufacturers have developed air abrasion instruments that offer a broad range of features, from small table-top units to self-contained systems with compressors, vacuums, and curing lights. The costs range dramatically--from $1,000 to $20,000 or more--depending on the complexity of the features and attachments. Manufacturers make a variety of claims to support the value of this technology to the practicing dentist. A term often used to describe one of the benefits of air abrasion is microdentistry. The claim is that smaller, less invasive tooth preparations may be accomplished using air abrasion than with a traditional bur and air turbine. This may be true in some instances, but it would certainly depend on the operator's experience and ability to visually discern fine detail. Other claims about air abrasion are that it can be used to cut into tooth structure without local anesthesia and that it should be used on all stained grooves or fissures to determine if incipient carious lesions are present. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, the popularity of air abrasion continues to grow. To gain additional insight about these claims and to see what might be on the horizon for this technology, I spoke with three highly respected educators who are recognized for their expertise in air abrasion. What they said should give the reader a better understanding of how air abrasion might augment restorative

  7. Wear resistance of a metal surface modified with minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, S. V.; Kislov, V. G.; Balasch, P. V.; Skazochkin, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Tikhonov, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    The article describes the advantages of the new technology of mineral coating of metal products for the friction pair of mechanical systems. It presents the research results of the wear rate of the samples made of 12X13 steel (X12Cr13) with mineral layers, in the experiments with a piston ring sliding inside a cylinder liner with grease. The wear rate of the samples with mineral layers is lower almost by two factors than that of the samples made of grey foundry iron and untreated samples. As the result of slip/rolling abrasion tests of parts with mineral layers under conditions of high contact pressure, a suggestion was made concerning probable mechanics of surface wear.

  8. In situ evaluation of different remineralization periods to decrease brushing abrasion of demineralized enamel.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Knöfel, S; Buchalla, W; Tütüncü, R

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present in situ study was to evaluate the effect of different periods of intraoral remineralization to decrease the susceptibility of previously demineralized enamel against toothbrushing abrasion. Six human enamel specimens (A-F) were recessed in the buccal aspects of each of eight intraoral appliances which were worn for 21 days by 8 panelists. Demineralization of the samples was performed twice a day extraorally in the acidic beverage Sprite Light for 90 s. Subsequently, the enamel specimens were brushed at different times. Specimen A was brushed immediately after the demineralization. The remaining samples B-E were brushed after the intraoral appliances had been worn for various periods of remineralization: specimen B, 10 min; C, 20 min; D, 30 min and E, 60 min, respectively. Specimen F was only demineralized and remineralized, but not brushed. After 21 days, enamel wear was measured with a laser profilometer. The following values (mean +/- standard deviation) were obtained: specimen A, 6.78+/-2.71 microm; B, 5.47+/-3.39 microm; C, 6.06+/-3.18 microm; D, 5.43+/-2.58 microm; E 4.78+/-2.57 microm, and F 0.66+/-1.11 micro;m. Analysis of variance revealed a significant influence of remineralization period on abrasive wear. However, even after a remineralization period of 60 min the wear was significantly increased as compared to the demineralized, but not brushed control. It is concluded that (1) abrasion resistance of softened enamel increases with remineralization period and (2) at least 60 min should elapse before toothbrushing after an erosive attack. PMID:11385203

  9. Research on wear properties of centrifugal dredge pump based on liquid-solid two-phase fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. J.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    The impeller and casing of dredge pump are worn by sediment in the flow. However, there are few studies about abrasion of the impeller and casing for normal pump operating conditions. This paper investigated the relationship between the wear rates on the surfaces of the impeller as well as casing and the sediment concentration, with the distribution of the wear rates for normal pump operating condition analyzed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure was used to simulate steady liquid-solid two-phase flow for various operating conditions. The Finnie model was then used to predict the abrasion. The results show that, the wear rate relative value of impeller and casing surface increase as the sediment concentration increases. The wear rate relative value of impeller and casing surface is larger when the pump is in low flow rate condition, and the value of casing surface is larger than that of the impeller. The wear rate relative value of pump is low when pump is in high efficiency condition. This paper shows the abrasion characteristics on the impeller and casing with sediment flow and provides reference data for predicting the abrasion conditions in the flow passage components for a dredge pump.

  10. Friction and wear characteristics of iron-chromium alloys in contact with themselves and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-chromium alloys in contact with (1) themselves, (2) single crystal silicon carbide disks, and (3) single crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide. Results indicate the coefficients of friction for the alloys sliding against themselves are between those for pure iron and pure chromium, and are only slightly different with 1, 5, 9, 14, and 19 weight percent chromium in iron. The wear is due, primarily, to shearing, or tearing fracture, of the cohesive bonds in the bulk metal and plowing of the bulk by lumps of wear debris. There are only slight differences in the coefficients of friction for the various alloys when sliding on silicon carbide. The coefficient of friction for the alloys are higher than those for pure iron and pure chromium. Alloy hardening observed in the alloys plays a dominant role in controlling the abrasive friction and wear behavior of the alloys.

  11. Applicability of Macroscopic Wear and Friction Laws on the Atomic Length Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Feldbauer, G.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Betz, G.; Vernes, A.

    2015-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we simulate the abrasion process of an atomically rough Fe surface with multiple hard abrasive particles. By quantifying the nanoscopic wear depth in a time-resolved fashion, we show that Barwell's macroscopic wear law can be applied at the atomic scale. We find that in this multiasperity contact system, the Bowden-Tabor term, which describes the friction force as a function of the real nanoscopic contact area, can predict the kinetic friction even when wear is involved. From this the Derjaguin-Amontons-Coulomb friction law can be recovered, since we observe a linear dependence of the contact area on the applied load in accordance with Greenwood-Williamson contact mechanics.

  12. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  13. Preparation and characterization of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/nanoclay nanocomposite flat sheet membranes for abrasion resistance.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-06-15

    Membranes with more resilience to abrasive wear are highly desired in water treatment, especially for seawater desalination. Nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/nanoclay membranes were prepared by phase inversion and then tested for abrasion resistance. Their material properties were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Nanoclay Cloisite(®) 15A was utilised as the inorganic nanoparticle incorporated into PVDF. FTIR results showed a shifting of the PVDF crystalline phase from α to β thus indicating that the nanoclay altered the PVDF host material's structure and mechanical properties in terms of stiffness and toughness. Water permeation test showed that nanoclay at low concentration tended to reduce water flux. All nanocomposite membranes, with between 1 wt% and 5 wt% initial nanoclay loading, were more abrasion resistant than the control PVDF membrane. However, the 1 wt% exhibited superior resistance, lasting two times longer than the reference PVDF membrane under the same abrasive condition. The 1 wt% nanoclay membrane appeared less abraded by SEM observation, while also having the greatest tensile strength improvement (from 4.5 MPa to 4.9 MPa). This membrane also had the smallest agglomerated nanoclay particle size and highest toughness compared to the higher nanoclay content membranes. Nanoclays are therefore useful for improving abrasion resistance of PVDF membranes, but optimal loadings are essential to avoid losing essential mechanical properties. PMID:24698723

  14. The impact of the bead width on the properties of the anti-abrasion surfacing weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beczkowski, Robert; Gucwa, Marek; Wróbel, Joanna; Kulawik, Adam

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the results of research on the anti-abrasion surfacing welds designated to operate under wear conditions. The main purpose of the work was to produce single-layer surface welds by means of semi-automatic hard-facing/surface welding with the use of filler material containing carbide precipitate and with the use of 10mm- and 20mm- wide beads. The samples were subject to visual and penetrant testing and to destructive testing in the form of macro and micro metallographic testing, hardness testing and bend testing with a view to determine the effect which the beads of various widths have on the analysed factors.

  15. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Resistance of Laser Cladded WC/Ni Composite Coatings with Different Contents of WC Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. S.; Zhang, X. C.; Xuan, F. Z.; Wang, Z. D.; Tu, S. T.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this article was to address the effect of WC content on the microstructure, microhardness, and sliding wear resistance of laser cladded WC/Ni composite coatings. The content of WC particle in the feed powder varied in the range of 0-80 wt.%. Experimental results showed that the laser cladded coatings exhibited homogeneous microstructure without pores or cracks. By comparing with the 45# steel substrate, the microhardness of WC/Ni composite coatings was relatively high. The microhardness of coating increased with increasing the content of WC particles. The wear resistance of WC/Ni composite coatings was strongly dependent on the content of WC particle and their microstructure. When the WC content was lower than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, the wear rate of the coatings decreased with increasing WC content. The two-body abrasive wear was identified as the main wear mechanisms. For the coatings with WC content higher than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, their wear rate increased with increasing WC content. The three-body abrasive wear and fatigue wear were the main failures. The coating with 40 wt.% WC in the feed powder exhibited the best wear resistance.

  16. Abrasion resistance of medical glove materials.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Donna L; Schwerin, Matthew R; Kisielewski, Richard W; Kotz, Richard M; Chaput, Maria P; Varney, George W; To, Theresa M

    2004-01-15

    Due to the increasing demand for nonlatex medical gloves in the health-care community, there is a need to assess the durability of alternative glove materials. This study examines durability characteristics of various glove materials by abrasion resistance testing. Natural rubber latex (latex), polyvinyl chloride (vinyl), acrylonitrile butadiene (nitrile), polychloroprene (neoprene), and a styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were tested. All test specimens, with the exception of the vinyl, were obtained from surgical gloves. Unaged out-of-the-box specimens as well as those subjected to various degrees of artificial aging were included in the study. After the abrasion sequence, the barrier integrity of the material was assessed through the use of a static leak test. Other traditional tests performed on these materials were viral penetration to validate the abrasion data and tear testing for comparative purposes. The results indicate that specific glove-material performance is dependent upon the particular test under consideration. Most notably, abrasion, even in controlled nonsevere conditions, may compromise to varying degrees the barrier integrity of latex, vinyl, SEBS, nitrile, and neoprene glove materials. However, as evidenced by the results of testing three brands of neoprene gloves, the abrasion resistance of any one glove material may be significantly affected by variations in production processes. PMID:14689500

  17. Diagnosis of erosive tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis 'erosion' is made from characteristic deviations from the original anatomical tooth morphology, thus distinguishing acid-induced tissue loss from other forms of wear. Primary pathognomonic features are shallow concavities on smooth surfaces occurring coronal from the enamel-cementum junction. Problems from diagnosing occlusal surfaces and exposed dentine are discussed. Indices for recording erosive wear include morphological as well as quantitative criteria. Currently, various indices are used, each having their virtues and flaws, making the comparison of prevalence studies difficult. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) is described, which is intended to provide an easy tool for research as well as for use in general dental practice. The cumulative score of this index is the sum of the most severe scores obtained from all sextants and is linked to suggestions for clinical management. In addition to recording erosive lesions, the assessment of progression is important as the indication of treatment measures depends on erosion activity. A number of evaluated and sensitive methods for in vitro and in situ approaches are available, but the fundamental problem for their clinical use is the lack of reidentifiable reference areas. Tools for clinical monitoring are described. PMID:24993255

  18. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  19. Air-propelled abrasive grit for postemergence in-row weed control in field corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic growers need additional tools for weed control. A new technique involving abrasive grit propelled by compressed air was tested in field plots. Grit derived from corn cobs was directed at seedlings of summer annual weeds growing at the bases of corn plants when the corn was at differing early...

  20. PAGMan - propelled abrasive grit to manage weeds in soybean and corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean and corn production in organic systems or in systems in which weeds developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Here we report on two developments: (i) the safety to soybean seedlings of using air-propelled abrasive grit (PAG) for managing...

  1. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  2. Effects of sintering temperatures on microstructure and wear resistance of iron-silica composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Adibah; Mamat, Othman

    2015-07-01

    Ceramic particle reinforced into metal base matrix composite has been reported to produce higher strength and wear resistance than its alloys because the ceramic phases can strongly resist abrasion. In this study the iron matrix was reinforced with two compositions of 20 and 25 wt. % fine silica particles. The compacts were produced by using powder metallurgy fabrication technique and sintered at three sintering temperatures: 1000, 1100 and 1200°C. Effects of various sintering temperatures on microstructures and the composite's wear resistance were evaluated via optical and SEM microscopy. Both compositions were also subjected to ball-on-disk wear test. The results showed the reinforcement weight fraction of 20 wt.% of silica and sintering temperature at 1100°C exhibited better result, in all aspects. It possessed higher mechanical properties, it's microstructure revealed most intact reinforcing region and it displayed higher wear resistance during wear test.

  3. Corneal Abrasions and Corneal Foreign Bodies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faheem; House, Robert James; Feldman, Brad Hal

    2015-09-01

    Corneal abrasions and corneal foreign bodies are frequently encountered ophthalmological injuries that are commonly diagnosed and managed by primary care physicians. The clinical course of a corneal epithelial defect can range from a relatively benign self-healing abrasion to a potentially sight-threatening complication such as a corneal ulcer, recurrent erosion, or traumatic iritis. A detailed clinical history regarding risk factors and exposure, along with a thorough slit lamp examination with fluorescein dye are essential for proper diagnosis and treatment, as well as to rule out penetrating globe injuries. Referral to an ophthalmologist is recommended in difficult cases or if other injuries are suspected. PMID:26319343

  4. Universal scaling relations for pebble abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of abrasion of gravel in bed load transport results from particle-to-particle collisions, where the energy involved is sufficient to cause chipping and spallation but not fragmentation of parent grains. The removed rock material is not infinitesimal; daughter products as large as coarse sand can be produced. Although previous work has shown that lithology, grain shape, and energy of collision are contributing factors that control abrasion rates of river-bed material, little is known regarding the relationship between these factors and diminution rates. Here we explicitly isolate and investigate how these three factors influence rates of abrasion and the size distribution of daughter products, with laboratory experiments. The apparatus is a double pendulum (Newton's cradle) that produces well-controlled binary collisions. A high-speed camera precisely measures collision energy, while mass of parent rocks. and the size and shape distributions of daughter products, are measured periodically. We examined abrasion of initially square-cut 'rocks' as they underwent successive collisions in the binary collision apparatus. We have examined mass loss rate for varied lithologies, and observe a similar power-law relationship between impact energy and mass abraded. When normalized by sensible material properties, mass loss curves for all materials collapse onto a single curve, suggesting that the underlying mechanics of abrasion for different materials are the same. The relationship does not display the linear trend expected from pure energetics, and we suggest that this is a shape effect as protruding - and hence easily eroded - corners are worn away. Analysis of daughter-product particle size distributions for different lithology fragments - including natural rocks and also bricks - show the same functional form. Surprisingly, it is the power-law relation expected for brittle materials undergoing fragmentation. This suggests that brittle fracture theory also

  5. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing PMID:26229264

  6. Recent progress of abrasion-resistant materials: learning from nature.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2016-01-21

    Abrasion-resistant materials have attracted great attention for their broad applications in industry, biomedicine and military. However, the development of abrasion-resistant materials that have with unique features such as being lightweight and flexible remains a great challenge in order to satisfy unmet demands. The outstanding performance of natural abrasion-resistant materials motivates the development of new bio-inspired abrasion-resistant materials. This review summarizes the recent progress in the investigation of natural abrasion-resistant materials to explore their general design principles (i.e., the correlation between chemical components and structural features). Following natural design principles, several artificial abrasion-resistant materials have shown unique abrasion-resistant properties. The potential challenges in the future and possible solutions for designing bio-inspired abrasion-resistant materials are also briefly discussed. PMID:26335377

  7. Effect of Toothpastes with Different Abrasives on Eroded Human Enamel: An in situ/ex vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Meire Coelho; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Vieirac, Ricardo de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the abrasive effect of CaCO3 and SiO2-based fluoride-free experimental toothpastes on eroded human permanent dental enamel and evaluate the effectiveness of waiting periods between acid exposure and tooth brushing. Twelve volunteers wore palatal appliances containing human enamel blocks for two periods of five days each. The appliances were immersed in a soft drink for five minutes four times a day (9:00 am, 11:00 am, 2:00 pm and 4:00 pm). On two occasions, two blocks were not submitted to additional treatment; two blocks were brushed (30 s) either with a CaCO3 or SiO2 toothpaste immediately after erosion and two blocks were brushed 1 h after erosion. Thus, the sample was divided into six groups: erosion alone (CaCO3 and SiO2 control); brushing with fluoride-free toothpaste (CaCO3 immediate and 1 h after erosion; SiO2 immediate and 1 h after erosion). Significant differences in wear depth were found between the enamel blocks in the CaCO3 immediate and 1 h after erosion groups and the blocks in the CaCO3 control group (p=0.001; p=0.022). No significant differences were found regarding the change in roughness and wear depth between blocks submitted to immediate abrasion and 1 h after erosion (CaCO3 and SiO2). The data revealed that surface roughness and wear depth is increased when erosion is combined with dental abrasion, regardless of the abrasive used. Waiting for 1 h to brush the eroded blocks offered no protective effect. PMID:24198851

  8. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  9. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of a Novel 6351 Al-Al4SiC4 Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Manas Kumar; Biswas, Koushik; Saha, Atanu; Maity, Joydeep

    2015-02-01

    In this research work the dry sliding wear behavior of 6351 Al alloy and 6351 Al based composites possessing varying amount of (2-7 vol.%) in situ Al4SiC4 reinforcement was investigated at low sliding speed (1 m/s) against a hardened EN 31 disk at different loads. In general, the wear mechanism involved adhesion and microcutting abrasion. Under selected loads (9.8 and 24.5 N), the overall wear resistance increased with increasing content of Al4SiC4 particles since particles stood tall against the process of wear. Besides, strain hardening of the matrix played an additional role to provide wear resistance. Therefore, the newly developed 6351Al-Al4SiC4 composite can be used as light weight wear resistance component in industry.

  10. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (j) All employees using abrasive wheels shall be protected by eye protection equipment in accordance with the requirements of subpart I of this part except when adequate eye protection is afforded by eye shields which are permanently attached to the bench or floor stand....

  11. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  12. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  13. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  14. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... spindle speed under all conditions of normal grinding. The rated maximum speed of the wheel shall not be...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... spindle speed under all conditions of normal grinding. The rated maximum speed of the wheel shall not be...) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides...

  17. Evaluation and Treatment of Perioperative Corneal Abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Kira L.; Fleischut, Peter M.; Kim, Charles; Levine, Ben; Faggiani, Susan L.; Banerjee, Samprit; Gadalla, Farida; Lelli, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate perioperative risk factors for corneal abrasion (CA) and to determine current care for perioperative CA in a tertiary care setting. Methods. Hospital-based, cross-sectional study. In Operating Room and Post-Anesthesia Care Units patients, a comparison of cases and controls was evaluated to elucidate risk factors, time to treatment, and most common treatments prescribed for corneal abrasions. Results. 86 cases of corneal abrasion and 89 controls were identified from the 78,542 surgical procedures performed over 2 years. Statistically significant risk factors were age (P = 0.0037), general anesthesia (P < 0.001), greater average estimated blood loss (P < 0.001), eyes taped during surgery (P < 0.001), prone position (P < 0.001), trendelenburg position (P < 0.001), and supplemental oxygen en route to and in the Post-Anesthesia Care Units (P < 0.001). Average time to complaint was 129 minutes. 94% of cases had an inpatient ophthalmology consult, with an average time to consult of 164 minutes. The most common treatment was artificial tears alone (40%), followed by combination treatment of antibiotic ointment and artificial tears (35.3%). Conclusions. Trendelenburg positioning is a novel risk factor for CA. Diagnosis and treatment of perioperative corneal abrasions by an ophthalmologist typically require three hours in the tertiary care setting. PMID:24672709

  18. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  19. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  1. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  5. Thermocycling--the effects upon the compressive strength and abrasion resistance of three composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of thermocycling upon the compressive strength and abrasive wear resistance of three commercial composites Fulfil, P-50 and Herculite-XR. Specimens of each material were divided into five treatment groups comprising a control, and four different cycling and storage regimes. Tests for compressive strength and wear resistance were carried out. Prior to testing all specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 week. Three groups were stored at a temperature of 37 degrees C and the remaining two at 60 degrees C. Thereafter all groups that were thermocycled were subjected to 750 cycles of a thermocycling regime consisting of the cycle ACAB where A and B represent the fixed temperatures of 37 degrees C and 5 degrees C, and C, depending upon the treatment group, either 50 degrees C or 60 degrees C. One-way analyses of variance upon the compressive strength and wear factor data following the treatments highlighted significant differences in the mean compressive strength for all materials (Fulfil (P < 0.05), P-50 and Herculite-XR (P < 0.01)) and in the wear factor values for only Fulfil and P-50 (P < 0.001). Surprisingly, thermocycling P-50 with an upper temperature limit of 50 degrees C had catastrophic consequences upon the measured properties. It is concluded that some of the observed behaviour may have potentially detrimental consequences upon the long-term clinical durability of the materials tested. PMID:7996337

  6. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  7. Detailed study of oxidation/wear mechanism in lox turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Wear of 440C angular contact ball bearings of the phase 2 high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) has been studied by means of various advanced nondestructive techniques (NDT) and modeled with reference to all known material, design, and operation variables. Three modes dominating the wear scenario were found to be the adhesive/sheer peeling (ASP), oxidation, and abrasion. Bearing wear was modeled in terms of the three modes. Lacking a comprehensive theory of rolling contact wear to date, each mode is modeled after well-established theories of sliding wear, while sliding velocity and distance are related to microsliding in ball-to-ring contacts. Microsliding, stress, temperature, and other contact variables are evaluated with analytical software packages of SHABERTH(TM)/SINDA(TM) and ADORE(TM). Empirical constants for the models are derived from NIST experiments by applying the models to the NIST wear data. The bearing wear model so established precisely predicts quite well the average ball wear rate for the HPOTP bearings. The wear rate has been statistically determined for the entire population of flight and development bearings based on Rocketdyne records to date. Numerous illustrations are given.

  8. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles. PMID:24909664

  9. [Improve wear resistance of UHMWPE by O+ ion implanted].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dangsheng

    2003-12-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was implanted with 450 keV and 100 keV O+ ions at dosage of 1 x 10(15)/cm2, 5 x 10(15)/cm2, 3 x 10(14)/cm2, respectively. Its wear behaviors were studied under dry friction condition and lubrication by means of distilled water using a pin-on-disk tribometer with a Si3N4 ceramic ball as a counterface. The wear surfaces were examined with SEM. The experimental results showed that the wear rate of implanted UHMWPE is lower than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions, especially for 450 keV energy and 5 x 10(15)/cm2 dose implantation. The friction coefficient of O+ ions implanted UHMWPE is higher than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions. The adhesive, plow and plastic deformation are the wearing mechanism for un-implanted UHMWPE; the fatigue and abrasive wear are that for implanted UHMWPE. PMID:14716850

  10. Friction and wear of alumina ceramics at high sliding speed

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.M.; Rigaut, B.; Armanet, F. Compiegne, Universite de Technologie )

    1991-07-01

    The influence of the sliding speed (from 5 m/s to 50 m/s) on friction properties of two Al2O3 steel sliding couples was studied on a pin-on-disk wear machine. For one Al2O3 pin on steel disk, a transition speed was found at about 30 m/s for both friction coefficient and wear rate of the pin. The wear rate is very small when the speed is lower than 30 m/s, and it becomes three times higher when the speed is over this value. In addition five alumina ceramics (94 percent, 95 percent, 96 percent, 99.7 percent, 99.8 percent HIP) were tested on the wear machine at 40 m/s. Four of them were also tested on an abrasion machine (pin-test) at very low speed (40 mm/s). Both experimental results show that the wear resistance of this kind of material is more closely related to fracture toughness than to hardness. 19 refs.

  11. New Mechanisms of rock-bit wear in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Macini, Paolo

    1996-01-24

    This paper presents recent results of an investigation on failure mode and wear of rock-bits used to drill geothermal wells located in the area of Larderello (Italy). A new wear mechanism, conceived from drilling records and dull bit evaluation analysis, has been identified and a particular configuration of rock-bit has been developed and tested in order to reduce drilling costs. The role of high Bottom Hole Temperature (BHT) on rock-bit performances seems not yet very well understood: so far, only drillability and formation abrasiveness are generally considered to account for poor drilling performances. In this paper, the detrimental effects of high BHT on sealing and reservoir system of Friction Bearing Rock-bits (FBR) have been investigated, and a new bearing wear pattern for FBR's run in high BHT holes has been identified and further verified via laboratory inspections on dull bits. A novel interpretation of flat worn cutting structure has been derived from the above wear pattern, suggesting the design of a particular bit configuration. Test bits, designed in the light of the above criteria, have been prepared and field tested successfully. The paper reports the results of these tests, which yielded a new rock-bit application, today considered as a standad practice in Italian geothermal fields. This application suggests that the correct evaluation of rock-bit wear can help to improve the overall drilling performances and to minimize drilling problems through a better interpretation of the relationships amongst rock-bits, formation properties and downhole temperature.

  12. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities. PMID:25922212

  13. Advance Abrasion Resistant Materials for Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.

    2004-06-01

    The high-density infrared (HDI) transient-liquid coating (TLC) process was successfully developed and demonstrated excellent, enhanced (5 times higher than the current material and process) wear performance for the selected functionally graded material (FGM) coatings under laboratory simulated, in-service conditions. The mating steel component exhibited a wear rate improvement of approximately one and a half (1.5) times. After 8000 cycles of. wear testing, the full-scale component testing demonstrated that the coating integrity was still excellent. Little or no spalling was observed to occur.

  14. ADVANCED ABRASION RESISTANT MATERIALS FOR MINING

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.

    2004-04-08

    The high-density infrared (HDI) transient-liquid coating (TLC) process was successfully developed and demonstrated excellent, enhanced (5 times higher than the current material and process) wear performance for the selected functionally graded material (FGM) coatings under laboratory simulated, in-service conditions. The mating steel component exhibited a wear rate improvement of approximately one and a half (1.5) times. After 8000 cycles of wear testing, the full-scale component testing demonstrated that the coating integrity was still excellent. Little or no spalling was observed to occur.

  15. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation. PMID:27305512

  16. Simplified Abrasion Test Methodology for Candidate EVA Glove Lay-Ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabel, Emily; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, space suit outer-layer fabrics were badly abraded after performing just a few extravehicular activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots that penetrated the outer-layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than 8 hrs of surface operations. Current plans for the exploration planetary space suits require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on a lunar or Martian surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last 40 years and improve on the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo Program. Over the past 25 years the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division has focused on tumble testing as means of simulating wear on the outer layer of the space suit fabric. Most recently, in 2009, testing was performed on 4 different candidate outer layers to gather baseline data for future use in design of planetary space suit outer layers. In support of the High Performance EVA Glove Element of the Next Generation Life Support Project, testing a new configuration was recently attempted in which require 10% of the fabric per replicate of that need in 2009. The smaller fabric samples allowed for reduced per sample cost and flexibility to test small samples from manufacturers without the overhead to have a production run completed. Data collected from this iteration was compared to that taken in 2009 to validate the new test method. In addition the method also evaluated the fabrics and fabric layups used in a prototype thermal micrometeoroid garment (TMG) developed for EVA gloves under the NASA High Performance EVA Glove Project. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, results of the validation study, and results of the TMG testing.

  17. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  18. Wear mechanisms and improvements of wear resistance in cobalt-chromium alloy femoral components in artificial total knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Like

    CrMo alloy surface roughness was higher than 0.022 mum Ra (surface roughness average), UHMWPE wear increased with increasing CoCrMo alloy surface roughness. Bone and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement abrasive particles created scratches on the alloy via a ploughing mechanism, and resulted in significantly rougher surfaces than controls without particles (P < 0.01). Solution treatments at 1230sp°C and 1245sp°C reduced the hardness and wear resistance of the as-cast F75 CoCrMo alloy. Aging at 700sp°C caused recrystallization of the forged F799 alloy and improved wear resistance. Thermo-mechanical treatments have the potential to increase the lifetime of artificial joints by increasing the wear resistance of CoCrMo components.

  19. Abrasion and fatigue resistance of PDMS containing multiblock polyurethanes after accelerated water exposure at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Kimberly A; Wilson, Charles L; Himes, Adam K; Dawson, James W; Haddad, Tarek D; Buckalew, Adam J; Miller, Jennifer P; Untereker, Darrel F; Simha, Narendra K

    2013-11-01

    Segmented polyurethane multiblock polymers containing polydimethylsiloxane and polyether soft segments form tough and easily processed thermoplastic elastomers (PDMS-urethanes). Two commercially available examples, PurSil 35 (denoted as P35) and Elast-Eon E2A (denoted as E2A), were evaluated for abrasion and fatigue resistance after immersion in 85 °C buffered water for up to 80 weeks. We previously reported that water exposure in these experiments resulted in a molar mass reduction, where the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction is supported by a straight forward Arrhenius analysis over a range of accelerated temperatures (37-85 °C). We also showed that the ultimate tensile properties of P35 and E2A were significantly compromised when the molar mass was reduced. Here, we show that the reduction in molar mass also correlated with a reduction in both the abrasion and fatigue resistance. The instantaneous wear rate of both P35 and E2A, when exposed to the reciprocating motion of an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) jacketed cable, increased with the inverse of the number averaged molar mass (1/Mn). Both materials showed a change in the wear surface when the number-averaged molar mass was reduced to ≈ 16 kg/mole, where a smooth wear surface transitioned to a 'spalling-like' pattern, leaving the wear surface with ≈ 0.3 mm cracks that propagated beyond the contact surface. The fatigue crack growth rate for P35 and E2A also increased in proportion to 1/Mn, after the molar mass was reduced below a critical value of ≈30 kg/mole. Interestingly, this critical molar mass coincided with that at which the single cycle stress-strain response changed from strain hardening to strain softening. The changes in both abrasion and fatigue resistance, key predictors for long term reliability of cardiac leads, after exposure of this class of PDMS-urethanes to water suggests that these materials are susceptible to mechanical compromise in vivo. PMID:23871543

  20. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  1. Evaluation of weight loss and surface roughness of compomers after simulated toothbrushing abrasion test.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Wang, Linda; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel; Prakki, Anuradha; Mondelli, José; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Ishikiriama, Aquira

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the compomers wear by an "in vitro" toothbrushing abrasion test. The null hypotheses tested were that there would be no differences in weight loss and no significant changes in surface roughness of the compomers after this test. The utilized commercial brands were Dyract (Dentsply), Dyract AP (Dentsply), Compoglass F (Vivadent), Freedom (SDI), F2000 (3M ESPE), which were compared to the two resin composites Z100 (3M ESPE) and Silux Plus (3M ESPE). Ten cylindrical specimens for each commercial brand were prepared with 5mm diameter and 3mm thickness. An appropriate machine with soft bristle tips containing dentifrice solution and deionized water was used. A total of 100,000 brushing cycles were performed. The amount of weight loss was measured by the percentage alteration between the initial (before toothbrushing) and final weight (after toothbrushing), measured by a Sartorius analytical balance. The surface roughness change was determined by the percentage difference between initial and final means after 5 tracings by a T 1000 Hommel Tester roughness meter on the specimen's surfaces before and after toothbrushing abrasion test. The statistical analysis (Students paired t-test, ANOVA and Tukey, á=0.05) showed that all materials presented statistically significant weight loss and roughness increase after abrasion test. All compomers presented higher weight loss than resin composites. Freedom and Dyract AP presented the lowest weight loss among compomers. F2000 presented the worst abrasion resistance, without statistical differences with Dyract. For roughness changes, Dyract, Dyract AP, Z100, Compoglass F and Silux Plus showed the lowest surface roughness alteration, in increasing order, without statistical differences between them. Freedom was the statistically roughest material of the study. PMID:20924536

  2. Abrasion resistance of linings in filament wound composite pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    Fiberglass filament wound composite pipe has numerous industrial applications including transportation of petroleum and natural gas. Its corrosion resistance is well known but it can be susceptible to abrasion and erosion when it is used to transport slurries or dry gas containing sand particles. However, composite pipe can be manufactured integrally with abrasion resistant linings which protect the pipe from abrasion and erosion and increase its life. Laboratory investigations were performed to determine the effect of abrasive flows through polyurea-lined and unlined glass-reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe, ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene (PE) pipe, and unlined steel pipe. Results are provided for the abrasion resistance, chemical resistance, adhesion strength, elongation, tensile strength, impact resistance and hardness of selected linings. The abrasion resistance of polyurea-lined composite pipe proved to be almost as resistant to abrasion and erosion as unlined steel pipe without the electrochemical corrosion associated with steel pipe.

  3. Abrasion-Resistant Technology and its Prospect for CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Li, Y. J.; Wang, L. J.; Liu, S. H.; Dou, Q. R.

    In recent years, CFB boilers (CFBB) have been widely used in the commercial power plants due to its environmental benefits, high combustion efficiency, wide coal flexibility, and some other advantages. At the same time, the abrasion problem, the greatest weakness of this kind of boiler, has been gradually exposed in its application process. The abrasion, particularly on key parts such as the heating surface of water-cooled wall, furnace corners, separator entrance, seriously restricts the long-period operation ability of the CFBB. This article discusses current development status for various abrasion resistant refractory materials used in a CFBB. Some comments are provided for developing new high-performance abrasion resistant refractory materials and rapid-repaired materials according to the abrasion principle and the abrasion on different parts, as well as the economical and environmental requirements for the material. The abrasion solution and operation period of CFBB can be better improved given realization.

  4. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  5. Development of new bound abrasive polishers for final finishing of optical glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchebner, Birgit E.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    1995-09-01

    Because there are no practical commercially available bound abrasive polishing media, we are developing a bound abrasive polisher for deterministic finishing of optical glasses. Several in- house formulated polishing pellets, molded laps, and ring tools have been studied. Two experimental test beds were employed. The first involved the polishing of flat optical glass parts on single pellet and molded pellet laps. The tests were conducted on a single spindle machine. The performance of in-house manufactured laps was compared to experimental and commercial formulations obtained from industry. Compositions which polished the glass below 20 angstrom rms surface roughness were selected for additional testing. The second test bed for these formulations was the Opticam SM. Materials were molded into a ring tool geometry. Although the tools polished effectively, more work is required to control surface figure during final finishing.

  6. Liquid abrasive pressure pot scoping tests report

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary initiatives of the LITCO Decontamination Development group at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant (ICPP) are the development of methods to eliminate the use of sodium bearing decontamination chemicals and minimization of the amount of secondary waste generated during decontamination activities. In July of 1994, a Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement was issued by the INEL to determine commercial interest in the development of an in-situ liquid abrasive grit blasting system. As a result of the CBD announcement, Klieber & Schulz issued an Expression of Interest letter which stated they would be interested in testing a prototype Liquid Abrasive Pressure Pot (LAPP). LITCO`s Decontamination group and Kleiber & Schulz entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in which the Decontamination Development group tested the prototype LAPP in a non-radioactive hot cell mockup. Test results are provided.

  7. Composites for Increased Wear Resistance: Current Achievements and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The various ways in which reductions in wear and/or friction can be achieved by the use of composite materials are reviewed. Reinforced plastics are emphasized and it is shown that fillers and fibers reduce wear via several mechanisms additional to their role of increasing overall mechanical strength, preferential transfer, counter face abrasion, preferential load support, or third-body formation on either the composite or its counterface. Examples are given from recent work on thin layer composites of the type widely used as dry bearings in aircraft flight control mechanisms. Developments in metal based composites and carbon-carbon composites for high energy brakes are discussed. The aspects which could benefit by increased fundamental understanding identified and the types of composites which appear to have greatest potential for further growth are indicated.

  8. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Kerns, John A.; Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Colella, Nicholas J.; Davis, Pete J.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools.

  9. Precision replenishable grinding tool and manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Blaedel, K.L.; Colella, N.J.; Davis, P.J.; Juntz, R.S.

    1998-06-09

    A reusable grinding tool consisting of a replaceable single layer of abrasive particles intimately bonded to a precisely configured tool substrate, and a process for manufacturing the grinding tool are disclosed. The tool substrate may be ceramic or metal and the abrasive particles are preferably diamond, but may be cubic boron nitride. The manufacturing process involves: coating a configured tool substrate with layers of metals, such as titanium, copper and titanium, by physical vapor deposition (PVD); applying the abrasive particles to the coated surface by a slurry technique; and brazing the abrasive particles to the tool substrate by alloying the metal layers. The precision control of the composition and thickness of the metal layers enables the bonding of a single layer or several layers of micron size abrasive particles to the tool surface. By the incorporation of an easily dissolved metal layer in the composition such allows the removal and replacement of the abrasive particles, thereby providing a process for replenishing a precisely machined grinding tool with fine abrasive particles, thus greatly reducing costs as compared to replacing expensive grinding tools. 11 figs.

  10. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  11. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  12. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  13. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  14. A personal perspective and update on erosive tooth wear - 10 years on: Part 2 - Restorative management.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D

    2016-08-26

    The management challenge with erosive tooth wear is that the condition involves erosion and contributions from attrition and abrasion, both of which impact on the longevity of restorations. Severe erosive tooth wear results in visibly shorter teeth, exposure of dentine and adaptive changes which complicate restorative management. There is increasing evidence to suggest if the risk factors, such as reducing the frequency of acidic foods and drinks, are reduced the progression of tooth wear slows and follows a normal pattern of wear. But once teeth become shorter patients often seek advice from dentists on restorative intervention. Composite restorations are successful in some patients but they often involve regular maintenance with repairs and rebuilds, which for some patients is unacceptable. Full coverage crowns, although destructive of tooth tissue, remain an option for restorations. PMID:27561573

  15. Wear of dental resin composites: insights into underlying processes and assessment methods--a review.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; De Moraes Purquerio, Benedito; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2003-05-15

    Given the increased aesthetic demands of patients, along with improvements in the formulation of resin composites, the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, and concerns about dental amalgam fillings, the applicability of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread. As resistance to wear represents an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, the aim of this article was to define what constitutes wear; the major underlying phenomena involved in this process-adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and corrosion-being described. Discussions were also focused on factors that contribute both to the magnitude and minimization of resin composite wear. Finally, insights were included on both in vivo and laboratory studies used to determine wear resistance. PMID:12687721

  16. Synthesis CNTs Particle Based Abrasive Media for Abrasive Flow Machining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sonu; Murtaza, Q.; Walia, R. S.; Dhull, S.; Tyagi, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    Abrasive flow machining (AFM) is a modem fine finishing process used for intricate and internal finishing of components or parts. It is based on flowing of viscoelastic abrasive media over the surface to be fine finished. The abrasive media is the important parameter in the AFM process because of its ability to accurately abrade the predefined area along it flow path. In this study, an attempt is made to develop a new abrasive, alumina with Carbon non tubes (CNTs) in viscoelastic medium. CNT s in house produced through chemical vapour deposition technique and characterize through TEM. Performance evaluation of the new abrasive media is carried out by increasing content of CNT s with fixed extrusion pressure, viscosity of media and media flow rate as process parameters and surface finish improvement and material removal as process responses in AFM setup. Significantly improvement has been observed in material removal and maximum improvement of 100% has been observed in the surface finish on the inner cylindrical surface of the cast iron work piece.

  17. [Influences of composition on brush wear of composite resins. Influences of particle size and content of filler].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, S

    1990-07-01

    The influences of the composition on abrasion resistance of composite resins were examined using various experimental composite resins which had various matrix resin, filler size and content. The abrasion test was conducted by the experimental toothbrush abrasion testing machine developed in our laboratory. Three series of heat-curing composite resins were tested. One series was made from a Bis-MPEPP or UDMA monomer, and a silica filler with an average particle size of 0.04, 1.9, 3.8, 4.3, 7.5, 13.8 and 14.1 microns. The filler content of this series was constant at 45 wt%. The second series contained a silica filler of 4.3 microns in a content ranging from 35 to 75 wt%. The third series contained a microfiller (0.04 microns) and macrofiller (4.3 microns) in total content of 45 wt%. In this series, the microfiller was gradually replaced by 5, 15, 25 and 45 wt% of the macrofiller. The results obtained for these three series indicated that the abrasion resistance of composite resins was controlled by the inorganic filler, mainly filler size and content. The abrasion loss did not vary with the difference of matrix resin. When the particle size of the filler was below about 5 microns, the abrasion resistance decreased markedly with the decrease in filler size. The composite resin which contained a 0.04 or 1.9 micron filler was less resistant to toothbrush wear than the unfilled matrix resin. However, the microfiller also contributed to abrasion resistance when used in combination with the macrofiller, although abrasion resistance decreased with the increase in the microfiller concentration. The increase of filler content clearly improved the abrasion resistance when used the macrofiller. The analysis of these results and SEM observations of the brushed surfaces of samples suggested that the toothbrush abrasion was three-body abrasion caused by the abrasive in the toothpaste, and affected by the difference in the particle size between abrasive and filler, and between

  18. Metallographic evaluation of hip joint implants wear and electrochemical implants potential.

    PubMed

    Kmieć, Krzysztof; Sibinski, Marcin; Synder, Marek; Drobniewski, Marek; Kozłowski, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    We performed metallographic evaluations of implants, removed during revision hip arthroplasty. The implants were evaluated for electrochemical potentials and the presence of wear products on the implants surface. A total of 50 patients (50 hips) underwent revision hip arthroplasty during the years 2007-2009 for aseptic loosening. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from six months to 17 years). All hip joint implants removed during the revision arthroplasty were submitted to metallographic analysis and all heads were submitted to analysis under a scanning microscope. All polyethylene (PE) cups and inserts showed numerous features of wear (friction wear, plastic deformation and creeping, fatigue wear and degradation), six PE cups were broken. In six ceramic cups, only friction wear features were found; one of them was mechanically broken. In all heads articulating on PE not one had any mechanical damage. Heads of ceramic implants in ceramic-ceramic articulation undergo abrasive wear. None of the studied stems (cemented or uncemented) revealed any features of wear. Areas of titanium crystals (formed by electrolytic sedimentation of metals) were macroscopically identified on the sliding surface of six heads that was confirmed by chemical composition and scanning microscope.In the course of prosthesis use, wear products are produced and transferred onto the sliding surfaces of implant heads and cups via ways other than purely mechanical contact. It has been confirmed that metals used for implant construction, make galvanic cells with different electrochemical potentials. PMID:25362874

  19. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  20. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite I-beam stiffened airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for I-beam stiffened skins constructed of aluminum, graphite-epoxy composite, and glass hybrid composite under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during an emergency belly landing. A test apparatus was developed to abrade the test specimens on actual runway surface under a range of pressures (2-5 psi) and velocities (16-50 mph). These parameters were chosen to fall within the range of conditions typical of an airframe sliding on a runway surface. The effects of the test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. In addition, the test apparatus was equipped to monitor the temperature variations on the backside of the skins during abrasion and these results are presented.

  1. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  2. Investigation of diamond-impregnated drill bit wear while drilling under Earth and Mars conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K. A.; Cooper, G. A.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments conducted on a dry and a water-saturated rock under Martian and Earth atmospheric pressures revealed two different wear behaviors in diamond-impregnated drill bits. When the rock was saturated, drilling under Martian pressure caused the water in contact with the rotating bit to vaporize. Since the volumetric expansion of the liquid water or ice as it turned into a vapor was 170,000, the continuous flow of water vapor cleared the cuttings out of the hole. Thus the bit matrix was always exposed to abrasive wear by the rock cuttings and was continually wearing down and exposing new diamonds to the rock. When the rock was dry, an accumulation of rock cuttings protected the matrix from abrasive wear. Since fresh diamonds were not exposed in a timely manner, the rate of penetration dropped. Both rock conditions, namely, dry or water saturated, may exist on Mars. This adds to the complexity of the drill bit design as, ideally, a bit should penetrate the rock irrespective of whether it is dry or water saturated. The ``fail-safe'' bit would have a very soft matrix to always produce some rock penetration at the expense of potential excessive bit wear and shallower than anticipated hole depth.

  3. Wellhead bowl protector and retrieving tool

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.

    1991-09-03

    This patent describes improvement in a wellhead protection system including a wear bushing and a retrieving tool. The improvement comprises a wear bushing supported within the wellhead, wherein the wear bushing includes an enlarged upper end having an external support shoulder for engagement with an internal support shoulder formed in the wellhead; wherein the wear bushing further includes an internal circumferential slot intersected by at least one vertically extending slot, the vertical slot extending from the circumferential slot to the upper end of the wear bushing; a retrieving tool having at least one outwardly biased, retractable lug member mounted thereon; and wherein the retrieving tool includes an enlarged portion adapted to be received within the enlarged upper end of the wear bushing. This patent also describes a method of retrieving a wear bushing from a wellhead comprising the steps of: lowering a retrieving tool into the wellhead for locking engagement with the wear bushing; aligning the retrieving tool with the wear bushing for automatically forcing lug members carried by the retrieving tool outwardly into locking engagement with the wear bushing; monitoring drill string weight for determining engagement of the retrieving tool with the wear bushing, wherein a substantial decrease in drill string weight is an indication that the retrieving tool is engaged with the wear bushing; and removing the wear bushing from the wellhead.

  4. Effects of sterilization on wear in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    White, S E; Paxson, R D; Tanner, M G; Whiteside, L A

    1996-10-01

    Twenty-nine Ortholoc II ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene tibial components were retrieved from 27 patients at revision surgery from the same hospital. The polyethylene material grade, method of sterilization, and sterilization dosage for 26 of the tibial components were determined by tracing the material lot number for each component. Each tibial surface was scored for wear using a qualitative scoring system that evaluated delamination, pitting, scratching, cold flow, abrasion, and burnishing. After the wear score analysis, 14 of the 26 components were analyzed to determine the physical and mechanical properties of the polyethylene including toughness and elongation. Seven of these 14 components were sterilized using ethylene oxide and 7 were sterilized using gamma radiation. Tibial components sterilized with gamma radiation had significantly higher wear rates than those sterilized with ethylene oxide. Thirteen of the 18 components sterilized with gamma radiation had delamination of the articular surface compared with 2 of 8 components sterilized with ethylene oxide. Mechanical properties were significantly affected by the sterilization method. Components sterilized with ethylene oxide had significantly higher toughness and percent elongation than those sterilized with gamma radiation. These findings suggest that ethylene oxide sterilization caused less microstructural damage to the polyethylene and resulted in significantly less wear than was found in those components sterilized with gamma radiation. PMID:8895634

  5. Critical Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Cemented Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2015-07-01

    Wear phenomena of cemented carbide (94 wt.% WC, 6 wt.% Co) tip of conical picks have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The conical pick is one type of the cutters which are used to excavate soft structure like coal. It has a cone-shaped abrasive part made of cemented carbide (CC). The picks, under study, have been used for coal mining in an underground mine through a continuous miner machine. During the critical analysis of four picks, wear mechanisms are categorized into four parts, such as, cracks, cavity formation in WC grains, grinding effect, and roughness of WC surface. Through a careful examination, the cracking mechanism has been further divided into three parts. They are cracks with overlapping surfaces, crack on a large surface of CC, and cracks in WC grains. In addition, the severe crushing and tearing of WC grains have also been clearly examined. The possible causes of each wear phenomenon have been explained comprehensively. Crushing and corrosion are the two wearing processes which have severely deteriorated the condition of the CC. Corrosion has been easily identified by observing a number of pores and triangular notches in the WC surface. The oxidation of WC grains due to corrosion has been established by EDS and XRD.

  6. Wear rate control of peek surfaces modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, S.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Faure, N.; Beaugiraud, B.; Guibert, M.; Mauclair, C.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser texturing on the tribological properties of PEEK surfaces under a ball-on-flat contact configuration. Thus, surfaces with circular dimples of various diameters and depth were created. Tests were conducted with a normal load of 5 N and a sliding velocity of 0.01 m s-1, using bovine calf serum at 37.5 °C as a lubricant. The tribological conditions including the sliding frequency and the lubricant viscosity indicate that tests were performed under boundary lubrication regime. Results showed that discs with higher dimple depth exhibited higher friction coefficient and caused more abrasive wear on the ball specimen. Nevertheless, tribosystems (ball and disc) with dimpled disc surfaces showed a higher wear resistance. In the frame of our experiments, wear rates obtained for tribosystems including dimpled surfaces were 10 times lower than tribosystems including limited patterned or untextured surfaces. Applications such as design of spinal implants may be concerned by such a surface treatment to increase wear resistance of components.

  7. The Inter-Relationship between Dietary and Environmental Properties and Tooth Wear: Comparisons of Mesowear, Molar Wear Rate, and Hypsodonty Index of Extant Sika Deer Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Mugino Ozaki; Yamada, Eisuke

    2014-01-01

    In reference to the evolutionary trend of increasing cheek tooth height in herbivorous ungulates, the causes of dental abrasion have long been debated. Interspecific comparisons of extant ungulates have revealed that both phytoliths in grass and external abrasive matter may play important roles. Using analysis of extant sika deer living in various environments and showing continuous latitudinal variation in food habits from northern grazing to southern browsing, we quantitatively evaluated the influence of dietary and environmental properties on three dental variables: mesowear score (MS), molar wear rate, and M3 hypsodonty index. We used 547 skulls and 740 mandibles from 16 populations of sika deer to obtain the dental measurements. We found that only graminoid proportion in diet correlated with MS and the molar wear rate, implying that phytoliths in grass abrade dental tissues. In contrast, annual precipitation in habitat was not correlated with any of the dental variables. We also found a significant correlation between the molar wear rate (selective pressure for high-crowned molars) and the M3 hypsodonty index of extant sika deer, implying an evolutionary increment in molar height corresponding to the molar wear rate. Our intraspecific comparative analyses provide further support for use of mesowear analysis as a paleodiet estimation method; it not only reveals staple food types (graminoids or dicots) but also implies regional or seasonal variation in the diet of the species. PMID:24603896

  8. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature. PMID:27010967

  9. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-03-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature.

  10. Wear-reducing Surface Functionalization of Implant Materials Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldorf, P.; Peters, R.; Reichel, S.; Schulz, A.-P.; Wendlandt, R.

    The aim of the project called "EndoLas" is the development of a reproducible and reliable method for a functionalization of articulating surfaces on hip joint endoprostheses due to a reduction of abrasion and wear by the generation of micro structures using ultrashort laser pulses. On the one hand, the microstructures shall ensure the capture of abraded particles, which cause third-body wear and thereby increase aseptic loosening. On the other hand, the structures shall improve or maintain the tribologically important lubricating film. Thereby, the cavities serve as a reservoir for the body's own synovial fluid. The dry friction, which promotes abrasion and is a part of the mixed friction in the joint, shall therefore be reduced. In experimental setups it was shown, that the abrasive wear can be reduced significantly due to micro-structuring the articulating implant surfaces. To shape the fine and deterministic cavities on the surfaces, an ultra-short pulsed laser, which is integrated in a high-precision, 5-axes micro-machining system, was used. The laser system, based on an Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier, has an average output power of 50 W at the fundamental wavelength of 1030 nm, a maximum repetition rate of 400 kHz and a pulse duration of 6 ps. Due to this, a maximum pulse energy of 125 μJ is achievable. Furthermore external second and third harmonic generation enables the usage of wavelengths in the green and violet spectral range.

  11. Optical wear monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  12. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use. PMID:20582212

  13. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... projections. The safety guard shall be mounted so as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the... as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the guard and its fastenings shall be...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... projections. The safety guard shall be mounted so as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the... as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the guard and its fastenings shall be...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... projections. The safety guard shall be mounted so as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the... as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the guard and its fastenings shall be...

  16. Effects of sintering temperature on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of WCp reinforced Ni-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-hui; Bai, Yang; Ye, Xu-chu

    2014-12-01

    This article focuses on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of 50wt%WC reinforced Ni-based composites prepared onto 304 stainless steel substrates by vacuum sintering at different sintering temperatures. The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The wear resistance of the coatings was tested by thrust washer testing. The mechanisms of the decomposition, dissolution, and precipitation of primary carbides, and their influences on the wear resistance have been discussed. The results indicate that the coating sintered at 1175°C is composed of fine WC particles, coarse M6C (M=Ni, Fe, Co, etc.) carbides, and discrete borides dispersed in solid solution. Upon increasing the sintering temperature to 1225°C, the microstructure reveals few incompletely dissolved WC particles trapped in larger M6C, Cr-rich lamellar M23C6, and M3C2 in the austenite matrix. M23C6 and M3C2 precipitates are formed in both the γ/M6C grain boundary and the matrix. These large-sized and lamellar brittle phases tend to weaken the wear resistance of the composite coatings. The wear behavior is controlled simultaneously by both abrasive wear and adhesive wear. Among them, abrasive wear plays a major role in the wear process of the coating sintered at 1175°C, while the effect of adhesive wear is predominant in the coating sintered at 1225°C.

  17. An investigation into the effects of conventional heat treatments on mechanical characteristics of new hot working tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, M. L.; Athmani, M.; Khelfaoui, Y.; Khettache, A.

    2012-02-01

    The effects of conventional heat treatments, i.e. quenching and tempering, on the mechanical characteristics of non standard hot work tool steel, close to either AISI-H11/H13 are investigated. The major elemental composition differences are in carbon, silicon and vanadium. The objective of the carried heat treatments is to obtain an efficient tool performance in terms of hardness, wear resistance and mechanical strength. Experimental results allow an explanation of the surface properties depending mainly on both chemical composition and optimised preheating parameters. After austenitizing at 1050 °C for 15 min, the as-quenched steel in oil bath exhibited the fully martensitic structure (without bainite) connected to a small fraction of retained austenite and complex carbides mainly of M23C6 type. Twice tempering at 500 °C and 600 °C resulted in initiating the precipitation processes and the secondary hardness effect. As a result, carbide content amounted to 3% while the retained austenite content decreased to 0%. Accordingly, the required mechanical properties in terms of hardness and wear are fulfilled and are adequately favourable in handling both shocks and pressures for the expected tool life. Induced microstructures are revealed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Phase compositions are assessed by means of X-ray diffraction technique while mechanical characteristics are investigated based on hardness and abrasive wear standard tests.

  18. Framework for assessing key variable dependencies in loose-abrasive grinding and polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Aikens, D.M.; Brown, N.J.

    1995-12-01

    This memo describes a framework for identifying all key variables that determine the figuring performance of loose-abrasive lapping and polishing machines. This framework is intended as a tool for prioritizing R&D issues, assessing the completeness of process models and experimental data, and for providing a mechanism to identify any assumptions in analytical models or experimental procedures. Future plans for preparing analytical models or performing experiments can refer to this framework in establishing the context of the work.

  19. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin. PMID:24642975

  20. Polyester and epoxy resins: Abrasion resistance. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and materials for enhanced wear and abrasion resistance of polyester and epoxy resins. Topics include test procedures and results, compounds and additives, forming processes, reinforcement effects, and applications. Electrical insulation, linings and coatings for numerous substrates, solar control film glazing material, hoses, material to rebuild worn metal parts, pipes, boats, industrial floor coverings, and ladder rungs are among the applications discussed. Trade name materials and manufacturers are included. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)