Science.gov

Sample records for abrasive wear mechanisms

  1. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  2. Experimental, numerical and analytical studies of abrasive wear: correlation between wear mechanisms and friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezlini, Salah; Zidi, M.; Arfa, H.; Ben Tkaya, Mohamed; Kapsa, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    The transport of granular material often generates severe damage. Understanding the correlation between the friction coefficient, particle geometry and wear mechanisms is of primary importance for materials undergoing abrasive wear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle geometry on wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. Numerical and analytical simulations and experimental results have been compared. The process to be studied is the scratch made by a rigid cone with different attack angles on a 5xxx aluminium alloy (Al-Mg) flat surface. A scratch test was used and the wear mechanisms were observed for different attack angles. A numerical study with a finite element code was made in order to understand the effect of attack angle on the friction coefficient. The contact surface and the friction coefficient were also studied, and the results compared to the Bowden and Tabor model. The superposition of the numerical, analytical and experimental results showed a better correlation between the wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. It also showed the importance of the model hypothesis used to simulate the scratch phenomenon. To cite this article: S. Mezlini et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  3. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  4. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  5. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  6. Abrasive Wear Study of NiCrFeSiB Flame Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satpal

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, abrasive wear behavior of NiCrFeSiB alloy coating on carbon steel was investigated. The NiCrFeSiB coating powder was deposited by flame spraying process. The microstructure, porosity and hardness of the coatings were evaluated. Elemental mapping was carried out in order to study the distribution of various elements in the coating. The abrasive wear behavior of these coatings was investigated under three normal loads (5, 10 and 15 N) and two abrasive grit sizes (120 and 320 grit). The abrasive wear rate was found to increase with the increase of load and abrasive size. The abrasive wear resistance of coating was found to be 2-3 times as compared to the substrate. Analysis of the scanning electron microscope images revealed cutting and plowing as the material removal mechanisms in these coatings under abrasive wear conditions used in this investigation.

  7. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Ordoñéz-Aguilera, Juan Fernando; Maenosono, Rafael Massunari; Volú, Fernanda Lessa Amaral; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm) were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10): Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3); RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC); RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100); and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2). Initial roughness (Ra, µm) was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles), and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm) was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05). The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm)/wear (µm) were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175); ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263); U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952); and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876). Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  8. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Ordoñéz-Aguilera, Juan Fernando; Maenosono, Rafael Massunari; Volú, Fernanda Lessa Amaral; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm) were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10): Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3); RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC); RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100); and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2). Initial roughness (Ra, µm) was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles), and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm) was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05). The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm)/wear (µm) were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175); ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263); U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952); and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876). Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations. PMID:25466330

  9. Three-body abrasive wear characteristics under reciprocating motion of CFRP in vibrating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Sadakazu; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Nakagawa, Tatsuo

    1996-12-31

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in industry because of their attractive mechanical characteristics. Such CFRP parts are invariably subjected to three-body wear due to small indentations and machine vibrations. In this study, the wear characteristics under the three-body condition and the abrasive wear of CFRP were investigated by using a vibrating environment and silicon carbide abrasive grains.

  10. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Cold-Sprayed 20 vol.% Cubic BN-NiCrAl Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Er-Juan; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chen-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    20 vol.% cubic boron nitride (cBN) dispersoid reinforced NiCrAl matrix nanocomposite coating was prepared by cold spray using mechanically alloyed nanostructured composite powders. The as-sprayed nanocomposite coating was annealed at a temperature of 750 °C to enhance the inter-particle bonding. Microstructure of spray powders and coatings was characterized. Vickers microhardness of the coatings was measured. Two-body abrasive wear behavior of the coatings was examined on a pin-on-disk test. It was found that, in mechanically alloyed composite powders, nano-sized and submicro-sized cBN particles are uniformly distributed in nanocrystalline NiCrAl matrix. Dense coating was deposited by cold spray at a gas temperature of 650 °C with the same phases and grain size as those of the starting powder. Vickers hardness test yielded a hardness of 1063 HV for the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl coating. After annealed at 750 °C for 5 h, unbonded inter-particle boundaries were partially healed and evident grain growth of nanocrystalline NiCrAl was avoided. Wear resistance of the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl nanocomposite coating was comparable to the HVOF-sprayed WC-12Co coating. Annealing of the nanocomposite coating resulted in the improvement of wear resistance by a factor of ~33% owing to the enhanced inter-particle bonding. Main material removal mechanisms during the abrasive wear are also discussed.

  11. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  12. Effect of abrasive grit size on wear of manganese-zinc ferrite under three-body abrasion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1987-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites under three-body abrasion. The abrasion mechanism of Mn-Zn ferrite changes drastically with the size of abrasive grits. With 15-micron (1000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion of Mn-Zn ferrite is due principally to brittle fracture; while with 4- and 2-micron (4000- and 6000-mesh) SiC grits, abrasion is due to plastic deformation and fracture. Both microcracking and plastic flow produce polycrystalline states on the wear surfaces of single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrites. Coefficient of wear, total thickness of the deformed layers, and surface roughness of the wear surfaces increase markedly with an increase in abrasive grit size. The total thicknesses of the deformed layers are 3 microns for the ferrite abraded by 15-micron SiC, 0.9 microns for the ferrite abraded by 4-micron SiC, and 0.8 microns for the ferrite abraded by 1-micron SiC.

  13. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  14. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  15. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  16. Microstructural influence on abrasive wear resistance of high-strength, high-toughness medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.K.; Thomas, G.

    1982-09-01

    A systematic study of abrasive wear resistance of Fe/Cr/Mn experimental steels has been carried out in two-body pin-on-disc abrasion tests. Silicon carbide, alumina, and quartz were used as abrasives. The relationships between microstructures, mechanical properties, and abrasive wear resistance for these experimental steels were studied. In addition, several commercial alloys were tested to provide a basis for comparison. Results show that dislocated lath martensite with continuous interlath film of retained austenite appears to be a desirable microstructure for good wear resistance. Grain refinement by double heat treatment was found to improve the toughness in the experimental steels but have little effect on the abrasive wear resistance. In general, superior tensile properties and wear resistance, without sacrifice in toughness, can be achieved by a lath martensitic microstructure. 8 figures.

  17. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  18. Effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rizwan M; McGarry, Frederick J; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Harris, William H

    2003-08-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is widely performed to recover hip joint functions lost by trauma or disease and to relieve pain. The major cause of failure in THR is the wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component. The dominant wear mechanism in THR occurs through adhesion and abrasion. While poor consolidation of UHMWPE is known to increase the incidence of a different damage mode, delamination, which is the dominant wear mechanism in tibial inserts but uncommon in THR, the effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of UHMWPE is not clear. In this study UHMWPE resin was subjected to hot isostatic pressing under a pressure of 138MPa at different temperatures (210 degrees C, 250 degrees C, and 300 degrees C) to achieve varying degrees of consolidation. The extent of consolidation was determined by optical microscopy using thin sections, and by scanning electron microscopy using cryofractured and solvent etched specimens. Wear behavior of the samples with varying degree of consolidation was determined using a bi-directional pin-on-disc machine simulating conditions in a hip joint. Increasing the processing temperature decreased the incidence of fusion defects and particle boundaries reflecting the powder flakes of the virgin resin, improving the consolidation. However, the bi-directional pin-on-disc wear rate did not change with the processing temperature, indicating that adhesive and abrasive wear is independent of the extent of consolidation in the range of parameters studied here. PMID:12763446

  19. Sliding and Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC-CoCr Coatings with Different Carbide Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the sliding and abrasive wear behaviors of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings with different WC grain sizes. The HVOF coating deposition was assisted by in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system. The powder feedstocks and their corresponding coatings were characterized by means of XRD and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope analysis. Hardness, porosity, and indentation fracture toughness of these coatings were calculated and compared with each other. Sliding wear resistance of these coatings was calculated using pin-on-disk tribometer (ASTM G99-90). The two-body abrasion was quantified by sliding the samples over silicon carbide (SiC) abrasive paper bonded to a rotating flat disk of auto-polisher. The mechanism of materials' removal in both the sliding and abrasive wears was studied and discussed on microstructural investigations. It was observed that fine grain WC-CoCr cermet coating exhibits higher sliding and abrasive wear resistances as compared with conventional cermet coating.

  20. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. PMID:26849309

  1. A comparative study of the abrasive wear behavior of MoSi[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E. . Albany Research Center)

    1995-03-01

    This study is a preliminary assessment of the abrasive wear behavior of monolithic MoSi[sub 2]. Comparisons with the wear behavior of other advanced materials, such as refractory metals, intermetallic compounds (i.e., TiAl, Fe[sub 3]Al), and ceramics (i.e., Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], ZrO[sub 2], and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]), are made. In general, the wear behavior of MoSi[sub 2] is similar to oxide ceramics, due in large part to the high relative hardness of the compound. However, as with most brittle materials, as the hardness of the abrasive increases relative to the hardness of the wearing material (i.e., MoSi[sub 2] abraded on garnet at 13 GPa versus abrasion on SiC at 24 GPa), volume wear increases; and the dominant wear mechanism changes, from one of primarily edge fracture to one combining micro-cutting with significant micro-fracture and grain pull-out.

  2. Growth and wear of incisor and cheek teeth in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) fed diets of different abrasiveness.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jacqueline; Clauss, Marcus; Codron, Daryl; Schulz, Ellen; Hummel, Jürgen; Fortelius, Mikael; Kircher, Patrick; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    Although patterns of tooth wear are crucial in palaeo-reconstructions, and dental wear abnormalities are important in veterinary medicine, experimental investigations on the relationship between diet abrasiveness and tooth wear are rare. Here, we investigated the effect of four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (due to both internal [phytoliths] and external abrasives [sand]) or whole grass hay fed for 2 weeks each in random order to 16 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on incisor and premolar growth and wear, and incisor and cheek tooth length. Wear and tooth length differed between diets, with significant effects of both internal and external abrasives. While diet abrasiveness was linked to tooth length for all tooth positions, whole forage had an additional effect on upper incisor length only. Tooth growth was strongly related to tooth wear and differed correspondingly between diets and tooth positions. At 1.4-3.2 mm/week, the growth of cheek teeth measured in this study was higher than previously reported for rabbits. Dental abnormalities were most distinct on the diet with sand. This study demonstrates that concepts of constant tooth growth in rabbits requiring consistent wear are inappropriate, and that diet form (whole vs. pelleted) does not necessarily affect cheek teeth. Irrespective of the strong effect of external abrasives, internal abrasives have the potential to induce wear and hence exert selective pressure in evolution. Detailed differences in wear effects between tooth positions allow inferences about the mastication process. Elucidating feedback mechanisms that link growth to tooth-specific wear represents a promising area of future research.

  3. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  4. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of Ni-Wc Composite Microwave Clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, Ni-WC powder was deposited on mild steel substrate to develop clads through microwave hybrid heating technique. The cladding trials were carried out in an industrial microwave applicator at 1.1 kW for 540 s. The Ni-WC composite clads were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of x-ray diffraction, electron and optical microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests. Phase analysis of the Ni-WC clad indicated the presence of stable carbides such as WC, W2C, Ni2W4C, and Fe6W6C. The microstructure study of the clad layer revealed the presence of a uniformly distributed interlocked WC-based reinforcement embedded in the Ni-based matrix. The average Vicker's microhardness in the clad layer was observed to be 1028 ± 90 HV, which was approximately three times the microhardness of the substrate. Abrasive wear resistance of the microwave clads was superior to the MS substrate. Abrasion was the main wear mechanism in the Ni-WC clads and the substrate samples. However, the presence of WC-based reinforcement in the composite clads reduced microcutting, resulting in enhanced wear resistance.

  5. Structural transformations, strengthening, and wear resistance of titanium nickelide upon abrasive and adhesive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Pushin, V. G.; Chernenko, N. L.; Makarov, V. V.

    2010-07-01

    Wear resistance and structural transformations upon abrasive and adhesive wear of titanium nickelide Ti49.4Ni50.6 in microcrystalline (MC) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) states have been investigated. It has been shown that the abrasive wear resistance of this alloy exceeds that of the steel 12Kh18N9 by a factor of about 2, that of the steel 110G13 (Hadfield steel), by a factor of 1.3, and is close to that of the steel 95Kh18. Upon adhesive wear in a testing-temperature range from -50 to +300°C, the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy, as compared to the steel 12Kh18N9, is characterized by the wear rate that is tens of times smaller and by a reduced (1.5-2.0 times) friction coefficient. The enhanced wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy is due to the development of intense strain hardening in it and to a high fracture toughness, which is a consequence of effective relaxation of high contact stresses arising in the surface layer of the alloy. The SMC state produced in the alloy with the help of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) has no effect on the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy. The favorable effect of ECAP on the wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy takes place under conditions of its adhesive wear at temperatures from -25 to +70°C. The electron-microscopic investigation showed that under conditions of wear at negative and room temperatures in the surface layer (1-5 μm thick) of titanium nickelide there arises a mixed structure consisting of an amorphous phase and nanocrystals of supposedly austenite and martensite. Upon friction at 200-300°C, a nanocrystalline structure of the B2 phase arises near the alloy surface, which, as is the case with the amorphous-nanocrystalline structure, is characterized by significant effective strength and wear resistance.

  6. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K. )

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  7. Methodology of evaluation of abrasive tool wear with the use of laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lipiński, Dariusz; Kacalak, Wojciech; Tomkowski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is one of the basic precise material removal methods. Abrasive and shape wear, as well as smearing of the tools' active surface handicap the processing results. The loss of cutting capacity in abrasive tools or alteration of their shape influences the surface quality and precision of the workpiece dimensions and its shape. Evaluation of the abrasive tool surface is the basic criterion of forecasting the tools' durability and the process results. The applied method of laser scanning made determination of the surface coordinates and subsequently of its geometric features with micrometric accuracy possible. Using the information on the abrasive tool surface geometric structure, a methodology of evaluation of the level of changes in geometric features of the tool during the grinding process was developed. Criteria for evaluation of the level of abrasive grains attritious wear, the degree of smearing of the abrasive tool surface and evaluation of the cutting capability of the abrasive tools were determined. The developed method allowed for evaluation of the level of abrasive tools' wear, and subsequently formed foundations for assessment of the influence of the grinding parameters on the durability of abrasive tools, evaluation of the influence of the parameters of the process of shaping the abrasive tools' active surfaces on their geometric characteristics and evaluation of the level of correlation between the monitored process parameters and the degree of the abrasive tools' wear.

  8. Effect of radiation cross-linking on the abrasive wear behaviour of polyethylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rizwan M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2014-06-01

    This study explores the differences in the dry abrasive wear behavior of different polyethylenes, and compares the effect of radiation cross-linking on the wear behavior. Four different types of polyethylenes: LDPE, LLDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE were studied. Cross-linking was carried out by high energy electron beam with radiation dose of 200 kGy. The results show that in unirradiated state UHMWPE has excellent wear resistance, with HDPE showing comparable wear properties; both LDPE and LLDPE exhibit high wear rate. Cross-linking improves wear rate of LDPE and UHMWPE, however, the wear rate of HDPE and LLDPE increases with cross-linking.

  9. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  10. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-01-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  11. Study of abrasive wear rate of silicon using n-alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1982-07-01

    The work carried out at the University of Illinois at Chicago for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project under contract No. 956053 is summarized. The abrasion wear rate of silicon in a number of fluid environments and the parameters that influence the surface mechanical properties of silicon were determined. Three tests were carried out in this study: circular and linear multiple-scratch test, microhardness test and a three-point bend test. The pertinent parameters such as effect of surface orientation, dopant and fluid properties were sorted. A brief review and critique of previous work is presented.

  12. Computer Simulation of Stress-Strain State of Pipeline Section Affected by Abrasion Due to Mechanical Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, P. V.; Afanas’ev, R. G.; Burkova, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the effect of abrasive wear of the pipeline section occurred due to mechanical impurities in the transported gas flow. The approaches to the detection of the maximum specific wear of the pipeline wall and the geometry of abrasion are the main problems of computer simulation described in this paper.

  13. Micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of medical implant material Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn alloy on various friction pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguo; Huang, Weijiu; Ma, Yanlong

    2014-09-01

    The micro-scale abrasion behaviors of surgical implant materials have often been reported in the literature. However, little work has been reported on the micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of Ti-25Nb-3Mo-3Zr-2Sn (TLM) titanium alloy in simulated body fluids, especially with respect to friction pairs. Therefore, a TE66 Micro-Scale Abrasion Tester was used to study the micro-scale abrasive wear behavior of the TLM alloy. This study covers the friction coefficient and wear loss of the TLM alloy induced by various friction pairs. Different friction pairs comprised of ZrO2, Si3N4 and Al2O3 ceramic balls with 25.4mm diameters were employed. The micro-scale abrasive wear mechanisms and synergistic effect between corrosion and micro-abrasion of the TLM alloy were investigated under various wear-corrosion conditions employing an abrasive, comprised of SiC (3.5 ± 0.5 μm), in two test solutions, Hanks' solution and distilled water. Before the test, the specimens were heat treated at 760°C/1.0/AC+550°C/6.0/AC. It was discovered that the friction coefficient values of the TLM alloy are larger than those in distilled water regardless of friction pairs used, because of the corrosive Hanks' solution. It was also found that the value of the friction coefficient was volatile at the beginning of wear testing, and it became more stable with further experiments. Because the ceramic balls have different properties, especially with respect to the Vickers hardness (Hv), the wear loss of the TLM alloy increased as the ball hardness increased. In addition, the wear loss of the TLM alloy in Hanks' solution was greater than that in distilled water, and this was due to the synergistic effect of micro-abrasion and corrosion, and this micro-abrasion played a leading role in the wear process. The micro-scale abrasive wear mechanism of the TLM alloy gradually changed from two-body to mixed abrasion and then to three-body abrasion as the Vickers hardness of the balls increased.

  14. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  15. Effects of Microstructural Features and Test Parameters on the Abrasive Wear Response of an Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Prasad, B. K.

    2013-07-01

    This article discusses some observations pertaining to the abrasive wear response of an Al-Si alloy as influenced by microstructural features and test parameters (applied load and traversal distance). The wear performance has also been correlated with corresponding changes in mechanical properties (hardness, UTS, and elongation) and morphology (length, diameter, and length/diameter ratio) of microconstituents like Si. Microstructural/morphological alterations in the alloy were brought about through T6 heat treatment involving solutionizing followed by artificial aging for different durations. Heat treatment brought about significant alterations in the morphology (length, diameter, and length/diameter ratio) of Si particles, as was also reflected in terms of microstructural changes. The length of the Si particles decreased while their diameter increased leading to a reduction in the aspect (length/diameter) ratio of the phase in the case of the heat-treated samples compared to the as cast alloy. Decreasing length, rising diameter, and reduction in the aspect (length/diameter) ratio indicates a higher degree of spheroidization of the phase as a result of heat treatment. Increasing aging duration caused the aspect ratio to decrease further. The study suggests increasing wear loss with a rise in the applied load and traversal distance. The heat-treated samples attained improved mechanical and reduced wear loss over the as-cast samples in general, an exception being the elongation wherein the property became comparable to that of the as-cast alloy at aging durations beyond 7 h. Also, aging for 3 h seems to be sufficient to realize the benefit of heat treatment in terms of improvement in the wear behavior and mechanical properties since it leads to the highest hardness, UTS and elongation properties. Aging durations longer than 3 h led to deterioration in the UTS and elongation properties, while hardness and wear loss attained steady-state condition. The wear

  16. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  17. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-10-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  18. Influence of alumina and titanium dioxide coatings on abrasive wear resistance of AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Remolina, A.; Marulanda, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to compare the behaviour of an AISI 1045 steel's abrasive wear resistance when is covered with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) or Titanium dioxide (TiO2), of nanometric size, using the technique of thermal hot spray, which allows to directly project the suspension particles on the used substrate. The tests are performed based on the ASTM G65-04 standard (Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Apparatus). The results show that the amount of, lost material increases linearly with the travelled distance; also determined that the thermal treatment of hardening-tempering and the alumina and titanium dioxide coatings decrease in average a 12.9, 39.6 and 29.3% respectively the volume of released material during abrasive wear test.

  19. Abrasive wear: The efects of fibres size on oil palm empty fruit bunch polyester composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasolang, S.; Kalam, A.; Ahmad, M. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Suhadah, W. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to determine the effect of palm oil empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre size in dry sliding testing of polyester composite. These composite samples were produced by mixing raw OPEFB fibre with resin. The samples were prepared at different sizes of fibre (100, 125, 180 and 250μm). Abrasion Resistance Tester (TR-600) was used to carried out abrasive wear tests in dry sliding conditions. These tests were performed at room temperature for two different loads (10 and 30N) and at a constant sliding velocity of 1.4m/s. The specific wear rates of OPEFB polyester composites were obtained. The morphology of composite surface before and after tests was also examined using 3D microscope imaging. Preliminary work on thermal distribution at the abrasive wheel point was also conducted for selected samples.

  20. Relationships Between Abrasive Wear, Hardness, and Surface Grinding Characteristics of Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to support the development of grinding models for titanium metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by investigating possible relationships between their indentation hardness, low-stress belt abrasion, high-stress belt abrasion, and the surface grinding characteristics. Three Ti-based particulate composites were tested and compared with the popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The three composites were a Ti-6Al-4V-based MMC with 5% TiB{sub 2} particles, a Ti-6Al-4V MMC with 10% TiC particles, and a Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-7.5%W binary alloy matrix that contained 7.5% TiC particles. Two types of belt abrasion tests were used: (a) a modified ASTM G164 low-stress loop abrasion test, and (b) a higher-stress test developed to quantify the grindability of ceramics. Results were correlated with G-ratios (ratio of stock removed to abrasives consumed) obtained from an instrumented surface grinder. Brinell hardness correlated better with abrasion characteristics than microindentation or scratch hardness. Wear volumes from low-stress and high-stress abrasive belt tests were related by a second-degree polynomial. Grindability numbers correlated with hard particle content but were also matrix-dependent.

  1. Erosion, Abrasive, and Friction Wear Behavior of Iron Aluminide Coatings Sprayed by HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Cinca, N.; Fernández, J.; Sampath, S.

    2008-12-01

    Iron aluminides have been proposed lately as promising materials for wear applications. Many authors have focused their investigations on the friction behavior of FeAl coatings, emphasizing the role of this intermetallic phase as a new matrix to embed ceramic particles and replace the extensively studied WC-Co cermet system for high temperature. However, few of these studies deal with the evaluation of the different tribological properties and their relationship with the coating microstructure. In the present study, the near stoichometric Fe40Al was successfully sprayed by means of high velocity oxy-fuel using different particle size distribution and the tribological behavior was assessed through solid particle erosion, abrasive and dry sliding tests. The wear mechanisms of the deposited coatings are discussed with regard to the observed results. In addition, oxidized samples were tested to evaluate the role of the oxide top layer; also, the powder was previously annealed to produce a coating with an almost fully ordered FeAl structure.

  2. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  3. Effect of carbonitride precipitates on the abrasive wear behaviour of hardfacing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ke; Yu, Shengfu; Li, Yingbin; Li, Chenglin

    2008-06-01

    Hardfacing alloy of martensitic stainless steel expect higher abradability to be achieved through the addition of nitrogen being provided by the fine scale precipitation of complex carbonitride particles. Niobium and titanium as the most effective carbonitride alloying elements were added in the Fe-Cr13-Mn-N hardfacing alloy to get carbonitride precipitates. Carbonitride was systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and energy spectrum analysis. Abrasive wear resistance of hardfacing alloy in as-welded and heat-treated conditions was tested by using the belt abrasion test apparatus where the samples slide against the abrasive belt. It is found that carbonitride particles in the hardfacing alloy are complex of Cr, Ti and Nb distributing on the grain boundary or matrix of the hardfacing alloy with different number and size in as-welded and heat-treated conditions. A large number of carbonitrides can be precipitated with very fine size (nanoscale) after heat treatment. As a result, the homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles can significantly improve the grain-abrasion wear-resisting property of the hardfacing alloy, and the mass loss is plastic deformation with minimum depth of grooving by abrasive particles and fine delamination.

  4. Mechanics of the pad-abrasive-wafer contact in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Dincer

    2009-12-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), a rigid wafer is forced on a rough, elastomeric polishing pad, while a slurry containing abrasive particles flows through the interface. The applied pressure on the wafer is carried partially by the 2-body pad-wafer contact (direct contact) and partially by the 3-body contact of pad, wafer and abrasive particles ( particle contact). The fraction of the applied pressure carried by particle contacts is an important factor affecting the material removal rate (MRR) as the majority of the material is removed by the abrasive particles trapped between the pad asperities and the wafer. In this thesis, the contact of a rough, deformable pad and a smooth, rigid wafer in the presence of rigid abrasive particles at the contact interface is investigated by using contact mechanics and finite element (FE) modeling. The interactions between the pad, the wafer and the abrasive particles are modeled at different scales of contact, starting from particle level interactions, and gradually expanding the contact scale to the multi-asperity contact of pad and wafer. The effect of surface forces consisting of van der Waals and electrical double layer forces acting between the wafer and the abrasive particles are also investigated in this work. The wear rate due to each abrasive particle is calculated based on the wafer-abrasive particle contact force, and by considering adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms. A passivated layer on the wafer surface with a hardness and thickness determined by the chemical effects is modeled, in order to characterize the effect of chemical reactions between slurry and wafer on the MRR. The model provides accurate predictions for the MRR as a function of pad related parameters; pad elastic modulus, pad porosity and pad topography, particle related parameters; particle size and concentration, and slurry related parameters; slurry pH, thickness and hardness of the passivated surface layer of wafer. A good qualitative

  5. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  6. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  7. A Study on 3-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Aluminium 8011 / Graphite Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha Shankar, B.; Anil, K. C.; Patil, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Metals and alloys have found their vital role in many applications like structural, corrosive, tribological, etc., in engineering environment. The alloys/composites having high strength to low weight ratio have gained attention of many researchers recently. In this work, graphite reinforced Aluminium 8011 metal matrix composite was prepared by conventional stir casting route, by varying the weight % of reinforcement. Uniform distribution of Graphite in matrix alloy was confirmed by optical micrographs. Prepared composite specimens were subjected to 3-body abrasive testing by varying applied load and time, the silica particles of 400 grit size were used as abrasive particles. It was observed that with the increase of weight% of Graphite the wear resistance of composite was also increasing and on comparison it was found that reinforced composite gives good wear resistance than base alloy.

  8. ABRASION WEAR RESISTANCE OF DIFFERENT ARTIFICIAL TEETH OPPOSED TO METAL AND COMPOSITE ANTAGONISTS

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Pâmela Carbone; Coppedê, Abílio Ricciardi; Macedo, Ana Paula; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important properties of artificial teeth is the abrasion wear resistance, which is determinant in the maintenance of the rehabilitation's occlusal pattern. Objectives: This in vitro study aims to evaluate the abrasion wear resistance of 7 brands of artificial teeth opposed to two types of antagonists. Material and methods: Seven groups were prepared with 12 specimens each (BIOLUX – BL, TRILUX – TR, BLUE DENT – BD, BIOCLER – BC, POSTARIS – PO, ORTHOSIT – OR, GNATHOSTAR – GN), opposed to metallic (M – nickel-chromium alloy), and to composite antagonists (C – Solidex indirect composite). A mechanical loading device was used (240 cycles/min, 4 Hz speed, 10 mm antagonist course). Initial and final contours of each specimen were registered with aid of a profile projector (20x magnification). The linear difference between the two profiles was measured and the registered values were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: Regarding the antagonists, only OR (M = 10.45 ± 1.42 μm and C = 2.77 ± 0.69 μm) and BC (M = 6.70 ± 1.37 μm and C = 4.48 ± 0.80 μm) presented statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). Best results were obtained with PO (C = 2.33 ± 0.91 μm and M = 1.78 ± 0.42 μm), followed by BL (C = 3.70 ± 1.32 μm and M = 3.70 ± 0.61 μm), statistically similar for both antagonists (p>0.05). Greater result variance was obtained with OR, which presented the worse results opposed to Ni-Cr (10.45 ± 1.42 μm), and results similar to the best ones against composite (2.77 ± 0.69 μm). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that the antagonist material is a factor of major importance to be considered in the choice of the artificial teeth to be used in the prosthesis. PMID:19936525

  9. Minimal alterations on the enamel surface by micro-abrasion: in vitro roughness and wear assessments

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Marcela Charantola; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Ulian; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; BASEGGIO, Wagner; WANG, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vitro changes on the enamel surface after a micro-abrasion treatment promoted by different products. Material and Methods: Fifty (50) fragments of bovine enamel (15 mm x 5 mm) were randomly assigned to five groups (n=10) according to the product utilized: G1 (control)= silicone polisher (TDV), G2= 37% phosphoric acid (3M/ESPE) + pumice stone (SS White), G3= Micropol (DMC Equipment), G4= Opalustre (Ultradent) and G5= Whiteness RM (FGM Dental Products). Roughness and wear were the responsible variables used to analyze these surfaces in four stages: baseline, 60 s and 120 s after the micro-abrasion and after polishing, using a Hommel Tester T1000 device. After the tests, a normal distribution of data was verified, with repeated ANOVA analyses (p≤0.05) which were used to compare each product in different stages. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied for individual comparisons between the products in each stage (p≤0.05). Results: Means and standard deviations of roughness and wear (mm) after all the promoted stages were: G1=7.26(1.81)/13.16(2.67), G2=2.02(0.62)/37.44(3.33), G3=1.81(0.91)/34.93(6.92), G4=1.92(0.29)/38.42(0.65) and G5=1.98(0.53)/33.45(2.66). At 60 seconds, all products tended to produce less surface roughness with a variable gradual decrease over time. After polishing, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups, except for G1. Independent of the product utilized, the enamel wear occurred after the micro-abrasion. Conclusions: In this in vitro study, enamel micro-abrasion presented itself as a conservative approach, regardless of the type of the paste compound utilized. These products promoted minor roughness alterations and minimal wear. The use of phosphoric acid and pumice stone showed similar results to commercial products for the micro-abrasion with regard to the surface roughness and wear. PMID:23739863

  10. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  11. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  12. The effect of daily fluoride mouth rinsing on enamel erosive/abrasive wear in situ.

    PubMed

    Stenhagen, K R; Hove, L H; Holme, B; Tveit, A B

    2013-01-01

    It is not known whether application of fluoride agents on enamel results in lasting resistance to erosive/abrasive wear. We investigated if one daily mouth rinse with sodium fluoride (NaF), stannous fluoride (SnF(2)) or titanium tetrafluoride (TiF(4)) solutions protected enamel against erosive/abrasive wear in situ (a paired, randomised and blind study). Sixteen molars were cut into 4 specimens, each with one amalgam filling (measurement reference surface). Two teeth (2 × 4 specimens) were mounted bilaterally (buccal aspects) on acrylic mandibular appliances and worn for 9 days by 8 volunteers. Every morning, the specimens were brushed manually with water (30 s) extra-orally. Then fluoride solutions (0.4% SnF(2) pH 2.5; 0.15% TiF(4) pH 2.1; 0.2% NaF pH 6.5, all 0.05 M F) were applied (2 min). Three of the specimens from each tooth got different treatment, and the fourth served as control. At midday, the specimens were etched for 2 min in 300 ml fresh 0.01 M hydrochloric acid and rinsed in tap water. This etch procedure was repeated in the afternoon. Topographic measurements were performed by a white-light interferometer. Mean surface loss (±SD) for 16 teeth after 9 days was: SnF(2) 1.8 ± 1.9 µm, TiF(4) 3.1 ± 4.8 µm, NaF 26.3 ± 4.7 µm, control 32.3 ± 4.4 µm. Daily rinse with SnF(2), TiF(4) and NaF resulted in 94, 90 and 18% reduction in enamel erosive/abrasive wear, respectively, compared with control (p < 0.05). The superior protective effect of daily rinse with either stannous or titanium tetrafluoride solutions on erosive/abrasive enamel wear is promising.

  13. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  14. Wear Modalities and Mechanisms of the Mining Non-asbestos Composite Brake Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiusheng; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Zhencai; Tong, Minming; Lu, Yuhao; Peng, Yuxing

    2013-08-01

    The mining brake material is generally made of composite materials and its wear has important influences on the braking performance of disc brakes. In order to improve the braking reliability of mine hoisters, this paper did some tribological investigations on the mining brake material to reveal its wear modalities and mechanisms. The mining non-asbestos brake shoe and 16Mn steel were selected as braking pairs and tested on a pad-on-disc friction tester. And a SEM was used to observe the worn surface of the brake shoe. It is shown that the non-asbestos brake material has mainly five wear modalities: adhesive wear, abrasive wear, cutting wear, fatigue wear and high heat wear. At the front period of a single braking the wear modality is mainly composed of some light mechanical wear such as abrasive, cutting and point adhesive. With the temperature rising at the back period it transforms to some heavy mechanical wear such as piece adhesive and fatigue. While in several repeated brakings once the surface temperature rises beyond the thermal-decomposition point of the bonding material, the strong destructive high heat wear takes leading roles on the surface. And a phenomenon called friction catastrophe (FC) occurs easily, which as a result causes a braking failure. It is considered that the friction heat has important influences on the wear modalities of the brake material. And the reduction of friction heat must be an effective technical method for decreasing wear and avoiding braking failures.

  15. Abrasive wear by diesel engine coal-fuel and related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the work summarized in this report was to obtain a basic understanding of the factors which are responsible for wear of the piston ring and cylinder wall surfaces in diesel engines utilizing coal-fuel. The approach included analytical studies using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses to characterize coal-fuel and various combustion particles, and two different wear tests. The wear tests were a modified pin-on-disk test and a block-on-ring test capable of either unidirectional or reciprocating-rotational sliding. The wear tests in general were conducted with mixtures of the particles and lubricating oil. The particles studied included coal-fuel, particles resulting from the combustion of coal fuel, mineral matter extracted during the processing of coal, and several other common abrasive particle types among which quartz was the most extensively examined. The variables studied included those associated with the particles, such as particle type, size, and hardness; variables related to contact conditions and the surrounding environment; and variables related to the type and properties of the test specimen materials.

  16. Determining the functional and material properties needed for abrasive wear prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, I.

    2016-08-01

    Abrassive wear is a complex mechanical process with specific characteristics, dependent on the bodies velocities and load, the quality of contact surfaces, the mechanical properties of the superficial layers, lubrication etc. During the friction of the bodies in contact, the mechanical properties and the micro-topography of superficial layers change, most of the time irrecoverable, leading to the shut-down of the technical system they are part of. The present paper proposes a theoretical and experimental analysis of the abrassive wear behaviour of a coupling made of steel/cast iron as well as the detection of the wear trace dependent on the inclination angle of the harder material asperities (penetrator).

  17. Assessment of Abrasive Wear of Nanostructured WC-Co and Fe-Based Coatings Applied by HP-HVOF, Flame, and Wire Arc Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Libardi, R.; Camargo, F.; Fals, H. C.; Ferraresi, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal spray processes have been widely used to minimize losses caused by wear mechanisms. Sprayed deposits using conventional wire and powder materials have been long solving tribological problems in engineering equipment. More recently, the option for new different technologies and consumables like nanostructured powder materials and nanocomposite cored wires have expanded the possibilities for technical solutions. Cored wire technology allows the use of compositions that cannot be drawn into wire form like carbides in metallic matrix and high-temperature materials, thus, intensifying the use of spraying processes with low operating cost to demanding wear and corrosion applications. The objective of this work was to study the mechanical characteristics and wear performance of coatings obtained by Flame, Wire Arc, and HVOF spraying using selected nanostructured WC10Co4Cr, WC12Co, and Fe-based 140 MXC powder and wire materials. Abrasive wear performance of the coatings was determinate following the ASTM G-65 standard. Based on the results, a higher abrasive wear resistance was found for the HVOF-sprayed WC10Co4Cr nanostructured coating.

  18. Abrasivity Assessment of Granitic Building Stones in Relation to Diamond Tool Wear Rate Using Mineralogy-Based Rock Hardness Indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Nurdan Güneş

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the abrasive wear potential of granites in circular sawing using some mineralogy-based rock hardness indexes. A literature study indicated that little or no attention has been given to assessing this kind of relationship in the field of stone processing. To accomplish this objective, sawing experiments were performed on nine different granites used widely as building and decorative stone materials. The measured sawblade-specific wear rates were correlated with three different rock hardness indexes attained by combining the percentage content of hard mineral constituents with their known hardness values. Statistical analysis of the experimental data revealed that rock hardness indexes that are based on both Vickers hardness number and Rosiwal hardness could be accepted as reliable indicators of granite abrasivity. These two indexes were also found to correlate well with the average power drawn during the process. However, the rock abrasivity index based on Mohs relative scratch hardness did not show statistically significant correlations with sawblade wear rate and power drawn. Although quartz percentage content is regarded as an important abrasivity parameter by practitioners, the observations made here indicate that consideration of quartz percentage content alone is not sufficient to describe the abrasive potential of granites, and thus incorporation of other hard mineral constituents could be more suitable.

  19. Tooth length and incisal wear and growth in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) fed diets of different abrasiveness.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Clauss, M; Codron, D; Schulz, E; Hummel, J; Kircher, P; Hatt, J-M

    2015-06-01

    Dental diseases are among the most important reasons for presenting guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and other rodents to veterinary clinics, but the aetiopathology of this disease complex is unclear. Clinicians tend to believe that the ever-growing teeth of rabbits and rodents have a constant growth that needs to be worn down by the mastication of an appropriate diet. In this study, we tested the effect of four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness [due to both internal (phytoliths) and external abrasives (sand)] or whole grass hay fed for 2 weeks each in random order to 16 guinea pigs on incisor growth and wear, and tooth length of incisors and cheek teeth. There was a positive correlation between wear and growth of incisors. Tooth lengths depended both on internal and external abrasives, but only upper incisors were additionally affected by the feeding of whole hay. Diet effects were most prominent in anterior cheek teeth, in particular M1 and m1. Cheek tooth angle did not become shallower with decreasing diet abrasiveness, suggesting that a lack of dietary abrasiveness does not cause the typical 'bridge formation' of anterior cheek teeth frequently observed in guinea pigs. The findings suggest that other factors than diet abrasiveness, such as mineral imbalances and in particular hereditary malocclusion, are more likely causes for dental problems observed in this species.

  20. Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC Reinforced Ni-BASED Composite Coating Sprayed and Fused by Oxy-Acetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Zhenhua; Ding, Zhang Xiong; Chen, Ding

    Microstructure of WC reinforced Ni-based self-fluxing alloy composite coating sprayed and fused by oxy-acetylene flame was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The wear performance of the coating was studied by a MLS-225 wet sand rubber wheel abrasive wear tester at various loads and sizes of abrasive particles. Also, the wear resistance of the coating was compared with uncoated ASTM1020 steel. The results indicated that the coating is bonded metallurgically to the substrate and has a homogeneous microstructure composed of both coarse WC and fine carbide and boride grains such as Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and Ni2B which disperse uniformly in the matrix of γ-Ni solid solution and Ni3B. The worn mass loss of the coating and ASTM1020 steel both increased with the load and size of abrasive particles, also, the coating has exhibited excellent abrasive wear resistance compared with ASTM1020 steel.

  1. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  2. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  3. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  4. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    In the current study, a high-carbon, high-alloy steel (0.79 pct C, 1.5 pct Si, 1.98 pct Mn, 0.98 pct Cr, 0.24 pct Mo, 1.06 pct Al, and 1.58 pct Co in wt pct) was subjected to an isothermal bainitic transformation at a temperature range of 473 K to 623 K (200 °C to 350 °C), resulting in different fully bainitic microstructures consisting of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. With a decrease in the transformation temperature, the microstructure was significantly refined from ~300 nm at 623 K (350 °C) to less than 60 nm at 473 K (200 °C), forming nanostructured bainitic microstructure. In addition, the morphology of retained austenite was progressively altered from film + blocky to an exclusive film morphology with a decrease in the temperature. This resulted in an enhanced wear resistance in nanobainitic microstructures formed at low transformation temperature, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). Meanwhile, it gradually deteriorated with an increase in the phase transformation temperature. This was mostly attributed to the retained austenite characteristics ( i.e., thin film vs blocky), which significantly altered their mechanical stability. The presence of blocky retained austenite at high transformation temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C) resulted in an early onset of TRIPing phenomenon during abrasion. This led to the formation of coarse martensite with irregular morphology, which is more vulnerable to crack initiation and propagation than that of martensite formed from the thin film austenite, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). This resulted in a pronounced material loss for the fully bainitic microstructures transformed at high temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C), leading to distinct sub-surface layer and friction coefficient curve characteristics. A comparison of the abrasive behavior of the fully bainitic microstructure formed at 623 K (350 °C) and fully pearlitic microstructure demonstrated a detrimental effect of blocky retained austenite with low mechanical stability on

  5. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, a high-carbon, high-alloy steel (0.79 pct C, 1.5 pct Si, 1.98 pct Mn, 0.98 pct Cr, 0.24 pct Mo, 1.06 pct Al, and 1.58 pct Co in wt pct) was subjected to an isothermal bainitic transformation at a temperature range of 473 K to 623 K (200 °C to 350 °C), resulting in different fully bainitic microstructures consisting of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. With a decrease in the transformation temperature, the microstructure was significantly refined from ~300 nm at 623 K (350 °C) to less than 60 nm at 473 K (200 °C), forming nanostructured bainitic microstructure. In addition, the morphology of retained austenite was progressively altered from film + blocky to an exclusive film morphology with a decrease in the temperature. This resulted in an enhanced wear resistance in nanobainitic microstructures formed at low transformation temperature, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). Meanwhile, it gradually deteriorated with an increase in the phase transformation temperature. This was mostly attributed to the retained austenite characteristics (i.e., thin film vs blocky), which significantly altered their mechanical stability. The presence of blocky retained austenite at high transformation temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C) resulted in an early onset of TRIPing phenomenon during abrasion. This led to the formation of coarse martensite with irregular morphology, which is more vulnerable to crack initiation and propagation than that of martensite formed from the thin film austenite, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). This resulted in a pronounced material loss for the fully bainitic microstructures transformed at high temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C), leading to distinct sub-surface layer and friction coefficient curve characteristics. A comparison of the abrasive behavior of the fully bainitic microstructure formed at 623 K (350 °C) and fully pearlitic microstructure demonstrated a detrimental effect of blocky retained austenite with low mechanical stability on the

  6. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  7. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior and Wear Mechanism of Five Different Veneering Porcelains

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Qiu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Minhao; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this research was to investigate the wear behavior and wear mechanism of five different veneering porcelains. Methods Five kinds of veneering porcelains were selected in this research. The surface microhardness of all the samples was measured with a microhardness tester. Wear tests were performed on a ball-on-flat PLINT fretting wear machine, with lubrication of artificial saliva at 37°C. The friction coefficients were recorded by the testing system. The microstructure features, wear volume, and damage morphologies were recorded and analyzed with a confocal laser scanning microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The wear mechanism was then elucidated. Results The friction coefficients of the five veneering porcelains differ significantly. No significant correlation between hardness and wear volume was found for these veneering porcelains. Under lubrication of artificial saliva, the porcelain with higher leucite crystal content exhibited greater wear resistance. Additionally, leucite crystal size and distribution in glass matrix influenced wear behavior. The wear mechanisms for these porcelains were similar: abrasive wear dominates the early stage, whereas delamination was the main damage mode at the later stage. Furthermore, delamination was more prominent for porcelains with larger crystal sizes. Significance Wear compatibility between porcelain and natural teeth is important for dental restorative materials. Investigation on crystal content, size, and distribution in glass matrix can provide insight for the selection of dental porcelains in clinical settings. PMID:26368532

  8. Critical Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Cemented Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2015-07-01

    Wear phenomena of cemented carbide (94 wt.% WC, 6 wt.% Co) tip of conical picks have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The conical pick is one type of the cutters which are used to excavate soft structure like coal. It has a cone-shaped abrasive part made of cemented carbide (CC). The picks, under study, have been used for coal mining in an underground mine through a continuous miner machine. During the critical analysis of four picks, wear mechanisms are categorized into four parts, such as, cracks, cavity formation in WC grains, grinding effect, and roughness of WC surface. Through a careful examination, the cracking mechanism has been further divided into three parts. They are cracks with overlapping surfaces, crack on a large surface of CC, and cracks in WC grains. In addition, the severe crushing and tearing of WC grains have also been clearly examined. The possible causes of each wear phenomenon have been explained comprehensively. Crushing and corrosion are the two wearing processes which have severely deteriorated the condition of the CC. Corrosion has been easily identified by observing a number of pores and triangular notches in the WC surface. The oxidation of WC grains due to corrosion has been established by EDS and XRD.

  9. Wear mechanisms of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is devoted to an investigation of the wear mechanisms of magnesia and yttria partially-stabilized zirconia in ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal sliding-contact tribological systems at high temperature. It was found that the wear of ceramics rubbed against ceramics at room temperature may be attributed to intensive plastic deformation of surfaces resulting in low cycle fatigue. The wear mechanism of ceramics rubbed against metals was by polishing and surface fracture, while that of metals was adhesive transfer of material on to ceramic surfaces. Investigation of the wear behavior of magnesia partially-stabilized zirconia rubbed against itself showed that up to three orders of magnitude increase in wear resistance can be achieved in a particular temperature range, depending on both sliding speed and the ambient temperature. XRD analysis revealed that a thermally-induced phase transformation takes place on the frictional interface.

  10. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-01-01

    extreme temperature increases are found, ruling out plasticity and temperature-assisted mechanisms. The COF reaches a steady-state value of ~0.20±0.05 after a short time at an initial value of ~0.11±0.01. Plowing tracks are found before the steady-state value of the COF is reached, suggesting only a short adhesive wear regime. This suggests a predominantly abrasive wear mechanism, controlled by fracture, which commences by the first particles created by adhesive wear.

  11. Comparison of methods for quantifying dental wear caused by erosion and abrasion.

    PubMed

    Passos, Vanara F; Melo, Mary A S; Vasconcellos, Andréa Araújo; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A; Santiago, Sérgio L

    2013-02-01

    Various methods have been applied to evaluate the effect of erosion and abrasion. So, the aim of this study was to check the applicability of stylus profilometry (SP), surface hardness (SH) and focus-variation 3D microscopy (FVM) to the analysis of human enamel and dentin subjected to erosion/abrasion. The samples were randomly allocated into four groups (n = 10): G1-enamel/erosion, G2-enamel/erosion plus abrasion, G3-dentin/erosion, and G4-dentin/erosion plus abrasion. The specimens were selected by their surface hardness, and they were subjected to cycles of demineralization (Coca-Cola®-60 s) and remineralization (artificial saliva-60 min). For groups G2 and G4, the remineralization procedures were followed by toothbrushing (150 strokes). The above cycle was repeated 3×/day during 5 days. The samples were assessed using SH, SP, and FVM. For each substrate, the groups were compared using an unpaired t-test, and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated (α = 5%). For enamel, both profilometry technique showed greater surface loss when the erosion and abrasion processes were combined (P <0.05). The correlation analysis did not reveal any relationships among SH, SP, and FVM to G2 and G4. There were significant correlation coefficients (-0.70 and -0.67) for the comparisons between the FVM and SH methods in enamel and dentin, respectively, in G1 and G3. Choosing the ideal technique for the analysis of erosion depends on the type of dental substrate. SP was not sufficiently sensitive to measure the effects on dentin of erosion or erosion/abrasion. However, SP, FVM and SH were adequate for the detection of tissue loss and demineralization in enamel. PMID:23129538

  12. The nature of surfaces and their influence in wear mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The wear of materials is strongly dependent upon the nature of the solid surfaces in contact, their properties and the nature of their films. Oxide films, orientation, crystal transformations, adhesive binding, crystal structure, hardness, and the presence of alloying agents are all shown to affect one or more of the forms of wear. The three most common forms of wear, adhesive, abrasive, and corrosive, are discussed in terms of the way each is affected by various material properties. Results presented indicate how wear can be optimized by concern for properties of materials.

  13. Wear mechanisms and improvements of wear resistance in cobalt-chromium alloy femoral components in artificial total knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Like

    CrMo alloy surface roughness was higher than 0.022 mum Ra (surface roughness average), UHMWPE wear increased with increasing CoCrMo alloy surface roughness. Bone and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement abrasive particles created scratches on the alloy via a ploughing mechanism, and resulted in significantly rougher surfaces than controls without particles (P < 0.01). Solution treatments at 1230sp°C and 1245sp°C reduced the hardness and wear resistance of the as-cast F75 CoCrMo alloy. Aging at 700sp°C caused recrystallization of the forged F799 alloy and improved wear resistance. Thermo-mechanical treatments have the potential to increase the lifetime of artificial joints by increasing the wear resistance of CoCrMo components.

  14. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 5; Abrasion: Plowing and Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5 discusses abrasion, a common wear phenomenon of great economic importance. It has been estimated that 50% of the wear encountered in industry is due to abrasion. Also, it is the mechanism involved in the finishing of many surfaces. Experiments are described to help in understanding the complex abrasion process and in predicting friction and wear behavior in plowing and/or cutting. These experimental modelings and measurements used a single spherical pin (asperity) and a single wedge pin (asperity). Other two-body and three-body abrasion studies used hard abrasive particles.

  15. Wear Mechanisms in a Reliability Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Danelle M.; Dugger, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    The main thrust in any reliability work is identifying failure modes and mechanisms. This is especially true for the new technology of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The methods are sometimes just as important as the results achieved. This paper will review some of the methods developed specifically for MEMS. Our methodology uses statistical characterization and testing of complex MEMS devices to help us identify dominant failure modes. We strive to determine the root cause of each failure mode and to gain a fundamental understanding of that mechanism. Test structures designed to be sensitive to a particular failure mechanism are typically used to gain understanding. The development of predictive models follows from this basic understanding. This paper will focus on the failure mechanism of wear and how our methodology was exercised to provide a predictive model. The MEMS device stressed in these studies was a Sandia-developed microengine with orthogonal electrostatic linear actuators connected to a gear on a hub. The dominant failure mechanism was wear in the sliding/contacting regions. A sliding beam-on-post test structure was also used to measure friction coefficients and wear morphology for different surface coatings and environments. Results show that a predictive model of failure-time as a function of drive frequency based on wear fits the functional form of the reliability data quite well, and demonstrates the benefit of a fundamental understanding of wear. The results also show that while debris of similar chemistry and morphology was created in the two types of devices, the dependence of debris generation on the operating environment was entirely different. The differences are discussed in terms of wear maps for ceramics, and the mechanical and thermal contact conditions in each device.

  16. Characterization of Wear Mechanisms in Distorted Conical Picks After Coal Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    The interest in understanding the wear mechanisms of cemented carbide (CC) is not a new development. For a long time, there have been studies on different wear mechanisms under different coal/rock cutting conditions. These studies have helped improving the quality of CC, thereby preventing such wearing of tools. Due to highly unpredictable character of coal/rock, the wearing phenomena cannot be attributed to one single domain of conditions. However, one conclusion that can be drawn in this context is that, under similar working conditions, similar types of CC undergo similar nature of wearing process. An optimum combination of high wear resistance, strength and hardness has facilitated widespread application of CC in the field of mining engineering. The abrasive parts of the mining tools are made of CC materials. The current study is focussed on a detailed characterization of the wear mechanisms of conical picks, which are used for coal mining. Conical picks consist of a steel body with an inserted cone-shaped CC tip. After being used for a certain period of time, both, the CC tip and the steel body get distorted. In this study, selection of appropriate samples was followed by critical observation of them through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the previous study, we explained the distortion process of both, the tip as well as the body, using the SEM images. For the present study, two samples were taken from our previous investigation for further analysis. Three other samples were also included in the present study. Seven different types of wear mechanisms, such as, cracking and crushing, cavity formation, coal intermixing, chemical degradation along with abrasion, long and deep cracks, heating effect and body deformation were observed in the five tool samples.

  17. Temperature-dependent wear mechanisms for magnetron-sputtered AlTiTaN hard coatings.

    PubMed

    Khetan, Vishal; Valle, Nathalie; Duday, David; Michotte, Claude; Mitterer, Christian; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-09-10

    AlTiTaN coatings have been demonstrated to have high thermal stability at temperatures up to 900 °C. It has been speculated that the high oxidation resistance promotes an improved wear resistance, specifically for dry machining applications. This work reports on the influence of temperature up to 900 °C on the wear mechanisms of AlTiTaN hard coatings. DC magnetron-sputtered coatings were obtained from an Al(46)Ti(42)Ta(12) target, keeping the substrate bias at -100 V and the substrate temperature at 265 °C. The coatings exhibited a single-phase face-centered cubic AlTiTaN structure. The dry sliding tests revealed predominant abrasion and tribo-oxidation as wear mechanisms, depending on the wear debris formed. At room temperature, abrasion leading to surface polishing was observed. At 700 and 800 °C, slow tribo-oxidation and an amorphous oxide formed reduced the wear rate of the coating compared to room temperature. Further, an increase in temperature to 900 °C increased the wear rate significantly due to fast tribo-oxidation accompanied by grooving. The friction coefficient was found to decrease with temperature increasing from 700 to 900 °C due to the formation of oxide scales, which reduce adhesion of asperity contacts. A relationship between the oxidation and wear mechanisms was established using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, confocal microscopy, and dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  18. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  19. Interface abrasion between rough surface femoral stems and PMMA cement results in extreme wear volumes--a retrieval study and failure analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchhorn, Gottfried Hans; Bersebach, Petra; Stauch, Tilo; Schultz, Wolfgang; Köster, Georg

    2015-01-01

    During the loosening cascade of cemented rough femoral stems, the destruction of the mantle and the production of cement and metal wear debris occur after the loss of constraint at the interface. Two-dimensional (2D) measurements (light microscopy based morphometry on fragments of mantles and vertical scanning interferometry of femoral stems) permitted mathematical 3D-extrapolations to estimate the wear volumes. Fragments of the cement mantles available lost volumes from 0.85 mm(3) to 494.10 mm(3) (median amount of bone cement wear = 178,426 mg). The harder metal surfaces lost between 1.459 mm(3) and 5.688 mm(3) of material (the median amount of metal wear per surface = 1.504 mg/100 mm(2)). Compared to the loss of material due to the fretting of stems, the abrasion of metal, and cement in defective cement mantles produced wear volumes sufficiently high to induce osteolysis. Though the design of the femoral stem and the handling of bone cement do not represent contemporary design and clinical practice, respectively, an extremely high number of joint replacements still in daily use may be impacted by this study because of possible predicted failures. Once the processes of fragmentation, abrasion, and osteolysis have been realized, the time until revision surgery should not be unduly prolonged. PMID:24820132

  20. Wear resistant alloys for coal handling equipment. Final technical report, October 1, 1977-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.; Parker, E.R.; Misra, A.; Finnie, I.

    1981-01-01

    In the progress report for 1977-1979, an extensive literature survey was completed in the areas of abrasive wear mechanisms, wear testing and microstructural effects on abrasive wear. Definitions of the various abrasive wear processes were clarified. A laboratory wear tester capable of simulating high stress two-body abrasive wear and low stress three-body wear was designed, constructed and calibrated. Experiments were run on some standard metals and alloys in the annealed, work hardened, and heat treated conditions under both two-body and three-body wear. In the 1979 to 1980 period, a detailed analysis of the abrasive size effect was performed based on the observations made on two- and three-body abrasion and erosion. It was concluded that the size effect was due to a shallow surface layer exhibiting higher flow stress than the bulk material when the material is abraded or eroded. The effect of certain variables on the wear resistance of different pure metals was compared for two-body abrasion, three-body abrasion and erosion. The variables studied are annealed hardness of the worn metal, the increase in hardness of the worn metal before the wear process due to work hardening and heat treatment, applied load, distance travelled, the abrasive particle size and abrasive hardness. The effect of most of these variables is similar for the three different wear processes. The existing low-stress, open three-body abrasive wear tester was modified and calibrated for testing abrasive wear up to 600/sup 0/C. Some standard materials were tested and in the case of pure aluminum it was found that the wear rate decreased with increase in temperature.

  1. Human tooth wear in the past and the present: tribological mechanisms, scoring systems, dental and skeletal compensations.

    PubMed

    d'Incau, Emmanuel; Couture, Christine; Maureille, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    This review of human tooth wear describes the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process. Using the tribological approach they can be systematised and this in turn aids our understanding of them. In past populations wear was ubiquitous, intense, abrasive and physiological as it was related to their food and their technologies. In these populations, it affected the proximal surfaces, and the occlusal surfaces which modified the occlusal plane profoundly. To categorise this wear many different classification systems are used, from which we can determine diet, cultural changes and the age at death of individuals. They also illustrate the evolution of certain functional dental and skeletal compensations in the masticatory apparatus such as continuous dental eruption, mesial drift of the arches and incisor lingual tipping which can then be monitored. These physiological adaptations related mainly to function and ontogenesis can also be found in present-day populations where wear is moderate, although they are much less obtrusive. Apart from certain pathological cases associated with a specific parafunction, iatrogenic tooth brushing or an eating disorder and encouraged by an acid environment, they are the result of a physiological process that should not be halted. To ensure this, it is essential to prevent lesions related to tooth wear, to detect them early and establish a reliable diagnosis. Types of tooth wear that had remained unchanged since the origin of humanity have undergone profound changes in a very short space of time. Today's tribochemical pathological model has replaced the abrasive physiological model of the past. PMID:21920497

  2. Material removal mechanisms in abrasive vibration polishing of complex molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinksmeier, E.; Riemer, O.; Schulte, H.

    2010-10-01

    Optical and medical industries are demanding a large variety of optical elements exhibiting complex geometries and multitude opto-functional areas in the range of a few millimeters [1]. Therefore, mold inserts made of steel or carbides must be finished by polishing for the replication of glass and plastic lenses [2]. For polishing theses complex components in the shape of localized cavities or grooves the application of rotating polishing pads is very limited. Established polishing processes are not applicable, so state of the art is a time consuming and therefore expensive polishing procedures by hand. An automated process with conventional polishing machines is impossible because of the complex mold insert geometry. The authors will present the development of a new abrasive polishing process for finishing these complex mold geometries to optical quality. The necessary relative velocity in the contact area between polishing pad and workpiece surface is exclusively realized by vibration motions which is an advantage over vibration assisted rotating polishing processes. The absence of rotation of the pad opens up the possibility to machine new types of surface geometries. The specific influence factors of vibration polishing were analyzed and will be presented. The determination of material removal behavior and polishing effect on planar steel samples has shown that the conventional abrasive polishing hypothesis of Preston is applicable to the novel vibration polishing process. No overlaid chemical material removal appears.

  3. Wear mechanism of diamond coated cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Leyendecker, T.; Lemmer, O.; Esser, S.

    1995-12-31

    Since Diamond Coatings were introduced into the market in 1989, five years experience in industrial applications of diamond coated cutting tools enables to present an overview of tool life and wear behavior of diamond coated cutting tools due to different cutting conditions and workpiece-materials. Machining reinforced plastics, presintered ceramic compacts, aluminum alloys, metal-matrix composites and graphite, different wear behavior occurs at the cutting edges of diamond coated tools. Having a good adhesion fatigue and chemical wear of Diamond coatings determines life time of the tools. By a profound pretreatment procedure CVD Diamond coated tools can compete with conventional PCD-tools.

  4. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  5. Mechanisms and causes of wear in tooth enamel: implications for hominin diets

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Peter W.; Omar, Ridwaan; Al-Fadhalah, Khaled; Almusallam, Abdulwahab S.; Henry, Amanda G.; Michael, Shaji; Thai, Lidia Arockia; Watzke, Jörg; Strait, David S.; Atkins, Anthony G.

    2013-01-01

    The wear of teeth is a major factor limiting mammalian lifespans in the wild. One method of describing worn surfaces, dental microwear texture analysis, has proved powerful for reconstructing the diets of extinct vertebrates, but has yielded unexpected results in early hominins. In particular, although australopiths exhibit derived craniodental features interpreted as adaptations for eating hard foods, most do not exhibit microwear signals indicative of this diet. However, no experiments have yet demonstrated the fundamental mechanisms and causes of this wear. Here, we report nanowear experiments where individual dust particles, phytoliths and enamel chips were slid across a flat enamel surface. Microwear features produced were influenced strongly by interacting mechanical properties and particle geometry. Quartz dust was a rigid abrasive, capable of fracturing and removing enamel pieces. By contrast, phytoliths and enamel chips deformed during sliding, forming U-shaped grooves or flat troughs in enamel, without tissue loss. Other plant tissues seem too soft to mark enamel, acting as particle transporters. We conclude that dust has overwhelming importance as a wear agent and that dietary signals preserved in dental microwear are indirect. Nanowear studies should resolve controversies over adaptive trends in mammals like enamel thickening or hypsodonty that delay functional dental loss. PMID:23303220

  6. Effect of processing, sterilization and crosslinking on UHMWPE fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing surface in total joint replacements (TJR) for nearly five decades. This semi-crystalline polymer has extraordinary energetic toughness owing to its high molecular weight and entanglement density. However, it is challenged by a need to offer a combined resistance to fatigue, wear and oxidation in vivo. The processing, sterilization treatment, and microstructural tailoring of UHMWPE has evolved considerably in the past 50 years but an optimized microstructure remains elusive. This review seeks to provide an overview of this processing history to address two primary questions: First, how does microstructure affect fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in UHMWPE? And second, can microstructure be optimized to provide resistance to fatigue, oxidation and wear in vivo? Previous literature demonstrates that while crosslinking improves resistance to adhesive/abrasive wear, it also reduces resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fatigue wear by restricting molecular mobility and rendering the polymer more brittle. Crystallinity improves fatigue resistance but generally increases elastic modulus and concomitant contact stresses in vivo. The presence of fusion defects or oxidation reduces further fatigue resistance and enhances fatigue wear. Thus, UHMWPE microstructural evolution comes with trade-offs. Currently there is no singular formulation of UHMWPE that is ideal for all TJR applications. PMID:26386167

  7. Effect of processing, sterilization and crosslinking on UHMWPE fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing surface in total joint replacements (TJR) for nearly five decades. This semi-crystalline polymer has extraordinary energetic toughness owing to its high molecular weight and entanglement density. However, it is challenged by a need to offer a combined resistance to fatigue, wear and oxidation in vivo. The processing, sterilization treatment, and microstructural tailoring of UHMWPE has evolved considerably in the past 50 years but an optimized microstructure remains elusive. This review seeks to provide an overview of this processing history to address two primary questions: First, how does microstructure affect fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in UHMWPE? And second, can microstructure be optimized to provide resistance to fatigue, oxidation and wear in vivo? Previous literature demonstrates that while crosslinking improves resistance to adhesive/abrasive wear, it also reduces resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fatigue wear by restricting molecular mobility and rendering the polymer more brittle. Crystallinity improves fatigue resistance but generally increases elastic modulus and concomitant contact stresses in vivo. The presence of fusion defects or oxidation reduces further fatigue resistance and enhances fatigue wear. Thus, UHMWPE microstructural evolution comes with trade-offs. Currently there is no singular formulation of UHMWPE that is ideal for all TJR applications.

  8. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  9. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  10. WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings in Low- and High-Stress Abrasive Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašparová, Michaela; Zahálka, František; Houdková, Šárka

    2011-03-01

    The article deals with the evaluation of abrasive wear resistance and adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings. The main attention was paid to differences between low- and high-stress abrasive conditions of the measuring. Conclusions include the evaluation of specific properties of the WC-Co and the Cr3C2-NiCr High Velocity Oxygen Fuel coatings and the evaluation of the changes in the behavior of the abrasive media. Mainly, the relationship between the low- and high-stress abrasion conditions and the wear mechanism in the tested materials was described. For the wear test, the abrasive media of Al2O3 and SiO2 sands were chosen. During wear tests, the volume loss of the tested materials and the surface roughness of the wear tracks were measured. The wear tracks on the tested materials and abrasive sands' morphologies were observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It was found that high-stress abrasive conditions change the coatings' behavior very significantly, particularly that of the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. Adhesive-cohesive properties of the coatings and relationships among individual structure particles were evaluated using tensile testing. It was found that the weak bond strength among the individual splats, structure particles, and phases plays a role in the poor wear resistance of the coatings.

  11. New wear resistant composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Angers, R.; Champagne, B.; Fiset, M.; Chollet, P.

    1983-01-01

    A composite material consisting of WC-Co particles in a steel matrix was fabricated by sintering mixtures of WC-Co particles and a steel powder and infiltrating the sintered pieces with a copper alloy. Its wear resistance and mechanical properties were studied as a function of the content in WC-Co particles and other characteristics of the composite material microstructure. Infiltration provided a simple means to obtain a strong cohesion between WC-Co particles and the steel matrix. An effective matrix protection against wear is obtained with relatively low additions of particles especially with a silica abrasive which is soft with respect to cemented carbide. The experimental results show that this material has good mechanical properties and wear resistance. Depending upon abrasion resistance, wear losses are reduced up to 10 times by a 30 vol% addition of cemented carbide particles.

  12. A study of the abrasive resistance of metal alloys with applications in dental prosthetic fixators.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Fernández, E; Manero, J M; Planell, J A; Sabrià, J; Cortada, M; Giner, L

    1995-01-01

    Wear is one of the main surface failure mechanisms in materials and it will play a leading role in substitutive dental biomaterials. The aim of the present study is to compare the abrasive wear of different metallic materials used in dental applications. The results show that the abrasive wear of alloys based on precious metals such as Pt, Pd, Au and Ag is higher than for Ti and Ti based alloys. The alloy with the highest wear resistance is the Co-Cr which exhibits as well the highest hardness and Young's modulus. Since the method corresponds to a well-established abrasive wear standard, the behaviour of the different materials can be easily compared.

  13. The unsteady nature of sea cliff retreat due to mechanical abrasion, failure and comminution feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Shaun W.; Adams, Peter N.; Limber, Patrick W.

    2014-08-01

    Sea cliff retreat is often linked to large waves, heavy precipitation and seismic events, but the specific operative mechanics have not been well constrained. In particular, what is the role of mechanical abrasion by beach sediments in cliff/platform evolution and how does it relate to the episodic nature of cliff retreat observed at certain locations? Here we present a simple, numerical model of sea cliff retreat that incorporates mechanical abrasion of a basal notch, threshold-controlled failure of the cantilevered block, and a feedback mechanism wherein retreat is dependent on the rate of sediment comminution within the surf zone. Using shore platform and cliff characteristics found in two coastal settings (the central California coast and the English North Sea coast), the model produces retreat rates comparable to those observed via field measurements. The highest retreat rates coincide with the steepest shore platforms and increasing wave height. Steeper platforms promote wave access to the cliff toe and, correspondingly, the receding cliff face produces additional accommodation space for the platform beach, preserving the erosive efficacy of the beach sediments. When exposed to energetic wave forcing, the slope of the inner platform segment controls retreat rates for concave platforms, whereas the slope of the outer platform segment exerts greater control for convex platforms. Platform beaches approached a long-term dynamic equilibrium on the concave profiles, leading to more consistent and steady retreat. Platform beaches were ephemeral on convex profiles, mirroring observed sand wave (Ord) migration on the Holderness coast, UK. These findings agree with previous field observations and support mechanical abrasion as a viable cause of temporal heterogeneity in cliff retreat rate for both coastlines.

  14. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  15. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  16. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  17. Fretting Wear Mechanisms in A216 Plain Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maich, Alyssa Anne

    The subsurface and surface microstructures during pin-on-disk fretting wear of A216 steel disks under various loading conditions and times are investigated. The corresponding pins are fabricated from 410 stainless steel to simulate in-service conditions found in such engineering components as the Siemens W501FD engine row-2 diaphragm of a Siemens turbine engine, which is known to be prone to failure by fretting wear. Loading conditions range from 2N to 15N and times from 1 hour to a maximum of 69 hours, when steady state is confirmed. Wear track depth is quantitatively determined by optical profilometry, and found to range from 3 to 11 microns dependent upon load. Wear depth increases from 2N to 10N load, but decreases when increased to 15N load, due to heavier transfer of pin material to disk, as can be seen by EDS images of chromium transfer on A216 disk. Microstructures are evaluated by transmission electron microscopy of samples prepared by focused ion beam machining to pinpoint wear tracks and expose them in cross-section. EDS is used, in conjunction with TEM, to elucidate primary wear mechanisms at each stage of fretting wear. Microstructures in the subsurface of wear tracks are found to be heavily dislocated and layered, features that vary with both applied load and time. The microstructure eventually evolves into stable dislocation cells with cell walls aligned parallel to the surface. Penetration depth of the damaged layers increases with applied load, associated with a non-uniform maximum shear stress distribution that varies with depth. Primary oxide appears to evolve from Fe2O3 to Fe3O4, with increasing fretting time, leading to a uniform oxide on the surface of the A216 disk. Oxidation rate may be increased with the evolution of this subsurface dislocation cell structure. It is concluded that fretting wear failure is likely associated with a synergy between oxidative wear and crack initiation and propagation along dislocation cell walls under high

  18. Intelligent identification of wear mechanism via on-line ferrograph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tonghai; Peng, Yeping; Sheng, Chenxing; Wu, Jiaoyi

    2014-03-01

    Condition based maintenance(CBM) issues a new challenge of real-time monitoring for machine health maintenance. Wear state monitoring becomes the bottle-neck of CBM due to the lack of on-line information acquiring means. The wear mechanism judgment with characteristic wear debris has been widely adopted in off-line wear analysis; however, on-line wear mechanism characterization remains a big problem. In this paper, the wear mechanism identification via on-line ferrograph images is studied. To obtain isolated wear debris in an on-line ferrograph image, the deposition mechanism of wear debris in on-line ferrograph sensor is studied. The study result shows wear debris chain is the main morphology due to local magnetic field around the deposited wear debris. Accordingly, an improved sampling route for on-line wear debris deposition is designed with focus on the self-adjustment deposition time. As a result, isolated wear debris can be obtained in an on-line image, which facilitates the feature extraction of characteristic wear debris. By referring to the knowledge of analytical ferrograph, four dimensionless morphological features, including equivalent dimension, length-width ratio, shape factor, and contour fractal dimension of characteristic wear debris are extracted for distinguishing four typical wear mechanisms including normal, cutting, fatigue, and severe sliding wear. Furthermore, a feed-forward neural network is adopted to construct an automatic wear mechanism identification model. By training with the samples from analytical ferrograph, the model might identify some typical characteristic wear debris in an on-line ferrograph image. This paper performs a meaningful exploratory for on-line wear mechanism analysis, and the obtained results will provide a feasible way for on-line wear state monitoring.

  19. Detailed study of oxidation/wear mechanism in lox turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Wear of 440C angular contact ball bearings of the phase 2 high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) has been studied by means of various advanced nondestructive techniques (NDT) and modeled with reference to all known material, design, and operation variables. Three modes dominating the wear scenario were found to be the adhesive/sheer peeling (ASP), oxidation, and abrasion. Bearing wear was modeled in terms of the three modes. Lacking a comprehensive theory of rolling contact wear to date, each mode is modeled after well-established theories of sliding wear, while sliding velocity and distance are related to microsliding in ball-to-ring contacts. Microsliding, stress, temperature, and other contact variables are evaluated with analytical software packages of SHABERTH(TM)/SINDA(TM) and ADORE(TM). Empirical constants for the models are derived from NIST experiments by applying the models to the NIST wear data. The bearing wear model so established precisely predicts quite well the average ball wear rate for the HPOTP bearings. The wear rate has been statistically determined for the entire population of flight and development bearings based on Rocketdyne records to date. Numerous illustrations are given.

  20. Detailed study of oxidation/wear mechanism in lox turbopump bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T. J.; McCarty, J. P.

    1993-12-01

    Wear of 440C angular contact ball bearings of the phase 2 high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) has been studied by means of various advanced nondestructive techniques (NDT) and modeled with reference to all known material, design, and operation variables. Three modes dominating the wear scenario were found to be the adhesive/sheer peeling (ASP), oxidation, and abrasion. Bearing wear was modeled in terms of the three modes. Lacking a comprehensive theory of rolling contact wear to date, each mode is modeled after well-established theories of sliding wear, while sliding velocity and distance are related to microsliding in ball-to-ring contacts. Microsliding, stress, temperature, and other contact variables are evaluated with analytical software packages of SHABERTH(TM)/SINDA(TM) and ADORE(TM). Empirical constants for the models are derived from NIST experiments by applying the models to the NIST wear data. The bearing wear model so established precisely predicts quite well the average ball wear rate for the HPOTP bearings. The wear rate has been statistically determined for the entire population of flight and development bearings based on Rocketdyne records to date. Numerous illustrations are given.

  1. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  2. Friction and wear with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide in contact with iron base binary alloys in oil: Effects of alloying element and its content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a rider of 0.025-millimeter-radius, single-crystal silicon carbide in mineral oil. Results indicate that atomic size and content of alloying element play a dominant role in controlling the abrasive-wear and -friction properties of iron-base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction and groove height (wear volume) general alloy decrease, and the contact pressure increases in solute content. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic radius ratio with the decreasing rate of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of groove height (wear volume), and the increasing rate of contact pressure with increasing solute content C. Those rates increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases from unity.

  3. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-20

    The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  5. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  6. Friction and wear behaviors of compacted graphite iron with different biomimetic units fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Na; Shan, Hongyu; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Darong; Li, Xiaoyan; Xia, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-07-01

    Mimicking the biological characters on the cuticles of pangolin scales, biomimetic units were fabricated on the surfaces of compacted graphite cast iron (CGI) with different unit materials using laser cladding process. The influences of various unit materials including TiC, WC, B4C and Al2O3 powders on the friction and wear behaviors of CGI were investigated. The wear resistance mechanism of biomimetic specimens was discussed. The results indicated that the wear resistance of biomimetic specimens cladding TiC was the best; the specimens cladding WC or B4C were in the middle; and the specimens cladding Al2O3 was the worst. The sequence of friction coefficient values of biomimetic specimens cladding different ceramic powders from high to low was B4C, TiC, WC and Al2O3. The wear mechanism of untreated specimen was mainly adhesion wear, abrasive wear as well as the oxidation wear, whereas the adhesive wear and abrasive wear was the main wear mechanism of the regions of substrate in biomimetic specimens and slight adhesion, abrasive wear and fatigue wear on the regions of biomimetic units.

  7. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  8. Mechanical and wear properties of PMMA/PVDF microfilled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.L.; Koelling, K.W.; Seghi, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    There is a clinical need in fixed prosthodontics for aesthetic materials that are biologically compatible. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been used extensively in dental applications. Blends of PMMA and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are a new class of materials that might perform as aesthetic restorative materials. The fracture properties of PMMA have been intensively studied because it is an amorphous glass below 110{degrees}C, thus exhibiting brittle fracture under normal testing conditions below about 85{degrees}C. However, this brittle behavior leads to poor wear resistance. The properties of the matrix can be tailored by blending with PVDF. The blends are composed of homogeneous mixtures of the two polymers at the molecular level. Polyvinylidene fluoride molecules do not contribute to the mechanical yield behavior of the blend but do act as plasticizers. Improvements in the mechanical properties may be achieved by incorporating a filler into the polymer matrix.

  9. Rig for testing the relative wear resistance of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.F.; Diulin, A.I.; Efimchuk, V.P.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Finogenov, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple and compact rig for studying the relative wear resistance of materials subjected to mechanical abrasion and friction. The rig has an electronic control system. It was used to test the relative wear resistance of a wide range of superhard and brittle materials under mechanical abrasion against a counterbody. The counterbody was made of modified iron and the test medium was a diamond suspension in oil. The results showed that specimen wear exhibits a linear relationship with abrasion time (in the range of 0.5-20 min.) at unit pressure from 0.01 to 0.10 MPa. That a standard wear pattern exists within a wide range of parameters indicates that abrasive conditions are highly stable and makes it possible to control conditions. The rig was used to establish the relative wear resistance of several abrasives, minerals, and refractory compounds. The very large difference (15.2 times) between the most and least-resistant materials (tungsten carbide and fluoride) illustrates the sensitivity of the methodology.

  10. Investigation of abrasion in Al–MgO metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Muharr em Pul; Çalin, Recep; Gül, Ferhat

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the effects of reinforcement volume fractions on abrasive wear behavior were examined in Al–MgO reinforced metal matrix composites of 5%, 10% and 15% reinforcement – volume ratios produced by melt-stirring. Abrasive wear tests were carried out by 60, 80 and 100 mesh sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive papers and pin-on-disc wear test apparatus under 10, 20 and 30 N loads at 0.2 m/s sliding speed. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture strength were determined. Subsequent to the wear tests, the microstructures of worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope analyses. While increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite resulted increased hardness, fracture strength was determined to decrease. Additionally, it was found that increased MgO reinforcement volume fraction in the composite was accompanied with increased wear loss and porosity as well as reinforcement – volume ratio was identified to be significant determinants of abrasive wear behavior.

  11. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, L.; Haenninen, H.; Paro, J.; Kauppinen, V.

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  12. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  13. Anti-wear properties of Cr C and Ni Co alloy coatings as substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhang, Junyan

    2008-09-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Co, amorphous Cr-C alloy and nanocrystalline Cr-C coatings were electrodeposited from 'environmentally acceptable' electrolytes as potential substitutes for conventional nanocrystalline Cr coatings electrodeposited from noxious hexavalent chromium. The structure, morphology and hardness of coatings are investigated using a transmission electron microscope, a scanning electronic microscope and a Vickers hardness tester, respectively. Anti-wear properties are tested on a pin-on-plate vibrant wear tester. The correlation between the wear resistance, hardness, brittleness and the lubricated state is investigated. The results show that the wear behaviour of specimens significantly depends on their lubricated state, hardness and brittleness. Under the lubricated sliding condition, abrasive wear is the primary wear mechanism for all specimens. With respect to the abrasive wear mechanism, both the elastic and plastic deformations play important roles during the lubricated sliding process. Thus, the amorphous and nanocrystalline Cr-C alloy coatings, with both high brittleness and high hardness, exhibit a lower wear rate than the conventional Cr and Ni-Co coatings. On the other hand, under the dry sliding condition, the annealed Ni-Co coating, with an excellent compromise between high hardness and toughness, exhibits an abrasive wear mechanism and a relatively low wear rate; in contrast, the brittle Cr-matrix coatings exhibit a severe fatigue/delamination wear mechanism and high wear rate.

  14. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Conducted on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1998-01-01

    Sojourner rover showing Lewis' wheel abrasion experiment. The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft soft-landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. Among the many experiments on its small Sojourner rover are three technology experiments from the NASA Lewis Research Center, including the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The WAE was designed, built, delivered, and operated on Mars by a team of engineers and scientists from Lewis' Photovoltaics and Space Environments Branch. This experiment collected data to assess wheel surface wear on the Sojourner. It used a specially designed rover wheel, with thin films (200 to 1000 angstroms) of aluminum, nickel, and platinum deposited on black, anodized aluminum strips attached to the rover's right center wheel. As the wheel spun in the Martian soil, a photovoltaic sensor monitored changes in film reflectivity. These changes indicated abrasion of the metal films by Martian surface material. Rolling wear data were accumulated by the WAE. Also, at frequent intervals, all the rover wheels, except the WAE test wheel, were locked to hold the rover stationary while the test wheel alone was spun and dug into the Martian regolith. These tests created wear conditions more severe than simple rolling. The WAE will contribute substantially to our knowledge of Martian surface characteristics. Marked abrasion would indicate a surface composed of hard, possibly sharply edged grains, whereas lack of abrasion would suggest a somewhat softer surface. WAE results will be correlated with ground simulations to determine which terrestrial materials behave most like those on Mars. This knowledge will enable a deeper understanding of erosion processes on Mars and the role they play in Martian surface evolution. Preliminary results show that electrostatic charging of the rover wheels sometimes caused dust to accumulate on the WAE wheel, making interpretation of the reflectance data problematic. If electrostatic charging is the mechanism for dust attraction, this indicates

  15. Preparation of monodisperse polystyrene/silica core-shell nano-composite abrasive with controllable size and its chemical mechanical polishing performance on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Zefang; Qin, Fei; Liu, Weili; Song, Zhitang

    2011-11-01

    Monodisperse silica-coated polystyrene (PS) nano-composite abrasives with controllable size were prepared via a two-step process. Monodisperse positively charged PS colloids were synthesized via polymerization of styrene by using a cationic initiator. In the subsequent coating process, silica formed shell on the surfaces of core PS particles via the ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane. Neither centrifugation/water wash/redispersion cycle process nor surface modification or addition surfactant was needed in the whole process. The morphology of the abrasives was characterized by scanning electron microscope. Transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis results indicated that silica layer was successfully coated onto the surfaces of PS particles. Composite abrasive has a core-shell structure and smooth surface. The chemical mechanical polishing performances of the composite abrasive and conventional colloidal silica abrasive on blanket copper wafers were investigated. The root mean square roughness decreases from 4.27 nm to 0.56 nm using composite abrasive. The PS/SiO2 core-shell composite abrasives exhibited little higher material removal rate than silica abrasives.

  16. Subsurface mechanical damage during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaineau, P.; André, D.; Laheurte, R.; Darnis, P.; Darbois, N.; Cahuc, O.; Neauport, J.

    2015-10-01

    The subsurface damage (SSD) introduced during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass was measured using a wet etch technique. Various process parameters and grinding configurations were studied. The relation between the SSD depth, the process parameters and forces applied by the grinding wheel on the sample was investigated and compared to a simulation using a discrete element method to model the grinding interface. The results reveal a relation between the SSD depth and the grinding forces normalized by the abrasive concentration. Regarding the creation of the SSD, numerical simulations indicate that only a small fraction of the largest particles in the diamond wheel are responsible for the depth of the damaged layer.

  17. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of H13 Steel in Different Environmental Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxing; Zhou, Yin; Cao, Huan; Li, Yixian; Wang, Lan; Wang, Shuqi

    2016-10-01

    Sliding wear tests were performed for H13 steel in atmosphere, distilled water, 3.5% NaCl, and 5% NaOH water solutions under various loads on a pin-on-disk wear tester. The results showed that for different environmental media, the wear rate of H13 steel in atmosphere was the maximum and that in 3.5% NaCl solution was the minimum. The maximum wear rate in atmosphere was caused by a larger quantity of heat produced in the friction process. In this case, the adhesive wear prevailed. In three wet environments, the mild wear prevailed due to the good lubrication and cooling capacity of media as well as corrosion product film on worn surface. In distilled water, the wear mechanism was a typical fatigue wear. On the other hand, in 3.5% NaCl and 5% NaOH solutions, corrosive wear prevailed. The minimum wear rate in 3.5% NaCl solution was attributed to the protective function of corrosion product film. On the contrary, noncompact corrosion product film in 5% NaOH solution resulted in higher wear rate.

  18. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of H13 Steel in Different Environmental Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxing; Zhou, Yin; Cao, Huan; Li, Yixian; Wang, Lan; Wang, Shuqi

    2016-08-01

    Sliding wear tests were performed for H13 steel in atmosphere, distilled water, 3.5% NaCl, and 5% NaOH water solutions under various loads on a pin-on-disk wear tester. The results showed that for different environmental media, the wear rate of H13 steel in atmosphere was the maximum and that in 3.5% NaCl solution was the minimum. The maximum wear rate in atmosphere was caused by a larger quantity of heat produced in the friction process. In this case, the adhesive wear prevailed. In three wet environments, the mild wear prevailed due to the good lubrication and cooling capacity of media as well as corrosion product film on worn surface. In distilled water, the wear mechanism was a typical fatigue wear. On the other hand, in 3.5% NaCl and 5% NaOH solutions, corrosive wear prevailed. The minimum wear rate in 3.5% NaCl solution was attributed to the protective function of corrosion product film. On the contrary, noncompact corrosion product film in 5% NaOH solution resulted in higher wear rate.

  19. Mechanical and wear properties of aluminum coating prepared by cold spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Siti Nurul Akmal Manap, Abreeza Afandi, Nurfanizan Mohd; Salim, Musdalilah; Misran, Halina

    2015-07-22

    In this study, aluminum (Al) powders were deposited onto Al substrates using cold spray to form a coating. The main objective is to investigate and compare the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al coating to that of the Al substrate. The microstructure of the coating and substrate were observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Hardness was evaluated using the Vickers Hardness test and wear properties were investigated using a pin-on-disk wear test machine. The elemental composition of the coating and substrate was determined using Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Results showed that the friction coefficient and specific wear rate decreased while wear rate increased linearly with increasing load. It was found that the coating exhibit slightly better mechanical and wear properties compared to the substrate.

  20. Mechanical and wear properties of aluminum coating prepared by cold spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Siti Nurul Akmal; Manap, Abreeza; Afandi, Nurfanizan Mohd; Salim, Musdalilah; Misran, Halina

    2015-07-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) powders were deposited onto Al substrates using cold spray to form a coating. The main objective is to investigate and compare the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of Al coating to that of the Al substrate. The microstructure of the coating and substrate were observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Hardness was evaluated using the Vickers Hardness test and wear properties were investigated using a pin-on-disk wear test machine. The elemental composition of the coating and substrate was determined using Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Results showed that the friction coefficient and specific wear rate decreased while wear rate increased linearly with increasing load. It was found that the coating exhibit slightly better mechanical and wear properties compared to the substrate.

  1. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  2. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2011-05-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  3. A fundamental review of the friction and wear behavior of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The basic concepts associated with the friction and wear of materials are discussed as they relate to ceramics. Properties of ceramics such as crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mechanical deformation, and surface chemistry are reviewed as they influence friction and wear. Both adhesive and abrasive wear of ceramics are discussed. The friction and wear of ceramics are examined in contact with themselves and when in contact with metals. The influences of environmental constituents such as water and hydrocarbons on friction and wear are reviewed. Materials discussed, by way of example, include aluminum oxide, rutile, calcium fluoride, and lithium fluoride.

  4. Effect of Surface Chemistry on the Mechanisms and Governing Laws of Friction and Wear.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Sorkin, Viacheslav; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that interface chemistry, that is, the formation and breaking of chemical bonds across contacting interfaces, is closely related to the wear and friction behavior at the nanoscale. In reality, the dangling bond density (DBD) at contacting surfaces can vary greatly. Currently, it remains unclear how friction and wear mechanisms depend on DBDs and whether the Archard's law for wear and Amonton's law for friction are still applicable for contacting surfaces with different DBDs. In this work, we address these issues by studying the wear and friction behavior between two sliding diamond-like carbon surfaces by controlling DBDs via hydrogenation using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the chemical bond breaking and remaking across the contacting interface play the key role in determining the friction and wear behavior. During the sliding, a higher DBD leads to more chemical bond formations across the interface, causing stronger wear via either atom or cluster detachments. With the same DBD, a mechanism transition from an atom-by-atom to cluster detachments is observed by increasing the normal load. Remarkably, a fully saturated surface can exhibit a wearless friction. We further show that after necessary modifications, the Archard's law for wear and the Amonton's law for friction may be applicable at the nanoscale. The present work reveals insights into the effect of interface chemistry on the friction and wear, and it provides guidelines for effective antiwear design.

  5. Contribution of human osteoblasts and macrophages to bone matrix degradation and proinflammatory cytokine release after exposure to abrasive endoprosthetic wear particles

    PubMed Central

    Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Lochner, Katrin; Schulze, Christoph; Pohle, Diana; Pustlauk, Wera; Hansmann, Doris; Bader, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    One of the major reasons for failure after total joint arthroplasty is aseptic loosening of the implant. At articulating surfaces, defined as the interface between implant and surrounding bone cement, wear particles can be generated and released into the periprosthetic tissue, resulting in inflammation and osteolysis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which osteoblasts and macrophages are responsible for the osteolytic and inflammatory reactions following contact with generated wear particles from Ti-6Al-7Nb and Co-28Cr-6Mo hip stems. To this end, human osteoblasts and THP-1 monocytic cells were incubated with the experimentally generated wear particles as well as reference particles (0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml) for 48 h under standard culture conditions. To evaluate the impact of these particles on the two cell types, the release of different bone matrix degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), and relevant cytokines were determined by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Following incubation with wear particles, human osteoblasts showed a significant upregulation of MMP1 and MMP8, whereas macrophages reacted with enhanced MMP3, MMP8 and MMP10 production. Moreover, the synthesis of TIMPs 1 and 2 was inhibited. The osteoblasts and macrophages also responded with modified expression of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. These results demonstrate that the release of wear particles affects the release of proinflammatory cytokines and has a negative impact on bone matrix formation during the first 48 h of particle exposure. Human osteoblasts are directly involved in the proinflammatory cascade of bone matrix degradation. The simultaneous activation and recruitment of monocytes/macrophages boosted osteolytic processes in the periprosthetic tissue. By the downregulation of TIMP production and the concomitant

  6. Investigations of mechanical and wear properties of alumina/titania/fire-clay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vinay Kumar; Chauhan, Shivani; Sharma, Aarushi

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effect of various particulates (alumina, titania, fire clay) reinforcements on mechanical and wear properties of epoxy composites have been studied with a prime motive of replacing the costly alumina and titania by much economical fire clay for high mechanical strength and/or wear resistant materials. Fire clay based epoxy composites delivered better mechanical (both tensile and impact) properties than the alumina filled or neat epoxy composites and slightly lower than titania reinforced composites, which qualified the fire clay a very suitable cost effective alternatives of both alumina and titania for high mechanical strength based applications. However, the poor wear behavior of fire clay reinforced composites revealed its poor candidacy for wear and tear applications.

  7. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    PubMed Central

    Schlupp, P.; Weber, M.; Schmidts, T.; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies. PMID:25756004

  8. Understanding wear in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mair, L H

    1999-01-01

    Tooth wear is an increasing problem in dentistry. Traditionally, it has been divided into three categories: abrasion, attrition, and erosion. However, most clinical cases of tooth wear involve more than one of these processes. It is often easier to make a diagnosis by looking for the signs of the fundamental wear processes rather than trying to categorize the individual case. Wear can be caused by direct surface-to-surface wear, an intervening slurry, or a corrosive environment. Wear occurs during mastication, but also at other times, often at night. Although it may be possible to institute a preventive regimen, this will not always help the patient if his or her prime concern is esthetics. The same processes that cause tooth wear will cause wear to restorative materials. To diagnose and prevent wear, its processes must be understood.

  9. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this activity is to obtain the necessary data which would enhance, promote, and encourage the introduction of advanced lubrication technology into the marketplace. This includes (a) defining specific but different applications, (b) establishing the limits or ranges of applied loads, speeds, and temperatures over which the concept of tribopolymerization would work in reducing wear and/or friction, (c) continuing in efforts to understand the film-forming process (this rates to (b) above), using this knowledge to develop new and even more effective additives, and (d) exploring possible connections with private and investment companies for the licensing and marketing of products which will reduce friction and wear in a variety of applications. Progress was made in several different but connected areas. These included (a) establishing of load/velocity limits of selected monomers for ceramic lubrication, (b) the discovery of new and effective monomers designed for higher temperature anti-wear applications, (c) improvements and modifications of the high load/high speed pin-on-disk machine, (d) the initiation of related or spin-off projects designed to get their advanced technology into the marketplace, (e) the filing of three new patent applications, and (f) collaborative research with Dr. Kajdas--the co-inventor with Dr. Furey--on tribopolymerization as a novel and effective approach to the boundary lubrication of ceramics and steel. These and other elements of progress made during the first Quarter of 1996 are discussed briefly.

  10. Wear mechanisms in thermally-sprayed Mo-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Sampath, S.; Anand, V.

    1994-07-01

    The successful development of advanced diesel engines relies heavily on piston ring coating materials which can withstand elevated temperatures and reduce friction. Traditional hard chrome plating and flame-sprayed Mo-wire materials have reached their potential in the diesel engine environment, and alternatives are needed. Thermally-sprayed Mo-based alloys and composites are being evaluated for applications as next-generation ring-face coatings. The alloy development task of producing complex Mo-based alloy powders for use as thermally-sprayed coating materials requires an understanding of their wear resistance under contact stress conditions. In this paper, the wear behavior of Mo and Mo + NiCrBSi thermally sprayed coatings is exmined by pin-on-disc and single-point scratch-test methods. Microstructural analysis beneath worn regions have revealed that fracture of splats and their decohesion constitute the mode of failure. Improved wear resistance and stability of low friction coefficient was obtained by prealloying Mo with NiCrBSi prior to thermal spraying.

  11. Influence of the microstructure of ceramic materials on their wear behavior in mechanical seals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, R.

    1994-10-01

    Ceramic materials such as aluminium oxide and silicon carbide are regularly used as one of the counterfaces to oppose carbon graphite in a mechanical seal. Under nominally identical test conditions, the same carbon graphite face can show high wear rates against a material from one supplier but a significantly lower wear rate on a similar material from another. The general descriptions of aluminium oxide and silicon carbide can cover significant differences in properties between materials from various suppliers. Ceramic counterfaces from several manufacturers have been examined, after testing under similar conditions, in order to understand the microstructural factors that influence the wear of the carbon graphite and hence the lift of the mechanical seal. There is evidence to suggest that the wear resistance of the system depends on the grain size distribution, the integrity of the grain bonding and the presence of additional phases. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-07-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  13. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  14. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ. PMID:27722174

  15. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  16. Optically transparent superhydrophobic surfaces with enhanced mechanical abrasion resistance enabled by mesh structure.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Naoyuki; Manabe, Kengo; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Shiratori, Seimei

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by naturally occurring superhydrophobic surfaces such as "lotus leaves", a number of approaches have been attempted to create specific surfaces having nano/microscale rough structures and a low surface free energy. Most importantly, much attention has been paid in recent years to the improvement of the durability of highly transparent superhydrophobic surfaces. In this report, superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated using three steps. First, chemical and morphological changes are generated in the polyester mesh by alkaline treatment of NaOH. Second, alkaline treatment causes hydrophobic molecules of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane to react with the hydroxyl groups on the fiber surfaces forming covalent bonds by using the chemical vapor deposition method. Third, hydrophobicity is enhanced by treating the mesh with SiO2 nanoparticles modified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane using a spray method. The transmittance of the fabricated superhydrophobic mesh is approximately 80% in the spectral range of 400-1000 nm. The water contact angle and the water sliding angle remain greater than 150° and lower than 25°, respectively, and the transmittance remains approximately 79% after 100 cycles of abrasion under approximately 10 kPa of pressure. The mesh surface exhibits a good resistance to acidic and basic solutions over a wide range of pH values (pH 2-14), and the surface can also be used as an oil/water separation material because of its mesh structure.

  17. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with single crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the friction force in the plowing of metal and the groove height (corresponding to the wear volume of the groove) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease, and the contact pressure increases with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic ratio with the decreasing rate of change of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of change of groove height and the increasing rate of change of contact pressure with increasing solute content. These rates of change increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  18. The influence of aluminum and carbon on the abrasion resistance of high manganese steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckholz, Samuel August

    Abrasive wear testing of lightweight, austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C cast steel has been performed in accordance with ASTM G65 using a dry sand, rubber wheel, abrasion testing apparatus. Testing was conducted on a series of Fe-30Mn-XAl-YC-1Si-0.5Mo chemistries containing aluminum levels from 2.9 to 9.5 wt.% and carbon levels from 0.9 to 1.83 wt.%. Solution treated materials having an austenitic microstructure produced the highest wear resistance. Wear resistance decreased with higher aluminum, lower carbon, and higher hardness after age hardening. In the solution treated condition the wear rate was a strong function of the aluminum to carbon ratio and the wear rate increased with a parabolic dependence on the Al/C ratio, which ranged from 1.8 to 10.2. Examination of the surface wear scar revealed a mechanism of plowing during abrasion testing and this method of material removal is sensitive to work hardening rate. Work hardening behavior was determined from tensile tests and also decreased with increasing Al/C ratio and after aging hardening. The loss of wear resistance is related to short range ordering of Al and C in the solution treated materials and kappa-carbide precipitation in age hardened materials and both contribute to planar slip and lower work hardening rates. A high carbon tool steel (W1) and a bainitic low alloy steel (SAE 8620) were also tested for comparison. A lightweight steel containing 6.5 wt.% Al and 1.2 wt.% C has wear resistance comparable to within 5% of the bainitic SAE 8620 steel forging currently used for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle track shoe and this cast Fe-Mn-Al-C steel, at equivalent tensile properties, would be 10% lighter.

  19. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    During the first three months of 1996, progress on the Energy-Related Project was made in several different but connected areas. These included (a) establishing of load/velocity limits of selected monomers for ceramic lubrication, (b) the discovery of new and effective monomers designed for higher temperature anti-wear applications, (c) improvements and modifications of the high load/high speed pin-on-disk machine, (d) the initiation of related or spin-off projects designed to get the advanced technology into the marketplace, (e) the filing of three new patent applications, and (f) collaborative research with Dr. Kajdas -- the co-inventor with Dr. Furey -- on tribopolymerization as a novel and effective approach to the boundary lubrication of ceramics and steel.

  20. Assessment of variations in wear test methodology.

    PubMed

    Gouvêa, Cresus V D; Weig, Karin; Filho, Thales R M; Barros, Renata N

    2010-01-01

    The properties of composite resin for dental fillings were improved by development, but its weakness continues to be its wear strength. Several tests have been proposed to evaluate wear in composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to verify how polishing and the type of abrasive can influence the wear rate of composite resin. The test was carried out on two groups. In one group we employed an ormocer and a hybrid composite that was polished group the composite was polished with the same abrasive paper plus a 1 microm and 0.25 microm grit diamond paste. A three-body wear test was performed using the metal sphere of the wear test machine, the composite and an abrasive. A diamond paste and aluminum oxide dispersion were used as abrasive. Analysis of the results showed that there was no difference between polishing techniques, but revealed a difference between abrasives.

  1. Mechanics of interaction and atomic-scale wear of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Grierson, David S; Turner, Kevin T; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-04-23

    Wear is one of the main factors that hinders the performance of probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM), including for the widely used amplitude modulation (AM-AFM) mode. Unfortunately, a comprehensive scientific understanding of nanoscale wear is lacking. We have developed a protocol for conducting consistent and quantitative AM-AFM wear experiments. The protocol involves controlling the tip-sample interaction regime during AM-AFM scanning, determining the tip-sample contact geometry, calculating the peak repulsive force and normal stress over the course of the wear test, and quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The peak repulsive tip-sample interaction force is estimated from a closed-form equation accompanied by an effective tip radius measurement procedure, which combines transmission electron microscopy and blind tip reconstruction. The contact stress is estimated by applying Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov contact mechanics model and also numerically solving a general contact mechanics model recently developed for the adhesive contact of arbitrary axisymmetric punch shapes. We discuss the important role that the assumed tip shape geometry plays in calculating both the interaction forces and the contact stresses. Contact stresses are significantly affected by the tip geometry while the peak repulsive force is mainly determined by experimentally controlled parameters, specifically, the free oscillation amplitude and amplitude ratio. The applicability of this protocol is demonstrated experimentally by assessing the performance of diamond-like carbon-coated and silicon-nitride-coated silicon probes scanned over ultrananocrystalline diamond substrates in repulsive mode AM-AFM. There is no sign of fracture or plastic deformation in the case of diamond-like carbon; wear could be characterized as a gradual atom-by-atom process. In contrast, silicon nitride wears through removal of the cluster of atoms and plastic

  2. Primary electric propulsion technology study. [for thruster wear-out mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Beattie, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the 30-cm engineering-model-thruster technology with emphasis placed on the development of models for understanding and predicting the operational characteristics and wear-out mechanisms of the thruster as a function of operating or design parameters is presented. The task studies include: (1) the wear mechanisms and wear rates that determine the useful lifetime of the thruster discharge chamber; (2) cathode lifetime as determined by the depletion of barium from the barium-aluminate-impregnated-porous-tungsten insert that serves as a barium reservoir; (3) accelerator-grid-system technology; (4) a verification of the high-voltage propellant-flow-electrical-isolator design developed under NASA contract NAS3-20395 for operation at 10-kV applied voltage and 10-A equivalent propellant flow with mercury and argon propellants. A model was formulated for predicting performance.

  3. Comparison of wear behaviors for an artificial cervical disc under flexion/extension and axial rotation motions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Song, Jian; Liao, Zhenhua; Feng, Pingfa; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-06-01

    The wear behaviors of a ball-on-socket (UHMWPE-on-Ti6Al4V) artificial cervical disc were studied with 1.5 MC (million cycles) wear simulation under single flexion/extension and axial rotation motion and their composite motion. The wear rates, wear traces, and contact stress were analyzed and contrasted based on mass loss, optical microscopy and SEM as well as 3D profilometer, and ANSYS software, respectively. A much higher wear rate and more severe wear scars appeared under multi-directional motion. Flexion/extension motion of 7.5° lead to more severe wear than that under axial rotation motion of 4°. The above results were closely related to the contact compression stress and shear stress. The wear surface in FE motion showed typical linear wear scratches while revealing obvious arc-shaped wear tracks in AR motion. However, the central zone of both ball and socket components revealed more severe wear tracks than that in the edge zone under these two different motions. The dominant wear mechanism was plowing/scratching and abrasive wear as well as a little oxidation wear for the titanium socket while it was scratching damage with adhesive wear and fatigue wear due to plastic deformation under cyclic load and motion profiles for the UHMWPE ball. PMID:27040218

  4. Wear mechanism and tribological characteristics of porous NiTi shape memory alloy for bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Guosong; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zheng, Dong; Chung, C Y; Xu, Z S; Chu, Paul K

    2013-09-01

    The abraded debris might cause osteocytic osteolysis on the interface between implants and bone tissues, thus inducing the subsequent mobilization of implants gradually and finally resulting in the failure of bone implants, which imposes restrictions on the applications of porous NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, the effects of the annealing temperature, applied load, and porosity on the tribological behavior and wear resistance of three-dimensional porous NiTi SMA are investigated systematically. The porous structure and phase transformation during the exothermic process affect the tribological properties and wear mechanism significantly. In general, a larger porosity leads to better tribological resistance but sometimes, SMAs with small porosity possess better wear resistance than ones with higher porosity during the initial sliding stage. It can be ascribed to the better superelasticity of the former at the test temperature. The porous NiTi phase during the exothermic reaction also plays an important role in the wear resistance. Generally, porous NiTi has smaller friction coefficients under high loads due to stress-induced superelasticity. The wear mechanism is discussed based on plastic deformation and microcrack propagation.

  5. Competing mechanisms in the wear resistance behavior of biomineralized rod-like microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar de Obaldia, Enrique; Herrera, Steven; Grunenfelder, Lessa Kay; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties observed in biological composite materials relative to those of their individual constituents distinguish them from common engineering materials. Some naturally occurring high-performance ceramics, like the external veneer of the Chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) tooth, have been shown to have superior hardness and impressive abrasion resistance properties. The mechanical performance of the chiton tooth has been attributed to a hierarchical arrangement of nanostructured magnetite rods surrounded with organic material. While nanoindentation tests provide useful information about the overall performance of this biological composite, understanding the key microstructural features and energy dissipation mechanisms at small scales remains a challenging task. We present a combined experimental/numerical approach to elucidate the role of material deformation in the rods, debonding at the rod interfaces and the influence of energy dissipation mechanisms on the ability of the microstructure to distribute damage under extreme loading conditions. We employ a 3D finite element-based micromechanical model to simulate the nanoindentation tests performed in geological magnetite and cross-sections of the chiton tooth. This proposed model is capable of capturing the inelastic deformation of the rods and the failure of their interfaces, while damage, fracture and fragmentation of the mineralized rods is assessed using a probabilistic function. Our results show that these natural materials achieve their abrasion resistant properties by controlling the interface strength between rods, alleviating the tensile stress on the rods near the indentation tip and therefore decreasing the probability of catastrophic failure without significantly sacrificing resistance to penetration. The understanding of these competing energy dissipating mechanisms provides a path to the prediction of new combination of materials. In turns, these results suggest certain

  6. "Severe" wear challenge to 36 mm mechanically enhanced highly crosslinked polyethylene hip liners.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, J G; Williams, P A; Clarke, I C; Green, D D; Donaldson, T K

    2008-07-01

    Our purpose was to compare the wear performance of mechanically enhanced 5Mrad highly crosslinked polyethylene (MEP, ArComXL) hip liners to (control) 3Mrad UHMWPE liners (ArCom) in 36 mm head size. As a more severe synergy of clinically relevant test models, we contrasted wear with custom roughened Co-Cr surfaces (Ra 500 nm) to the standard pristine Co-Cr heads (Ra < 20 nm) using a severe microseparation test mode in our hip simulator. We adopted a previously published model to estimate potential biological activity. On new Co-Cr heads, the MEP liners showed a 47% reduction in volumetric wear a 13% reduction in wear particle size and a 27% reduction in Functional Biological Activity (FBA) compared to our control. On rough Co-Cr heads, the MEP liners showed little advantage in terms of volumetric wear compared with the control. However, the MEP liners overall showed a 38% reduction in FBA compared to the control owing to a larger volume fraction of larger particles. Thus overall the MEP liners appeared to offer advantages in terms of reduced FBA indices.

  7. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1986-02-01

    Casing wear caused by new tooljoint hardfacings, such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material, has been investigated in the laboratory. The tests were performed on a full-scale test facility with field conditions-forces, motions, and fluids-simulated as closely as possible. It was found that the major mechanisms responsible for casing wear by tooljoints are adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and ploughing. Wear mechanisms can be classified as mild, normal, and severe. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures for lessening casing wear. This can be achieved with (1) tooljoints that have a sufficiently large, smooth, round, and uniform surface and (2) an appropriate mud that has a sufficiently high content of soft solid particles, such as barites, to form a layer in the tooljoint/casing contact area so that metal-to-metal contact is avoided and small, hard mud particles are embedded.

  8. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-07

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  9. GENIPIN CROSSLINKING OF CARTILAGE ENHANCES RESISTANCE TO BIOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION AND MECHANICAL WEAR

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mariah L.; Ovaert, Timothy C.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Wagner, Diane R.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen crosslinking enhances many beneficial properties of articular cartilage, including resistance to chemical degradation and mechanical wear, but many crosslinking agents are cytotoxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of genipin, a crosslinking agent with favorable biocompatibility and cytotoxicity, as a potential treatment to prevent the degradation and wear of articular cartilage. First, the impact of genipin concentration and treatment duration on the viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage was quantified. Next, two short-term (15 minute) genipin crosslinking treatments were chosen, and the change in collagenase digestion, cartilage wear, and the friction coefficient of the tissue with these treatments was measured. Finally, chondrocyte viability after exposure to these genipin treatments was assessed. Genipin treatment increased the stiffness of healthy, intact cartilage in a dose-dependent manner. The 15-minute crosslinking treatments improved cartilage's resistance to both chemical degradation, particularly at the articular surface, and to damage due to mechanical wear. These enhancements were achieved without sacrificing the low coefficient of friction of the tissue and at a genipin dose that preserved chondrocyte viability. The results of this study suggest that collagen crosslinking via genipin may be a promising preventative treatment to slow the degradation of cartilage. PMID:25939430

  10. Surface folding in metals: a mechanism for delamination wear in sliding

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Anirban; Guo, Yang; Sundaram, Narayan K.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, in situ imaging of a hard, wedge-shaped model asperity sliding against a metal surface, we demonstrate a new mechanism for particle formation and delamination wear. Damage to the residual surface is caused by the occurrence of folds on the free surface of the prow-shaped region ahead of the wedge. This damage manifests itself as shallow crack-like features and surface tears, which are inclined at very acute angles to the surface. The transformation of folds into cracks, tears and particles is directly captured. Notably, a single sliding pass is sufficient to damage the surface, and subsequent passes result in the generation of platelet-like wear particles. Tracking the folding process at every stage from surface bumps to folds to cracks/tears/particles ensures that there is no ambiguity in capturing the mechanism of wear. Because fold formation and consequent delamination are quite general, our findings have broad applicability beyond wear itself, including implications for design of surface generation and conditioning processes. PMID:25197251

  11. A lexicon for wear of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    McKellop, Harry A; Hart, Alister; Park, Sang-Hyun; Hothi, Harry; Campbell, Pat; Skinner, John A

    2014-09-01

    Research on metal-on-metal (MoM) hip bearings has generated an extensive vocabulary to describe the wear processes and resultant surface damage. However, a lack of consistency and some redundancy exist in the current terminology. To facilitate the understanding of MoM tribology and to enhance communication of results among researchers and clinicians, we propose four categories of wear terminology: wear modes refer to the in vivo conditions under which the wear occurred; wear mechanisms refer to fundamental wear processes (adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and tribochemical reactions); wear damage refers to the resultant changes in the morphology and/or composition of the surfaces; and wear features refer to the specific wear phenomena that are described in terms of the relevant modes, mechanisms, and damage. Clarifying examples are presented, but it is expected that terms will be added to the lexicon as new mechanisms and types of damage are identified. Corrosion refers to electrochemical processes that can remove or add material and thus also generate damage. Corrosion can act alone or may interact with mechanical wear. Examples of corrosion damage are also presented. However, an in-depth discussion of the many types of corrosion and their effects is beyond the scope of the present wear lexicon.

  12. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of a Wear-Resistant Alloyed Ductile Iron Austempered at Various Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junjun; Chen, Liqing

    2015-08-01

    To further improve the mechanical performance of a new type of alloyed bainitic wear-resistant ductile iron, the effects of the various austempering temperatures have been investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed ductile iron Fe-3.50C-1.95Si-3.58Ni-0.71Cu-0.92Mo-0.65Cr-0.36Mn (in weight percent). This alloyed ductile iron were firstly austenitized at 1123 K (850 °C) for 1 hour and then austempered in a salt bath at 548 K, 573 K, and 598 K (275 °C, 300 °C, and 325 °C) for 2 hours according to time-temperature-transformation diagram calculated by JMatPro software. The microstructures of austempered wear-resistant ductile irons consist of matrix of dark needle-like ferrite plus bright etching austenite and some amount of martensite and some dispersed graphite nodules. With increasing the austempering temperature, the amount of ferrite decreases in austempered ductile iron, while the amount of austenite and carbon content of austenite increases. There is a gradual decrease in hardness and increase in compressive strength with increasing austempering temperature. The increased austenite content and coarsened austenite and ferrite can lead to a hardness decrease as austempering temperature is increased. The increased compressive strength can be attributed to a decreased amount of martensitic transformation. The alloyed ductile iron behaves rather well wear resistance when the austempering is carried out at 598 K (325 °C) for 2 hours. Under the condition of wear test by dry sand/rubber wheel, the wear mechanisms of austempered ductile irons are both micro-cutting and plastic deformation.

  13. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  14. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how bonded solid lubricant films lubricate and wear (in general), the tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were studied (in specific). A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; but in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95 mm diameter flat area was slid against the film. This was done so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred. In the first, the film supported the load. The lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer (of the film) between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  15. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  16. Sliding Wear Properties of HVOF Thermally Sprayed Nylon-11 and Nylon-11/Ceramic Composites on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L.; Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Cairncross, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Polymer and polymer/ceramic composite coatings were produced by ball-milling 60 μm Nylon-11 together with nominal 10 vol.% of nano and multiscale ceramic reinforcements and by HVOF spraying these composite feedstocks onto steel substrates to produce semicrystalline micron and nanoscale reinforced polymer matrix composites. Room temperature dry sliding wear performance of pure Nylon-11, Nylon-11 reinforced with 7 nm silica, and multiscale Nylon-11/silica composite coatings incorporating 7-40 nm and 10 μm ceramic particles were characterized using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficient of friction and wear rate were determined as a function of applied load and coating composition. Surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize and analyze the coatings and wear scars. The pure Nylon-11 coating experienced less wear than the composites due to the occurrence of two additional wear mechanisms: abrasive and fatigue wear.

  17. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior

  18. Abrasion and deformed layer formation of manganese-zinc ferrite in sliding contact with lapping tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    Wear experiments were conducted using replication electron microscopy and reflection electron diffraction to study abrasion and the deformed layers produced in single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite simulated heads during contact with lapping tapes. The crystaline state of the head is changed drastically during the abrasion process. Crystalline states ranging from nearly amorphous to highly textured polycrystalline can be produced on the wear surface of a single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite head. The total thickness of the deformed layer was approximately 0.8 microns. This thickness increased as the load and abrasive grit size increased. The anisotropic wear of the ferrite was found to be inversely proportional to the hardness of the wear surface. The wear was lower in the order 211 111 10 0110. The wear of the ferrite increased markedly with an increase in sliding velocity and abrasive grit size.

  19. Unveiling Ultra-High Temperature Wear and Indentation Damage Mechanisms of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumgardner, Clifton; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are necessary to protect turbine blades within jet engines from extreme environments that the substrate material may not be capable of withstanding. Therefore, failure of the coating due to wear during its operational lifecycle is a critical event. In order to understand the failure mechanisms of the coating layers, a zirconia-based coating on a nickel alloy substrate was subjected to wear testing to simulate pressure and temperature conditions within a jet engine. Using a Hertzian contact model, the maximum shear and its depth were determined and analyzed in conjunction with the coating material properties and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry images. The coupled imaging and contact model analyses made possible the identification of the location and time of delamination and its underlying causes. Our findings provide key insights for the development of more resilient thermal barrier coatings.

  20. Friction and abrasion of elastomeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    An abrasion apparatus is described. Experimental measurements are reported for four representative elastomeric materials, including a typical high-quality tire tread material and a possible replacement material for aircraft tire treads based on transpolypentenamer (TPPR). Measurements are carried out at different levels of frictional work input, corresponding to different severities of wear, and at both ambient temperature and at 100 C. Results indicate the marked superiority in abrasion resistance of the material based on TPPR, especially at 100 C, in comparison with the other materials examined.

  1. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid. PMID:26556515

  2. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  3. WEAR RESISTANCE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HIGHLY CROSSLINKED UHMWPE DOPED WITH VITAMIN-E

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Christensen, Steven D.; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Wannomae, Keith K.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2008-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that cross-linked UHMWPE stabilized with vitamin-E would be wear and fatigue resistant. Acetabular liners were radiation cross-linked, doped with vitamin E and γ-sterilized. Hip simulator wear rate of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE was approximately 1 and 6 mg/million-cycles in clean serum and in serum with third-body bone cement particles, respectively; a four to ten-fold decrease from that of conventional UHMWPE. The ultimate strength, yield strength, elongation-at-break and fatigue resistance of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE were significantly higher than that of 100-kGy irradiated and melted UHMWPE and were unaffected by accelerated aging. Rim impingement testing with 3.7 mm-thick acetabular liners up to 2 million-cycles showed no significant damage of the cross-linked liners compared to conventional, gamma-sterilized in inert UHMWPE vitamin-E stabilized liners. The data indicate good wear properties and improved mechanical and fatigue properties for vitamin-E stabilized cross-linked UHMWPE. PMID:16781413

  4. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Resistance of Laser Cladded WC/Ni Composite Coatings with Different Contents of WC Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. S.; Zhang, X. C.; Xuan, F. Z.; Wang, Z. D.; Tu, S. T.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this article was to address the effect of WC content on the microstructure, microhardness, and sliding wear resistance of laser cladded WC/Ni composite coatings. The content of WC particle in the feed powder varied in the range of 0-80 wt.%. Experimental results showed that the laser cladded coatings exhibited homogeneous microstructure without pores or cracks. By comparing with the 45# steel substrate, the microhardness of WC/Ni composite coatings was relatively high. The microhardness of coating increased with increasing the content of WC particles. The wear resistance of WC/Ni composite coatings was strongly dependent on the content of WC particle and their microstructure. When the WC content was lower than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, the wear rate of the coatings decreased with increasing WC content. The two-body abrasive wear was identified as the main wear mechanisms. For the coatings with WC content higher than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, their wear rate increased with increasing WC content. The three-body abrasive wear and fatigue wear were the main failures. The coating with 40 wt.% WC in the feed powder exhibited the best wear resistance.

  5. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated.

  6. The boron oxide{endash}boric acid system: Nanoscale mechanical and wear properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Unertl, W.N.; Erdemir, A.

    1999-08-01

    The film that forms spontaneously when boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is exposed to humid air is a solid lubricant. This film is usually assumed to be boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), the stable bulk phase. We describe the nanometer-scale surface morphology, mechanical properties, and tribological properties of these films and compare them with crystals precipitated from saturated solutions of boric acid. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) and low-load indentation were the primary experimental tools. Mechanical properties and their variation with depth are reported. In all cases, the surfaces were covered with a layer that has different mechanical properties than the underlying bulk. The films formed on boron oxide showed no evidence of crystalline structure. A thin surface layer was rapidly removed, followed by slower wear of the underlying film. The thickness of this initial layer was sensitive to sample preparation conditions, including humidity. Friction on the worn surface was lower than on the as-formed surface in all cases. In contrast, the SFM tip was unable to cause any wear to the surface film on the precipitated crystals. Indentation pop-in features were common for precipitated crystals but did not occur on the films formed on boron oxide. The surface structures were more complex than assumed in models put forth previously to explain the mechanism of lubricity in the boron oxide{endash}boric acid{endash}water system. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  7. Applicability of Macroscopic Wear and Friction Laws on the Atomic Length Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Feldbauer, G.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Betz, G.; Vernes, A.

    2015-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we simulate the abrasion process of an atomically rough Fe surface with multiple hard abrasive particles. By quantifying the nanoscopic wear depth in a time-resolved fashion, we show that Barwell's macroscopic wear law can be applied at the atomic scale. We find that in this multiasperity contact system, the Bowden-Tabor term, which describes the friction force as a function of the real nanoscopic contact area, can predict the kinetic friction even when wear is involved. From this the Derjaguin-Amontons-Coulomb friction law can be recovered, since we observe a linear dependence of the contact area on the applied load in accordance with Greenwood-Williamson contact mechanics.

  8. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 2: Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The wear of the keeper electrode in discharge hollow cathodes is a major impediment to the implementation of ion propulsion onboard long-duration space science missions. The development of a predictive theoretical model for hollow cathode keeper life has long been sought, but its realization has been hindered by the complexities associated with the physics of the partially ionized gas and the associated erosion mechanisms in these devices. Thus, although several wear mechanisms have been hypothesized, a quantitative explanation of life test erosion profiles has remained incomplete. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas in a discharge cathode has been developed and applied to understand the mechanisms that drove the erosion of the keeper in two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion thruster. An extensive set of comparisons between predictions by the numerical simulations and measurements of the plasma properties and of the erosion patterns is presented. It is found that the near-plume plasma oscillations, predicted by theory and observed by experiment, effectively enhance the resistivity of the plasma as well as the energy of ions striking the keeper.

  9. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  10. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A. F.; Adams, W.; Western Michigan Univ.; Flowserve Corp.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R{sub a} {>=} 1 {mu}m), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH{sub 4}/Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R{sub a} = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  11. Wear resistance of a metal surface modified with minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, S. V.; Kislov, V. G.; Balasch, P. V.; Skazochkin, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Tikhonov, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    The article describes the advantages of the new technology of mineral coating of metal products for the friction pair of mechanical systems. It presents the research results of the wear rate of the samples made of 12X13 steel (X12Cr13) with mineral layers, in the experiments with a piston ring sliding inside a cylinder liner with grease. The wear rate of the samples with mineral layers is lower almost by two factors than that of the samples made of grey foundry iron and untreated samples. As the result of slip/rolling abrasion tests of parts with mineral layers under conditions of high contact pressure, a suggestion was made concerning probable mechanics of surface wear.

  12. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  13. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  14. Preparation and characterization of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/nanoclay nanocomposite flat sheet membranes for abrasion resistance.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-06-15

    Membranes with more resilience to abrasive wear are highly desired in water treatment, especially for seawater desalination. Nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/nanoclay membranes were prepared by phase inversion and then tested for abrasion resistance. Their material properties were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Nanoclay Cloisite(®) 15A was utilised as the inorganic nanoparticle incorporated into PVDF. FTIR results showed a shifting of the PVDF crystalline phase from α to β thus indicating that the nanoclay altered the PVDF host material's structure and mechanical properties in terms of stiffness and toughness. Water permeation test showed that nanoclay at low concentration tended to reduce water flux. All nanocomposite membranes, with between 1 wt% and 5 wt% initial nanoclay loading, were more abrasion resistant than the control PVDF membrane. However, the 1 wt% exhibited superior resistance, lasting two times longer than the reference PVDF membrane under the same abrasive condition. The 1 wt% nanoclay membrane appeared less abraded by SEM observation, while also having the greatest tensile strength improvement (from 4.5 MPa to 4.9 MPa). This membrane also had the smallest agglomerated nanoclay particle size and highest toughness compared to the higher nanoclay content membranes. Nanoclays are therefore useful for improving abrasion resistance of PVDF membranes, but optimal loadings are essential to avoid losing essential mechanical properties. PMID:24698723

  15. Preparation and characterization of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/nanoclay nanocomposite flat sheet membranes for abrasion resistance.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-06-15

    Membranes with more resilience to abrasive wear are highly desired in water treatment, especially for seawater desalination. Nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/nanoclay membranes were prepared by phase inversion and then tested for abrasion resistance. Their material properties were characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Nanoclay Cloisite(®) 15A was utilised as the inorganic nanoparticle incorporated into PVDF. FTIR results showed a shifting of the PVDF crystalline phase from α to β thus indicating that the nanoclay altered the PVDF host material's structure and mechanical properties in terms of stiffness and toughness. Water permeation test showed that nanoclay at low concentration tended to reduce water flux. All nanocomposite membranes, with between 1 wt% and 5 wt% initial nanoclay loading, were more abrasion resistant than the control PVDF membrane. However, the 1 wt% exhibited superior resistance, lasting two times longer than the reference PVDF membrane under the same abrasive condition. The 1 wt% nanoclay membrane appeared less abraded by SEM observation, while also having the greatest tensile strength improvement (from 4.5 MPa to 4.9 MPa). This membrane also had the smallest agglomerated nanoclay particle size and highest toughness compared to the higher nanoclay content membranes. Nanoclays are therefore useful for improving abrasion resistance of PVDF membranes, but optimal loadings are essential to avoid losing essential mechanical properties.

  16. Evaluation of hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Fathi, Mohamad Hossein; Navabi, Amir Arsalan; Savabi, Ghazal

    2013-01-01

    Background: The interim restorative materials should have certain mechanical properties to withstand in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Fifteen identical rectangular shape specimens with dimensions of 2 mm × 10 mm × 30 mm were made from 7 interim materials (TempSpan, Protemp 3 Garant, Revotek, Unifast LC, Tempron, Duralay, and Acropars). The Vickers hardness and abrasive wear of specimens were tested in dry conditions and after 1 week storage in artificial saliva. The depth of wear was measured using surface roughness inspection device. Data were subjected to Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between hardness and wear (α =0.05). Results: TempSpan had the highest hardness. The wear resistance of TempSpan (in dry condition) and Revotek (after conditioning in artificial saliva) was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant correlation between degree of wear and hardness of the materials (P = 0.281, r = −0.31). Conclusion: Hardness and wear resistance of interim resins are material related rather than category specified. PMID:23946734

  17. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  18. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid-lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were investigated. A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95-mm-diameter flat area was slid against the film so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred: in the first, the film supported the load and the lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  19. Influence of Corrosion on the Abrasion of Cutter Steels Used in TBM Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Jakobsen, P. D.; Langmaack, L.; Macias, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abrasion on tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutters may be critical in terms of project duration and costs. Several researchers are currently studying the degradation of TBM cutter tools used for excavating hard rock, soft ground and loose soil. So far, the primary focus of this research has been directed towards abrasive wear. Abrasive wear is a very common process in TBM excavation, but with a view to the environment in which the tools are working, corrosion may also exert an influence. This paper presents a selection of techniques that can be used to evaluate the influence of corrosion on abrasion on TBM excavation tools. It also presents the influence of corrosion on abrasive wear for some initial tests, with constant steel and geomaterial and varying properties of the excavation fluids (soil conditioners, anti-abrasion additives and water). The results indicate that the chloride content in the water media greatly influences the amount of wear, providing evidence of the influence of corrosion on the abrasion of the cutting tools. The presence of conditioning additives tailored to specific rock or soil conditions reduces wear. However, when chloride is present in the water, the additives minimise wear rates but fail to suppress corrosion of the cutting tools.

  20. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Metal Bond Diamond Wheels- Part II: Wheel Wear Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    The use of stereo scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the wear mechanism of the wire EDM true metal bond diamond wheel for ceramic grinding is presented. On the grinding wheel, a wedge-shape removal part was machined to enable the examination and measurement of the worn wheel surfaces using the stereo SEM. The stereo SEM was calibrated by comparing results of depth profile of a wear groove with the profilometer measurements. On the surface of the grinding wheel after wire EDM truing and before grinding, the diamond protruding heights were measured in the level of 35 {micro}m, comparing to the 54 {micro}m average size of the diamond in the grinding wheel. The gap between the EDM wire and rotating grinding wheel is estimated to be about 35 to 40 {micro}m. This observation indicates that, during the wire EDM, electrical sparks occur between the metal bond and EDM wire, which leaves the diamond protruding in the gap between the wire and wheel. The protruding diamond is immediately fractured at the start of the grinding process, even under a light grinding condition. After heavy grinding, the grinding wheel surface and the diamond protrusion heights are also investigated using the stereo SEM. The height of diamond protrusion was estimated in the 5 to 15 {micro}m range. This study has demonstrated the use of stereo SEM as a metrology tool to study the grinding wheel surface.

  1. Development of a two-body wet abrasion test method with attention to the effects of reused abradant

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    Abrasive wear is among the most common and costliest causes for material wastage, and it occurs in many forms. A simple method has been developed to quantify the response of metals and alloys to two-body wet abrasion. A metallographic polishing machine was modified to create a disk-on-flat sliding test rig. Adhesive-backed SiC grinding papers were used under fixed load and speed to rank the abrasive wear of seven alloy steels, some of which are candidates for drill cones for geothermal drilling. Standardized two-body abrasion tests, like those described in ASTM G132, feed unused abrasive into the contact; however, the current work investigated whether useful rankings could still be obtained with a simpler testing configuration in which specimens repeatedly slide on the same wear path under water-lubricated conditions. Tests using abrasive grit sizes of 120 and 180 resulted in the same relative ranking of the alloys although the coarser grit produced more total wear. Wear decreased when the same abrasive disk was re-used for up to five runs, but the relative rankings of the steels remained the same. This procedure was presented to ASTM Committee G2 on Wear and Erosion as a potential standard test for wet two-body abrasive wear.

  2. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF GREEN TEA ON DENTIN EROSION AND ABRASION

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Rios, Daniela; Hannas, Angélica Reis; Attin, Thomas; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This in situ study evaluated the protective effect of green tea on dentin erosion (ERO) and erosion-abrasion (ABR). Material and methods: Ten volunteers wore intraoral palatal appliances with bovine dentin specimens subjected to ERO or ERO + toothbrushing abrasion performed immediately (ERO+I-ABR) or 30 min after erosion (ERO+30-min-ABR). During 2 experimental 5-day crossover phases, the volunteers rinsed with green tea or water (control, 1 min) between each erosive (5 min, cola drink) and abrasive challenge (30 s, toothbrushing), 4x/day. Dentin wear was measured by profilometry. Results: The green tea reduced the dentin wear significantly for all conditions compared to control. ERO+I-ABR led to significantly higher wear than ERO, but it was not significantly different from ERO+30-min-ABR. ERO+30-min-ABR provoked significant higher wear than ERO, only for the placebo treatment. Conclusions: From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that green tea reduces the dentin wear under erosive/abrasive conditions. PMID:20027426

  3. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  4. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  5. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  6. Reciprocating sliding wear behavior of alendronate sodium-loaded UHMWPE under different tribological conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Qu, Shuxin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Dan; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the tribological behaviors and wear mechanisms of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN), a potential drug to treat osteolysis, under different normal loads and lubrication conditions. A mixture of UHMWPE powder and ALN (1.0 wt.%) solution was dried and hot pressed. The static and dynamic friction coefficients of UHMWPE-ALN were slightly higher than those of UHMWPE except under normal load as 10 N and in 25 v/v % calf serum. The specific wear rates of UHMWPE-ALN and UHMWPE were the lowest in 25 v/v % calf serum compared to those in deionized water or physiological saline. In particular, the specific wear rate of UHMWPE-ALN was lower than that of UHMWPE at 50 N in 25 v/v % calf serum. The main wear mechanisms of UHMWPE and UHMWPE-ALN in deionized water and UHMWPE in physiological saline were abrasive. The main wear mechanism of UHMWPE-ALN in physiological saline was micro-fatigue. In 25 v/v % calf serum, the main wear mechanism of UHMWPE and UHMWPE-ALN was abrasive wear accompanied with plastic deformation. The results of Micro-XRD indicated that the molecular deformation of UHMWPE-ALN and UHMWPE under the lower stress were in the amorphous region but in the crystalline region at the higher stress. These results showed that the wear of UHMWPE-ALN would be reduced under calf serum lubricated, which would be potentially applied to treat osteolysis.

  7. Effect of progressive wear on the contact mechanics of hip replacements--does the realistic surface profile matter?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Wenjian; Peng, Xifeng; Li, Dichen; Dong, Shuangpeng; Zhang, Shu; Zhu, Jinyu; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-04-13

    The contact mechanics of artificial metal-on-polyethylene hip joints are believed to affect the lubrication, wear and friction of the articulating surfaces and may lead to the joint loosening. Finite element analysis has been widely used for contact mechanics studies and good agreements have been achieved with current experimental data; however, most studies were carried out with idealist spherical geometries of the hip prostheses rather than the realistic worn surfaces, either for simplification reason or lacking of worn surface profile. In this study, the worn surfaces of the samples from various stages of hip simulator testing (0 to 5 million cycles) were reconstructed as solid models and were applied in the contact mechanics study. The simulator testing results suggested that the center of the head has various departure value from that of the cup and the value of the departure varies with progressively increased wear. This finding was adopted into the finite element study for better evaluation accuracy. Results indicated that the realistic model provided different evaluation from that of the ideal spherical model. Moreover, with the progressively increased wear, large increase of the contact pressure (from 12 to 31 MPa) was predicted on the articulating surface, and the predicted maximum von Mises stress was increased from 7.47 to 13.26 MPa, indicating the marked effect of the worn surface profiles on the contact mechanics of the joint. This study seeks to emphasize the importance of realistic worn surface profile of the acetabular cup especially following large wear volume.

  8. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  9. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages. PMID:25194522

  10. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  11. Effect of Zr addition on the mechanical characteristics and wear resistance of Al grain refined by Ti after extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Adnan I. O.; Al-Qawabah, S. M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are normally grain refined by Ti or Ti+B to transfer their columnar structure during solidification into equiaxed one which improves their mechanical behavior and surface quality. In this paper, the effect of addition of Zr on the metallurgical, and mechanical aspects, hardness, ductility and wear resistance of commercially pure aluminum grain refined by Ti after extrusion is investigated. Zr was added at a level of 0.1% which corresponds to the peretectic limit at the Al-Zr phase diagram. The experimental work was carried out on the specimens after direct extrusion. It was found that addition of Ti resulted in decrease of Al grain size, whereas addition of Zr alone or in the presence of Ti, resulted in reduction of Al grain size. This led to increase of Al hardness. The effect of the addition of Ti or Zr alone resulted almost in the same enhancement of Al mechanical characteristics. As for the strain hardening index,n, increase was obtained when Zr was added alone or in the presence of Ti. Hence pronounced improvement of its formability. Regarding the effect of Zr addition on the wear resistance of aluminum; it was found that at small loads and speeds addition of Ti or Zr or both together resulted in deterioration of its wear resistance whereas at higher loads and speeds resulted in pronounced improvement of its wear resistance. Finally, the available Archard model and the other available models which consider only the mass loss failed to describe the wear mechanism of Al and its micro-alloys because they do not consider the mushrooming effect at the worn end.

  12. Effect of load, area of contact, and contact stress on the wear mechanisms of a bonded solid lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A pin on disk type of friction and wear apparatus was used to study the effect of load, contact stress and rider area of contact on the friction and wear properties of polyimide bonded graphite fluoride films. Different rider area contacts were obtained by initially generating flats (with areas of 0.0035, 0.0071, 0.0145, and 0.0240 cm) on 0.476-cm radius hemispherically tipped riders. Different projected contact stresses were obtained by applying loads of 2.5- to 58.8-N to the flats. Two film wear mechanisms were observed. The first was found to be a linear function of contact stress and was independent of rider area of contact. The second was found to increase exponentially as the stress increased. The second also appeared to be a function of rider contact area. Wear equations for each mechanism were empirically derived from the experimental data. In general, friction coefficients increased with increasing rider contact area and with sliding duration. This was related to the build up of thick rider transfer films.

  13. Wear of the Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement investigated using an electro-mechanical spine simulator

    PubMed Central

    Moghadas, Parshia; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    The Charité® lumbar intervertebral disc replacement was subjected to wear testing in an electro-mechanical spine simulator. Sinusoidally varying compression (0.6–2 kN, frequency 2 Hz), rotation (±2°, frequency 1 Hz), flexion–extension (6° to −3°, frequency 1 Hz) and lateral bending (±2°, frequency 1 Hz) were applied out of phase to specimens immersed in diluted calf serum at 37 °C. The mass of the ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene component of the device was measured at intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 million cycles; its volume was also measured by micro-computed tomography. Total mass and volume losses were 60.3 ± 4.6 mg (mean ± standard deviation) and 64.6 ± 6.0 mm3. Corresponding wear rates were 12.0 ± 1.4 mg per million cycles and 12.8 ± 1.2 mm3 per million cycles; the rate of loss of volume corresponds to a mass loss of 11.9 ± 1.1 mg per million cycles, that is, the two sets of measurements of wear agree closely. Wear rates also agree closely with measurements made in another laboratory using the same protocol but using a conventional mechanical spine simulator. PMID:25834002

  14. The influence of irradiation dose on mechanical properties and wear resistance of molded and extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lei; Xiong, Dangsheng

    2012-05-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a type of biomedical material used in total joint replacement. In this study, molded and extruded UHMWPE was used to investigate the influence of irradiation dose on its mechanical properties and wear resistance. The results of tensile and compressive tests showed that tensile properties decreased as the irradiation dose increased. Compressive properties decreased significantly after irradiation, but then increased as the irradiation dose increased. Microhardness also had a similar variety tendency as compressive properties. It could be corresponding to the variety of crystallinity for UHMWPE. The fracture surfaces of tensile samples indicated that molded and extruded UHMWPE had a similar fracture mechanism, although the tensile properties were significantly different. The wear tests of knee joint moving simulator showed that the wear rate of molded and extruded UHMWPE decreased as the irradiation dose increased, and a significant reduction of wear rate was exhibited till the irradiation dose of 100 kGy under saline lubrication, and 150 kGy under calf serum lubrication. The IR results indicated that packaging and remelting in vacuum was an effective method to remove oxygen in UHMWPE blocks.

  15. The influence of irradiation dose on mechanical properties and wear resistance of molded and extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lei; Xiong, Dangsheng

    2012-05-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a type of biomedical material used in total joint replacement. In this study, molded and extruded UHMWPE was used to investigate the influence of irradiation dose on its mechanical properties and wear resistance. The results of tensile and compressive tests showed that tensile properties decreased as the irradiation dose increased. Compressive properties decreased significantly after irradiation, but then increased as the irradiation dose increased. Microhardness also had a similar variety tendency as compressive properties. It could be corresponding to the variety of crystallinity for UHMWPE. The fracture surfaces of tensile samples indicated that molded and extruded UHMWPE had a similar fracture mechanism, although the tensile properties were significantly different. The wear tests of knee joint moving simulator showed that the wear rate of molded and extruded UHMWPE decreased as the irradiation dose increased, and a significant reduction of wear rate was exhibited till the irradiation dose of 100 kGy under saline lubrication, and 150 kGy under calf serum lubrication. The IR results indicated that packaging and remelting in vacuum was an effective method to remove oxygen in UHMWPE blocks. PMID:22498285

  16. Effects of simulated oxidation on the in vitro wear and mechanical properties of irradiated and melted highly crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Neils, Andrew L; Doshi, Brinda N; Fu, Jun; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation crosslinked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) have reduced the wear rate of the bearing surface in total joint arthroplasty and the incidence of peri-prosthetic bone loss due to wear particles. The oxidation potential afforded to the material by the trapped residual free radicals after irradiation was addressed in first generation crosslinked UHMWPEs by using thermal treatments such as annealing or melting after irradiation. Postirradiation melted crosslinked UHMWPE did not contain detectable free radicals at the time of implantation and was expected to be resistant against oxidation for the lifetime of the implants. Recent analyses of long-term retrievals showed it was possible for irradiated and melted UHMWPEs to oxidize in vivo but studies on the effects of oxidation on these materials have been limited. In this study, we determined the effects of in vitro aging on the wear and mechanical properties of irradiated and melted UHMWPE as a function of radiation dose and found that even small amount of oxidation (oxidation index of 0.1) can have detrimental effects on its mechanical properties. There was a gradual increase in the wear rate below an oxidation index of 1 and a drastic increase thereafter. Therefore, it was shown in a simulated environment that oxidation can have detrimental effects to the clinically relevant properties of irradiated and melted UHMWPEs.

  17. A numerical approach towards understanding the mechanism of fatigue wear in tread vulcanizates during rolling of tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghi-Kashani, Mehdi

    2000-10-01

    Analysis of surface fracture and progress of fatigue wear on the surface of tire tread under road asperity loading is the main objective of this study. Starting with an idealized smooth surface of having precursor flaws, a simple mechanism for formation of wear debris and development of surface patterns is proposed. In this mechanism, step-wise propagation of these micro-flaws under periodic loading by asperities of the road is simulated using Moving Template Finite Element Analysis (MTFEA) in linear geometry and further analyzed using ABAQUS software in non-linear geometry. It is attempted to extend this analysis to heterogeneous rubber compounds where dispersed particles may affect propagation of surface cracks. Mechanical characterization of all existing phases i.e. rubber matrix, filler reinforcing units, and dispersed rubber particles (minor phase in blends) under similar conditions as asperity loading is performed by experimental/numerical methods prior to any stress analysis of such systems. Also, some features of carbon black reinforcement such as stress/strain amplifications in the rubber phase and distribution of stress/strain in constituents of the compound are predicted by combining FEA with experimental observations. Applying mechanical properties of all phases in local FEA models, interactions between ongoing crack tips and dispersed particles are analyzed. Some mechanical mechanisms by which filler reinforcing units and dispersed rubber particles retard propagation of cracks and possibly improving wear resistance are hypothesized.

  18. Etude de la degradation des refractaires aluminosiliceux par abrasion, chocs thermiques et corrosion par l'aluminium: Correlation et interaction des mecanismes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntakaburimvo, Nicodeme

    Aluminosilicate refractories used for melting and holding furnaces on which the present work was focused are submitted to mechanical abuse such as abrasion, mechanical impact and erosion, on one hand; and to chemical degradation by corrosion, as well as to thermal stresses, mostly due to thermal shocks; on the other hand. This thesis is focused on four main objectives. The first one is related to the designing of an experimental set-up allowing abrasion testing of refractories. The second deals with the separate study of the deterioration of aluminosilicate refractories by abrasion, thermal shock and corrosion. The third is the correlation between these three mechanisms while the fourth is related to the interaction between thermal shock and corrosion. One of the contributions of this thesis is the realisation of the above mentioned experimental set-up, which permits to carry out refractories abrasion testing, as well as at room and high temperature, in the absence or in the presence of molten metal. The fact of testing refractory resistance when it is submitted separately and simultaneously to the action of dynamic corrosion, erosion and abrasion leads to the studying of the influence of each of these three mechanisms on the other. One of the characteristics of the designed set-up is the fact that it allows to adjust the seventy testing conditions according to the mechanical resistance of the test material. The other important point is related to the fact the abrasion tests were carried out in such manner to permit degradation quantification, otherwise than by the traditional method of loss of weight measurement; particularly by measuring the wear depth and the residual material properties, such as the rupture force and the strength. A perfect correlation was observed between the wear depth and the loss of weight, both being negatively correlated with the residual rupture force. The abrasion resistance was found to be globally positively correlated with the

  19. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  20. Effect of EGR contamination of diesel engine oil on wear.

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Aldajah, S.; Goldblatt, I. L.; Energy Systems; United Arab Emirates Univ.; BP-Global Lubricants Technology

    2007-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is one of the effective means to reduce the NO{sub X} emission from diesel engines. Returning exhaust product to the diesel engine combustion chamber accelerated the degradation of the lubricant engine oil, primarily by increasing the total acid number (TAN) as well as the soot content and, consequently, the viscosity. These oil degradation mechanisms were observed in engine oil exposed to EGR during a standard Cummins M-l 1 diesel engine test. Four-ball wear tests with M-50 balls showed that, although the used oils slightly decrease the friction coefficients, they increased the ball wear by two orders of magnitude when compared to tests with clean oil. Wear occurred primarily by an abrasive mechanism, but in oil with the highest soot loading of 12%, scuffing and soot particle embedment were also observed. Laboratory wear tests showed a linear correlation with the TAN, while the crosshead wear during the engine test was proportional to the soot content.

  1. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  2. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used. PMID:15146320

  3. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  4. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  5. The effect of graphene content and sliding speed on the wear mechanism of nickel-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algul, H.; Tokur, M.; Ozcan, S.; Uysal, M.; Cetinkaya, T.; Akbulut, H.; Alp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nickel-graphene metal matrix composite coatings were fabricated by pulse electrodeposition technique from a Watt's type electrolyte. Effect of the graphene concentration in the electrolyte on the microstructure, microhardness, tribological features of nanocomposite coatings were evaluated in details. Microhardness of the composite coating was measured using a Vicker's microhardness indenter. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy, EDS and XRD analysis were used to determine chemical composition and structure of composite coatings. The tribological behavior of the resultant composite coating was tested by a reciprocating ball-on disk method at constant load but varying sliding speeds for determination the wear loss and friction coefficient features against a counterface. The wear and friction variations of the electrodeposited nickel graphene nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel balls were carried out on a CSM Instrument. The friction and wear properties of the coatings were examined without any lubrication at room temperature in the ambient air. The change in wear mechanisms by changing graphene nanosheets content was also comprehensively studied.

  6. Recent advances in the mechanical durability of superhydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2016-03-01

    Large majority of superhydrophobic surfaces have very limited mechanical wear robustness and long-term durability. This problem has restricted their utilization in commercial or industrial applications and resulted in extensive research efforts on improving resistance against various types of wear damage. In this review, advances and developments since 2011 in this field will be covered. As such, we summarize progress on fabrication, design and understanding of mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces. This includes an overview of recently published diagnostic techniques for probing and demonstrating tribo-mechanical durability against wear and abrasion as well as other effects such as solid/liquid spray or jet impact and underwater resistance. The review is organized in terms of various types of mechanical wear ranging from substrate adhesion, tangential surface abrasion, and dynamic impact to ultrasonic processing underwater. In each of these categories, we highlight the most successful approaches to produce robust surfaces that can maintain their non-wetting state after the wear or abrasive action. Finally, various recommendations for improvement of mechanical wear durability and its quantitative evaluation are discussed along with potential future directions towards more systematic testing methods which will also be acceptable for industry.

  7. Recent advances in the mechanical durability of superhydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2016-03-01

    Large majority of superhydrophobic surfaces have very limited mechanical wear robustness and long-term durability. This problem has restricted their utilization in commercial or industrial applications and resulted in extensive research efforts on improving resistance against various types of wear damage. In this review, advances and developments since 2011 in this field will be covered. As such, we summarize progress on fabrication, design and understanding of mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces. This includes an overview of recently published diagnostic techniques for probing and demonstrating tribo-mechanical durability against wear and abrasion as well as other effects such as solid/liquid spray or jet impact and underwater resistance. The review is organized in terms of various types of mechanical wear ranging from substrate adhesion, tangential surface abrasion, and dynamic impact to ultrasonic processing underwater. In each of these categories, we highlight the most successful approaches to produce robust surfaces that can maintain their non-wetting state after the wear or abrasive action. Finally, various recommendations for improvement of mechanical wear durability and its quantitative evaluation are discussed along with potential future directions towards more systematic testing methods which will also be acceptable for industry. PMID:26792021

  8. Innovative tribometer for in situ spectroscopic analyses of wear mechanisms and phase transformation in ceramic femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Wenliang, Zhu; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The literature on tribological assessments of artificial hip joints usually focuses on correlations between joint composition, size, and specific wear rates, but conspicuously ignores the physical aspects behind the occurrence of degradation mechanisms of friction and wear. Surface degradation in artificial joints occurs because of increases in temperature and local exacerbation of contact stresses inside the moving contact as a consequence of physical and chemical modifications of the sliding surfaces. This article reports about the development of a new pin-on-ball spectroscopy-assisted tribometer device that enables investigating also physical rather than merely engineering aspects of wear processes using in situ Raman and fluorescence techniques. This innovative tribometer is designed to bring about, in addition to conventional tribological parameters, also information of temperature, stress and phase transformations in the femoral heads as received from the manufacturer. Raman and fluorescence spectra at the point of sliding contact are recorded durilng reciprocating hard-on-hard dry-sliding tests. Preliminary results were collected on two different commercially available ceramic-on-ceramic hip joint bearing couples, made of monolithic alumina and alumina-zirconia composites. Although the composite couple showed direct evidence of tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation, which enhanced the coefficient of friction, the specific wear rate was significantly lower than that of the monolithic one (i.e., by a factor 2.63 and 4.48 on the pin and head side, respectively). In situ collected data compared to ex situ analyses elucidated the surface degradation processes and clarified the origin for the higher wear resistance of the composite as compared to the monolithic couple.

  9. [Improve wear resistance of UHMWPE by O+ ion implanted].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dangsheng

    2003-12-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was implanted with 450 keV and 100 keV O+ ions at dosage of 1 x 10(15)/cm2, 5 x 10(15)/cm2, 3 x 10(14)/cm2, respectively. Its wear behaviors were studied under dry friction condition and lubrication by means of distilled water using a pin-on-disk tribometer with a Si3N4 ceramic ball as a counterface. The wear surfaces were examined with SEM. The experimental results showed that the wear rate of implanted UHMWPE is lower than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions, especially for 450 keV energy and 5 x 10(15)/cm2 dose implantation. The friction coefficient of O+ ions implanted UHMWPE is higher than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions. The adhesive, plow and plastic deformation are the wearing mechanism for un-implanted UHMWPE; the fatigue and abrasive wear are that for implanted UHMWPE.

  10. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  11. Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

    1983-05-01

    The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

  12. Unified wear model for highly crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE).

    PubMed

    Muratoglu, O K; Bragdon, C R; O'Connor, D O; Jasty, M; Harris, W H; Gul, R; McGarry, F

    1999-08-01

    Crosslinking has been shown to improve the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in both in vitro and clinical in vivo studies. The molecular mechanisms and material properties that are responsible for this marked improvement in wear resistance are still not well understood. In fact, following crosslinking a number of mechanical properties of UHMWPE are decreased including toughness, modulus, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and hardness. In general, these changes would be expected to constitute a precursor for lower wear resistance, presenting a paradox in that wear resistance increases with crosslinking. In order to understand better and to analyze this paradoxical behaviour of crosslinked UHMWPE, we investigated the wear behavior of (i) radiation-crosslinked GUR 1050 resin, (ii) peroxide-crosslinked GUR 1050 resin and (iii) peroxide-crosslinked Himont 1900 resin using a bi-directional pin-on-disk (POD) machine. Wear behavior was analyzed as a function of crystallinity, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and molecular weight between crosslinks (Mc). The crosslink density increased with increasing radiation dose level and initial peroxide content. The UTS, YS, and crystallinity decreased with increasing crosslink density. While these variations followed the same trend, the absolute changes as a function of crosslink density were different for the three types of crosslinked UHMWPE studied. There was no unified correlation for the wear behavior of the three types of crosslinked UHMWPE with the crystallinity, UTS and YS. However, the POD wear rate showed the identical linear dependence on Mc with all three types of crosslinked UHMWPEs studied. Therefore, we have strong evidence to propose that Mc or crosslink density is a fundamental material property that governs the lubricated adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms of crosslinked UHMWPEs, overriding the possible effects of other material properties such as UTS, YS

  13. Mobile load simulators - A tool to distinguish between the emissions due to abrasion and resuspension of PM10 from road surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrig, R.; Zeyer, K.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Poulikakos, L. D.; Furger, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2010-12-01

    Mechanically produced abrasion particles and resuspension processes are responsible for a significant part of the PM10 emissions of road traffic. However, specific differentiation between PM10 emissions due to abrasion and resuspension from road pavement is very difficult due to their similar elemental composition and highly correlated variation in time. In this work Mobile Load Simulators were used to estimate PM10 emission factors for pavement abrasion and resuspension on different pavement types for light and heavy duty vehicles. From the experiments it was derived that particle emissions due to abrasion from pavements in good condition are quite low in the range of only a few mg·km -1 per vehicle if quantifiable at all. Considerable abrasion emissions, however, can occur from damaged pavements. Resuspension of deposited dust can cause high and extremely variable particle emissions depending strongly on the dirt load of the road surface. Porous pavements seem to retain deposited dust better than dense pavements, thus leading to lower emissions due to resuspension compared to pavements with a dense structure (e.g. asphalt concrete). Tyre wear seemed not to be a quantitatively significant source of PM10 emissions from road traffic.

  14. Valve for abrasive material

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  15. Processing, wear, and mechanical properties of polyethylene composites prepared with pristine and organosilane-treated carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Weston

    Polymers and nanocomposites have been increasingly used for tribological applications over the last few decades. In particular, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a high performance polymer with excellent strength, toughness, and wear resistance. Because of these properties, UHMWPE is an ideal material for a variety of applications including body armor, components of sporting goods such as skies and snowboards, and liners in total joint replacement. Though the toughness and wear resistance far exceed that of most other polymeric materials, there is a high demand for improving the tribological and mechanical properties of UHMWPE for many applications. The approach used in this work for improving such properties is through nanocomposite technology, specifically via the incorporation of carbon nanofibers. In order to obtain the full potential of nanocomposite technology, two critical issues need to be addressed: appropriate interactions between the filler and matrix and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement. These critical issues are particularly important for UHMWPE nanocomposites in that UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. Furthermore, UHMWPE is non-polar, so interactions between filler and matrix will be limited to Van der Waals forces for untreated nanofillers. Therefore, the research presented aims at solving these issues by using a paraffin-assisted processing method and applying appropriate surface treatment to the carbon nanofibers. Under optimized processing conditions, wear and mechanical properties of UHMWPE composites can be substantially improved.

  16. Wear Modeling: Evaluation and Categorization of Wear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hsien-Chung

    The objective of this study was to evaluate progress in wear modeling and propose guidelines for future work. Such guidelines can help wear modelers to make appropriate decisions and ascertain information relevant to wear modeling. Over 5,000 papers in the literature were surveyed. 182 erosion wear and sliding wear equations proposed between 1957 and 1992 were found and studied. Two approaches were taken to analyze the surveyed models. The first approach focuses on common features and variations in each of five wear modeling steps. The second approach identifies characteristics of the overall development of wear modeling. The conclusions and recommendations of this study: (1) No single universal equation or extensively accepted theory fully explains the many types of wear behavior. (2) Wear mechanisms as typically described in research literature are not fundamental processes of material loss. Mechanical, chemical, physical and metallurgical action are the four fundamental processes: future wear models should include consideration of these four simultaneously, together with their interactions. (3) Wear models based on a single academic discipline cannot fully explain a wearing process even if for a single wear mechanism. An interdisciplinary approach should be applied to build wear models. (4) Two characteristics in past development of wear modeling are positive and should be carried into future work: (a) progressively more and more local information about the variations of working conditions has been considered in wear modeling, and (b) the approaches of different disciplines has been more frequently and extensively applied together to build wear models which explain progressively more wear phenomena in a wearing system. (5) Wear modelers should derive wear equations to concisely present research results and to complete wear modeling. Out of the 5000 papers considered in this study, only 182 presented equations as well as word descriptions to describe erosion and

  17. Sliding Wear Behavior of TiC-Reinforced Cu-4 wt.% Ni Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pushkar; Gautam, R. K.; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-08-01

    The present investigation explores the effect of TiC content on the sliding wear properties of Cu-4 wt.% Ni matrix composites. Cu-4 wt.% Ni - x wt.% TiC (x = 0, 2, 4 and 8 wt.%) metal matrix composites were developed by powder metallurgy route. Their friction and wear was studied under dry sliding at different loads of 5, 7.5 and 10 N and constant sliding speed of 2 m/s using a pin-on-disk machine. The metallographic observations showed an almost uniform distribution of TiC particles in the matrix. Hardness of the composites increased with increasing TiC content (up to 4 wt.%). Friction and wear results of TiC-reinforced composites show better wear resistance than unreinforced matrix alloy. However, the optimum wear resistance was observed for 4 wt.% TiC-reinforced composites. Worn surfaces of specimens indicated the abrasion as the primary mechanism of wear in all the materials investigated in the study. The observed behavior has been explained on the basis of (1) the hardness which results in a decrease in real area of contact in composites containing TiC particles and (2) the formation of a transfer layer of wear debris on the surface of the composites which protects underlying substrate by inhibiting metal-metal contact.

  18. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  19. Sliding Wear Behavior of TiC-Reinforced Cu-4 wt.% Ni Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pushkar; Gautam, R. K.; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation explores the effect of TiC content on the sliding wear properties of Cu-4 wt.% Ni matrix composites. Cu-4 wt.% Ni - x wt.% TiC ( x = 0, 2, 4 and 8 wt.%) metal matrix composites were developed by powder metallurgy route. Their friction and wear was studied under dry sliding at different loads of 5, 7.5 and 10 N and constant sliding speed of 2 m/s using a pin-on-disk machine. The metallographic observations showed an almost uniform distribution of TiC particles in the matrix. Hardness of the composites increased with increasing TiC content (up to 4 wt.%). Friction and wear results of TiC-reinforced composites show better wear resistance than unreinforced matrix alloy. However, the optimum wear resistance was observed for 4 wt.% TiC-reinforced composites. Worn surfaces of specimens indicated the abrasion as the primary mechanism of wear in all the materials investigated in the study. The observed behavior has been explained on the basis of (1) the hardness which results in a decrease in real area of contact in composites containing TiC particles and (2) the formation of a transfer layer of wear debris on the surface of the composites which protects underlying substrate by inhibiting metal-metal contact.

  20. Wear resistance and mechanical properties of highly cross-linked, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene doped with vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Christensen, Steven D; Malhi, Arnaz S; Wannomae, Keith K; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2006-06-01

    Our hypothesis was that cross-linked, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) stabilized with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) would be wear-resistant and fatigue-resistant. Acetabular liners were radiation cross-linked, doped with vitamin E, and gamma-sterilized. Hip simulator wear rate of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE was approximately 1 and 6 mg/million-cycles in clean serum and in serum with third-body particles, respectively, a 4-fold to 10-fold decrease from that of conventional UHMWPE. The ultimate strength, yield strength, elongation at break, and fatigue resistance of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE were significantly higher than that of 100 kGy-irradiated and melted UHMWPE, and were unaffected by accelerated aging. Rim impingement testing with 3.7-mm-thick acetabular liners up to 2 million-cycles showed no significant damage of the cross-linked liners compared with conventional, gamma-sterilized in inert UHMWPE, vitamin E-stabilized liners. The data indicate good in vitro wear properties and improved mechanical and fatigue properties for vitamin E-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPE.

  1. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature. PMID:27010967

  2. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-03-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature.

  3. Self-healing Characteristics of Collagen Coatings with Respect to Surface Abrasion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    A coating based on collagen with self-healing properties was developed for applications in mechanical components that are prone to abrasion due to contact with a counter surface. The inherent swelling behavior of collagen in water was exploited as the fundamental mechanism behind self-healing of a wear scar formed on the surface. The effects of freeze-drying process and water treatment of the collagen coatings on their mechanical and self-healing properties were analyzed. Water was also used as the medium to trigger the self-healing effect of the collagen coatings after the wear test. It was found that collagen coatings without freeze-drying did not demonstrate any self-healing effect whereas the coatings treated by freeze-drying process showed remarkable self-healing effect. Overall, collagen coatings that were freeze-dried and water treated showed the best friction and self-healing properties. Repeated self-healing ability of these coatings with respect to wear scar was also demonstrated. It was also confirmed that the self-healing property of the collagen coating was effective over a relatively wide range of temperature. PMID:27010967

  4. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  5. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  6. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  7. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  8. Wind abrasion on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Aeolian activity was predicted for Mars from earth based observations of changing surface patterns that were interpreted as dust storms. Mariner 9 images showed conclusive evidence for aeolian processes in the form of active dust storms and various aeolian landforms including dunes and yardangs. Windspeeds to initiate particle movement are an order of magnitude higher on Mars than on Earth because of the low atmospheric density on Mars. In order to determine rates of abrasion by wind blown particles, knowledge of three factors is required: (1) particle parameters such as numbers and velocities of windblown grains as functions of windspeeds at various heights above the surface; (2) the susceptibility to abrasion of various rocks and minerals; and (3) wind frequencies and speeds. For estimates appropriate to Mars, data for the first two parameters can be determined through lab and wind tunnel tests; data for the last two factors are available directly from the Viking Lander meteorology experiments for the two landing sites.

  9. Photoresist-free patterning by mechanical abrasion of water-soluble lift-off resists and bare substrates: toward green fabrication of transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Printz, Adam D; Chan, Esther; Liong, Celine; Martinez, René S; Lipomi, Darren J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of transparent electrodes based on grids of copper microwires using a non-photolithographic process. The process--"abrasion lithography"--takes two forms. In the first implementation (Method I), a water-soluble commodity polymer film is abraded with a sharp tool, coated with a conductive film, and developed by immersion in water. Water dissolves the polymer film and lifts off the conductive film in the unabraded areas. In the second implementation (Method II), the substrate is abraded directly by scratching with a sharp tool (i.e., no polymer film necessary). The abraded regions of the substrate are recessed and roughened. Following deposition of a conductive film, the lower profile and roughened topography in the abraded regions prevents mechanical exfoliation of the conductive film using adhesive tape, and thus the conductive film remains only where the substrate is scratched. As an application, conductive grids exhibit average sheet resistances of 17 Ω sq(-1) and transparencies of 86% are fabricated and used as the anode in organic photovoltaic cells in concert with the conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Compared to devices in which PEDOT:PSS alone serves as an anode, devices comprising grids of copper/nickel microwires and PEDOT:PSS exhibit lowered series resistance, which manifests in greater fill factor and power conversion efficiency. This simple method of forming micropatterns could find use in applications where cost and environmental impact should be minimized, especially as a potential replacement for the transparent electrode indium tin oxide (ITO) in thin-film electronics over large areas (i.e., solar cells) or as a method of rapid prototyping for laboratory-scale devices.

  10. Photoresist-Free Patterning by Mechanical Abrasion of Water-Soluble Lift-Off Resists and Bare Substrates: Toward Green Fabrication of Transparent Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Printz, Adam D.; Chan, Esther; Liong, Celine; Martinez, René S.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of transparent electrodes based on grids of copper microwires using a non-photolithographic process. The process—“abrasion lithography”—takes two forms. In the first implementation (Method I), a water-soluble commodity polymer film is abraded with a sharp tool, coated with a conductive film, and developed by immersion in water. Water dissolves the polymer film and lifts off the conductive film in the unabraded areas. In the second implementation (Method II), the substrate is abraded directly by scratching with a sharp tool (i.e., no polymer film necessary). The abraded regions of the substrate are recessed and roughened. Following deposition of a conductive film, the lower profile and roughened topography in the abraded regions prevents mechanical exfoliation of the conductive film using adhesive tape, and thus the conductive film remains only where the substrate is scratched. As an application, conductive grids exhibit average sheet resistances of 17 Ω sq–1 and transparencies of 86% are fabricated and used as the anode in organic photovoltaic cells in concert with the conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Compared to devices in which PEDOT:PSS alone serves as an anode, devices comprising grids of copper/nickel microwires and PEDOT:PSS exhibit lowered series resistance, which manifests in greater fill factor and power conversion efficiency. This simple method of forming micropatterns could find use in applications where cost and environmental impact should be minimized, especially as a potential replacement for the transparent electrode indium tin oxide (ITO) in thin-film electronics over large areas (i.e., solar cells) or as a method of rapid prototyping for laboratory-scale devices. PMID:24358321

  11. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Donald M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  12. Abrasion resistant heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, D.M.

    1984-10-23

    A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  13. Microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of laser surface melted Ti6Al4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Soderlind, Julie; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Laser surface melting (LSM) of Ti6Al4V alloy was carried out with an aim to improve properties such as microstructure and wear for implant applications. The alloy substrate was melted at 250W and 400W at a scan velocity of 5mm/s, with input energy of 42J/mm(2) and 68J/mm(2), respectively. The results showed that equiaxed α+β microstructure of the substrate changes to mixture of acicular α in β matrix after LSM due to high cooling rates in the range of 2.25×10(-3)K/s and 1.41×10(-3)K/s during LSM. Increasing the energy input increased the thickness of remelted region from 779 to 802µm and 1173 to 1199µm. Similarly, as a result of slow cooling rates under present experimental conditions, the grain size of the alloy increased from 4.8μm to 154-199μm. However, the hardness of the Ti6Al4V alloy increased due to LSM melting and resulted in lowest in vitro wear rate of 3.38×10(-4)mm(3)/Nm compared to untreated substrate with a wear rate of 6.82×10(-4)mm(3)/Nm.

  14. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  15. Prepolishing on a CNC platform with bound abrasive contour tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffler, Adrienne E.; Gregg, Leslie L.; Schoen, John M.; Fess, Edward M.; Hakiel, Michael; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2003-05-01

    Deterministic microgrinding (DMG) of optical glasses and ceramics is the commercial manufacturing process of choice to shape glass surfaces prior to final finishing. This process employs rigid bound matrix diamond tooling resulting in surface roughness values of 3-5μm peak to valley and 100-400nm rms, as well as mid-spatial frequency tool marks that require subsequent removal in secondary finishing steps. The ability to pre-polish optical surfaces within the grinding platform would reduce final finishing process times. Bound abrasive contour wheels containing cerium oxide, alumina or zirconia abrasives were constructed with an epoxy matrix. The effects of abrasive type, composition, and erosion promoters were examined for tool hardness (Shore D), and tested with commercial optical glasses in an Optipro CNC grinding platform. Metrology protocols were developed to examine tool wear and subsequent surface roughness. Work is directed to demonstrating effective material removal, improved surface roughness and cutter mark removal.

  16. Receiving Wear-Resistance Coverings Additives of Nanoparticles of Refractory Metals at a Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzakov, M. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Andreev, A. O.; Birukov, V. P.; Markushov, Y. V.

    2016-02-01

    Laser cladding technology was used to conduct experiments on production of wear-resistant coatings with additive nanoparticles of refractory metals (WC, TaC). Mechanical testing of coating abrasion was made using Brinell-Howarth method. The obtained data was compared with wear- resistance of commercial powder containing WC. It was found that at a concentration 10-15% coating with nanopowder additives shows a dramatic increase in wear-resistance by 4-6 times as compared to carbon steel substrate. There were conducted metallurgical studies of coatings on inverse electron reflection. There was determined elemental composition of deposited coating and substrate, and microhardness measured. It was found that structure of deposited coating with nanoparticles is fine.

  17. Effect of low temperature annealing on the wear properties of NITINOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda, Sriram; Nath. S, Narendra; Herbert, Mervin A.; Mukunda, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy is a wonder material that is a solution looking for problems. The material finds wide biomedical applications like endodontic files for root canal treatment and cardiovascular stents. This material has rendered the surgical procedure simple compared to that with the existing Stainless Steel (SS) or titanium ones. NiTi as an endodontic file would cause less discomfort to the patients in comparison to that with far stiffer SS or titanium ones. Here nearly equi-atomic 50:50 commercial NiTi rods were subjected to low temperature aging at 300 to 450°C. The wear resistance of the as-received and the heat-treated samples was studied using adhesive wear tests on hardened steel counter face. Abrasive wear tests were run against Alumina disc to simulate the working of endodontic drills and files against dental hard and soft tissues. The abrasive wear resistance is expected to be proportional to the Vickers Hardness of the material and is high for the 450°C heat-treated sample. A correlation between the mechanical properties and microstructures of this material is attempted

  18. Universal scaling relations for pebble abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of abrasion of gravel in bed load transport results from particle-to-particle collisions, where the energy involved is sufficient to cause chipping and spallation but not fragmentation of parent grains. The removed rock material is not infinitesimal; daughter products as large as coarse sand can be produced. Although previous work has shown that lithology, grain shape, and energy of collision are contributing factors that control abrasion rates of river-bed material, little is known regarding the relationship between these factors and diminution rates. Here we explicitly isolate and investigate how these three factors influence rates of abrasion and the size distribution of daughter products, with laboratory experiments. The apparatus is a double pendulum (Newton's cradle) that produces well-controlled binary collisions. A high-speed camera precisely measures collision energy, while mass of parent rocks. and the size and shape distributions of daughter products, are measured periodically. We examined abrasion of initially square-cut 'rocks' as they underwent successive collisions in the binary collision apparatus. We have examined mass loss rate for varied lithologies, and observe a similar power-law relationship between impact energy and mass abraded. When normalized by sensible material properties, mass loss curves for all materials collapse onto a single curve, suggesting that the underlying mechanics of abrasion for different materials are the same. The relationship does not display the linear trend expected from pure energetics, and we suggest that this is a shape effect as protruding - and hence easily eroded - corners are worn away. Analysis of daughter-product particle size distributions for different lithology fragments - including natural rocks and also bricks - show the same functional form. Surprisingly, it is the power-law relation expected for brittle materials undergoing fragmentation. This suggests that brittle fracture theory also

  19. The wear of oriented UHMWPE under isotropically rough and scratched counterface test conditions.

    PubMed

    Dharmastiti, R; Barton, D C; Fisher, J; Edidin, A; Kurtz, S

    2001-01-01

    Unidirectional wear tests of UHMWPE against smooth counterfaces show that molecular chains at the surface of virgin material become oriented parallel to the sliding direction giving low wear rate. It is postulated that under more abrasive conditions and predominantly unidirectional motion as in knee prostheses, it may proof beneficial to provide molecular orientation of the bulk material. Therefore strips of UHMWPE were oriented by die drawing at elevated temperature and the resulting anisotropic material subjected to tensile tests, small punch tests and also unidirectional wear tests both parallel and perpendicular to the draw direction. The tensile tests showed that, in the parallel direction, the oriented UHMWPE became stiffer and less ductile compared to the virgin UHMWPE. In the perpendicular direction, there were reductions in yield stress, 5% proof stress and energy to failure compared to the virgin material. The small punch test showed that the oriented UHMWPE exhibited apparent hardening when tested in both parallel and perpendicular directions but the mechanical behaviour in the perpendicular direction was comparable to the virgin UHMWPE. The wear tests demonstrated that the oriented UHMWPE did not show any significant improvement of wear resistance for sliding against either isotropically rough or scratched counterfaces. There was no clear dependency between the mechanical properties and wear factors of the oriented UHMWPE. PMID:11564907

  20. Abrasion and fatigue resistance of PDMS containing multiblock polyurethanes after accelerated water exposure at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Kimberly A; Wilson, Charles L; Himes, Adam K; Dawson, James W; Haddad, Tarek D; Buckalew, Adam J; Miller, Jennifer P; Untereker, Darrel F; Simha, Narendra K

    2013-11-01

    Segmented polyurethane multiblock polymers containing polydimethylsiloxane and polyether soft segments form tough and easily processed thermoplastic elastomers (PDMS-urethanes). Two commercially available examples, PurSil 35 (denoted as P35) and Elast-Eon E2A (denoted as E2A), were evaluated for abrasion and fatigue resistance after immersion in 85 °C buffered water for up to 80 weeks. We previously reported that water exposure in these experiments resulted in a molar mass reduction, where the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction is supported by a straight forward Arrhenius analysis over a range of accelerated temperatures (37-85 °C). We also showed that the ultimate tensile properties of P35 and E2A were significantly compromised when the molar mass was reduced. Here, we show that the reduction in molar mass also correlated with a reduction in both the abrasion and fatigue resistance. The instantaneous wear rate of both P35 and E2A, when exposed to the reciprocating motion of an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) jacketed cable, increased with the inverse of the number averaged molar mass (1/Mn). Both materials showed a change in the wear surface when the number-averaged molar mass was reduced to ≈ 16 kg/mole, where a smooth wear surface transitioned to a 'spalling-like' pattern, leaving the wear surface with ≈ 0.3 mm cracks that propagated beyond the contact surface. The fatigue crack growth rate for P35 and E2A also increased in proportion to 1/Mn, after the molar mass was reduced below a critical value of ≈30 kg/mole. Interestingly, this critical molar mass coincided with that at which the single cycle stress-strain response changed from strain hardening to strain softening. The changes in both abrasion and fatigue resistance, key predictors for long term reliability of cardiac leads, after exposure of this class of PDMS-urethanes to water suggests that these materials are susceptible to mechanical compromise in vivo.

  1. Wear Mechanism Maps for Magnesium Alloy AM60 and Composite AM60-9% (Al2O3)f

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Muhammad Zafar

    The purpose of this work was to study the tribological behaviour of squeeze cast Mg alloy AM60 and its composite AM60-9% (Al2O3) f. Dry sliding wear tests were performed on specimens of these materials using a block-on-ring tribometer which was equipped with a COF and temperature measurement system. Wear, COF and temperature maps were constructed to illustrate the effect of temperature and COF on the wear behaviour of the Mg alloy and it's composite. Four wear regimes namely low, mild, transient and severe wear were identified. The transition from mild to severe wear regime was found to be dependent on the bulk temperature of the specimen. Oxidational wear prevailed in low and mild wear whereas plastic deformation induced wear and melt wear controlled the wear rates in transient and severe wear regimes, respectively. This study shows that the incorporation of Al2O3 fibres in AM60 alloy improved the wear resistance of the resulting composite by delaying the transition from mild to severe wear.

  2. Characterization of wear damage in coatings by optical profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallaire, S.; Dufour, M.; Gauthier, B.

    1993-12-01

    The accurate determination of the volume loss of plasma- sprayed coatings submitted to abrasive and erosive wear and the visualization of wear track or crater profiles are of major concern when ranking coatings, developing wear- resistant coatings, or identifying the mechanism responsible for failure. The determination of the volume loss by liquid displacement measurements is impractical when the size of coated pieces is large and the volume loss is small. For evaluating coating damage and directly measuring the volume loss, a three- dimensional surface mapping method is proposed. The three- dimensional image of the worn surface is obtained by a laser triangulation method. The experimental setup is basically composed of an illuminating source and a detecting device. The light source is focused on the sample surface, and the reflected light is then collected on a network of charge couple detectors linked to a computer. Because the spot location on the network is a direct function of the measured height, a three- dimensional image can be obtained after scanning the entire damaged surface so that the volume loss can be calculated easily. Intensity- coded depth images of the worn surface and computerized cross sections of the damaged area can also be obtained. Inspection of coatings damaged by abrasion wear or slurry erosion by optical profilometry reveals that the volume loss measurements by this technique are very accurate as opposed to the volume measured by liquid displacement methods or calculated from weight loss measurements. Moreover, intensity- coded depth images of worn surfaces and computerized cross sections of damaged areas provide relevant information about the coating performance or defects resulting from the deposition process.

  3. Effects of Deep Cryogenic Treatment on the Wear Resistance and Mechanical Properties of AISI H13 Hot-Work Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiçek, Adem; Kara, Fuat; Kıvak, Turgay; Ekici, Ergün; Uygur, İlyas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a number of wear and tensile tests were performed to elucidate the effects of deep cryogenic treatment on the wear behavior and mechanical properties (hardness and tensile strength) of AISI H13 tool steel. In accordance with this purpose, three different heat treatments (conventional heat treatment (CHT), deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), and deep cryogenic treatment and tempering (DCTT)) were applied to tool steel samples. DCT and DCTT samples were held in nitrogen gas at -145 °C for 24 h. Wear tests were conducted on a dry pin-on-disk device using two loads of 60 and 80 N, two sliding velocities of 0.8 and 1 m/s, and a wear distance of 1000 m. All test results showed that DCT improved the adhesive wear resistance and mechanical properties of AISI H13 steel. The formation of small-sized and uniformly distributed carbide particles and the transformation of retained austenite to martensite played an important role in the improvements in the wear resistance and mechanical properties. After cleavage fracture, the surfaces of all samples were characterized by the cracking of primary carbides, while the DCT and DCTT samples displayed microvoid formation by decohesion of the fine carbides precipitated during the cryo-tempering process.

  4. Friability and crushing strength of micrometer-size diamond abrasives used in microgrinding of optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yiyang; Takahashi, Toshio; Quesnel, David J.; Funkenbusch, Paul D.

    1996-04-01

    In abrasive grinding, the properties of the abrasives and their response to impact loading play a significant role in determining the results achievable. For micrometer-size diamond abrasives used for bound-abrasive microgrinding of optical glass, friability testing is used to estimate the related particle properties. Friability and crushing strength of diamond abrasives are estimated based on the data from comminution of sample powders on a commercial SPEX mixer/mill. Different diamond abrasives as well as a CBN abrasive are tested. Evolution of powder size and size distribution with comminution time is characterized with a HORIBA laser scattering analyzer. Correlation is established for the impact stress and the probability of fracture during comminution. This study demonstrates how to combine the ease of data acquisition found in a conventional friability test with the capability of predicting specific mechanical properties normally found only by crushing individual abrasive particles.

  5. Development of wear resistant nanostructured duplex coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel process for use in oil sands industry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gobinda C; Khan, Tahir I; Glenesk, Larry B

    2009-07-01

    Oil sands deposits in Northern Alberta, Canada represent a wealth of resources attracting huge capital investment and significant research focus in recent years. As of 2005, crude oil production from the current oil sands operators accounted for 50% of Canada's domestic production. Alberta's oil sands deposits contain approximately 1.7 trillion barrels of bitumen, of which over 175 billion are recoverable with current technology, and 315 billion barrels are ultimately recoverable with technological advances. A major problem of operating machinery and equipment in the oil sands is the unpredictable failure from operating in this highly aggressive environment. One of the significant causes of that problem is premature material wear. An approach to minimize this wear is the use of protective coatings and, in particular, a cermet thin coating. A high level of coating homogeneity is critical for components such as bucketwheels, draglines, conveyors, shovels, heavyhauler trucks etc. that are subjected to severe degradation through abrasive wear. The identification, development and application of optimum wear solutions for these components pose an ongoing challenge. Nanostructured cermet coatings have shown the best results of achieving the degree of homogeneity required for these applications. In this study, WC-17Co cermet powder with nanocrystalline WC core encapsulated with 'duplex' Co layer was used to obtain a nanostructured coating. To apply this coating, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technique was used, as it is known for producing wear-resistant coatings superior to those obtained from plasma-based techniques. Mechanical, sliding wear and microstructural behavior of the coating was compared with those of the microstructured coating obtained from spraying WC-10Co-4Cr cermet powder by HVOF technique. Results from the nanostructured coating, among others, showed an average of 25% increase in microhardness, 30% increase in sliding wear resistance and

  6. Wear Resistance of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy with and Without Microarc Oxidation Coating and Ti6Al4V Alloy in Artificial Saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. P.; Zou, Y. S.; Wu, F. M.; Zhao, Z. P.; You, L.; Gu, C. F.; Liao, Y. Z.

    The wear resistances of AZ91D magnesium alloy with and without microarc oxidation (MAO) coating and Ti6Al4V alloy in artificial saliva were investigated at room temperature. The wear resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva was significantly improved after microarc oxidation treatment. The volume loss of untreated AZ91D magnesium alloy sample was 20.95 times of that of AZ91D magnesium alloy with MAO coating, and that of Ti6Al4V was 5.42 times of that of MAO. Furthermore, the wear resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy was lower than that of Ti6Al4V alloy in artificial saliva. The wear mechanisms of AZ91D magnesium and Ti6Al4V were discussed. It was found that the wear mechanism of the MAO was associated with abrasion and microfracture. There were two dominative wear mechanisms for AZ91D alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy under the loading conditions used in the experiment, namely, micro-machining wear and deformation-induced wear.

  7. Mechanical properties and wear and corrosion resistance of electrodeposited Ni Co/SiC nanocomposite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Sun, Chufeng; Gao, Ping; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2006-03-01

    Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings with various contents of SiC nano-particulates were prepared by electrodeposition in a Ni-Co plating bath containing SiC nano-particulates to be co-deposited. The influences of the nanoparticulates concentration, current density, stirring rate and temperature of the plating bath on the composition of the coatings were investigated. The shape and size of the SiC nano-particulates were observed and determined using a transmission electron microscope. The polarization behavior of the composite plating bath was examined on a PAR-273A potentiostat/galvanostat device. The wear behavior of the Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings was evaluated on a ball-on-disk UMT-2MT test rig. The worn surface morphologies of the Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The corrosion behavior of the nanocomposite coatings was evaluated by charting the Tafel curves of the solution of 0.5 mol L -1 NaCl at room temperature. It was found that the cathodic polarization potential of the composite electrolyte increased with increasing SiC concentration in the plating bath. The microhardness and wear and corrosion resistance of the nanocomposite coatings also increased with increasing content of the nano-SiC in the plating bath, and the morphologies of the nanocomposite coatings varied with varying SiC concentration in the plating bath as well. Moreover, the co-deposited SiC nano-particulates were uniformly distributed in the Ni-Co matrix and contributed to greatly increase the microhardness and wear resistance of the Ni-Co alloy coating.

  8. Study on torsional fretting wear behavior of a ball-on-socket contact configuration simulating an artificial cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Wang, Fei; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Qingliang; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-10-01

    A ball-on-socket contact configuration was designed to simulate an artificial cervical disk in structure. UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene) hot pressed by powders and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected as the material combination of ball and socket. The socket surface was coated by a ~500 nm C-DLC (carbon ion implantation-diamond like carbon) mixed layer to improve its surface nano hardness and wear resistance. The torsional fretting wear behavior of the ball-on-socket model was tested at different angular displacements under 25% bovine serum lubrication with an axial force of 100 N to obtain more realistic results with that in vivo. The fretting running regimes and wear damage characteristics as well as wear mechanisms for both ball and socket were studied based on 2D (two dimension) optical microscope, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and 3D (three dimension) profiles. With the increase of angular displacement amplitude from 1° to 7°, three types of T-θ (Torsional torque-angular displacement amplitude) curves (i.e., linear, elliptical and parallelogram loops) corresponding to running regimes of PSR (partial slip regime), MR (mixed regime) and SR (slip regime) were observed and analyzed. Both the central region and the edge zone of the ball and socket were damaged. The worn surfaces were characterized by wear scratches and wear debris. In addition, more severe wear damage and more wear debris appeared on the central region of the socket at higher angular displacement amplitude. The dominant damage mechanism was a mix of surface scratch, adhesive wear and abrasive wear for the UHMWPE ball while that for the coated socket was abrasive wear by PE particles and some polishing and rolling process on the raised overgrown DLC grains. The frictional kinetic behavior, wear type, damage region and damage mechanism for the ball-on-socket model revealed significant differences with those of a ball-on-flat contact while showing better consistency with that of in

  9. Study on torsional fretting wear behavior of a ball-on-socket contact configuration simulating an artificial cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Wang, Fei; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Qingliang; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-10-01

    A ball-on-socket contact configuration was designed to simulate an artificial cervical disk in structure. UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene) hot pressed by powders and Ti6Al4V alloy were selected as the material combination of ball and socket. The socket surface was coated by a ~500 nm C-DLC (carbon ion implantation-diamond like carbon) mixed layer to improve its surface nano hardness and wear resistance. The torsional fretting wear behavior of the ball-on-socket model was tested at different angular displacements under 25% bovine serum lubrication with an axial force of 100 N to obtain more realistic results with that in vivo. The fretting running regimes and wear damage characteristics as well as wear mechanisms for both ball and socket were studied based on 2D (two dimension) optical microscope, SEM (scanning electron microscope) and 3D (three dimension) profiles. With the increase of angular displacement amplitude from 1° to 7°, three types of T-θ (Torsional torque-angular displacement amplitude) curves (i.e., linear, elliptical and parallelogram loops) corresponding to running regimes of PSR (partial slip regime), MR (mixed regime) and SR (slip regime) were observed and analyzed. Both the central region and the edge zone of the ball and socket were damaged. The worn surfaces were characterized by wear scratches and wear debris. In addition, more severe wear damage and more wear debris appeared on the central region of the socket at higher angular displacement amplitude. The dominant damage mechanism was a mix of surface scratch, adhesive wear and abrasive wear for the UHMWPE ball while that for the coated socket was abrasive wear by PE particles and some polishing and rolling process on the raised overgrown DLC grains. The frictional kinetic behavior, wear type, damage region and damage mechanism for the ball-on-socket model revealed significant differences with those of a ball-on-flat contact while showing better consistency with that of in

  10. Wear and Friction Behavior of the Spray-Deposited SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu Functionally Graded Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Yan, H. G.; Chen, J. H.; Zeng, P. L.; Chen, G.; Chen, C. C.

    2013-05-01

    The spray-deposited SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu functionally graded material (FGM) can meet the structure design requirements of brake disk. The effects of rotational speed and load on the wear and friction behaviors of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM sliding against the resin matrix friction material were investigated. For comparison, the wear and friction behaviors of a commercially used cast iron (HT250) brake rotor were also studied. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM decreases constantly with the increase of load or rotational speed and is affected by the gradient distribution of SiC particles. The wear rate of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM firstly increases, then decreases and finally increases again with increasing load or speed, and is about 1/10 of that of HT250. Based on observations and analyses on the morphology and substructure of the worn surface, the mechanical mixing layer acts as a protective coating and lubricant, and its thickness reduces with the SiC content increasing. Furthermore, it is proposed that the dominant wear mechanism of SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM changes from the abrasive wear to the oxidative wear and further to the delamination wear with increasing load or speed.

  11. Abrasion protection in process piping

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, J.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping often is subjected to failure from abrasion or a combination of abrasion and corrosion. Abrasion is a complex phenomenon, with many factors involved to varying degrees. Hard, mineral based alumina ceramic and basalt materials are used to provide protection against abrasion in many piping systems. Successful life extension examples are presented from many different industries. Lined piping components require special attention with regard to operating conditions as well as design and engineering considerations. Economic justification involves direct cost comparisons and avoided costs.

  12. Abrasion resistant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  13. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  14. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  15. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-10-09

    During this quarterly period, the author has made progress in a number of areas. He has continued to evaluate potential candidates for high load/high speed antiwear action using the approach of generating tribopolymers capable of withstanding high temperatures. Results are promising for ceramics as well as steel. The construction of a new instrument for high temperature studies of both liquid and vapor phase lubrication is almost complete. This will permit studies up to 350 C bulk temperature and considerably higher surface temperatures in controlled vapor-phase and liquid-phase studies. Selected monomers and monomer combinations found to be effective in hexadecane as a carrier fluid have also been tested in other fluids, including synthetic ester lubricant carriers. Additional studies using FTIRM for surface analysis of wear tracks have been made and are continuing. Further industrial contacts have been made to arrange for field testing of selected compounds as antiwear additives. The applications include the lubrication of 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines, machining and cutting, and fuel injector wear, particularly in gas (e.g., natural gas) engines.

  16. Single-asperity contributions to multi-asperity wear simulated with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Bianchi, D.

    2016-03-01

    We use a molecular dynamics approach to simulate the wear of a rough ferrite surface due to multiple hard, abrasive particles under variation of normal pressure, grinding direction, and particle geometry. By employing a clustering algorithm that incorporates some knowledge about the grinding process such as the main grinding direction, we can break down the total wear volume into contributions from the individual abrasive particles in a time-resolved fashion. The resulting analysis of the simulated grinding process allows statements on wear particle generation, distribution, and stability depending on the initial topography, the grinding angle, the normal pressure, as well as the abrasive shape and orientation with respect to the surface.

  17. Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete made with two aggregates, Stonewall Jackson Dam, West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, T. C.

    1983-09-01

    The resistance to abrasion-erosion of two concretes made with different coarse aggregates was evaluated. The aggregates used were selected as being representative of those that may be selected for use during construction of Stonewall Jackson Dam. The two coarse aggregates were limestones from different sources. All other concrete ingredients were identical for the two mixtures. Both concretes showed very high abrasion-erosion losses when tested using the Corps of Engineers standard test method. A recommendation was made that coarse aggregates with better wear-resistant properties be selected for use in areas of the structure that may be subjected to abrasion-erosion.

  18. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  19. Dry sliding wear behaviour of magnesium oxide and zirconium oxide plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Liang, J.; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-03-01

    Two types of PEO coatings, one consisting of magnesium oxide (MgO) and the other comprising zirconium oxide (ZrO 2) as the main phase composition were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy from alkaline and acidic electrolytes, respectively. The ZrO 2 coating was found to be spongy and thicker with a higher roughness, whilst the relatively more compact MgO coating was having contrasting features. In the dry sliding oscillating wear tests under two different loads viz., 2 N and 5 N, the ZrO 2 coating exhibited a very poor wear resistance. The MgO coating showed an excellent resistance to sliding wear under 2 N load; however, the load bearing capacity of the coating was found to be insufficient to resist the wear damage under 5 N load. The higher specific wear rates of the MgO coating under 5 N load and that of the ZrO 2 coating under 2 N and 5 N loads were attributed to the poor load bearing capacity and a three-body-abrasive wear mechanism.

  20. Chemically Derived Dense Alumina-Zirconia Composites for Improved Mechanical and Wear Erosion Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As a result of this funded project high purity Zirconia-Toughened Alumina (ZTA) ceramic powders with and without yttria were produced using metal alkoxide precursors. ZTA ceramic powders with varying volume percents of zirconia were prepared (7, 15, and 22%). Aluminum tri-sec butoxide, zirconium propoxide, and yttrium isopropoxide were the reagents used. Synthesis conditions were varied to control the hydrolysis and the aging conditions for the sol to gel transition. FTIR analysis and rheological characterization were used to follow the structural evolution during the sol to gel transition. The greater extent of hydrolysis and the build-up of structure measured from viscoelastic properties were consistent. Heat treatment was conducted to produce submicron grain fully crystalline ZTA ceramic powders. This improved materials should have enhanced properties such strength, toughness, and wear resistance for advanced structural applications, for example engine components in high technology aerospace applications.

  1. Effect of La2O3 Addition on Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Electrospark Deposited Ni-BASED Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuxin, Gao; Jian, Yi

    2013-12-01

    La2O3 doped Ni-based coatings have been prepared by electrospark deposition technique. The effect of La2O3 on the microstructure, hardness and wear behavior of the as-prepared Ni-based coatings is investigated by using X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, wear tribometer and Vickers hardness tester. Results indicates that the microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of La2O3 doped Ni-based coatings are effectively improved as compared to the undoped one, and the coating with the addition of 2.5 wt.% La2O3 shows the optimal improvement effects. The addition of La2O3 can reduce the defects, refine grains and increase hardness of the coating, which can inhibit the nucleation and propagation of cracking, consequently resist cutting and fracture during the wear process. Moreover, the addition of La2O3 leads to changes in abrasion mechanism of the coatings, and the reasons resulting in different abrasion mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Design of an impact abrasion testing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Beeley, P. R.; Baker, A. J.

    1994-04-01

    By using a cam-flat follower-impact shaft with a crank-flat rotating anvil system, the machine to be described can create various impact abrasion conditions to simulate a large range of industrial situations encountered in this field. The main features of the machine are the long working life of the flat rotating anvil, which works in the same way as that of the disk in a pin-on-disk wear tester, and the accurate control of both the impact energy delivered to the specimen and the total sliding distance of the specimen on the anvil. Statistical analysis of test results on the machine with EN24 steel and cast high manganese steel shows that the uncertainty of the population mean is within +/- 4.7% of the sample mean under a 95% confidence level of student distribution, which indicates a very good accuracy of test.

  3. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  4. Structure and properties of corrosion and wear resistant Cr-Mn-N steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenel, U. R.; Knott, B. R.

    1987-06-01

    Steels containing about 12 pct Cr, 10 pct Mn, and 0.2 pct N have been shown to have an unstable austenitic microstructure and have good ductility, extreme work hardening, high fracture strength, excellent toughness, good wear resistance, and moderate corrosion resistance. A series of alloys containing 9.5 to 12.8 pct Cr, 5.0 to 10.4 pct Mn, 0.16 to 0.32 pct N, 0.05 pct C, and residual elements typical of stainless steels was investigated by microstructural examination and mechanical, abrasion, and corrosion testing. Microstructures ranged from martensite to unstable austenite. The unstable austenitic steels transformed to α martensite on deformation and displayed very high work hardening, exceeding that of Hadfield’s manganese steels. Fracture strengths similar to high carbon martensitic stainless steels were obtained while ductility and toughness values were high, similar to austenitic stainless steels. Resistance to abrasive wear exceeded that of commercial abrasion resistant steels and other stainless steels. Corrosion resistance was similar to that of other 12 pct Cr steels. Properties were not much affected by minor compositional variations or rolled-in nitrogen porosity. In 12 pct Cr-10 pct Mn alloys, ingot porosity was avoided when nitrogen levels were below 0.19 pet, and austenitic microstructures were obtained when nitrogen levels exceeded 0.14 pct.

  5. Degradation of nontoxic fouling-release coatings as a result of abrasion and long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, A.E.; Baier, R.E.; Forsberg, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    Previous work by this research group demonstrates that methylsilicone-based coatings having critical surface tensions between 20 and 25 mN/m allow easy mechanical detachment of zebra mussel infestations and other fouling for at least 2 years. Continuing evaluations of the coated test panels and trash racks at test sites in western New York confirm and extend the 2-year findings. Coatings which, in addition, contain elutable oils display an apparent further resistance to initial colonization by zebra mussels, but this early benefit does not carry over to the brush-removal forces required for cleaning of the once-fouled coating. Several of the elastomeric methylsilicone coatings are prone to cutting and abrasion damage, limiting their suitability for heavy-duty use and/or situations requiring periodic cleaning. Since standard tests for abrasion and wear developed for paints are not applicable to elastomeric coatings, our laboratory is using a brush abrasion test to evaluate fouling-release coatings for an increasing series of wet brushing cycles.

  6. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.; Salvador, M. D.; Bonache, V.; García, J. C.; Morgiel, J.; Grzonka, J.

    2010-09-01

    WC-12%Co coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying using conventional and nanostructured powders and two secondary plasmogenous gases (He and H2). Coating microstructure and phase composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray diffraction techniques (XRD) techniques. This study examined wear and friction properties of the coatings under dry friction conditions. SEM was used to analyze abraded surface microstructure. Coating microhardness and fracture toughness were also determined. All coatings displayed strong decarburization as a result of WC decomposition, which gave rise to the formation of secondary phases (W2C and W). A very fine undissolved WC crystalline dispersion coexisted with these new phases. TEM observation confirmed that the matrix was predominantly amorphous and filled with block-type, frequently dislocated crystallites. Wear was observed to follow a three-body abrasive mechanism, since debris between the ball and the coating surface was detected. The main wear mechanism was based on subsurface cracking, owing to the arising debris. WC grain decomposition and dissolution were concluded to be critical factors in wear resistance. The level of decomposition and dissolution could be modified by changing the plasmogenous gas or feed powder grain size. The influence of the plasmogenous gas on wear resistance was greater than the influence of feedstock particle size.

  7. Nanosecond laser micro- and nanotexturing for the design of a superhydrophobic coating robust against long-term contact with water, cavitation, and abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanenko, Alexandre M.; Shagieva, Farida M.; Domantovsky, Alexandr G.; Boinovich, Ludmila B.

    2015-03-01

    Existing and emerging applications of laser-driven methods make an important contribution to advancement in nanotechnological approaches for the design of superhydrophobic surfaces. In this study, we describe a superhydrophobic coating on stainless steel, designed by nanosecond IR laser treatment with subsequent chemisorption of fluorooxysilane for use in heavily loaded hydraulic systems. Coating characterization reveals extreme water repellency, chemical stability on long-term contact with water, and excellent durability of functional properties under prolonged abrasive wear and cavitation loads. The coating also demonstrates self-healing properties after mechanical damage.

  8. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  9. Process monitoring evaluation and implementation for the wood abrasive machining process.

    PubMed

    Saloni, Daniel E; Lemaster, Richard L; Jackson, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading. PMID:22163477

  10. Process Monitoring Evaluation and Implementation for the Wood Abrasive Machining Process

    PubMed Central

    Saloni, Daniel E.; Lemaster, Richard L.; Jackson, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Wood processing industries have continuously developed and improved technologies and processes to transform wood to obtain better final product quality and thus increase profits. Abrasive machining is one of the most important of these processes and therefore merits special attention and study. The objective of this work was to evaluate and demonstrate a process monitoring system for use in the abrasive machining of wood and wood based products. The system developed increases the life of the belt by detecting (using process monitoring sensors) and removing (by cleaning) the abrasive loading during the machining process. This study focused on abrasive belt machining processes and included substantial background work, which provided a solid base for understanding the behavior of the abrasive, and the different ways that the abrasive machining process can be monitored. In addition, the background research showed that abrasive belts can effectively be cleaned by the appropriate cleaning technique. The process monitoring system developed included acoustic emission sensors which tended to be sensitive to belt wear, as well as platen vibration, but not loading, and optical sensors which were sensitive to abrasive loading. PMID:22163477

  11. Three-Body Abrasion Testing Using Lunar Dust Simulants to Evaluate Surface System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Budinski, Kenneth G.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Klaus, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous unexpected operational issues relating to the abrasive nature of lunar dust, such as scratched visors and spacesuit pressure seal leaks, were encountered during the Apollo missions. To avoid reoccurrence of these unexpected detrimental equipment problems on future missions to the Moon, a series of two- and three-body abrasion tests were developed and conducted in order to begin rigorously characterizing the effect of lunar dust abrasiveness on candidate surface system materials. Two-body scratch tests were initially performed to examine fundamental interactions of a single particle on a flat surface. These simple and robust tests were used to establish standardized measurement techniques for quantifying controlled volumetric wear. Subsequent efforts described in the paper involved three-body abrasion testing designed to be more representative of actual lunar interactions. For these tests, a new tribotester was developed to expose samples to a variety of industrial abrasives and lunar simulants. The work discussed in this paper describes the three-body hardware setup consisting of a rotating rubber wheel that applies a load on a specimen as a loose abrasive is fed into the system. The test methodology is based on ASTM International (ASTM) B611, except it does not mix water with the abrasive. All tests were run under identical conditions. Abraded material specimens included poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), hardened 1045 steel, 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) and 1018 steel. Abrasives included lunar mare simulant JSC- 1A-F (nominal size distribution), sieved JSC-1A-F (<25 m particle diameter), lunar highland simulant NU-LHT-2M, alumina (average diameter of 50 m used per ASTM G76), and silica (50/70 mesh used per ASTM G65). The measured mass loss from each specimen was converted using standard densities to determine total wear volume in cm3. Abrasion was dominated by the alumina and the simulants were only similar to the silica (i.e., sand) on the softer materials of

  12. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abrasion. Eleven volunteers wore for 3 weeks, during working hours, appliances containing 2 control and 2 FV-treated human enamel samples. Erosion took place extraorally 3 times a day (5 min) in the soft drink Sprite. At the end of each experimental day one control and one FV sample (C-er+abr and FV-er+abr) were brushed (5 s) with fluoridated dentrifice. The remaining control and FV sample (C-er and FV-er) were left unbrushed. Enamel volume loss was quantified by optical profilometry at day 5, 10 and 15. A statistically significant progression in enamel loss was found for the C-er, C-er+abr and FV-er+abr groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively) but not for the FV-er group (p = 0.053). The values of cumulative normalized volume loss (x10(8) mum) at day 15 were: C-er 5.53 +/- 2.14, C-er+abr 5.70 +/- 2.07, FV-er 0.79 +/- 0.67 and FV-er+abr 2.76 +/- 1.35. The FV-er and FV-er+abr groups showed significant lower volume loss than the C-er group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively) and the C-er+abr group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). The results indicate that fluoride varnish is effective in the reduction of erosive wear. PMID:17167261

  13. On the mechanism of formation of wear-resistant coatings on the friction surfaces of technical products in the presence of these drugs Tribo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, S. N.; Dunayev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Extending the service life of technical devices by exposing the surface of the friction tribo different drugs is an established fact. There are various hypotheses to explain the mechanism of formation of coatings with high wear resistance and low coefficient of friction on the mating surfaces of friction units of machines and mechanisms during their operation with the presence of drugs Tribo. All these conflicting hypotheses. The proposed technology without the wear operation of equipment using Tribo drugs differ in content and methodology of processing machinery. In this paper, an analysis of existing hypotheses formation mechanism of these coatings. The authors have their own experience in the development and application of technologies without the wear operation of equipment using Tribo drugs. This allows them to develop their own hypothesis of the mechanism of formation of coatings with high wear resistance and low coefficient of friction on the mating surfaces of friction units of machines and mechanisms during their operation with the presence of drugs Tribo.

  14. Wear and microstructural integrity of ceramic plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Lynn C.

    1999-10-01

    In this work a series of ceramic plasma sprayed (PS) coatings, both alumina- and chromia-based, were sprayed according to a matrix of deposition parameters in order to produce a broad range of microstructures. To investigate the effect of splat size on the coating response, a series of mono-crystalline a -alumina powders with very narrow particle size ranges, nominally 5, 10 and 18 microns in diameter, was sprayed. The coatings were extensively characterized for a variety of microstructural features, including porosity, the angular distribution and density of microcracks as well as the lamellar, or splat, dimensions, using techniques of metallurgical analysis and electron microscopy. The coatings were then evaluated using a series of micromechanical techniques, including indentation, controlled scratch testing, abrasion and dry particle erosion, to investigate their response to different contact situations. It was found that the microstructural features with the most influence on the behaviour of ceramic PS coatings during contact, or wear, by hard particles include, in order of importance: (1) macro-porosity, (2) horizontal crack density, (3) degree of flattening of the splats and (4) volume of unmelted particles, which are all linked to the level and strength of interlamellar bonding in the coating. The major effect of the inter-lamellar bonding in ceramic PS coatings was seen in the wear mechanism transitions. As the level of inter-splat bonding in the coating decreases, the contact load at which the transition from plastic deformation to splat fracture and debonding occurs does as well. However, the load at which catastrophic brittle fracture and spalling occur is increased. All of the micromechanical and wear methods evaluated in the present work were sensitive to differences in the coating microstructures to varying degrees. The low load abrasion results showed the most sensitivity to the microstructural differences of the coatings, followed by controlled

  15. Study on the influence of back blade shape on the wear characteristics of centrifugal slurry pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Zhou, S. P.; Li, S.

    2016-05-01

    CFX particle inhomogeneous model was introduced for the mechanism analysis of a centrifugal slurry pump which is equipped with back blades on impeller shrouds. Combining with the total efficiency correction, the simulation showed good prediction accuracy of external characteristics results compared with the experimental values. Vorticity and Q-Criterion were chosen as the variables to illustrate the abrasion morphology and wear mechanism by contrasting simulation result with worn impeller in engineering. The analysis showed that the large vorticity intensity areas are distributed at the edge of impeller shroud and intensively behind the back blades. Moreover, the vorticity scattered on suction surface of back blade shows the largest intensity. The contour of Q-Criterion demonstrated that the swirl scale in front cavity is obviously larger than that in back cavity. The distribution of vorticity on both front and back shrouds can reasonably explain the impeller wear characteristics. Finally, the forward curved back blade proved to be excellence performance in vorticity distribution.

  16. Effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment on microstructure, hardness and wear behaviour of the hypereutectic Mg-5Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, M. E.; Waly, M. A.; El-Sheikh, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of high-intensity ultrasonic treatment (HIUST) on microstructure, hardness and wear behavior in Mg-5wt.%Si hypereutectic alloy has been investigated. The results showed clearly that without HIUST, most of primary Mg2Si appeared as coarse dendritic morphology with average size of about 200 µm. With HIUST, the average size of primary Mg2Si decreased significantly to about 33 µm and their morphologies changed to polyhedral shape. The modification mechanism is mainly attributed conjugation of two mechanisms: cavitation-enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and cavitation-induced dendrite fragmentation. The alloy treated with HIUST has higher hardness and wear resistance than that untreated with HIUST. The wear mechanism of investigated alloys at low applied load (10 N) and low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) is a mild abrasive oxidative wear with little adhesion. However, the wear mechanism due to the applied high loads (30, 50 N) at low sliding speed (0.3 m/s) and/or to the applied high sliding speeds (0.6, 0.9 m/s) under low load (10 N), could be described as delamination mechanism. The microstructures of the specimens were analyzed by optical microscope (OM) (model OPTIKA M-790, Italy). Energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) affiliated to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) (model Quanta FEG, The Netherlands) were performed to reveal the concentration of alloying elements in selected areas of the microstructure.

  17. A novel approach to abrasion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.A.; Mohr, P.B.; Leider, H.R.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1988-03-01

    The high abrasion and impact loads characteristic of many technologies require frequent maintenance or special materials. Conventional approaches to protection have used either extremely hard coatings or complaint elastomeric coatings. The former are typically ceramic or ceramic-like surfaces produced by direct deposition or by in situ formation by oxidation, carburization or nitriding. Ceramic coatings are very good against abrasion, but are vulnerable to impact damage. Elastomeric coatings have excellent impact resistance and are capable of withstanding deformation; however, they are limited in thermal range and chemical resistance. It is possible to combine the desirable properties of both types by using ''hair,'' a structure in which an extremely hard material can be simultaneously elastic and compliant by virture of a very high L/D ratio. We have demonstrated the good performance of carbon fiber ''hair'' in resisting damage from impacting particles and have identified a probable failure mechanism. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Abrasion-resistant antireflective coating for polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Following plasma-polymerization technique, treatment in oxygen glow discharge further enhances abrasion resistance and transmission. Improvement in abrasion resistance was shown by measuring percentage of haze resulting from abrasion. Coating samples were analyzed for abrasion using standard fresh rubber eraser. Other tests included spectra measurements and elemental analysis with spectrometers and spectrophotometers.

  19. Transparent, abrasion resistant coating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ashlock, L.T.; Mukamal, H.; White, W.H.

    1985-02-19

    There is disclosed transparent, abrasion resistant coating compositions comprising a colloidal dispersion of a water insoluble dispersant in a water-alcohol solution of the partial condensate of silanol wherein the dispersant comprises metals, alloys and salts thereof.

  20. Abrasives in snuff?

    PubMed

    Dahl, B L; Stølen, S O; Oilo, G

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and calculate the inorganic contents of four brands of snuff. Visual inspection of wet snuff showed fairly large, yellow crystal-like particles. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dispersive (EDX) analyses were used to study both wet snuff and ashes of snuff, whereas light emission spectrography was used to determine elements in the ashes. The crystal-like particles did not dissolve in distilled water or in ethanol heated to 60 degrees C. EDX analyses showed that most elements remained in the particles after washing. The total weight percentage of inorganic material in snuff was calculated after burning dried snuff until constant weight was obtained. The ashes of snuff did not contain any crystal-like particles but consisted of a small-grained amorphous mass. The following elements were detected: Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Si, Sr, Ti, Va, and Zr. Other elements such as rare earths were not searched for. The weight percentage of inorganic elements ranged between 12.35 +/- 0.69 and 20.95 +/- 0.81. Provided snuff is used in the same manner as chewing tobacco, and some people admit to doing so, there is a risk that its relatively high contents of inorganic material and heavily soluble salts may be conducive to excessive abrasion of teeth and restorations. PMID:2782061

  1. Structure characterization and wear performance of NiTi thermal sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinca, N.; Isalgué, A.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) has been studied for many years for its shape memory and pseudoelastic properties, as well as its biocompatibility, which make it suitable for many biomedical applications. However, SMA NiTi is also interesting for relevant wear resistance near the transition temperature which, along with its high oxidation and corrosion resistance, suggests its use as a coating to increase the lifetime of some components. Also, whereas bulk material properties have been characterized in respect of the nominal composition, manufacturing methods and thermo-mechanical treatments, NiTi overlays have been investigated much less. Most existent works in this field specifically deal with magnetron sputtering technology for thin films and its use in micro-devices (micro-electro-mechanical systems, MEMS), just some works refer to vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) for thicker coatings. The present paper explores and compares the microstructure and wear-related properties of coatings obtained from atomized NiTi powders, by VPS as well as by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) techniques. In the present case, the wear behaviour of the NiTi deposits has been studied by rubber-wheel equipment and ball-on-disk tests. The results obtained at room temperature show that the APS-quenched coatings exhibit a preferential dry sliding wear mechanism, while the VPS and HVOF coatings show an abrasive mechanism.

  2. Dental abrasion as a cutting process.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter W; Wagner, Mark; Al-Fadhalah, Khaled; Almusallam, Abdulwahab S; Michael, Shaji; Thai, Lidia A; Strait, David S; Swain, Michael V; van Casteren, Adam; Renno, Waleed M; Shekeban, Ali; Philip, Swapna M; Saji, Sreeja; Atkins, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    A mammalian tooth is abraded when a sliding contact between a particle and the tooth surface leads to an immediate loss of tooth tissue. Over time, these contacts can lead to wear serious enough to impair the oral processing of food. Both anatomical and physiological mechanisms have evolved in mammals to try to prevent wear, indicating its evolutionary importance, but it is still an established survival threat. Here we consider that many wear marks result from a cutting action whereby the contacting tip(s) of such wear particles acts akin to a tool tip. Recent theoretical developments show that it is possible to estimate the toughness of abraded materials via cutting tests. Here, we report experiments intended to establish the wear resistance of enamel in terms of its toughness and how friction varies. Imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to assess the damage involved. Damage ranged from pure plastic deformation to fracture with and without lateral microcracks. Grooves cut with a Berkovich diamond were the most consistent, suggesting that the toughness of enamel in cutting is 244 J m(-2), which is very high. Friction was higher in the presence of a polyphenolic compound, indicating that this could increase wear potential. PMID:27274807

  3. Use of a TiBN Multilayer Coating for Wear Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Moehwald, Kai; Deißer, Todd Alexander; Bistron, Marcus

    2007-05-01

    The near surface area of forging dies is exposed to high mechanical loads. Additionally thermal and chemical stresses occur during the forging process. Depending on the number of forged parts, several kinds of damage develop in the surface area, which lead to failures of forging dies. Die wear is the main reason of failure with a 70% ratio. The abrasion resistance of the surface area of forging dies has to be increased in order to reduce wear. Therefore different methods were examined such as the increase of the abrasion resistance by plasma nitriding and by coating with ceramic layers (TiN, TiCN, TiC, CrN). These layers are applied to the forging die by using PACVD or PAPVD treatment. At the Institute of Metal Forming and Metal-Forming Machines of the University of Hanover a wear reduction by factor 3.5 compared to nitrided forging dies for forging helical gears was achieved. This was possible by using a coating compound of 18 ceramic layers. These excellent results for the multilayer system can be explained through the energy reduction at the inner boundaries and a crack deflection effect at the phase transitions. The layer support of neighboring layers and a stress relaxation through the stacked construction of the layer system are also improving the durability of the coating. This multilayer coating consists of a TiN-TiCN-TiC layer system with an overall thickness of 1.8 μm. This paper presents investigations of this multilayer compound and further research to reduce wear through an additional TiBN coating layer. With this additional top coating an increase of the thermal resistance and the oxidation resistance can be achieved. As a result of this enhancement a further increase of the wear reduction was expected.

  4. Fretting Wear Properties of TiCN-Ni Cermets: Influence of Load and Secondary Carbide Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj Kumar, B. V.; Basu, Bikramjit

    2008-03-01

    The increasing demand for TiCN-based cermets in tribological applications necessitates a thorough understanding of the influence of experimental as well as material parameters on the friction and wear properties. In optimizing microstructure and properties, secondary carbides are added to baseline TiCN-Ni cermet. The present work aims at evaluating the fretting wear behavior of Ti(CN)-Ni cermets containing various secondary carbides, such as WC, NbC, TaC, and HfC, against steel at different loading (2, 6, and 10 N) conditions. The evolution of tangential frictional force for the investigated cermets was analyzed in terms of fretting logs and fretting loops. The topographical characterization of worn surfaces was performed, using laser surface profilometry and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) capability. The steady-state coefficient of friction (COF) was minimum (0.33) for a TiCN-20Ni cermet/steel tribocouple, while a maximum COF (0.47) was recorded for TiCN-20Ni-10HfC cermet/steel at a 2-N load. The wear rate of the cermets varied in the range of 1.7 × 10-6 to 3.5 × 10-6 mm3/Nm. The TiCN-20Ni-10HfC cermet exhibited poor wear resistance among investigated cermets. The dominant wear mechanisms were found as abrasion and tribolayer formation. The dominance of abrasion is explained in terms of cumulative energy dissipation.

  5. Characterization of coating wear phenomena in nitride and carbide coated tool inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.; Kaufherr, N.; Lee, R.H.; Kramer, B.M.; Bunshah, R.F.; Sproul, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Hard nitride- and carbide- coatings of Ti, Zr, and Hf were deposited on T-15 cutting tool inserts using high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) and activated reactive evaporation (ARE) processes. The coated inserts were subjected to a series of metal cutting tests to evaluate their performance and to compare their relative ranking with wear model predictions. The cutting tests indicated the coated inserts outperformed uncoated inserts by a factor of 2- to 10 depending on the coating process and composition; however their ranking based on measured lifetime (to reach a 0.003 in. crater depth) did not agree with predicted wear model predictions. Subsequently, a series of short-term cutting tests were initiated to study the wear behavior of the coatings during the early stages of the wear process when the coating was still intact. Post-test examination of the inserts suggest that the predominant wear mechanism was not due to abrasion or thermochemical dissolution as predicted by the model, but was a result of substrate softening followed by microfracture of the coating. The substrate softening is attributed to the severe cutting conditions (325 sfpm under dry cutting conditions) used in the cutting tests. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A comparison of the tribological behaviour of Y-TZP in tea and coffee under micro-abrasion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, S.; Stack, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    The micro-abrasion of Y-TZP, a candidate dental restorative material, was investigated in a range of caffeine-containing solutions which included tea and coffee. Additions of sugar and milk were used to test the effects of viscosity and pH on the wear rate. The results indicated a significant increase in wear rate in the various solutions, with some correlation between wear rate and increases in viscosity and this was linked to enhance particle entrainment in the more viscous solutions. The generally lower wear rate in tea compared to coffee was associated with a longer ageing period in this solution before uniform wear was observed. Micro-abrasion maps were used to characterize the differences in performance for the material in the environments studied.

  7. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodali, Padma

    steel were determined to be adhesive, abrasive, and third body wear. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The wear morphology of the coatings that were tested against a ruby slider suggested that abrasive wear, brittle fracture, and third body wear are the mechanisms by which loss of material can occur.

  8. The Behavior of Water in Collagen and Hydroxyapatite Sites of Cortical Bone: Fracture, Mechanical Wear, and Load Bearing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Singh, Chandan; Papaioannou, Antonios; Sinha, Neeraj; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cortical bone, which is largely comprised of collagen, hydroxyapatite, and water, are known to hinge on hydration. Recently, the characteristics of water in bone have drawn attention as potential markers of bone quality. We report on the dynamics, diffusion, population, and exchange of water in cortical bone by NMR relaxation and diffusion methodologies. Relaxation measurements over timescales ranging from 0.001 to 4.2 s reveal two distinguishable water environments. Systematic exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or collagenase reveals one peak in our 2D relaxation map belonging to water present in the hydroxyapatite rich environment, and a second peak with shorter relaxation times arising from a collagen rich site. Diffusion-T2 measurements allowed for direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of water in all observable reservoirs. Further, deuterium relaxation methods were applied to study cortical bone under an applied force, following mechanical wear or fracture. The tumbling correlation times of water reduce in all three cases, indicating that water dynamics may be used as a probe of bone quality. Lastly, changes in the relative populations and correlation times of water in bone under an applied force suggest that load bearing occurs largely in the collagen rich environment and is reversible. PMID:26659838

  9. Improved hardness and wear properties of B-ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Mansur, L.K. )

    1992-07-01

    Polycarbonate (Lexan) was implanted with 100 and 200 keV B{sup +} ions to doses of 0.26, 0.78, and 2.6{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature ({lt}100 {degree}C). Mechanical characterization of implanted materials was carried out by nanoindentation and sliding wear tests. The results showed that the hardness of implanted polycarbonate increased with increasing ion energy and dose, attaining hardness up to 3.2 GPa at a dose of 2.6{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} for 200 keV ions, which is more than 10 times that of the unimplanted polymer. Wear properties were characterized using a reciprocating tribometer with nylon, brass, and SAE 52100 Cr-steel balls with 0.5 and 1 N normal forces for 10 000 cycles. The wear mode varied widely as a function of ion energy, dose, wear ball type, and normal load. For given ion energy, load, and ball type conditions, there was an optimum dose that produced the greatest wear resistance and lowest friction coefficient. For polycarbonate implanted with 0.78{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, the nylon ball produced no wear after 10 000 cycles. Moreover, the overall friction coefficient was reduced by over 40% by implantation. The results suggest that the potential of ion-beam technology for improving polycarbonate is significant, and that surface-sensitive mechanical properties can be tailored to meet the requirements for applications demanding hardness, wear, and abrasion resistance.

  10. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  11. CR TKA UHMWPE wear tested after artificial aging of the vitamin E treated gliding component by simulating daily patient activities.

    PubMed

    Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Grupp, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The wear behaviour of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is dominated by two wear mechanisms: the abrasive wear and the delamination of the gliding components, where the second is strongly linked to aging processes and stress concentration in the material. The addition of vitamin E to the bulk material is a potential way to reduce the aging processes. This study evaluates the wear behaviour and delamination susceptibility of the gliding components of a vitamin E blended, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. Daily activities such as level walking, ascending and descending stairs, bending of the knee, and sitting and rising from a chair were simulated with a data set received from an instrumented knee prosthesis. After 5 million test cycles no structural failure of the gliding components was observed. The wear rate was with 5.62 ± 0.53 mg/million cycles falling within the limit of previous reports for established wear test methods.

  12. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  13. Comparison microstructure and sliding wear properties of nickel-cobalt/CNT composite coatings by DC, PC and PRC current electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslioglu, Ramazan; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-10-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) alloys and Ni-Co/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite coatings were prepared under direct current (DC), pulse current (PC) and pulse reverse current (PRC) methods. The effect of different deposition currents on the surface microstructure, crystallographic structure, microhardness, and reciprocating sliding wear behavior were investigated. MWCNT co-deposition caused to modify Ni-Co surface morphology, decrease in grain size, and increase in surface roughness, since MWCNTs effected the deposition mechanisms of Ni-Co alloy. The nanocomposite coatings deposited using PC and PRC deposition exhibited significant improvement in microhardness and wear resistance due to unique enhanced reinforcement of MWCNTs in Ni-Co coatings. Reciprocating sliding wear tests evidenced that co-deposition of MWCNTs provided effective load bearing ability and self-lubrication between the friction surfaces. However, the friction coefficient increases for all the nanocomposites produced with DC, PC and PRC methods showed to be increased. In the Ni-Co alloy coatings, the predominant wear mechanisms was delamination caused by fatigue micro cracking whereas in the MWCNT co-deposited composites wear mechanism showed abrasive grooves and plastic deformation due to decreased real contact area.

  14. Conditioning method development for 3M Trizact diamond tile fixed abrasives used in the finishing of brittle substrates; Technical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Tim; Gobena, Feben T.; Romero, Vince; Sventek, Bruce; Schoenhofen, Walter

    2005-05-01

    Results of a series of single sided lapping experiments designed to develop appropriate conditioning methods for 3M Trizact Diamond Tile fixed abrasives are reported. Trizact™ Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive lapping technology developed by 3M. The Trizact™ Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder)-inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. The effect of platen and conditioner speed on pad wear will be explored for a roller yoke single-side lapping machine. Pad break-in conditioning was studied in detail for a 6 micron Trizact™ Diamond Tile abrasive used to lap soda-lime glass.

  15. Anti-Wear Performance and Mechanism of an Oil-Miscible Ionic Liquid as a Lubricant Additive

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Bansal, Dinesh G; Yu, Bo; Howe, Jane Y; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Li, Huaqing; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate has been investigated as a potential anti-wear lubricant additive. Unlike most other ILs that have very low solubility in non-polar fluids, this IL is fully miscible with various hydrocarbon oils. In addition, it is thermally stable up to 347 oC, showed no corrosive attack to cast iron in ambient environment, and has excellent wettability on solid surfaces (e.g., contact angle on cast iron <8o). Most importantly, this phosphonium-based IL has demonstrated effective anti-scuffing and anti-wear characteristics when blended with lubricating oils. For example, a 5 wt.% addition into a synthetic base oil eliminated the scuffing failure experienced by the neat oil and, as a result, reduced the friction coefficient by 60% and the wear rate by three orders of magnitude. A synergistic effect on wear protection was observed with the current anti-wear additive when added into a fully-formulated engine oil. Nanostructure examination and composition analysis revealed a tribo-boundary film and subsurface plastic deformation zone for the metallic surface lubricated by the IL-containing lubricants. This protective boundary film is believed to be responsible for the IL s anti-scuffing and anti-wear functionality.

  16. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of Fe-Al Intermetallic Coating Prepared by Hot-Dip Aluminizing and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, J. Q.; Chen, K. M.; Mo, J. G.; Cui, X. H.; Wang, S. Q.

    2016-05-01

    A Fe-Al intermetallic compound coating was prepared on AISI H13 steel by hot-dip aluminizing and subsequent high-temperature diffusion. Dry sliding wear tests of the Fe-Al intermetallic coating were performed at 298 K to 873 K (25 °C to 600 °C). The wear behavior of the Fe-Al intermetallic coating was noticed to vary markedly with the temperature and load. At 298 K (25 °C), the wear rate rapidly increased with an increase of the load. As the temperature was elevated, the wear rate dramatically decreased except for the cases under 300 N at 473 K and 673 K (200 °C and 400 °C). The Fe-Al intermetallic coating possessed an excellent elevated-temperature wear performance, especially at 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), but worse room-temperature one, which were noticed to be attributed to the existence and inexistence of thin tribo-oxide layers, respectively. Such a thin tribo-oxide layer was considered to provide a protection for the intermetallic compound. When the tribo-oxide layer did not form at room temperature or the formed one was massively delaminated above the critical load at elevated temperatures, Fe-Al intermetallic coating possessed poor wear resistance.

  17. Wear Behaviour of Al-6061/SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium Al-6061 base composites, reinforced with SiC particles having mesh size of 150 and 600, which is fabricated by stir casting method and their wear resistance and coefficient of friction has been investigated in the present study as a function of applied load and weight fraction of SiC varying from 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 %. The dry sliding wear properties of composites were investigated by using Pin-on-disk testing machine at sliding velocity of 2 m/s and sliding distance of 2000 m over a various loads of 10, 20 and 30 N. The result shows that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC particulates up to weight percentage of 35 % reduces the wear rate. The result also show that the wear of the test specimens increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction slightly decreases with increasing weight percentage of reinforcements. The wear surfaces are examined by optical microscopy which shows that the large grooved regions and cavities with ceramic particles are found on the worn surface of the composite alloy. This indicates an abrasive wear mechanism, which is essentially a result of hard ceramic particles exposed on the worn surfaces. Further, it was found from the experimentation that the wear rate decreases linearly with increasing weight fraction of SiC and average coefficient of friction decreases linearly with increasing applied load, weight fraction of SiC and mesh size of SiC. The best result has been obtained at 35 % weight fraction and 600 mesh size of SiC.

  18. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Hardness and Wear Resistance of Electroless Ni-B-Mo Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serin, Ihsan Gökhan; Göksenli, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Formation of nickel-boron-molybdenum (Ni-B-Mo) coating on steel by electroless plating and evaluation of their morphology, hardness and tribological properties post heat treatment at different temperatures for 1 h is investigated. The 25 μm thick coating is uniform and adhesion between the substrate and coating is good. Ni-B-Mo coating was amorphous-like structure in their as-plated condition and by 400°C heat-treated coating, nickel fully crystallized and nickel borides and molybdenum carbide were formed. All coatings exhibited higher hardness than the substrate steel. Hardness values of all coatings up to 400°C did not change distinctively but decreased partly beyond 400°C. Friction coefficient reached lowest value post heat treatment at 300°C but later increased with increasing tempering temperature. Wear resistance was lowest in as-plated coating; however it reached the highest value at 300°C. Worn surface of the coatings showed the abrasive wear as the dominant wear mechanism. An additional adhesive wear mechanism was detected in coating tempered at 550°C. Moreover, our results confirmed that the molybdenum addition improved the thermal stability of the resulting coating. Therefore, Ni-B-Mo coating has potential for application in precision mould, optical parts mould or bipolar plates, where thermal stability is essential.

  19. Wear and degradation on retrieved zirconia femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Nogiwa-Valdez, A A; Rainforth, W M; Stewart, T D

    2014-03-01

    Zirconia femoral heads retrieved from patients after different implantation periods (up to 13 years) were analysed using vertical scanning interferometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. A range of topographical and compositional changes on the surface of the retrievals are reported in this work. The study revealed that changes in roughness are the result of a combination of factors, i.e. scratching, surface upheaval due to transformation to the monoclinic phase and grain pull-out. Clusters of transformed monoclinic grains were observed on heads implanted for more than 3 years. The phase composition of these clusters was confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. Increased abrasive wear and a higher monoclinic phase content concentrated on the pole of the femoral heads, confirming that the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was not only induced by the tetragonal phase metastability and environmental conditions but mechanical and tribological factors, also affected the transformation kinetics. Additionally, the head implanted for 13 years showed evidence of a self-polishing mechanism leading to a considerable smoothening of the surface. These observations provide an insight into the interrelated mechanisms underlying the wear and transformation process on zirconia ceramics during implantation. PMID:24140384

  20. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 1: Neutralizer Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Upon the completion of two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion engine, the orifice channel of the neutralizer hollow cathode was eroded away to as much as twice its original diameter. Whereas the neutralizer cathode orifice opened significantly, no noticeable erosion of the discharge cathode orifice was observed. Noquantitative explanation of these erosion trends has been established since the completion of the two life tests. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas inside these devices has been developed and applied to the neutralizer hollow cathode. The numerical simulations show that the main mechanism responsible for the channel erosion is sputtering by Xe+. These ions are accelerated by the sheath along the channel and bombard the surface with kinetic energy/charge of about 17 V at the beginning of cathode life. The density of the ions inside the neutralizer orifice is computed to be as high as 2.1 x 10(sup 22) m(sup -3). Because of the 3.5-times larger diameter of the discharge cathode orifice, the ion density inside the orifice is more than 40 times lower and the sheath drop 7 V lower compared with the values in the neutralizer. At these conditions, Xe+ can cause no significant sputtering of the surface.

  1. Influence of Plasma Intensity on Wear and Erosion Resistance of Conventional and Nanometric WC-Co Coatings Deposited by APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonache, V.; Salvador, M. D.; García, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.

    2011-03-01

    The effects of plasma intensity and powder particle size on wear and erosion resistance have been evaluated for WC-12 wt.%Co coatings deposited by Air Plasma Spraying. Coatings were deposited from micrometric and nanostructured powders. SEM and XRD characterization showed the presence of WC, W2C, W, and an amorphous Co-rich matrix. The performance of the different coatings was compared in sliding wear tests (ball-on-disk), under dry friction conditions. Wear debris and tracks were analyzed by SEM. The debris generated during the test was found to have a great influence on the sliding properties. Wear follows a "three-body abrasive mechanism" and is dominated by coating spallation because of sub-surface cracking. In order to evaluate erosion behavior, solid particle erosion tests were conducted. Eroded coatings were analyzed by SEM, and erosion mainly occurs by a "cracking and chipping mechanism." The study shows that wear and erosion behavior is strongly affected by plasma arc intensity.

  2. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  3. Interproximal wear facets and tooth associations in the Paşalar hominoid sample.

    PubMed

    Gençturk, Insaf; Alpagut, Berna; Andrews, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Interproximal wear facets were examined on hominoid teeth from the middle Miocene site at Paşalar, Turkey. The aim was to find matches between adjacent premolar and molar teeth from single individuals that were collected in the field as isolated teeth and use them to reconstruct tooth rows. These were then used to investigate: (1) the wear gradient on the molar teeth; (2) the dispersal of teeth from single mandibles and maxillae; (3) the size ratios among the molars; and (4) the number of individuals represented by the hominoid sample. Facets were scored for size and shape and were assessed visually using photographs and superimposed outline drawings on acetate transparencies. Out of a sample of approximately 1,500 teeth collected between 1983 and 1996, 532 molars and 258 premolars produced apparent matches making up 160 tooth rows. These were then examined rigorously for morphological consistency and state of wear, and, employing the criterion that only the most unequivocal associations should be used, the final number was reduced to 48 tooth rows-31 mandibular and 17 maxillary. The tooth associations represent a minimum of 21 individuals and probably as many as 34. Molar wear was rapid, with M1s having almost twice as much wear as M3s, as measured by a wear-gradient index. The M2s are intermediate but generally closer to M1s in degree of wear, as are P4s. This wear pattern suggests either delayed eruption of M3s or extremely abrasive diets causing rapid, heavy wear. There is some indication that the wear patterns in Griphopithecus alpani and Kenyapithecus kizili are different, with the latter perhaps having a lower wear gradient, but the K. kizili sample is very small. In both species, the M2 is the largest molar and the M1 is the smallest. Separation of individual teeth in the 48 tooth associations varied from widely separated-up to 8.5m apart-to within a few centimeters of each other. One tooth row (D922) was found with the teeth in contact but the maxillary

  4. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina-zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina-zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina-zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking.

  5. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina-zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina-zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina-zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking. PMID:26491323

  6. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina–zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina–zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina–zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking. PMID:26491323

  7. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  8. Comparison of ceria nanoparticle concentrations in effluent from chemical mechanical polishing of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zazzera, Larry; Mader, Brian; Ellefson, Mark; Eldridge, Jess; Loper, Steve; Zabasajja, John; Qian, Julie

    2014-11-18

    This work measured and compared the effluent from the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of silicon dioxide using ceria slurry and ceria fixed abrasive. CMP waste streams were tested for total solids, cerium, silicon, and 6 nm to 20 μm diameter particles. The concentration of cerium and total solids in the effluent were very different for the two polishes studied. The fixed abrasive polish produced 94% less CeO2 emissions per SiO2 removed. The higher ceria levels in the slurry effluent are associated with 99-279 nm particles, and attributed to ceria abrasive. The lower concentration of ceria in the effluent from the fixed abrasive process is due to the lower wear rate of mineral from the fixed abrasive, compared to the more environmentally mobile mineral in the slurry. These results support the "bonded" nature of the abrasive particles in fixed abrasive polishing and are relevant to sustainability strategies that seek to reduce particle emissions in surface conditioning technology.

  9. Comparison of ceria nanoparticle concentrations in effluent from chemical mechanical polishing of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zazzera, Larry; Mader, Brian; Ellefson, Mark; Eldridge, Jess; Loper, Steve; Zabasajja, John; Qian, Julie

    2014-11-18

    This work measured and compared the effluent from the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of silicon dioxide using ceria slurry and ceria fixed abrasive. CMP waste streams were tested for total solids, cerium, silicon, and 6 nm to 20 μm diameter particles. The concentration of cerium and total solids in the effluent were very different for the two polishes studied. The fixed abrasive polish produced 94% less CeO2 emissions per SiO2 removed. The higher ceria levels in the slurry effluent are associated with 99-279 nm particles, and attributed to ceria abrasive. The lower concentration of ceria in the effluent from the fixed abrasive process is due to the lower wear rate of mineral from the fixed abrasive, compared to the more environmentally mobile mineral in the slurry. These results support the "bonded" nature of the abrasive particles in fixed abrasive polishing and are relevant to sustainability strategies that seek to reduce particle emissions in surface conditioning technology. PMID:25317965

  10. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  11. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were severely abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub-layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

  12. Correlating mechanical properties and anti-wear performance of tribofilms formed by ionic liquids, ZDDP and their combinations

    DOE PAGES

    Landauer, Alexander K.; Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun

    2016-03-10

    Here we examine the elasticity, hardness, and resistance-to-plastic-deformation (P/S2) measured via nanoindentation of several tribofilms and correlates these properties to friction and wear behavior. The tribofilms were generated by ball-on-plate reciprocating sliding lubricated by a base oil containing an ionic liquid, phosphonium-organophosphate or ammonium-organophosphate, zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), or combination of IL and ZDDP. Nanoindentation was conducted at room and elevated temperatures. While there seems little correlation between the tribofilm hardness and tribological behavior, a higher modulus generally leads to better friction and wear performance. Interestingly, a lower P/S2 ratio tends to reduce friction and improve wear protection, which is inmore » an opposite trend as reported for bulk materials. Ultimately, this is likely attributable to the dynamic, self-healing characteristics of tribofilms.« less

  13. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  14. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abrasive wheels. 1915.134 Section 1915.134 Labor... § 1915.134 Abrasive wheels. This section shall apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking. (a) Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be provided with...

  18. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar(Registered TradeMark), Vectran(Registered TradeMark), Orthofabric, and Tyvek(Registered TradeMark)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran(Registered TradeMark)) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek , the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek(Registered TradeMark). This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran(Registered TradeMark) and Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  19. Wear of metal fiber brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd Perryman, Jr.

    The goal of this dissertation was determining the wear mechanism of metal fiber brushes on commutators and slip rings with the goal of achieving the lowest possible wear rate. To this end, metal fiber brushes were operated, while conducting direct current, on gold-plated copper rotors with and without unfilled gaps to simulate slip rings and commutators, respectively. Wear rates on unfilled-groove commutators were found to be only modestly higher than on slip ring style rotors. Three possible causes for enhanced metal fiber brush wear on commutators were considered: (i) accelerated "adhesive" wear controlled by contact spots, (ii) fatigue induced wear and (iii) "fiber chopping". Similarly, SEM analysis of fiber tips and wear particles produced scant, if any, evidence of fiber chopping, which would occur as, again, fiber tips extend elastically into the commutator grooves and small slices of them would be "chopped" off by oncoming edges of commutator bars. Finally considered was "modified chopping", wherein fiber tips would be dragged over groove edges, resulting in tensile fracture and chopping. Only a single fiber fragment showed damage that might be compatible with that mechanism. Moreover, the fact that it was exemplified by a single tenuous case, rules it out as significant. The same conclusion also follows from comparing commutator wear rates with that on slip rings. These show good correlation in terms of effective brush pressure, which on commutators is increased because only bars conduct current and gaps do not support load. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. NASA interdisciplinary collaboration in tribology. A review of oxidational wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, T. F. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth review of oxidational wear of metals is presented. Special emphasis is given to a description of the concept of oxidational wear and the formulation of an Oxidational Wear Theory. The parallelism between the formation of an oxide film for dry contact conditions and the formation of other surface films for a lubricated contact is discussed. The description of oxidational wear is prefaced with a unification of wear modes into two major classes of mild and severe wear including both lubricated and dry contacts. Oxidational wear of metals is a class of mild wear where protective oxide films are formed at real areas of contact and during the time of contact at temperataure T sub c. When the oxide reaches a critical thickness, frequently in the range of 1 to 3 microns, the oxide breaks up and eventually appears as a wear particle. These oxides are preferentially formed on plateaux which alternately carry the load as they reach their critical thickness and are removed. If the system is operated at elevated temperatures, thick oxides can form both out of contact and between the plateaux. Temperature is important in determining the structure of the oxide film present. Spinel oxide (Fe3O4) which forms above 300 C is more protective than the lower temperature rhomobohedral (alpha-Fe2O3) oxide which is abrasive. An Oxidational Wear Theory is derived using a modified Archard wear law expressed in terms of activation energy (Qp) and Arrhenius constant (Ap).

  1. Damage tolerant functionally graded materials for advanced wear and friction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, Lubos

    The research work presented in this dissertation focused on processing effects, microstructure development, characterization and performance evaluation of composite and graded coatings used for friction and wear control. The following issues were addressed. (1) Definition of prerequisites for a successful composite and graded coating formation by means of thermal spraying. (2) Improvement of characterization methods available for homogenous thermally sprayed coating and their extension to composite and graded materials. (3) Development of novel characterization methods specifically for FGMs, with a focus on through thickness property measurement by indentation and in-situ curvature techniques. (4) Design of composite materials with improved properties compared to homogenous coatings. (5) Fabrication and performance assessment of FGM with improved wear and impact damage properties. Materials. The materials studied included several material systems relevant to low friction and contact damage tolerant applications: MO-Mo2C, WC-Co cermets as materials commonly used sliding components of industrial machinery and NiCrAlY/8%-Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia composites as a potential solution for abradable sections of gas turbines and aircraft engines. In addition, uniform coatings such as molybdenum and Ni5%Al alloy were evaluated as model system to assess the influence of microstructure variation onto the mechanical property and wear response. Methods. The contact response of the materials was investigated through several techniques. These included methods evaluating the relevant intrinsic coating properties such as elastic modulus, residual stress, fracture toughness, scratch resistance and tests measuring the abrasion and friction-sliding behavior. Dry-sand and wet two-body abrasion testing was performed in addition to traditional ball on disc sliding tests. Among all characterization techniques the spherical indentation deserved most attention and enabled to

  2. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R.; Suan, T. Nguen

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  3. Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Zr-Doped DLC on Ti-13Zr-13Nb Biomedical Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prateek; Babu, P. Dilli; Mohan, L.; Anandan, C.; Grips, V. K. William

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr)-doped DLC was deposited on biomedical titanium alloy Ti-13Nb-13Zr by a combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering. The concentration of Zr in the films was varied by changing the parameters of the bi-polar pulsed power supply and the Ar/CH4 gas composition. The coatings were characterized for composition, morphology, nanohardness, corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid (SBF) and tribological properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies on the samples were used to estimate the concentration of Zr in the films. XPS and micro-Raman studies were used to find the variation of I D/ I G ratio with Zr concentration. These studies show that the disorder in the film increased with increasing Zr concentration as deduced from the I D/ I G ratio. Nanohardness measurements showed no clear dependence of hardness and Young's modulus on Zr concentration. Reciprocating wear studies showed a low coefficient of friction (0.04) at 1 N load and it increased toward 0.4 at higher loads. The wear volume was lower at all loads on the coated samples. The wear mechanism changed from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear after coating. The corrosion current in SBF was unaffected by the coating and corrosion potential moved toward nobler (more positive) values.

  4. Comprehensive process maps for synthesizing high density aluminum oxide-carbon nanotube coatings by plasma spraying for improved mechanical and wear properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar

    Plasma sprayed aluminum oxide ceramic coating is widely used due to its outstanding wear, corrosion, and thermal shock resistance. But porosity is the integral feature in the plasma sprayed coating which exponentially degrades its properties. In this study, process maps were developed to obtain Al2O3-CNT composite coatings with the highest density (i.e. lowest porosity) and improved mechanical and wear properties. Process map is defined as a set of relationships that correlates large number of plasma processing parameters to the coating properties. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added as reinforcement to Al2O 3 coating to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance. Two novel powder processing approaches viz spray drying and chemical vapor growth were adopted to disperse CNTs in Al2O3 powder. The degree of CNT dispersion via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was superior to spray drying but CVD could not synthesize powder in large amount. Hence optimization of plasma processing parameters and process map development was limited to spray dried Al2O3 powder containing 0, 4 and 8 wt. % CNTs. An empirical model using Pareto diagram was developed to link plasma processing parameters with the porosity of coating. Splat morphology as a function of plasma processing parameter was also studied to understand its effect on mechanical properties. Addition of a mere 1.5 wt. % CNTs via CVD technique showed ˜27% and ˜24% increase in the elastic modulus and fracture toughness respectively. Improved toughness was attributed to combined effect of lower porosity and uniform dispersion of CNTs which promoted the toughening by CNT bridging, crack deflection and strong CNT/Al2O3 interface. Al2O 3-8 wt. % CNT coating synthesized using spray dried powder showed 73% improvement in the fracture toughness when porosity reduced from 4.7% to 3.0%. Wear resistance of all coatings at room and elevated temperatures (573 K, 873 K) showed improvement with CNT addition and decreased porosity

  5. Improvement in mechanical properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings by Al2O3 reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manoj; Nath, S K; Prakash, Satya

    2013-07-01

    Thermal sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings suffer from poor mechanical properties like tensile strength, wear resistance, hardness, toughness and fatigue. The mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite coatings can be enhanced via incorporation of secondary bioinert reinforcement material. In this study an attempt has been made to improve the mechanical properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite by reinforcing it with 10, 20 and 30% Al2O3. The plasma sprayed coatings have been characterized using FE-SEM/EDAX, XRD, AFM and FTIR spectroscopy. Corrosion studies have been done in simulated body fluid and abrasive wear studies have been performed on flat specimens on a disk wear tester. Microhardness, tensile strength and wear resistance are found to be increased with increasing Al2O3 content. All types of coatings show superior resistance against corrosion in simulated body fluid.

  6. A Multidirectional Tribo-System: Wear of UHMWPE under Sliding, Rolling, and Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, Elias Wolfgang

    perpendicular to the primary sliding directions. These are consistent with abrasive wear, plastic flow and adhesive wear, and fatigue wear mechanisms reported in other in vitro and in vivo wear studies. The orientations of the lamellae at the wear surfaces were not discernibly different from the lamellae of an unworn section of the disk surface. Similarly, the near-surface regions of the disk cross-section were not discernibly different from the subsurface regions. Previous studies have demonstrated orientation of the microstructure during wear using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques, and such methods may be necessary for texture characterization. These results demonstrate that knee kinematics have a significant effect on the cross-shear and wear of UHMWPE and should not be neglected when designing TKR. A better theoretical understanding of how kinematics contribute to wear can lead to better UHMWPE formulations, improved computer simulations of wear, and optimized TKR designs with longer life-spans.

  7. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for small skin specimens under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during emergency belly landing. A test apparatus consisting of a standard belt sander provided the sliding surface. Small test specimens constructed of aluminum, standard graphite-epoxy composite, aramid-epoxy composite, and toughened-resin composites were tested undar a range of pressures, belt velocities, and belt-surface textures. The effects of these test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. The effect of fiber orientation in the composite materials on wear rate was also investigated. In addition, tests were performed in which thermocouples were imbedded into the various test specimens to obtain temperature-time histories during abrasion.

  8. Wear of tillage tools coated by thermoplastic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Waheed Y.; Ezzat, Fawzy M. H.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the abrasive wear of tillage tools caused by soil. Low-carbon steel and hardened steel specimens as well as specimens coated by thermoplastic composites were tested. Silicon oxide (SiO2), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), iron, copper and glass fibre were used as filling materials in polyamide (PA6) and polyethylene (PE) coatings. Low-carbon steel was used as substrate. An abrasive wear tester was constructed to simulate the operation of real tillage tools. The relative motion between the test specimens and soil was controlled. PA6 showed promising results, especially if both the concentration and grain size of the additives were carefully selected. The addition of iron and Al2O3 powders to PA6 showed a considerable mitigation in the wear process if their concentrations were controlled to a certain limit.

  9. Application of surface analysis to solve problems of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented for the use of surface analytical tools including field ion microscopy, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis (AES), cylindrical mirror Auger analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data from the field ion microscope reveal adhesive transfer (wear) at the atomic level with the formation of surface compounds not found in the bulk, and AES reveals that this transfer will occur even in the presence of surface oxides. Both AES and XPS reveal that in abrasive wear with silicon carbide and diamond contacting the transition metals, the surface and the abrasive undergo a chemical or structural change which effects wear. With silicon carbide, silicon volatilizes leaving behind a pseudo-graphitic surface and the surface of diamond is observed to graphitize.

  10. Wear Mechanisms of Carbon-Based Refractory Materials in SiMn Tap-Holes—Part II: In Situ Observation of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, J. D.; Pistorius, P. Chris; Tangstad, M.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study presented here is to determine to what extent chemical reactions between carbon-based refractory and slag or metal in the tap-hole of a SiMn furnace can contribute to wear of tap-hole refractory. The results of the study are reported in two parts. In Part I, thermodynamic calculations suggested that reaction between silicomanganese slag and carbon-based tap-hole refractory is possible, and experiments with nominally pure materials support this. However, practical refractory materials are by no means pure materials and contain secondary phases and porosity which can be expected to affect reaction with slag. In Part II, such reactions are examined experimentally, in cup and wettability tests, using commercially available carbon block and cold-ramming paste refractory materials and mainly industrial SiMn slag. Clear evidence was found of chemical reaction at approximately 1870 K (approximately 1600 °C), forming SiC and, it appears, metal droplets. Both carbon block and ramming paste refractory reacted with slag, with preferential attack on and penetration into the binder phase rather than aggregate particles. The two types of carbon-based refractory materials showed similar extents of chemical reaction observed as wetting and penetration in the laboratory tests. The differences in refractory life observed practically in industrial furnaces should therefore be attributed to wear mechanisms other than pure chemical wear as studied in this work.

  11. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  12. Experimental study and effect of particulate interference on the microhardness, wear and microstructural properties of ternary doped coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Joseph, O. O.; Inegbenebor, A. O.; Olukanni, D. O.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies effects of the composite particle infringement of ZnO/Cr2O3 on zinc rich ternary based coating. The corrosion-degradation property in 3.5% NaCl was investigatedusing polarization technique. The structural characteristics of the multilayer produce coatings were evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The mechanical response of the coated samples was studied using a diamond base Dura -Scan) micro-hardness tester and a MTR-300 dry abrasive wear tester. The combined effect of the coatings gave highly-improved performance on microhardness, corrosion and wear damage. This also implies that protection of wind-energy structures in marine environments can be achieved by composite strengthening capacity.

  13. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  14. CFD Based Erosion Modelling of Abrasive Waterjet Nozzle using Discrete Phase Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim Kamarudin, Naqib; Prasada Rao, A. K.; Azhari, Azmir

    2016-02-01

    In Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) machining, the nozzle is the most critical component that influences the performance, precision and economy. Exposure to a high speed jet and abrasives makes it susceptible to wear erosion which requires for frequent replacement. The present works attempts to simulate the erosion of the nozzle wall using computational fluid dynamics. The erosion rate of the nozzle was simulated under different operating conditions. The simulation was carried out in several steps which is flow modelling, particle tracking and erosion rate calculation. Discrete Phase Method (DPM) and K-ε turbulence model was used for the simulation. Result shows that different operating conditions affect the erosion rate as well as the flow interaction of water, air and abrasives. The simulation results correlates well with past work.

  15. The impact of uropygial gland secretions on mechanically induced wearing of barn owl and pigeon body feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Benjamin; Müsse, Annika; Wagner, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Bird feathers are remarkable structures light but yet durable providing insulation and the ability of flight. Owls are highly specialized birds of prey, widely known for their ability to y silently which is enabled by (micro-) structural specializations of the feathers. The barn owl replaces feathers less frequently in comparison to other same sized birds like pigeons, indicating a much better resistance against material fatigue of these delicate microstructures. We used axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) of water drop contact angles as a non-destructive method of characterizing wearing processes in feathers. We hypothesized that feathers become more wettable when worn. We also investigated the impact of ethanol treatment in order to remove fatty residues of the uropygial gland secretions, barn owls and pigeons use for preening, on ageing processes. Ethanol treatment resulted in a slight, but significant increase of water repellency in barn owl but not in pigeon flight feathers. Our preliminary data also suggest that the uropygial gland secretions decelerate the wearing process of the feather keratin. We observed this effect in both species, however, it was more distinct for barn owl uropygial gland secretions. The results of this study, obtained by contact angle measurements used as a non-destructive evaluation method of material fatigue, yield insights into the material fatigue of feathers and the decelerating effect of uropygial gland secretions on wear on the other hand.

  16. Microstructural analyses and wear behavior of the cemented carbide tools after laser surface treatment and PVD coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Davi; Diniz, Anselmo Eduardo; Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion is one of the most important characteristics of coating on cutting tools. Poor coating adhesion on the tool favors fragmentation and release of hard abrasive particles between the tool and the workpiece. These particles interact with the surfaces of the tool, accelerating its wear and decreasing tool life. One possible solution is the use of laser texturing prior to coating in order to achieve a desired surface topography with enhanced adhesion properties. In the texturing, a high-frequency short-pulse laser changes surface characteristics, generating resolidified material and selective vaporization. This work evaluated the effectiveness of laser texturing in improving the substrate-coating adhesion of PVD coated cemented carbide tools. To this end, the substrates were textured with a Nd:YAG laser, in four different intensities, and then coated with a PVD TiAlN film. To ascertain the effectiveness of laser texturing, Rockwell C indentation and turning experiments were performed on both textured tools and conventional unlasered tools. The PVD coated laser-textured tool showed better performance in the indentation and turning tests than the standard tools. A comparative evaluation of tool wear mechanisms indicated that texturing did not change the wear mechanisms, but altered their importance to tool wear. The anchoring provided by the higher roughness of the textured surface increased the adhesion of the coating on the substrate, thus increasing tool life. Additionally, the chemical modification of the carbide grains due to the laser heating might be responsible for an enhanced adhesion between coating and substrate.

  17. Dental Surface Texture Characterization Based on Erosive Tooth Wear Processes.

    PubMed

    Hara, A T; Livengood, S V; Lippert, F; Eckert, G J; Ungar, P S

    2016-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of dental wear lesions affects their clinical management. We hypothesized that surface texture parameters can differentiate simulated erosion, abrasion, and erosion-abrasion lesions on human enamel and dentin. This in vitro study comprised 2 parts (both factorial 4 × 2), with 4 lesion types (erosion, abrasion, erosion-abrasion, and sound [no lesion; control]) and 2 substrates (enamel and dentin). Flattened/polished dental specimens were used in part 1, whereas natural dental surfaces were used in part 2. Testing surfaces were evaluated in blind conditions, using average surface roughness (Sa) and the following scale-sensitive fractal analysis parameters: area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc), exact proportion length-scale anisotropy of relief (eplsar), scale of maximum complexity (Smc), and textural fill volume (Tfv). Two-way analyses of variance, followed by Fisher's protected least significant difference tests (α = 0.05), were used to evaluate the effects of lesion and substrate. Classification trees were constructed to verify the strength of potential associations of the tested parameters. In part 1,Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates; only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion enamel lesions (allP< 0.05). The best association of parameters correctly classified up to 84% and 94% of the lesions on enamel and dentin, respectively. In part 2, only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates, whereas eplsar was able to differentiate erosion from erosion-abrasion (allP< 0.05). The association of parameters correctly classified up to 81% and 91% of the lesions in enamel and dentin, respectively.Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions, despite their complicated surface textures. The association of parameters improved the

  18. Lunar Dust Simulant in Mechanical Component Testing - Paradigm and Practicality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Street, K.; Abel, P.; Richmond, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uniquely harsh lunar surface environment, terrestrial test activities may not adequately represent abrasive wear by lunar dust likely to be experienced in mechanical systems used in lunar exploration. Testing to identify potential moving mechanism problems has recently begun within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center Mechanical Systems Lunar Dust Assessment activity in coordination with the Exploration Technology and Development Program Dust Management Project, and these complimentary efforts will be described. Specific concerns about differences between simulant and lunar dust, and procedures for mechanical component testing with lunar simulant will be considered. In preparing for long term operations within a dusty lunar environment, the three fundamental approaches to keeping mechanical equipment functioning are dust avoidance, dust removal, and dust tolerance, with some combination of the three likely to be found in most engineering designs. Methods to exclude dust from contact with mechanical components would constitute mitigation by dust avoidance, so testing seals for dust exclusion efficacy as a function of particle size provides useful information for mechanism design. Dust of particle size less than a micron is not well documented for impact on lunar mechanical components. Therefore, creating a standardized lunar dust simulant in the particulate size range of ca. 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer is useful for testing effects on mechanical components such as bearings, gears, seals, bushings, and other moving mechanical assemblies. Approaching actual wear testing of mechanical components, it is beneficial to first establish relative wear rates caused by dust on commonly used mechanical component materials. The wear mode due to dust within mechanical components, such as abrasion caused by dust in grease(s), needs to be considered, as well as the effects of vacuum, lunar thermal cycle, and electrostatics on wear rate.

  19. The effect of cup inclination and wear on the contact mechanics and cement fixation for ultra high molecular weight polyethylene total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wroblewski, B Michael; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Ling

    2012-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate individual and combined influences of the cup inclination and wear on the contact mechanics and fixation of a Charnley hip replacement using finite element method. The effects of cup inclination and penetration on the contact mechanics of articulating bearings as well as the stress within the cement and at the bone-cement interface were examined. The maximum contact pressure and the von Mises stress on the cup were reduced by ~30% and ~20% respectively when even a small penetration occurred. However, no large differences were found between different cup penetration depths with regards to either the contact pressure or the von Mises stress. The von Mises stress at the bone-cement interface was predicted almost unaltered with an increased cup inclination angle to 55° for a cup penetration to 4mm. These predictions suggest that the contact mechanics and the cement stress are insensitive to the cup inclination and wear under these normal conditions investigated, therefore explaining the robustness of the Charnley hip implant. An increase in the cup inclination angle to 65°, coupled with a maximum penetration of 4mm, resulted in a large increase in the maximum von Mises stress at the bone-cement interface.

  20. Detecting Inter-Cusp and Inter-Tooth Wear Patterns in Rhinocerotids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lucy A.; Kaiser, Thomas M.; Schwitzer, Christoph; Müller, Dennis W. H.; Codron, Daryl; Clauss, Marcus; Schulz, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Extant rhinos are the largest extant herbivores exhibiting dietary specialisations for both browse and grass. However, the adaptive value of the wear-induced tooth morphology in rhinos has not been widely studied, and data on individual cusp and tooth positions have rarely been published. We evaluated upper cheek dentition of browsing Diceros bicornis and Rhinoceros sondaicus, mixed-feeding R. unicornis and grazing Ceratotherium simum using an extended mesowear method adapted for rhinos. We included single cusp scoring (EM(R)-S) to investigate inter-cusp and inter-tooth wear patterns. In accordance with previous reports, general mesowear patterns in D. bicornis and R. sondaicus were attrition-dominated and C. simum abrasion-dominated, reflecting their respective diets. Mesowear patterns for R. unicornis were more attrition-dominated than anticipated by the grass-dominated diet, which may indicate a low intake of environmental abrasives. EM(R)-S increased differentiation power compared to classical mesowear, with significant inter-cusp and inter-tooth differences detected. In D. bicornis, the anterior cusp was consistently more abrasion-dominated than the posterior. Wear differences in cusp position may relate to morphological adaptations to dietary regimes. Heterogeneous occlusal surfaces may facilitate the comminution of heterogeneous browse, whereas uniform, broad grinding surfaces may enhance the comminution of physically more homogeneous grass. A negative tooth wear gradient was found in D. bicornis, R. sondaicus and R. unicornis, with wear patterns becoming less abrasion-dominated from premolars to molars. No such gradients were evident in C. simum which displayed a uniform wear pattern. In browsers, premolars may be exposed to higher relative grit loads, which may result in the development of wear gradients. The second premolar may also have a role in food cropping. In grazers, high absolute amounts of ingested abrasives may override other signals, leading to

  1. Abrasive drill for resilient materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Resilient materials normally present problem in obtaining accurate and uniform hole size and position. Tool is fabricated from stiff metal rod such as tungsten or carbon steel that has diameter slightly smaller than required hole. Piercing/centering point is ground on one end of rod. Rod is then plasma-sprayed (flame-sprayed) with suitable hard abrasive coating. High-speed, slow-feed operation of tool is necessary for accurate holes, and this can be done with drill press, hard drill, or similar machines.

  2. Fretting Wear of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lerch, Bradley A.; Draper, Susan L.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the wear behavior of gamma titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb in atomic percent) in contact with a typical nickel-base superalloy under repeated microscopic vibratory motion in air at temperatures from 296-823 K. The surface damage observed on the interacting surfaces of both Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and superalloy consisted of fracture pits, oxides, metallic debris, scratches, craters, plastic deformation, and cracks. The Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb transferred to the superalloy at all fretting conditions and caused scuffing or galling. The increasing rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures led to a drop in Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear at 473 K. Mild oxidative wear was observed at 473 K. However, fretting wear increased as the temperature was increased from 473-823 K. At 723 and 823 K, oxide disruption generated cracks, loose wear debris, and pits on the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear surface. Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear generally decreased with increasing fretting frequency. Both increasing slip amplitude and increasing load tended to produce more metallic wear debris, causing severe abrasive wear in the contacting metals. Keywords

  3. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  4. The effect of erosion and abrasion on surface properties of composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Munteanu, A.; Balan, A.; Iovan, G.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the surface roughness of two commercial composite resins submitted to erosive attack, to abrasive wear and to association of erosive and abrasive challenge. Standardized samples of G-snial anterior (GC Company) and Essentia (GC Company) composite resins were randomly split in 6 groups. In group 1 the samples were maintained in artificial saliva until the evaluation of surface roughness. In group 2 the samples were submitted only to erosive attack, in group 3 only to abrasive challenge and in groups 4,5, and 6 the erosive attack was followed by abrasive challenge immediately (group 4), 30 minutes after the erosive attack (group 5) and one hour after the erosive attack (group 6). The specimens were evaluated using surface roughness measuring tester SJ-210 (Mitutoyo Corporation, Japan) and the mean surface roughness values (Ra, μm) of each specimen were registered. A significantly increase of both composite resins surface roughness was recorded after erosive attack and abrasive challenge. Toothbrushing 60 minutes after acidic contact determined no significant differences in surface roughness of composite resins.

  5. Tooth wear: diet analysis and advice.

    PubMed

    Young, William George

    2005-04-01

    Diet analysis and advice for patients with tooth wear is potentially the most logical intervention to arrest attrition, erosion and abrasion. It is saliva that protects the teeth against corrosion by the acids which soften enamel and make it susceptible to wear. Thus the lifestyles and diet of patients at risk need to be analysed for sources of acid and reasons for lost salivary protection. Medical conditions which put patients at risk of tooth wear are principally: asthma, bulimia nervosa, caffeine addiction, diabetes mellitus, exercise dehydration, functional depression, gastroesophageal reflux in alcoholism, hypertension and syndromes with salivary hypofunction. The sources of acid are various, but loss of salivary protection is the common theme. In healthy young Australians, soft drinks are the main source of acid, and exercise dehydration the main reason for loss of salivary protection. In the medically compromised, diet acids and gastroesophageal reflux are the sources, but medications are the main reasons for lost salivary protection. Diet advice for patients with tooth wear must: promote a healthy lifestyle and diet strategy that conserves the teeth by natural means of salivary stimulation; and address the specific needs of the patients' oral and medical conditions. Individualised, patient-empowering erosion WATCH strategies; on Water, Acid, Taste, Calcium and Health, are urgently required to combat the emerging epidemic of tooth wear currently being experienced in westernised societies.

  6. Influence of Al Contents on the Microstructure, Mechanical, and Wear properties of Magnetron Sputtered CrAlN Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Hetal N.; Jayaganthan, R.

    2012-09-01

    CrAlN (0 < x < 0.1) coatings were deposited on SA304 substrate by a reactive magnetron sputtering. The microstructure and composition of the as-deposited coatings were systematically characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy/EDS and atomic force microscopy, and the phase formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The hardness of the coatings was investigated using nanoindentation, while wear properties were investigated using pin-on-disk tribometer. XRD study reveals that the deposited CrAlN coatings crystallized in the cubic B1 NaCl structure. The minimum and maximum hardness of the coatings are found to be 15.28 and 18.81 GPa, respectively. The COF and wear rate are found to be 0.48 and 2.25 × 10-5 mm3/N · m, which is lower than the CrN coatings deposited and characterized under the same environment (0.63 and 2.25 × 10-5 mm3/Nm).

  7. Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Low Friction, Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Bruce A; Harringa, J; Anderegg, A; Russell, A M; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in coating science and technology offer new opportunities to enhance the energy-efficiency and performance of industrial machinery such as hydraulic fluid pumps and motors. The lubricated friction and wear characteristics of two wear-resistant coatings, diamond-like carbon and a nanocomposite material based on AlMgB{sub 14}-50 vol.% TiB{sub 2}, were compared in pin-on-disk tribotests using Mobil DTE-24{trademark} oil as the lubricant. In each case, the pins were fixed 9.53 mm diameter spheres of AISI 52100 steel, the load was 10 N, and the speed 0.5 m/s in all tests. Average steady-state friction coefficient values of 0.10 and 0.08 were measured for the DLC and nanocomposite, respectively. The coatings and their 52100 steel counterfaces were analyzed after the tests by X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy for evidence of material transfer or tribo-chemical reactions. The low-friction behavior of the boride nanocomposite coating is due to the formation of lubricative boric acid, B(OH){sub 3}. In contrast, the low-friction behavior of the DLC coating is related to the relatively low dielectric constant of the oil-based lubricant, leading to desorption of surface hydrogen from the coating.

  8. Wear and friction properties of experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Serhii; Datskevich, Oleg; Kulak, Leonid; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their higher biocompatibility in comparison to other metallic biomaterials. However, they commonly contain aluminum and vanadium, whose ions may be detrimental to the nervous system. Furthermore, they suffer from poor wear resistance, which limits their applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of experimental Ti-1.25Si-5Zr, Ti-2.5Si-5Zr, Ti-6Si-5Zr and Ti-2.5Si-5Zr-0.2Pd alloys as compared to that of control Ti-6Al-4V, CoCr F75 and CoCr F799 alloys. Friction and wear tests were performed using a standard ball-on-disc rig in serum solution at ambient temperature with Si3N4-balls as counterparts. The alloys microstructure and hardness were investigated using optical microscopy, XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vickers indentation. The coefficients of friction of the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys were generally lower than the commercial ones with Ti-6Si-5Zr presenting the lowest value (approx. 0.1). Their wear rates were found to be 2-7 times lower than that of the commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy, but still higher than those of the CoCr alloys. SEM analysis of worn surfaces showed that abrasion was the predominant wear mechanism for all studied materials. Wear and friction were influenced by the formation and stability of transfer layers, and while commercial Ti-6Al-4V as well as the experimental Ti-Si-Zr alloys demonstrated extensive material transfer to the ceramic counterparts, the CoCr alloys did not show such material transfer.

  9. The study of ionic liquids and carbon nanotubes to reduce friction and wear in PS, PC and PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo Conesa, Cayetano

    Polymer nanocomposites obtained from nanophases such as carbon nanotubes represent one of the most important strategies in order to improve the mechanical properties of thermoplastic materials. The present work describes the use of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquids with the objective of reducing the friction coefficients and wear rates of polystyrene, polycarbonate and polymethylmethacrylate. New ionic nanofluids have been prepared and characterized from alkylimidazolium ionic liquids and single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes. When used as external lubricants of polycarbonate--stainless steel contacts, under the pin-on-disk configuration, these new nanofluids give rise to ultralow friction coefficients and negligible wear damage. New polystyrene, polycarbonate and polymethylmethacrylate matrix nanocomposites containing carbon nanotubes or ionic liquid-modified carbon nanotubes have been obtained and characterized. The wear resistance of the new nanocomposites has been determined by pin-on-disk tests, as a function of the dispersed nanophases. The resistance to abrasive wear of the polystyrene matrix nanocomposites has been determined by multiple scratch tests, as a function of the dispersed nanophases, the normal applied load and the manufacturing process.

  10. Lava Channel Formation during the 2001 Eruption on Mount Etna: Evidence for Mechanical Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlito, Carmelo; Siewert, Jens

    2006-01-01

    We report the direct observation of a peculiar lava channel that was formed near the base of a parasitic cone during the 2001 eruption on Mount Etna. Erosive processes by flowing lava are commonly attributed to thermal erosion. However, field evidence strongly suggests that models of thermal erosion cannot explain the formation of this channel. Here, we put forward the idea that the essential erosion mechanism was abrasive wear. By applying a simple model from tribology we demonstrate that the available data agree favorably with our hypothesis. Consequently, we propose that erosional processes resembling the wear phenomena in glacial erosion are possible in a volcanic environment.

  11. Lava channel formation during the 2001 eruption on Mount Etna: evidence for mechanical erosion.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Carmelo; Siewert, Jens

    2006-01-20

    We report the direct observation of a peculiar lava channel that was formed near the base of a parasitic cone during the 2001 eruption on Mount Etna. Erosive processes by flowing lava are commonly attributed to thermal erosion. However, field evidence strongly suggests that models of thermal erosion cannot explain the formation of this channel. Here, we put forward the idea that the essential erosion mechanism was abrasive wear. By applying a simple model from tribology we demonstrate that the available data agree favorably with our hypothesis. Consequently, we propose that erosional processes resembling the wear phenomena in glacial erosion are possible in a volcanic environment.

  12. Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Karsten H.; Karlsson, Stefan; Limbach, Rene; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance. PMID:26656260

  13. Microstructure and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based (Cr, Fe)7C3 Composite Coating Fabricated by PTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y. L.; Li, Z. G.

    2013-11-01

    Using Cr3C2 and Fe-CrNiBSi powder blends as raw materials, an α-Fe matrix composite coating reinforced by in situ (Cr, Fe)7C3 rods, with a thickness of about 3.6 mm, was fabricated on the surface of AISI A36 low carbon steel by means of plasma-transferred arc welding. The results of microstructural analysis show that in the coating, a large number of carbides, (Cr, Fe)7C3, in rod shape grow, and radiate around some half-dissolved Cr3C2 particles. The results of dry sliding wear tests at loads 100, 200, and 300 N show that the wear resistances of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating, respectively, are about 6.9, 14.9, and 17 times higher than that of nonreinforced pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating; the average value and fluctuation range of friction coefficient (FC) of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating are less than those of pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating; the main wear mechanisms of pure Fe-CrNiBSi alloy coating are ploughing, deformation, and adhesive wear, whereas those of (Cr, Fe)7C3-reinforced coating are microcutting, abrasive, and oxidation wear; the cracks on surfaces of (Cr, Fe)7C3 rods increased with the increasing loads; and the matrix α-Fe can prevent them from extending further in the composite coating.

  14. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  15. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Gorin, A.H.; Seals, R.D.

    1994-11-22

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  16. Ceramic-bonded abrasive grinding tools

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Gorin, Andrew H.; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-01-01

    Abrasive grains such as boron carbide, silicon carbide, alumina, diamond, cubic boron nitride, and mullite are combined with a cement primarily comprised of zinc oxide and a reactive liquid setting agent and solidified into abrasive grinding tools. Such grinding tools are particularly suitable for grinding and polishing stone, such as marble and granite.

  17. Investigation of the potential for using electrochemical technology to reduce drill bit wear

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Glowka, D.A.

    1982-02-01

    Recent work has shown that an important drill bit wear mechanism in aqueous environments is electrochemical in nature. The synergistic effects of corrosion and abrasion are responsible for a large percentage of bit wear in laboratory studies. It has been shown that measured wear rates can be reduced by factors of two to five with the application of a voltage potential which opposes and exceeds the galvanic potential generated by the corrosion cells existing downhole. The present study investigates the potential for applying this technique in the downhole environment. The results demonstrate that a downhole generator sub powered by drilling fluid is a possible electrical power source. Graphite is chosen as the optimal nonsacrificial anode material for this application. Steel is also shown to be a possible anode material, but the anode would be sacrificial in this case, requiring periodic replacement. The electrical power required to achieve the desired effect for 4-1/2 inch drill bit is determined to be on the order of one milliwatt. Additionally, up to 250 feet of 4 inch drill pipe could be protected from corrosion with power levels on the order of 150 milliwatts. These relatively low power levels suggest that dry cell batteries could alternatively be employed as the power source; however, the temperature limitations of commercially available batteries would have to be overcome for geothermal applications.

  18. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  19. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  20. An analysis of the physiologic parameters of intraoral wear: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Janyavula, Sridhar; Cakir, Deniz; Burgess, John O.

    2013-10-01

    This paper reviews the conditions of in vivo mastication and describes a novel method of measuring in vitro wear. Methods: parameters of intraoral wear are reviewed in this analysis, including chewing force, tooth sliding distance, food abrasivity, saliva lubrication, and antagonist properties. Results: clinical measurement of mastication forces indicates a range of normal forces between 20 and 140 N for a single molar. During the sliding phase of mastication, horizontal movement has been measured between 0.9 and 2.86 mm. In vivo wear occurs by three-body abrasion when food particles are interposed between teeth and by two-body abrasion after food clearance. Analysis of food particles used in wear testing reveals that food particles are softer than enamel and large enough to separate enamel and restoration surfaces and act as a solid lubricant. In two-body wear, saliva acts as a boundary lubricant with a viscosity of 3 cP. Enamel is the most relevant antagonist material for wear testing. The shape of a palatal cusp has been estimated as a 0.6 mm diameter ball and the hardest region of a tooth is its enamel surface. pH values and temperatures have been shown to range between 2-7 and 5-55 °C in intraoral fluids, respectively. These intraoral parameters have been used to modify the Alabama wear testing method.

  1. Investigation of the mechanical properties of FeNiCrMnSi high entropy alloy wear resistant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buluc, G.; Florea, I.; Chelariu, R.; Popescu, G.; Carcea, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigated microstructure, hardness and wear resistance for FeNiCrMnAl, high entropy alloy. The FeNiCrMnSi, high entropy alloy was elaborated in a medium induction furnace, by choosing the silicon, as an alliance element within the equi- atomic high entropy alloy, we managed to obtain a dendritic structure, the formation of intermetallic compounds or separated silicon. The medium hardness value of the investigated alloy was 948.33 HV and the medium value of the friction coefficient was 0.6655 in the first 20 seconds and 0.5425 for 1667 seconds. The volume loss of the high entropy alloy FeNiCrMnSi was 0.0557 mm3.

  2. The Effect of Friction Stir Processing by Stepped Tools on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of a Mg-Al-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, Seyed Mohammad; Jahromi, Seyed Ahmad Jenabali; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-10-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) which imposes severe plastic strains has been used as a solid-state process to refine the grain structure of a Mg-Al-Zn alloy and therefore to enhance the strength and wear resistance without significant reduction of ductility. The introduced stepped tools result in more uniform microstructure, and therefore higher mechanical properties, as well as enhanced wear resistance. More passes of FSP could lead to more uniform microstructure and finer grains. The grain size was reduced from above 40 µm to below 4 µm. The pin root hole defect is also reduced during FSP by the stepped tools especially by cylindrical one. Microhardness was increased more than two times compared with the as-received sample. The tensile strength and elongation are almost doubled after different conditions of FSP. Coefficient of friction is reduced to 1/13.3, and weight loss has been reduced to about 50% of initial values after friction stir processing. The obtained results also demonstrated the successful dynamic recrystallization during FSP.

  3. The Effect of Friction Stir Processing by Stepped Tools on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of a Mg-Al-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, Seyed Mohammad; Jahromi, Seyed Ahmad Jenabali; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-08-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) which imposes severe plastic strains has been used as a solid-state process to refine the grain structure of a Mg-Al-Zn alloy and therefore to enhance the strength and wear resistance without significant reduction of ductility. The introduced stepped tools result in more uniform microstructure, and therefore higher mechanical properties, as well as enhanced wear resistance. More passes of FSP could lead to more uniform microstructure and finer grains. The grain size was reduced from above 40 µm to below 4 µm. The pin root hole defect is also reduced during FSP by the stepped tools especially by cylindrical one. Microhardness was increased more than two times compared with the as-received sample. The tensile strength and elongation are almost doubled after different conditions of FSP. Coefficient of friction is reduced to 1/13.3, and weight loss has been reduced to about 50% of initial values after friction stir processing. The obtained results also demonstrated the successful dynamic recrystallization during FSP.

  4. AIBA as Free Radical Initiator for Abrasive-Free Polishing of Hard Disk Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Ren, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    In order to optimize the existing slurry for abrasive-free polishing (AFP) of a hard disk substrate, a water-soluble free radical initiator, 2,2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AIBA) was introduced into H2O2-based slurry in the present work. Polishing experiment results with AIBA in the H2O2 slurry indicate that the material removal rate (MRR) increases and the polished surface has a lower surface roughness. The mechanism of AIBA in AFP was investigated using electron spin-resonance spectroscopy and UV-Visible analysis, which showed that the concentration of hydroxyl radical (a stronger oxidizer than H2O2) in the slurry was enhanced in the present of AIBA. The structure of the film formed on the substrate surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, auger electron spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technology, showing that a looser and porous oxide film was found on the hard disk substrate surface when treated with the H2O2-AIBA slurry. Furthermore, potentiodynamic polarization tests show that the H2O2-AIBA slurry has a higher corrosion current density, implying that a fast dissolution reaction can occur on the substrate surface. Therefore, we can conclude that the stronger oxidation ability, loose oxide film on the substrate surface, and the higher corrosion-wear rate of the H2O2-AIBA slurry lead to the higher MRR.

  5. Cleaning power and abrasivity of European toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Wülknitz, P

    1997-11-01

    For 41 toothpastes available to European consumers in 1995, the cleaning efficacy was evaluated in comparison with abrasivity on dentin (RDA value). For cleaning power assessment, a modified pellicle cleaning ratio (PCR) measurement method was developed. The method is characterized by a five-day tea-staining procedure on bovine front teeth slabs on a rotating wheel, standardized brushing of the slabs in a V8 cross-brushing machine, and brightness measurement by a chromametric technique. All tested products were in accordance with the new DIN/ISO standard 11,609 for toothpastes in terms of dentin abrasivity. Not a single product exceeded an RDA value of 200. The majority of toothpastes (80%) had an RDA value below 100. Only three products surpassed the reference in cleaning power. Most products (73%) had a cleaning power (PCR value) between 20 and 80. The correlation between cleaning power and dentin abrasion was low (r = 0.66), which can be explained with the different influence on dentin and stains by factors like abrasive type, particle surface and size, as well as the chemical influence of other toothpaste ingredients. Some major trends could be shown on the basis of abrasive types. The ratio PCR to RDA was rather good in most silica-based toothpastes. A lower ratio was found in some products containing calcium carbonate or aluminum trihydrate as the only abrasive. The addition of other abrasives, such as polishing alumina, showed improved cleaning power. Some active ingredients, especially sequenstrants such as sodium tripolyphosphate or AHBP, also improve the PCR/RDA ratio by stain-dissolving action without being abrasive. The data for some special anti-stain products did not differ significantly from standard products. Compared with data measured in 1988, a general trend toward reduced abrasivity without loss of cleaning efficacy could be noticed on the European toothpaste market. This may be mostly due to the increased use of high-performance abrasives such

  6. Study on depth-related microstructure and wear property of rare earth nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Zhang, C. S.; Sun, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The quenched M50NiL steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 500 °C with rare earth (RE) addition. The RE nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel was removed stepwise (0 μm, 12 μm, 65 μm and 100 μm from the surface) and characterized using SEM equipped with EDS, XRD and microhardness tester respectively. Depth-related wear behavior of the RE nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel was investigated using pin-on-disk tribometer. The results show that the surface layer (0 μm from the surface) mainly consists of α‧N,C (expanded martensite), γ‧-Fe4(N,C), ɛ-Fe2-3(N,C) and a trace of Fe3O4 phase. The phase structure of the inner layers is single α‧N,C or α‧-Fe. There is a lower steady stage for all the depth-related friction coefficients of the layers due to the generation of the compact oxide film. The layer 12 μm from the surface has the lowest wear rate which is 2.4660 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1. The work hardening effect only occurred on the layer 100 μm from the surface. The wear mechanisms of the layers transformed from mild abrasive and oxidative wear (0 μm from the surface) to severe adhesive and oxidative wear (100 μm from the surface) due to different phase structures and hardness. The oxygen content of the wear scar increases as the flash temperature rises and the hardness decreases when the layer comes inwards. The highest wolfram content for the layer 65 μm from the surface results in the dual role of the wear mechanism and hardness.

  7. Predicted wear resistances of binary carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1986-11-01

    A mechanistic model of the tool wear process has been presented (B. M. Kramer and P. K. Judd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3, 2439 (1985)) that includes the effects of both the abrasion of the tool material by inclusions within the workpiece and the chemical dissolution of the tool material into the matrix of the workpiece. Machining tests have been run on steel with titanium carbide coated tooling and the resulting test data have been employed to produce a rough calibration of the proposed model. This model has been used to predict the wear resistances of the other group IV B carbides and of the (Ti,Hf)C system in the machining of steel.

  8. Surgery to improve contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Buckley, R J; Woodward, E G

    1991-04-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone that gives rise to contact lens related abrasions. These nebulae do not flatten when contact lens wear is discontinued. We describe a simple technique of superficial keratectomy to remove proud nebulae in which the resulting defect healed quickly under a therapeutic hydrogel lens. In all of the six cases described patients were able to resume contact lens wear within one month of the procedure. One case was lost to follow-up. Of the remaining five (follow-up 3-9 months), all achieved comfortable wearing times of 8 hours or more and visual acuities of 20/40 or better. One patient developed a recurrent epithelial defect that resolved on discontinuing lens wear for one week. Corneal transplantation was thus avoided. PMID:2049822

  9. Mechanical and tribological properties of the TiC-TiB2 composite coating deposited on 40Cr-steel by electro spark deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingming

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, TiC-TiB2 composite coating was deposited by electrical discharge hardening onto the surface of 40Cr steel with a TiC-TiB2 composite rod as electrode. The composite coating structure and phase compositions were characterized by SEM and XRD, the hardness and its distribution along coating were measured on micro-hardness machine. Wear resistance of composite coating was evaluated on MM-200 wear experiment machine. The results suggest that the major phases of the composite coating are TiB2, TiC and Fe3C. The micro hardness distribution along depth of composite coating is inhomogeneous, the micro hardness value of the composite coating is about 4 times of the substrate. The wear mechanism of 40Cr steel is mainly attributed to micro-cutting and adhesive wear, but the wear mechanism of composite coating is mainly attributed to micro-cutting, scratch and fatigue abrasion. The results show that the change of wear mechanism between the samples because of the hard particles and higher hardness of composite coating. Compared with the substrate, wear resistance of composite coating is 5 times higher than that of the substrate, friction coefficient of the coating decreased by 0.12-0.17 under the same wear environment. The erosion mechanism of the TiC-TiB2 composite coating is ploughing and cutting at low impact angles, but it failure in fatigue cracking and spalling at high impact angles.

  10. Refining the parameters of Archard's wear model for calculating wear of wheels applied for 25 t per axle freight wagons on Russian railways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidova, Alina; Orlova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the research is for a reasonable choice of wear coefficients for severe and mild phases in Archard's abrasive wear theory and friction coefficients for wheel flange and tread that correspond to conditions of Russian track for wheel profile wear modelling using dynamic models of wagons. This paper considers the gondola wagon on bogies model 18-9855 that are of the three-piece Barber S-2-R design. The wagon running test results on Experimental Loop Track in Scherbinka, the results of hardness measurements of wheel flange/tread and of wheel profile wear modelling are presented in this paper. In conclusion, a comparison of wheels wear of two freight wagons' bogies (with friction and elastic-friction links of wheel sets with side frames) on the basis of specified wear model was carried out.

  11. Tooth wear in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis): mesowear analysis classifies free-ranging specimens as browsers but captive ones as grazers.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Brasch, Juliane; Castell, Johanna C; Kaiser, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) mostly do not attain the longevity possible for this species and frequently have problems associated with low energy intake and fat storage mobilization. Abnormal tooth wear has been among the causes suggested as an underlying problem. This study utilizes a tooth wear scoring method ("mesowear") primarily used in paleobiology. This scoring method was applied to museum specimens of free-ranging (n=20) and captive (n=41) giraffes. The scoring system allows for the differentiation between attrition--(typical for browsers, as browse contains little abrasive silica) and abrasion--(typical for grazers, as grass contains abrasive silica) dominated tooth wear. The dental wear pattern of the free-ranging population is dominated by attrition, resembles that previously published for free-ranging giraffe, and clusters within browsing herbivores in comparative analysis. In contrast, the wear pattern of the captive population is dominated by abrasion and clusters among grazing herbivores in comparative analyses. A potential explanation for this difference in tooth wear is likely related to the content of abrasive elements in zoo diets. Silica content (measured as acid insoluble ash) is low in browse and alfalfa. However, grass hay and the majority of pelleted compound feeds contain higher amounts of silica. It can be speculated that the abnormal wear pattern in captivity compromises tooth function in captive giraffe, with deleterious long-term consequences.

  12. NK cells are necessary for recovery of corneal CD11c+ dendritic cells after epithelial abrasion injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms controlling CD11c(+) MHCII(+) DCs during corneal epithelial wound healing were investigated in a murine model of corneal abrasion. Selective depletion of NKp46(+) CD3- NK cells that normally migrate into the cornea after epithelial abrasion resulted in >85% reduction of the epithelial CD1...

  13. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  14. Considerations on the European Standard EN 14157 Test Methods: Abrasion Resistance of Natural Stones Used for Flooring in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Z.; Günes Yılmaz, N.; Goktan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, the Wide Wheel abrasion (WWA) test and the Böhme abrasion (BA) test are among the most widely used standard test methods for determining abrasion resistance of natural stones, the former being the reference test method in EN 14157 Standard. However, it is stated in the Annex-A (Informative) of EN 14157 Standard that very limited data are available to provide correlations between these two test methods. To be able to fill this gap, in this study, 25 different natural stones belonging to sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous groups were tested for their abrasion resistance as well as physico-mechanical properties. Also, for a better interpretation of abrasion resistance characteristics of the tested stone materials, relationships between abrasion resistance and physico-mechanical properties were statistically examined. A statistically significant linear correlation ( R 2 = 0.85; P value = 0.000) was established between the WWA test and the BA test, which could be used in practice for converting the measured abrasion resistance values from one testing method to another. It was also found that the correlation between these two test methods improved significantly ( R 2 = 0.93; P value = 0.001) when relatively high-porosity stone materials (porosity ≥1%) were separately evaluated. Both methods of abrasion resistance employed in the present study showed statistically significant linear correlations with uniaxial compressive strength and Brazilian tensile strength, the former proving to be a more influencing parameter on resistance to abrasion. Also, from the point view of representing actual abrasion mechanism of stone materials in practice, the necessity of simulating multi-directional foot traffic in abrasion testing methods was discussed. In this respect, the reference test method in the EN 14157 Standard was criticized for not fully meeting this requirement. It was also pointed out that the reference method could have some drawbacks when applied to coarse

  15. Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

    2013-04-23

    A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

  16. Wear transition of solid-solution-strengthened Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloys by interstitial oxygen for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken; Liu, Huihong

    2015-11-01

    In previous studies, it has been concluded that volume losses (V loss) of the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) discs and balls are larger than those of the respective Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) discs and balls, both in air and Ringer's solution. These results are related to severe subsurface deformation of TNTZ, which is caused by the lower resistance to plastic shearing of TNTZ than that of Ti64. Therefore, it is necessary to further increase the wear resistance of TNTZ to satisfy the requirements as a biomedical implant. From this viewpoint, interstitial oxygen was added to TNTZ to improve the plastic shear resistance via solid-solution strengthening. Thus, the wear behaviors of combinations comprised of a new titanium alloy, TNTZ with high oxygen content of 0.89 mass% (89O) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti64 were investigated in air and Ringer's solution for biomedical implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damage were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy and an electron probe microanalysis. V loss of the 89O discs and balls are smaller than those of the respective TNTZ discs and balls in both air and Ringer's solution. It can be concluded that the solid-solution strengthening by oxygen effectively improves the wear resistance for TNTZ materials. However, the 89O disc/ball combination still exhibits higher V loss than the Ti64 disc/ball combination in both air and Ringer's solution. Moreover, V loss of the disc for the 89O disc/Ti64 ball combination significantly decreases in Ringer's solution compared to that in air. This decrease for the 89O disc/Ti64 ball combination in Ringer's solution can be explained by the transition in the wear mechanism from severe delamination wear to abrasive wear.

  17. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  18. Forecasting of operational indicators of grinding tools with the controlled form and orientation of abrasive grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. A.; Minkin, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    The interconnection of the abrasive grain front angle parameter with the form, orientation and wear out parameters is investigated. The form of the abrasive grains was estimated by means of form coefficient which represents the relation of diameters of the spheres described around contours of grains, to diameters of the spheres entered in them. The spatial orientation angle of the abrasive grains was defined between main (i.e. the biggest) axis of the grains and the cutting plane. It is established that, depending on an orientation angle at increase in a form coefficient of the abrasive grains can be either an increase or a decrease in the values of their front angles. In most cases, with an increase in a form coefficient of the oriented grinding grains (at orientation angles Θ=10°÷125°) the growth of their front angles is fixed. At tangential orientation of grains (Θ=0°) and at the close directions of orientation (Θ=135°÷80°) the return picture is observed. Also established that the longer the abrasive grain wears along the main axis and located in the tool body, the larger is its front angle. Besides that, the front angles of the abrasive grains reach the maximum positive values at orientation angles Θ=22.5°÷45°.Dependence of tension in grains during the work with parameters of their form, orientation and depth of embedment in the bundle is investigated. It was found that for all orientation angles of grains their tension significantly increases with an increase in their form coefficient. Besides that it is confirmed that the deeper the grain is in the bundle, the lower the tension is there. Also found that tension is minimal when the grains are tangential orientated. Further on increase the option of the grains in the direction of action of the cutting force follows. Such option of orientation is the most rational both from the point of view of minimization of tension, and for ensuring rational sizes of front angles of the abrasive grains. The

  19. Systematic review of the prevalence of tooth wear in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kreulen, C M; Van 't Spijker, A; Rodriguez, J M; Bronkhorst, E M; Creugers, N H J; Bartlett, D W

    2010-01-01

    Data on the prevalence of tooth wear among children and adolescents are inconsistent. Given the impact of extensive tooth wear for over a lifetime, evidence on the extent is required. The aim was to systematically review the literature on the prevalence of tooth wear in children and adolescents. A PubMed literature search (1980-2008) used the keywords 'tooth' AND 'wear'; 'dental' AND 'attrition' AND 'prevalence'; 'dental' AND 'wear' AND 'prevalence'; 'erosion AND prevalence' AND 'abrasion AND prevalence'. Following exclusion criteria, 29 papers were reviewed using established review methods. There was a total of 45,186 subjects (smallest study 80 and largest study 17,047 subjects) examined from thirteen multiple random clusters, eight multiple convenience clusters and eight convenience clusters. Nine different tooth wear indices were used, but the common denominator among studies was dentin exposure as an indicator of severe wear. Forest plots indicated substantial heterogeneity of the included studies. Prevalence of wear involving dentin ranged from 0 to 82% for deciduous teeth in children up to 7 years; regression analysis showed age and wear to be significantly related. Most of the studies in the permanent dentition showed low dentin exposure, a few reported high prevalence (range 0-54%); age and wear were not related (regression analysis). The results of this systematic review indicate that the prevalence of tooth wear leading to dentin exposure in deciduous teeth increases with age. Increase in wear of permanent teeth with age in adolescents up to 18 years old was not substantiated.

  20. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  1. Surface-gradient cross-linked polyethylene acetabular cups: oxidation resistance and wear against smooth and rough femoral balls.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fu-Wen; McKellop, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Two methods were developed and evaluated for cross-linking the bearing surface of a polyethylene acetabular cup to a limited depth, in order to improve its resistance to wear without degrading the mechanical properties of the bulk of the component. In the first method, low-energy electron beams were used to cross-link only the bearing surface of the cups to a maximum depth of about 2 mm. The cups then were annealed at 100 degrees C in vacuum for 3 or 6 days to reduce the residual free radicals, and the resultant resistance to oxidation was compared by artificially aging the cups at 80 degrees C in air. Chemically cross-linked surface layers were produced by coating the bearing surfaces of the cups with a thin layer of polyethylene powder mixed with 1% weight peroxide, and compressing them at 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and 170 degrees C. This resulted in a cross-linked surface layer that extended about 3 mm deep, with a gradual transition to conventional (noncross-linked) polyethylene in the bulk of the implant. In hip simulator wear tests with highly polished (implant quality) femoral balls, both types of surface cross-linking were found to improve markedly the wear resistance of the acetabular cups. In tests with roughened femoral balls, the wear rates were much higher and were comparable to those obtained with similarly roughened balls against noncross-linked polyethylene cups in a previous study, indicating that the full benefit of cross-linking may not be realized under conditions of severe third-body abrasion. Nevertheless, these results show a promising approach for optimizing the wear resistance and the bulk mechanical properties of polyethylene components in total joint arthroplasty.

  2. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  3. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  4. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  5. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  6. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... mines. Silica sand or other materials containing more than 1 percent free silica shall not be used as...

  7. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  8. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  9. The effect of aluminum on the work hardening and wear resistance of hadfield manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, B. K.; Subramanyam, D. K.; Leslie, W. C.

    1987-09-01

    A study has been made of the work-hardening and wear resistance of aluminum-modified Hadfield manganese steels ranging in composition from 1.00 to 1.75 Pct carbon and from 0.0 to 4.0 Pct aluminum. Aluminum additions reduced carbon activity and diffusivity in austenites of Hadfield’s composition, increasing the metastable solubility of carbon in Hadfield steel. Aluminum additions inhibited mechanical twinning and, by inference, increased the stacking fault energy of austenite. Increasing carbon in solution in austenite expanded the temperature range over which dynamic strain aging and rapid work hardening occurred. Simultaneous aluminum additions and increased carbon content increased the work-hardening rate and high-stress abrasion resistance of Hadfield steel, but there was an optimum aluminum content beyond which both declined. Maximum work-hardening rate was exhibited by an alloy containing nominally 1.75 Pct C, 13.5 Pct Mn, and 1.3 Pct Al. Improved high-stress abrasion resistance was also found in an alloy containing nominally 1.00 Pct C, 13.5 Pct Mn, and 4.0 Pct Al.

  10. [The application of air abrasion in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Mandinić, Zoran; Vulićević, Zoran R; Beloica, Milos; Radović, Ivana; Mandić, Jelena; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip's size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist.

  11. Evaluation of wear rates and mechanisms of titanium diboride-graphite composite materials proposed for use as cathodes in Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Brimhall, J.L.; Raney, P.J.; Hart, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to measure the initial wear rates of TiB/sub 2/ carbon-containing cathode materials (TiB/sub 2/-G) under electrolytic conditions. Parameters evaluated included bath ratio, current density, and aluminum pad thickness. In order to measure initial wear rates, the tests were limited to 8 h.

  12. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups.

  14. Resistance of nanofill and nanohybrid resin composites to toothbrush abrasion with calcium carbonate slurry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Kyoizumi, Hideaki; Finger, Werner J; Kanehira, Masafumi; Endo, Tatsuo; Utterodt, Andreas; Hisamitsu, Hisashi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the wear of four nanofilled resin composites using simulated toothbrushing for 50,000 cycles with calcium carbonate slurry. The depth of abrasion and roughness (Ra) were measured after each 10,000 brushing cycle. The surface texture of the worn samples was examined by SEM.The wear depths of the nanofill Filtek Supreme XT (FIL), the nanohybrides Grandio (GRA), Tetric EvoCeram (TET), and Venus Diamond (VED) increased linearly with numbers of brushing cycles or approximately 80, 12, 600, and 60 mum, respectively after 50,000 strokes. Surface roughness showed virtually no change between 10,000 and 50,000 brushing cycles; the ranking order was TET < FIL < GRA < VED. FIL showed rather uniform abrasion with nanoclusters protruding from the surface. TET was very smoothly abraded without signs of debonding of the prepolymerized particles, whereas GRA and VED showed pronounced wear of the matrix polymer surrounding larger glass filler particles. PMID:20019422

  15. Abrasive resistance of metastable V-Cr-Mn-Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons using the factorial design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Shimizu, K.; Cheiliakh, A. P.; Pastukhova, T. V.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Kusumoto, K.

    2016-06-01

    Full factorial design was used to evaluate the two-body abrasive resistance of 3wt%C-4wt%Mn-1.5wt%Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons with varying vanadium (5.0wt%-10.0wt%) and chromium (up to 9.0wt%) contents. The alloys were quenched at 920°C. The regression equation of wear rate as a function of V and Cr contents was proposed. This regression equation shows that the wear rate decreases with increasing V content because of the growth of spheroidal VC carbide amount. Cr influences the overall response in a complex manner both by reducing the wear rate owing to eutectic carbides (M7C3) and by increasing the wear rate though stabilizing austenite to deformation-induced martensite transformation. This transformation is recognized as an important factor in increasing the abrasive response of the alloys. By analyzing the regression equation, the optimal content ranges are found to be 7.5wt%-10.0wt% for V and 2.5wt%-4.5wt% for Cr, which corresponds to the alloys containing 9vol%-15vol% spheroidal VC carbides, 8vol%-16vol% M7C3, and a metastable austenite/martensite matrix. The wear resistance is 1.9-2.3 times that of the traditional 12wt% V-13wt% Mn spheroidal carbide cast iron.

  16. Air abrasion: an old technology reborn.

    PubMed

    Berry, E A; Eakle, W S; Summitt, J B

    1999-08-01

    Recently, air abrasion has experienced a rebirth in restorative dentistry. Originally developed in the late 1940s, the principle of air abrasion is the imparting of kinetic energy to tiny aluminum oxide particles that are projected by a stream of compressed air or gas and expelled from a small nozzle. The force generated by the relatively hard particles striking a relatively hard surface is sufficient to cut into that surface. In the last decade, more than a dozen models of air abrasion units have been introduced into the marketplace and more are on the way. Manufacturers have developed air abrasion instruments that offer a broad range of features, from small table-top units to self-contained systems with compressors, vacuums, and curing lights. The costs range dramatically--from $1,000 to $20,000 or more--depending on the complexity of the features and attachments. Manufacturers make a variety of claims to support the value of this technology to the practicing dentist. A term often used to describe one of the benefits of air abrasion is microdentistry. The claim is that smaller, less invasive tooth preparations may be accomplished using air abrasion than with a traditional bur and air turbine. This may be true in some instances, but it would certainly depend on the operator's experience and ability to visually discern fine detail. Other claims about air abrasion are that it can be used to cut into tooth structure without local anesthesia and that it should be used on all stained grooves or fissures to determine if incipient carious lesions are present. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, the popularity of air abrasion continues to grow. To gain additional insight about these claims and to see what might be on the horizon for this technology, I spoke with three highly respected educators who are recognized for their expertise in air abrasion. What they said should give the reader a better understanding of how air abrasion might augment restorative

  17. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  18. Al-MoSi2 Composite Materials: Analysis of Microstructure, Sliding Wear, Solid Particle Erosion, and Aqueous Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gousia, V.; Tsioukis, A.; Lekatou, A.; Karantzalis, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this effort, AMCs reinforced with new intermetallic phases, were produced through casting and compared as far as their microstructure, sliding wear, solid particle erosion, and aqueous corrosion response. Casting was selected as a production method based on the concept: (a) ease-to-handle and low cost production route and (b) optimum homogeneity of the reinforcing phase distribution. The MoSi2 phase was produced through vacuum arc melting and the resulting drops were milled for 30 h to produce fine powder, the characteristics of which were ascertained through SEM-EDS and XRD analysis. MoSi2 was used as precursor source for the final reinforcing phase. The powder material was incorporated in molten Al1050 alloy to additions of 2, 5 and 10 vol.% respectively. Extensive reactivity between the molten Al and the MoSi2 particles was observed, leading to the formation of new reinforcing phases mainly of the Al-Mo system. In all cases, a uniform particle distribution was observed, mainly characterized by isolated intermetallic phases and few intermetallic phase clusters. Sliding wear showed a beneficial action of the reinforcing phase on the wear of the composites. Surface oxidation, plastic deformation, crack formation, and debris abrasive action were the main degradation features. The results of solid particle erosion showed that the mechanism is different as the impact angle and the vol.% change. Regarding the corrosion, the analysis revealed localized corrosion effects. The composite behavior was not altered significantly compared to that of the monolithic matrix.

  19. Nanoscale adhesion, friction and wear studies of biomolecules on silane polymer-coated silica and alumina-based surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Gupta, Samit; Lee, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins on biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS) confer specific molecular functionalities. In planar FET sensors (field-effect transistors, a class of devices whose protein-sensing capabilities we demonstrated in physiological buffers), interfacial proteins are analyte receptors, determining sensor molecular recognition specificity. Receptors are bound to the FET through a polymeric interface, and gross disruption of interfaces that removes a large percentage of receptors or inactivates large fractions of them diminishes sensor sensitivity. Sensitivity is also determined by the distance between the bound analyte and the semiconductor. Consequently, differential properties of surface polymers are design parameters for FET sensors. We compare thickness, surface roughness, adhesion, friction and wear properties of silane polymer layers bound to oxides (SiO2 and Al2O3, as on AlGaN HFETs). We compare those properties of the film–substrate pairs after an additional deposition of biotin and streptavidin. Adhesion between protein and device and interfacial friction properties affect FET reliability because these parameters affect wear resistance of interfaces to abrasive insult in vivo. Adhesion/friction determines the extent of stickage between the interface and tissue and interfacial resistance to mechanical damage. We document systematic, consistent differences in thickness and wear resistance of silane films that can be correlated with film chemistry and deposition procedures, providing guidance for rational interfacial design for planar AlGaN HFET sensors. PMID:18986962

  20. Novel in-situ longitudinal model for the study of dentifrices on dental erosion-abrasion.

    PubMed

    Hara, Anderson T; Barlow, Ashley P; Eckert, George J; Zero, Domenick T

    2014-04-01

    A novel longitudinal erosion-abrasion in-situ model was proposed. In an exploratory test (phase 1) toothbrushing effect was investigated using a parallel design, whereas in the main study (phases 1 + 2), a crossover design tested the effect of fluoride dentifrice. In phase 1, 16 subjects (n = 5-6 subjects per group) wore partial dentures with enamel specimens for 28 d and adhered to one of the following treatment regimens: regimen A, erosion only; regimen B, erosion + toothbrushing with fluoride-containing dentifrice [1,100 ppm of fluoride as sodium fluoride (NaF)]; and regimen C, erosion + toothbrushing with placebo dentifrice (0 ppm fluoride). Erosion consisted of the exposure of specimens to grapefruit juice. In regimens B and C, toothbrushing was performed with the test dentifrices 5 min after erosion. For the main study a second phase was carried out in which subjects initially treated with regimen B were treated with regimen C, and vice versa (crossover, n = 11), repeating the same experimental protocol. Enamel wear was measured by optical profilometry at baseline and every 7 d thereafter. In the exploratory test (phase 1), no significant differences were observed among regimens at any of the study time-points. In the main study (phases 1 + 2), higher enamel wear was observed for regimen C than for regimen B. A significant trend was observed for the increase of enamel wear over time. Fluoridated dentifrice reduced the development of erosive-abrasive lesions. The proposed longitudinal model provided adequate responses for erosion-abrasion frequency and fluoride effects.

  1. Effects of Jet Pressure on the Ground Surface Quality and CBN Wheel Wear in Grinding AISI 690 Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitouni, Ahmed; Chaieb, Iheb; Rhouma, Amir Ben; Fredj, Nabil Ben

    2016-09-01

    Fluid application in grinding is getting attention as higher stock removal rates, higher surface integrity and longer wheel life are required. It is necessary to define proper conditions of application for meeting high productivity goals by lowering the specific grinding energy and reducing the temperature of the contact zone. The present study investigated the capacity of the jet pressure of a spot nozzle to improve the wear of a CBN wheel when grinding the AISI 690 superalloy. Grinding experiments were conducted with an emulsion-type cooling fluid delivered at pressure ranging from 0.1 to 4 MPa. Results show that the maximum stock removal, reached at 4 MPa, is 5 times the stock removal obtained at 0.1 MPa, while the grinding ratio at 4 MPa is 8 times that at 0.1 MPa, and there is a critical pressure (P c) around 1.5 MPa corresponding to the minimum specific grinding energy. Scanning electron microscopy of the grain tips showed that the wear mechanism shifts from breaking and dislodgment at low jet pressure to micro-fracture resulting in continuous self-sharpening of the abrasive grains. By lubricating at jet pressure close to P c, there is less thermal damage due to plowing and sliding and the resulting lower loading of the abrasive grains favors the micro-fracture of grains and thus a longer wheel life.

  2. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  3. The Effect of Pleural Abrasion on the Treatment of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mo-yu; Cai, Shuang-qi; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural abrasion has been widely used to control the recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, controversy still exists regarding the advantages and disadvantages of pleural abrasion compared with other interventions in preventing the recurrence of PSP. Methods The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched up to December 15, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of pleural abrasion with those of other interventions in the treatment of PSP. The study outcomes included the PSP recurrence rate and the occurrence rate of adverse effects. Results Mechanical pleural abrasion and apical pleurectomy after thoracoscopic stapled bullectomy exhibited similarly persistent postoperative air leak occurrence rates (p = 0.978) and 1-year PSP recurrence rates (p = 0.821), whereas pleural abrasion led to reduced residual chest pain and discomfort (p = 0.001) and a smaller rate of hemothorax (p = 0.036) than did apical pleurectomy. However, the addition of minocycline pleurodesis to pleural abrasion did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with apical pleurectomy (3.8% for both procedures) but was associated with fewer complications. There was no statistical difference in the pneumothorax recurrence rate between mechanical pleural abrasion and chemical pleurodesis with minocycline on either an intention-to-treat basis (4 of 42 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.12; Fisher exact test) or after exclusions (2 of 40 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.24; Fisher exact test). Pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis also did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with pleural abrasion alone (p = 0.055). Moreover, pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis was associated with more intense acute chest pain. The postoperative overall recurrence rate in patients who underwent staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue was similar to that

  4. Abrasion resistance of medical glove materials.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Donna L; Schwerin, Matthew R; Kisielewski, Richard W; Kotz, Richard M; Chaput, Maria P; Varney, George W; To, Theresa M

    2004-01-15

    Due to the increasing demand for nonlatex medical gloves in the health-care community, there is a need to assess the durability of alternative glove materials. This study examines durability characteristics of various glove materials by abrasion resistance testing. Natural rubber latex (latex), polyvinyl chloride (vinyl), acrylonitrile butadiene (nitrile), polychloroprene (neoprene), and a styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were tested. All test specimens, with the exception of the vinyl, were obtained from surgical gloves. Unaged out-of-the-box specimens as well as those subjected to various degrees of artificial aging were included in the study. After the abrasion sequence, the barrier integrity of the material was assessed through the use of a static leak test. Other traditional tests performed on these materials were viral penetration to validate the abrasion data and tear testing for comparative purposes. The results indicate that specific glove-material performance is dependent upon the particular test under consideration. Most notably, abrasion, even in controlled nonsevere conditions, may compromise to varying degrees the barrier integrity of latex, vinyl, SEBS, nitrile, and neoprene glove materials. However, as evidenced by the results of testing three brands of neoprene gloves, the abrasion resistance of any one glove material may be significantly affected by variations in production processes. PMID:14689500

  5. Wear simulation effects on overdenture stud attachments.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate wear effects on overdenture resilient attachments. Six commercially available attachments were investigated: ERA orange and white (EO and EW), Locator pink, white and blue (LRP, LRW and LRB) and OP anchor (OP). Five specimens were used for wear simulation while other two specimens served as controls. Fifteen thousands insertion-removal cycles were simulated. Dimensional changes and surface characteristics were evaluated using light microscopy and SEM, respectively. Sudden decrease of retentive force was characteristic for EO and EW attachments. Retentive force of Locator attachments fluctuated throughout the wear simulation period. Dimensional changes and surface wear was more expressed on plastic cores than on plastic rings of attachment males. Based on SEM analysis, some of the specimens obtained smoother surface after wear simulation. Mechanism of retention loss of resilient overdenture attachments can be only partially explained by dimensional changes and surface alterations.

  6. The impact of the bead width on the properties of the anti-abrasion surfacing weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beczkowski, Robert; Gucwa, Marek; Wróbel, Joanna; Kulawik, Adam

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the results of research on the anti-abrasion surfacing welds designated to operate under wear conditions. The main purpose of the work was to produce single-layer surface welds by means of semi-automatic hard-facing/surface welding with the use of filler material containing carbide precipitate and with the use of 10mm- and 20mm- wide beads. The samples were subject to visual and penetrant testing and to destructive testing in the form of macro and micro metallographic testing, hardness testing and bend testing with a view to determine the effect which the beads of various widths have on the analysed factors.

  7. Effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, mechanical and wear behaviors of AISI H13 hot work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneshlou, Mahdi; Meshinchi Asl, Kaveh; Khomamizadeh, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of low temperature (subzero) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of H13 hot work tool steel. Cryogenic treatment at -72 °C and deep cryogenic treatment at -196 °C were applied and it was found that by applying the subzero treatments, the retained austenite was transformed to martensite. As the temperature was decreased more retained austenite was transformed to martensite and it also led to smaller and more uniform martensite laths distributed in the microstructure. The deep cryogenic treatment also resulted in precipitation of more uniform and very fine carbide particles. The microstructural modification resulted in a significant improvement on the mechanical properties of the H13 tool steel.

  8. Slurry Erosion Characteristics and Erosive Wear Mechanisms of Co-Based and Ni-Based Coatings Formed by Laser Surface Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamurthy, R. C.; Kamaraj, M.; Nagarajan, R.; Shariff, S. M.; Padmanabham, G.

    2010-02-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the slurry erosion properties and operating erosive wear mechanisms of Co-based Stellite 6 and Ni-based Colmonoy 88 coatings, and also to list the conditions at which maximum and minimum erosion rates occur. Laser surface alloying (LSA) has been done on 13Cr-4Ni steels with commercial Co-based Stellite 6 and Ni-based Colmonoy 88 powders. Slurry erosion tests have been conducted on LSA-modified steels for a constant slurry velocity of 12 m/s and for a fixed slurry concentration of 10 kg/m3 of irregular, sharp-edged SiO2 particles with average sizes of 375 and 100 μm and at impingement angles of 30, 45, 60, and 90 deg. A mixed (neither ductile nor brittle) mode of erosion behavior for Stellite 6 coatings and a brittle mode of erosion behavior for Colmonoy 88 coatings were observed when these materials were impacted with particles with an average size of 375 μm, whereas only a brittle mode of erosion was observed for both Stellite 6 and Colmonoy 88 coatings when impacted with particles with an average size of 100 μm. Mainly, chip formation, chip fracture, microcutting, plowing, and crater lip and platelet formation were observed for Stellite 6 coatings and progressive fracture of carbides, carbide pullout and carbide/boride intact were observed for the case of Colmonoy 88 coatings.

  9. Friction and wear characteristics of iron-chromium alloys in contact with themselves and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-chromium alloys in contact with (1) themselves, (2) single crystal silicon carbide disks, and (3) single crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide. Results indicate the coefficients of friction for the alloys sliding against themselves are between those for pure iron and pure chromium, and are only slightly different with 1, 5, 9, 14, and 19 weight percent chromium in iron. The wear is due, primarily, to shearing, or tearing fracture, of the cohesive bonds in the bulk metal and plowing of the bulk by lumps of wear debris. There are only slight differences in the coefficients of friction for the various alloys when sliding on silicon carbide. The coefficient of friction for the alloys are higher than those for pure iron and pure chromium. Alloy hardening observed in the alloys plays a dominant role in controlling the abrasive friction and wear behavior of the alloys.

  10. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  11. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  12. Effect of NiCr Clad BaF2·CaF2 Addition on Wear Performance of Plasma Sprayed Chromium Carbide-Nichrome Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lingzhong; Huang, Chuanbing; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Jingmin; Liu, Wei

    2010-03-01

    NiCr clad BaF2·CaF2 fluoride eutectic powders were added into chromium carbide-nichrome feedstock to improve the tribological properties of NiCr-Cr3C2 coating, and the structures, mechanical, and ball-on-disk sliding wear performance of the coating were characterized. The results show that NiCr cladding can effectively decrease the density and thermophysical difference between the feedstock components, while alleviate the decarburization and oxidization of the constituent phases, and form the coating with a uniform and dense microstructure. However, the addition of BaF2·CaF2 has a negative effect on mechanical properties of the coating. When the temperature reaches 500 °C, the BaF2·CaF2 eutectic is soften by the heat and smeared by the counterpart, thus the low shear stress lubricating film forms between the contact surface, that improves the tribological properties dramatically. At this temperature, the dominant wear mechanisms also change from splats spallation and abrasive wear at room temperature to plastic deformation and plawing by the counterpart. Within the temperature range from 600 to 800 °C, the friction coefficient, the wear rates of NiCr/Cr3C2-10% BaF2·CaF2 coating and its coupled Si3N4 ball are 20%, 40%, and 75% lower than those of the NiCr/Cr3C2 coating, respectively. The NiCr/Cr3C2-BaF2·CaF2 coating shows superior wear performance to the NiCr/Cr3C2 coating without lubricant additive.

  13. Toothbrushing after an erosive attack: will waiting avoid tooth wear?

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Lussi, Jonas; Carvalho, Thiago S; Cvikl, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if storage for up to 4 h in human saliva results in a decrease of erosive tooth wear (ETW) and in an increase of surface microhardness (SMH) of enamel samples after an erosive attack with subsequent abrasion. Furthermore, we determined the impact of individual salivary parameters on ETW and SMH. Enamel samples were distributed into five groups: group 1 had neither erosion nor saliva treatment; groups 2-5 were treated with erosion, then group 2 was placed in a humid chamber and groups 3-5 were incubated in saliva for 30 min, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively. After erosion and saliva treatments, all groups were treated with abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW were measured before and after erosion, incubation in saliva, and abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW showed significant changes throughout the experiment: SMH decreased and ETW increased in groups 2-5, regardless of the length of incubation in saliva. The results of groups 3-5 (exposed to saliva) were not significantly different from those of group 2 (not exposed to saliva). Exposure of eroded enamel to saliva for up to 4 h was not able to increase SMH or reduce ETW. However, additional experiments with artificial saliva without proteins showed protection from erosive tooth wear. The recommendation to postpone toothbrushing of enamel after an erosive attack should be reconsidered.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of wear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hualiang

    Wear has been recognized as a vital problem in many industries. It results in a loss of durability, reliability, and efficiency and costs tens of billions of dollars annually. Significant effort has been devoted in both experimental and theoretical studies. However, the mechanisms of wear are still poorly understood and therefore wear control is far behind its demand. One way to study wear process is via computer simulation, which has become more powerful with the rapid development in computer facilities and efficient algorithms. It allows observation of atomic scale deformation and therefore it is a very good tool to study wear mechanisms at the nano-scale. This study presents a series of molecular dynamic simulation of some nano-scale wear processes, such as indentation and plowing, with the goal of exploring the factors that affect wear and predicting wear for different conditions. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out on a system that includes an aluminum substrate and a hard tip. Embedded atom method (EAM) and Lennard-Jones potentials were used to describe interactions between atoms. For nano-indentation simulations, both constant indent force and constant loading speed were applied to study the wear mechanisms as well as material properties. Some phenomenon, such as jump-to-contact, local melting, and dislocation nucleation were observed. More importantly, the effects of system temperature, indent force, substrate orientation, tip-substrate bond, indenter shape, boundary condition, and defect concentrations of the substrate were systematically investigated during indentation. The results are in qualitative agreement with limited experimental data. Similar simulations were carried out for plowing. The effects of plowing force, substrate orientation, the tip-substrate bond, and alloy elements are discussed based on the simulation results. In addition, a simple analytic model of plowing behavior is provided. The model reveals two parameters, static

  15. Wear characteristics of bonded solid film lubricant under high load condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiraoka, Naofumi; Sasaki, Akira; Kawashima, Noritsugu; Honda, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Wear properties of phenolic resin bonded molybdenum disulfide film lubricant were studied. In-vacuo journal bearing tests were performed to evaluate the wear-life of this film lubricant. The wear-life depends on substrate materials and on sliding velocity. Pretreated substrate surfaces were examined to reveal the reasons for these results. Additionally, investigations on film wear mechanisms were made.

  16. The Comparative Effect of Sugarcane Juice on the Abrasion-Corrosion Behavior of Fe-Cr-B Electric Arc Sprayed and Fe-Cr-C Weld Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Vernon E.

    2012-02-01

    Abrasion-corrosion tests were conducted on two commonly Fe-Cr-C shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) hardfacings used in the sugar industry and an arc sprayed Fe-Cr-based coating. The tests were performed on a modified block-on-ring tester with the coatings sliding against compressed sugarcane fiber in the presence of abrasive slurry. The findings showed that, in the presence of sugarcane juice and sand slurry, the SMAW coatings had similar wear performance while the abrasive wear of the arc-sprayed coating was superior to the SMAW coatings. In the presence of a neutral solution, the material loss from the arc-sprayed coating was similar to that obtained in the sugarcane juice while the SMAW coatings showed a marked decrease; this demonstrated that the arc-sprayed coating was more desirable in an abrasive-corrosion environment. The study also showed that the resistance to material does not follow the expected trend, in which wear resistance increases with increasing hardness.

  17. Investigation of machining damage and tool wear resulting from drilling powder metal aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the cutting of aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) parts for the North Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The parts, an aluminum powder metal formulation, were supplied by Sinter Metals Inc., of Conover, North Carolina. The intended use of the alloy is for automotive components. Machining tests were conducted at Y-12 in the machine shop of the Skills Demonstration Center in Building 9737. Testing was done on June 2 and June 3, 1997. The powder metal alloy tested is very abrasive and tends to wear craters and produce erosion effects on the chip washed face of the drills used. It also resulted in huge amounts of flank wear and degraded performance on the part of most drills. Anti-wear coatings on drills seemed to have an effect. Drills with the coating showed less wear for the same amount of cutting. The usefulness of coolants and lubricants in reducing tool wear and chipping/breakout was not investigated.

  18. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing... that contains an abrasive material, such as silica pumice, intended to remove debris from the...

  1. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  2. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  3. Early abrasion of outer silicone insulation after intracardiac lead friction in a patient with cardiac device-related infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, Andrej; Małecka, Barbara; Kołodzińska, Agnieszka; Maziarz, Andrej; Lelakowski, Jacek; Kutarski, Andrej

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a 76-year-old woman on a permanent pacing device, with early abrasion of silicone endocardial lead insulations complicated by lead-dependent infective endocarditis 13 months after placement of an implantable pulse generator. The leads were removed using transvenous technique with direct traction, and with no additional tools. In the previous report, a set of additional tools was used, and therefore intraoperative endocardial lead abrasions or mechanical damage of leads could have not been excluded. The present case undoubtedly proves that the friction of leads against each other may result in abrasions of insulation of the intracardiac section of the lead.

  4. Tribological and Mechanical Behaviors of Polyamide 6/Glass Fiber Composite Filled with Various Solid Lubricants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duxin; Xie, Ying; Li, Wenjuan; You, Yilan; Deng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), graphite, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and their compounds on mechanical and tribological properties of glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6/GF) were studied. The polymeric materials were blended using twin-screw extruder and subsequently injection molded for test samples. Mechanical properties were investigated in terms of hardness, tensile strength, and impact strength. Friction and wear experiments were run under ambient conditions at a rotating speed of 200 rpm and load of 100 N. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were also observed with scanning electron microscope. The results showed that graphite could increase the tensile strength of PA6/GF-15 composite, but the material became soft. Graphite/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were effective in increasing the already high impact strength of PA6/GF-15 composite. 5% PTFE gave the maximum reduction in the coefficient of friction. However, PTFE/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were the best choice for improving both friction and wear behaviors due to the lower friction coefficient and mass wear rate. Moreover, the worn surface of PA6 composites revealed that adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and fatigue wear occurred in this study. PMID:23766687

  5. Tribological and mechanical behaviors of polyamide 6/glass fiber composite filled with various solid lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, Duxin; Xie, Ying; Li, Wenjuan; You, Yilan; Deng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), graphite, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and their compounds on mechanical and tribological properties of glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6/GF) were studied. The polymeric materials were blended using twin-screw extruder and subsequently injection molded for test samples. Mechanical properties were investigated in terms of hardness, tensile strength, and impact strength. Friction and wear experiments were run under ambient conditions at a rotating speed of 200 rpm and load of 100 N. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were also observed with scanning electron microscope. The results showed that graphite could increase the tensile strength of PA6/GF-15 composite, but the material became soft. Graphite/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were effective in increasing the already high impact strength of PA6/GF-15 composite. 5% PTFE gave the maximum reduction in the coefficient of friction. However, PTFE/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were the best choice for improving both friction and wear behaviors due to the lower friction coefficient and mass wear rate. Moreover, the worn surface of PA6 composites revealed that adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and fatigue wear occurred in this study. PMID:23766687

  6. Tribological and mechanical behaviors of polyamide 6/glass fiber composite filled with various solid lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, Duxin; Xie, Ying; Li, Wenjuan; You, Yilan; Deng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), graphite, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and their compounds on mechanical and tribological properties of glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6/GF) were studied. The polymeric materials were blended using twin-screw extruder and subsequently injection molded for test samples. Mechanical properties were investigated in terms of hardness, tensile strength, and impact strength. Friction and wear experiments were run under ambient conditions at a rotating speed of 200 rpm and load of 100 N. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were also observed with scanning electron microscope. The results showed that graphite could increase the tensile strength of PA6/GF-15 composite, but the material became soft. Graphite/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were effective in increasing the already high impact strength of PA6/GF-15 composite. 5% PTFE gave the maximum reduction in the coefficient of friction. However, PTFE/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were the best choice for improving both friction and wear behaviors due to the lower friction coefficient and mass wear rate. Moreover, the worn surface of PA6 composites revealed that adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and fatigue wear occurred in this study.

  7. 29 CFR 1915.134 - Abrasive wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeded. (j) All employees using abrasive wheels shall be protected by eye protection equipment in accordance with the requirements of subpart I of this part except when adequate eye protection is afforded by eye shields which are permanently attached to the bench or floor stand....

  8. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  9. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  10. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  11. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  12. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with the miner outside the device. (b) Underground areas of underground mines. Silica sand or...

  13. Effect of Toothpastes with Different Abrasives on Eroded Human Enamel: An in situ/ex vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Meire Coelho; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Vieirac, Ricardo de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the abrasive effect of CaCO3 and SiO2-based fluoride-free experimental toothpastes on eroded human permanent dental enamel and evaluate the effectiveness of waiting periods between acid exposure and tooth brushing. Twelve volunteers wore palatal appliances containing human enamel blocks for two periods of five days each. The appliances were immersed in a soft drink for five minutes four times a day (9:00 am, 11:00 am, 2:00 pm and 4:00 pm). On two occasions, two blocks were not submitted to additional treatment; two blocks were brushed (30 s) either with a CaCO3 or SiO2 toothpaste immediately after erosion and two blocks were brushed 1 h after erosion. Thus, the sample was divided into six groups: erosion alone (CaCO3 and SiO2 control); brushing with fluoride-free toothpaste (CaCO3 immediate and 1 h after erosion; SiO2 immediate and 1 h after erosion). Significant differences in wear depth were found between the enamel blocks in the CaCO3 immediate and 1 h after erosion groups and the blocks in the CaCO3 control group (p=0.001; p=0.022). No significant differences were found regarding the change in roughness and wear depth between blocks submitted to immediate abrasion and 1 h after erosion (CaCO3 and SiO2). The data revealed that surface roughness and wear depth is increased when erosion is combined with dental abrasion, regardless of the abrasive used. Waiting for 1 h to brush the eroded blocks offered no protective effect. PMID:24198851

  14. The effects of peroxide content on the wear behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of peroxide crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene used in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rizwan M

    2008-06-01

    The wear of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular components and wear debris induced osteolysis are the major causes of failure in total hip replacements. Crosslinking has been shown to improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE by producing a network structure, resisting the plastic deformation of the surface layer. In this study organic peroxides were used to crosslink two different types of UHMWPE resins, using hot isostatic pressing as the processing method. The effects of peroxide content on the different properties were investigated, along with the effect of the crosslink density on the wear behavior. An increase in peroxide content decreases the melting point and the degree of crystallinity, which results in a decrease in the yield strength. The ultimate tensile strength remains essentially unchanged. The molecular weight between crosslinks decreases with an increase in the peroxide content and reaches a saturation limit at around 0.3-0.5 weight percent peroxide, its value at the saturation limit is a function of the virgin resin used for processing. The wear rate decreases linearly with the increase in crosslink density. PMID:18219557

  15. Friction and Wear Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3-13 wt.%TiO2 Coatings Under the Lubrication of Liquid Paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqin; An, Yulong; Hou, Guoliang; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2014-04-01

    Two types of ceramic composite coatings (denoted as N-AT13 coating and M-AT13 coating) were fabricated on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate from ultra-fine and coarse Al2O3-13%TiO2 feedstocks by air plasma spraying. The friction and wear behavior of as-prepared coatings sliding against Al2O3 and stainless steel balls under the lubrication of liquid paraffin was evaluated with an SRV friction and wear tester (Optimol, Germany). The fractured and worn surfaces of the coatings were observed using a scanning electron microscope and a field-emission scanning electron microscope; and the wear mechanisms of the coatings were discussed based on scanning electron microscopic analysis and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. Results show that N-AT13 coating possesses a unique microstructure and strong inter-splat bonding, thereby showing increased microhardness and bonding strength as well as much better friction-reduction and wear resistance than M-AT13 coating. Moreover, there exist differences in the wear mechanisms of N-AT13 and M-AT13 coatings which slide against ceramic and stainless steel balls under the lubrication of liquid paraffin. Namely, with the increase of normal load, the burnishing of N-AT13 coating coupled with Al2O3 ball is gradually transformed to grain-abrasion and deformation, while M-AT13 coating is dominated by grain-pullout and brittle fracture in the whole range of tested normal load.

  16. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.303 - Abrasive wheels and tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abrasive wheels and tools. 1926.303 Section 1926.303 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Tools-Hand and Power § 1926.303 Abrasive wheels... Institute, B7.1-1970, Safety Code for the Use, Care and Protection of Abrasive Wheels, and paragraph (d)...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abrasive device and accessories. 872.6010 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories. (a) Identification. An abrasive device and accessories is a device constructed of various...

  1. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  2. Fret wear mediation of NIRCam filter wheel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privári, Béla I.

    2011-10-01

    We will discuss a fret wear solution developed for the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam filter wheel assembly by implementation of a hard coating. With mechanisms and structures designed for space flight application, titanium is often selected as the choice material of construction. Titanium offers a low-density high strength material that is good for use with many optical instruments due to its' favorable thermal properties. An important factor to consider with titanium mechanisms and structures are component fits and the vibration environment that must be survived during launch. In many instances, small (slip) fits between titanium components can cause fret wear during launch induced vibration. Titanium is particularly susceptible to fret wear, although other materials also demonstrate the fret wear. Fretting is adhesive failure of a material that experiences impact and micro-slip with an adjacent part. The mechanism of fret wear involves small particles that are pulled from the surface of parts that turn into hard oxides that further accelerate the wear between the parts. To mitigate fret wear, the mechanism or structure can be designed to eliminate all slip fits altogether, lubricants may be added to the wear surfaces or hard coatings can be applied to the wear surfaces when the other approaches are not feasible. For the NIRCam filter wheel assembly, which must operate at 35K and remain optically clean, only hard coatings are feasible. A discussion of several coating alternatives and associated wear testing will be presented along with the selection of an optimal solution.

  3. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  4. ADVANCED ABRASION RESISTANT MATERIALS FOR MINING

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.

    2004-04-08

    The high-density infrared (HDI) transient-liquid coating (TLC) process was successfully developed and demonstrated excellent, enhanced (5 times higher than the current material and process) wear performance for the selected functionally graded material (FGM) coatings under laboratory simulated, in-service conditions. The mating steel component exhibited a wear rate improvement of approximately one and a half (1.5) times. After 8000 cycles of wear testing, the full-scale component testing demonstrated that the coating integrity was still excellent. Little or no spalling was observed to occur.

  5. Advance Abrasion Resistant Materials for Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.

    2004-06-01

    The high-density infrared (HDI) transient-liquid coating (TLC) process was successfully developed and demonstrated excellent, enhanced (5 times higher than the current material and process) wear performance for the selected functionally graded material (FGM) coatings under laboratory simulated, in-service conditions. The mating steel component exhibited a wear rate improvement of approximately one and a half (1.5) times. After 8000 cycles of. wear testing, the full-scale component testing demonstrated that the coating integrity was still excellent. Little or no spalling was observed to occur.

  6. Effect of Compaction Load and Sintering Temperature on Tribological and Mechanical Behavior of Ni/SiC/MoS2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-04-01

    In the present investigation, the effects of compaction load and sintering temperature on the tribological and mechanical behavior of Ni/20%SiC/7%MoS2 hybrid composites was studied. The density, compression strength, and hardness of the composites were evaluated and compared. The wear properties of the composites were evaluated for the test condition of 1 m/s speed and 10 N load using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The braking performance of the composites was evaluated in a subscale dynamometer for the 500 kJ energy condition. The microstructure and wear surface morphology of the composites were analyzed by stereo, optical, and scanning electron microscopes. From the results, the following important conclusions are drawn: (1) the compaction load of 1400 kN and sintering temperature of 900 °C are optimum to obtain the best combination of tribological and mechanical properties; (2) the properties such as density, compression strength, hardness, wear, and friction increase up to a critical sintering temperature, and then decrease later; (3) the composition and thickness of the interface reaction product phases (Ni2Si, Ni3Si, and graphite) play a key role in deciding the strength of Ni/SiC interface that consequently affects the mechanical and tribological properties of the composites; (4) the abrasive wear is found to be the main wear mechanism in the highly densified composites, whereas the delamination wear and the third-body wear are major wear mechanisms in the poorly densified composites; and (5) the better braking performance of the highly densified composites is attributed to the absence of third-body wear, controlled flow of solid lubricant, and lower porosity.

  7. Tungsten solution kinetics and amorphization of nickel in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aning, A. O.; Wang, Z.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of solution of W, and the subsequent amorphization of Ni, in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys has been investigated. As W is a highly abrasive material in the energy intensive devices used for mechanical alloying, we studied the above reactions in different mills. One used hardened steel balls as the grinding media, and the other Al2O3. Abrasion is common to both mills, but Fe wear debris from the hardened steel enters into solution in the Ni rich phases whereas Al2O3 debris is present as small dispersoids. The kinetics of W solution and those of subsequent amorphization do not appear strongly affected by the Fe in solution or the Al2O3 dispersoid. Tungsten dissolves in crystalline Ni in amounts in excess of the equilibrium solubility during alloying. Amorphization of the Ni phase occurs if the W content in this phase exceeds ca. 28 at. pct.

  8. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation. PMID:27305512

  9. Simplified Abrasion Test Methodology for Candidate EVA Glove Lay-Ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabel, Emily; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, space suit outer-layer fabrics were badly abraded after performing just a few extravehicular activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots that penetrated the outer-layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than 8 hrs of surface operations. Current plans for the exploration planetary space suits require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on a lunar or Martian surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last 40 years and improve on the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo Program. Over the past 25 years the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division has focused on tumble testing as means of simulating wear on the outer layer of the space suit fabric. Most recently, in 2009, testing was performed on 4 different candidate outer layers to gather baseline data for future use in design of planetary space suit outer layers. In support of the High Performance EVA Glove Element of the Next Generation Life Support Project, testing a new configuration was recently attempted in which require 10% of the fabric per replicate of that need in 2009. The smaller fabric samples allowed for reduced per sample cost and flexibility to test small samples from manufacturers without the overhead to have a production run completed. Data collected from this iteration was compared to that taken in 2009 to validate the new test method. In addition the method also evaluated the fabrics and fabric layups used in a prototype thermal micrometeoroid garment (TMG) developed for EVA gloves under the NASA High Performance EVA Glove Project. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, results of the validation study, and results of the TMG testing.

  10. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation.

  11. Metal nitride coatings by physical vapor deposition (PVD) for a wear resistant aluminum extrusion die.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Young; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the friction and wear behaviors of CrN, TiN, CrAlN, and TiAIN coated onto SKD61 for application to Al 7000 series extrusion dies. On the wear test, the experimental parameters are the load and the counter material's temperature. The results showed that the friction coefficient increased with load but decreased with the counter material's temperature, and the friction coefficients of CrN and CrAIN were lower than the friction coefficients of TiAIN and TIN, especially at a higher temperature. The wear track with different coatings identified different wear behaviors; the wear behavior of CrAIN was found to be abrasive, but the wear behavior of TiN, CrN, and TiAIN was adhesive. Therefore, CrAIN showed the least wear loss with a lower friction coefficient and less adhesion with counter materials at the highest range of wear load and temperature. This resulted in the easy formation of aluminum oxide in the wear track and less Al adhesion; moreover during the hard second phase, AIN dispersed in the film during deposition.

  12. Sliding wear resistance of epoxy polymers against stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, G.M.; Dimovski, L.; Samandi, M.

    1993-12-31

    The wear mechanisms occurring during sliding contact between epoxy resins and a smooth steel counterface have been investigated. The samples were prepared from a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy and cured with various hardeners. The cured resins displayed a wide range of mechanical properties (particularly fracture toughness), and crosslink densities. The wear rates of the samples were found to vary by up to four orders of magnitude. It was found that the wear rates correlated to the inverse of the fracture toughness, which was in accord with previous studies on the wear of plastics by Omar et al. The mechanism was found to involve an ``adhesive/fatigue`` process, as proposed by Omar. Additionally, it was found that the addition of a rubber toughening agent had no effect on the wear rate, whilst sliding contact between polymer and polymer resulted in a much higher rate of wear. Possible explanations for this behavior are given.

  13. Study on the potential inhibition of root dentine wear adjacent to fluoride-containing restorations.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Domiciano, Silvia Jorge; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the vicinity of root dentine that had been restored with fluoride-releasing materials was at reduced risk for erosive/abrasive wear compared to root dentine restored with a non-fluoride-containing material. According to a randomized complete block design, standardized cavities prepared on the surface of 150 bovine root dentine slabs were restored with glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified resin composite, fluoride-containing or conventional composite. Specimens were coated with two layers of an acid-resistant nail varnish exposing half of the dentine surface and half of the restoration. Subsequently, specimens were either eroded in an acidic drink or left uneroded, then exposed to artificial saliva and abraded in a toothbrushing machine. Wear depth in the vicinity of restorations was quantified by a stylus profilometer, based on the nonabraded areas surrounding the erosion/abrasion region. Two-way ANOVA did not demonstrate significant interaction between restoratives and eroded-uneroded dentine (p=0.5549) nor significant difference among restorative materials (p=0.8639). Tukey's test ascertained that the wear depth was higher for eroded than for uneroded groups. Fluoride-releasing materials seemed to negligibly inhibit wear in the vicinity of restored root dentine subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges.

  14. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  15. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  16. Abrasion-Resistant Technology and its Prospect for CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Li, Y. J.; Wang, L. J.; Liu, S. H.; Dou, Q. R.

    In recent years, CFB boilers (CFBB) have been widely used in the commercial power plants due to its environmental benefits, high combustion efficiency, wide coal flexibility, and some other advantages. At the same time, the abrasion problem, the greatest weakness of this kind of boiler, has been gradually exposed in its application process. The abrasion, particularly on key parts such as the heating surface of water-cooled wall, furnace corners, separator entrance, seriously restricts the long-period operation ability of the CFBB. This article discusses current development status for various abrasion resistant refractory materials used in a CFBB. Some comments are provided for developing new high-performance abrasion resistant refractory materials and rapid-repaired materials according to the abrasion principle and the abrasion on different parts, as well as the economical and environmental requirements for the material. The abrasion solution and operation period of CFBB can be better improved given realization.

  17. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Ameri, Hamideh; Eslami, Samaneh; Mirzaeepoor, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05). The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required. PMID:23349570

  18. Abrasion resistance of linings in filament wound composite pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    Fiberglass filament wound composite pipe has numerous industrial applications including transportation of petroleum and natural gas. Its corrosion resistance is well known but it can be susceptible to abrasion and erosion when it is used to transport slurries or dry gas containing sand particles. However, composite pipe can be manufactured integrally with abrasion resistant linings which protect the pipe from abrasion and erosion and increase its life. Laboratory investigations were performed to determine the effect of abrasive flows through polyurea-lined and unlined glass-reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe, ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene (PE) pipe, and unlined steel pipe. Results are provided for the abrasion resistance, chemical resistance, adhesion strength, elongation, tensile strength, impact resistance and hardness of selected linings. The abrasion resistance of polyurea-lined composite pipe proved to be almost as resistant to abrasion and erosion as unlined steel pipe without the electrochemical corrosion associated with steel pipe.

  19. Understanding Characteristic of Abrasion of Refractory Lining Caused by Bath Oscillation in BOF Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, Zongshu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the refractory abrasion occurring widely inside basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking. The mechanism of refractory abrasion is examined numerically referring to the bath oscillation with regard to flows, turbulence and wall shear stress inside a BOF. The simulation results reveal that the refractory abrasion tends to occur on the wall region between the slag/atmosphere and slag/metal interfaces due to the oscillation of the bath in the blowing process, which generally promotes slag-line erosion. The decreased nozzle angle, and either increased lance height or operation pressure can lead to more serious refractory erosion that occurs more likely during the slag-making period in the operation of BOF.

  20. Silicon-based plant defences, tooth wear and voles.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Ivan; Zub, Karol; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Zalewski, Andrzej; Merceron, Gildas

    2016-02-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are hypothesized to drive vole population cycles through the grazing-induced production of phytoliths in leaves. Phytoliths act as mechanical defences because they deter herbivory and lower growth rates in mammals. However, how phytoliths impair herbivore performance is still unknown. Here, we tested whether the amount of phytoliths changes tooth wear patterns. If confirmed, abrasion from phytoliths could play a role in population crashes. We applied dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) to laboratory and wild voles. Lab voles were fed two pelleted diets with differing amounts of silicon, which produced similar dental textures. This was most probably due to the loss of food mechanical properties through pelletization and/or the small difference in silicon concentration between diets. Wild voles were trapped in Poland during spring and summer, and every year across a population cycle. In spring, voles feed on silica-rich monocotyledons, while in the summer they also include silica-depleted dicotyledons. This was reflected in the results; the amount of silica therefore leaves a traceable record in the dental microwear texture of voles. Furthermore, voles from different phases of population cycles have different microwear textures. We tentatively propose that these differences result from grazing-induced phytolith concentrations. We hypothesize that the high amount of phytoliths in response to intense grazing in peak years may result in malocclusion and other dental abnormalities, which would explain how these silicon-based plant defences help provoke population crashes. DMTA could then be used to reconstruct vole population dynamics using teeth from pellets or palaeontological material. PMID:26889000

  1. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  2. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities.

  3. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities. PMID:25922212

  4. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  5. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  6. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  7. Circular Signs of the Rock Abrasion Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's front hazard-avoidance camera, providing a circular sign of the success of the rover's first grinding of a rock. The round, shallow hole seen in this image is on a rock dubbed 'McKittrick,' located in the 'El Capitan' area of the larger outcrop near Opportunity's landing site.

    Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool to grind off a patch of rock 45.5 millimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter during the 30th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Feb. 23, 2004). The grinding exposed fresh rock for close inspection by the rover's microscopic imager and two spectrometers located on its robotic arm. The Honeybee Robotics team, which designed and operates the rock abrasion tool, determined the depth of the cut at 'McKittrick' to be 4.4 millimeters (0.17 inches) deep.

    On sol 34 (Feb. 27, 2004), the rover is scheduled to grind into its second target on the 'El Capitan' area, a rock dubbed 'Guadalupe' in the upper middle part of this image. The rock abrasion tools on both Mars Exploration Rovers were supplied by Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y.

  8. Wear studies on ZrO2-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5wt.% ZrO2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc.

  9. Wear studies on ZrO2-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5wt.% ZrO2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. PMID:27612794

  10. Wear of polyethylene acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty. An analysis of one hundred and twenty-eight components retrieved at autopsy or revision operations.

    PubMed

    Jasty, M; Goetz, D D; Bragdon, C R; Lee, K R; Hanson, A E; Elder, J R; Harris, W H

    1997-03-01

    decreased rate of wear (p < 0.05) in the group of metal-backed components, which had a 25 per cent increase in the rate of wear for every one-millimeter decrease in thickness, but not in the other groups. The estimated median annual rates of wear, after adjustment of confounding variables to a hypothetical constant set of median values for the parameters (duration in situ, 132 months; diameter of the femoral head, twenty-six millimeters; and thickness of the polyethylene, eight millimeters), were significantly different among the three groups of components (p < 0.05). Histological evaluation of the worn surfaces showed the predominant mechanisms of wear to be abrasion and adhesion rather than fatigue-cracking or delamination. The highly worn areas were polished to a glassy finish on gross examination, but scanning electron microscopy showed numerous multidirectional scratches along with fine, drawn-out fibrils with a diameter of one micrometer or less oriented parallel to each other. These fibrils are the most likely source of submicrometer wear particles. Thus, wear appeared to occur mostly at the surface of the components and to be due to large-strain plastic deformation and orientation of the surface layers into fibrils that subsequently ruptured during multidirectional motion.

  11. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  12. A personal perspective and update on erosive tooth wear - 10 years on: Part 2 - Restorative management.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D

    2016-08-26

    The management challenge with erosive tooth wear is that the condition involves erosion and contributions from attrition and abrasion, both of which impact on the longevity of restorations. Severe erosive tooth wear results in visibly shorter teeth, exposure of dentine and adaptive changes which complicate restorative management. There is increasing evidence to suggest if the risk factors, such as reducing the frequency of acidic foods and drinks, are reduced the progression of tooth wear slows and follows a normal pattern of wear. But once teeth become shorter patients often seek advice from dentists on restorative intervention. Composite restorations are successful in some patients but they often involve regular maintenance with repairs and rebuilds, which for some patients is unacceptable. Full coverage crowns, although destructive of tooth tissue, remain an option for restorations. PMID:27561573

  13. Type of wear for the pair Ti6Al4V/PCTFE in ambient air and in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozet, J.-L.

    1993-04-01

    The pair Ti6Al4V/polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) on a pin-on-disk tribometer in ambient air and liquid nitrogen with the contact pressure and sliding speed ranging from 3 to 9 MPa and 0.03 to 0.05 m/s, respectively, is evaluated within the framework of a high pressure valves for cryogenic rocket engines project. Results show that an abrasion wear process, which is closely connected with a tribochemical wear process producing fluorides and an abrasive form of carbon, exists when PCTFE is continuously rubbed against Ti6Al4V in ambient air, liquid nitrogen, and gaseous argon. Degradations detected on the Ti6Al4V surface are found to be unacceptable in most cases, but in the real cryotechnic valves this type of wear was not observed. The latter is attributed to the great dwell time between actuations and the low speed of the reciprocating movements which considerably limit the heating.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of twin-wire arc sprayed Ni-Al composite coatings on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-xiao; Liu, Jing-shun; Zhang, Lun-yong; Sun, Jian-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2014-05-01

    We have systematically studied the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni-5wt%Al and Ni-20wt%Al composite coatings fabricated on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet by twin-wire arc spraying under different experimental conditions. The abrasive wear behavior and interface diffusion behavior of the composite coatings were evaluated by dry/wet rubber wheel abrasive wear tests and heat treatment, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite coatings exhibit features of adhesive wear. Besides, the Vickers microhardness of NiAl and Ni3Al intermetallic compounds is relatively larger than that of the substrate, which is beneficial for enhancing the wear resistance. With the increase of annealing temperature and time, the interface diffusion area between the Ni-Al coating and the substrate gradually expands with the formation of NiAl3 and Ni2Al3 phases, and is controlled by diffusion of aluminum atoms. The grain growth exponent n of diffusion kinetics of the Ni-Al coating, calculated via a high-temperature diffusion model at 400, 480, and 550°C, is between 0.28 and 0.38. This satisfies the cubic law, which is consistent with the general theoretical relationship of high-temperature diffusion.

  15. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite I-beam stiffened airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for I-beam stiffened skins constructed of aluminum, graphite-epoxy composite, and glass hybrid composite under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during an emergency belly landing. A test apparatus was developed to abrade the test specimens on actual runway surface under a range of pressures (2-5 psi) and velocities (16-50 mph). These parameters were chosen to fall within the range of conditions typical of an airframe sliding on a runway surface. The effects of the test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. In addition, the test apparatus was equipped to monitor the temperature variations on the backside of the skins during abrasion and these results are presented.

  16. Nanocrystalline Cellulose Improves the Biocompatibility and Reduces the Wear Debris of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene via Weak Binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Qiang; Sun, Jiashu; Gao, Feng; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-26

    The doping of biocompatible nanomaterials into ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the biocompatibility and reduce the wear debris is of great significance to prolonging implantation time of UHMWPE as the bearing material for artificial joints. This study shows that UHMWPE can form a composite with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC, a hydrophilic nanosized material with a high aspect ratio) by ball-milling and hot-pressing. Compared to pure UHMWPE, the NCC/UHMWPE composite exhibits improved tribological characteristics with reduced generation of wear debris. The underlying mechanism is related to the weak binding between hydrophilic NCC and hydrophobic UHMWPE. The hydrophilic, rigid NCC particles tend to detach from the UHMWPE surface during friction, which could move with the rubbing surface, serve as a thin lubricant layer, and protect the UHMWPE substrate from abrasion. The biological safety of the NCC/UHMWPE composite, as tested by MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and macrophage RAW264.7 cells, is high, with significantly lower inflammatory responses/cytotoxicity than pure UHMWPE. The NCC/UHMWPE composite therefore could be a promising alternative to the current UHMWPE for bearing applications.

  17. Finite element based simulation of dry sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegadekatte, V.; Huber, N.; Kraft, O.

    2005-01-01

    In order to predict wear and eventually the life-span of complex mechanical systems, several hundred thousand operating cycles have to be simulated. Therefore, a finite element (FE) post-processor is the optimum choice, considering the computational expense. A wear simulation approach based on Archard's wear law is implemented in an FE post-processor that works in association with a commercial FE package, ABAQUS, for solving the general deformable-deformable contact problem. Local wear is computed and then integrated over the sliding distance using the Euler integration scheme. The wear simulation tool works in a loop and performs a series of static FE-simulations with updated surface geometries to get a realistic contact pressure distribution on the contacting surfaces. It will be demonstrated that this efficient approach can simulate wear on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional surface topologies. The wear on both the interacting surfaces is computed using the contact pressure distribution from a two-dimensional or three-dimensional simulation, depending on the case. After every wear step the geometry is re-meshed to correct the deformed mesh due to wear, thus ensuring a fairly uniform mesh for further processing. The importance and suitability of such a wear simulation tool will be enunciated in this paper.

  18. Wear analysis of revolute joints with clearance in multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, ZhengFeng; Zhao, Yang; Wang, XingGui

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the prediction of wear for revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems is investigated using a computational methodology. The contact model in clearance joint is established using a new hybrid nonlinear contact force model and the friction effect is considered by using a modified Coulomb friction model. The dynamics model of multibody system with clearance is established using dynamic segmentation modeling method and the computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint in multibody systems is presented. The main computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint includes two steps, which are dynamics analysis and wear analysis. The dynamics simulation of multibody system with revolute clearance joint is carried out and the contact forces are drawn and used to calculate the wear amount of revolute clearance joint based on the Archard's wear model. Finally, a four-bar multibody mechanical system with revolute clearance joint is used as numerical example application to perform the simulation and show the dynamics responses and wear characteristics of multibody systems with revolute clearance joint. The main results of this work indicate that the contact between the joint elements is wider and more frequent in some specific regions and the wear phenomenon is not regular around the joint surface, which causes the clearance size increase non-regularly after clearance joint wear. This work presents an effective method to predict wear of revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems.

  19. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated.

  20. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  1. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use. PMID:20582212

  2. Electrochemical Wear of Carbon Cathodes in Electrowinning of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschöpe, Kati; Støre, Anne; Solheim, Asbjørn; Skybakmoen, Egil; Grande, Tor; Ratvik, Arne Petter

    2013-11-01

    Cathode wear is the main factor limiting the lifetime of high-amperage aluminum electrolysis cells with graphitized cathodes. The current article deals with an investigation of cathode wear in a laboratory cell, where the cathode is directly exposed to the electrolyte during electrolysis. The wear was shown to be electrochemical in nature and dependent on the current density, the rotation speed, and the depth of prefabricated slots in the cylindrical cathodes. The wear mechanism is discussed with respect to kinetics influencing the electrochemistry as well as the solubility of aluminum carbide in the electrolyte.

  3. Wear of seal materials used in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of various types of seal locations in a gas turbine engine and the significance of wear for each type are presented. Material selection guidelines and the PV (contact pressure times sliding velocity) criteria for seal materials are discussed, and examples of wear mechanisms in positive contact seals are given. It is suggested that improved wear, erosion, and oxidation resistant materials will be required for improved seal durability; finally, a correlation is proposed between wear characteristics and a factor that includes material strength, ductility, specific heat and hot-working temperature to attain low porosity metallic gas path seal materials.

  4. Effect of humidity on fretting wear of several pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goto, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments with several pure metals were conducted in air at various relative humidity levels. The materials used were iron, aluminum, copper, silver, chromium, titanium, and nickel. Each pure metal had a maximum fretting wear volume at a specific humidity level RH sub max that was not dependent on mechanical factors such as contact load, fretting amplitude, and frequency in the ranges studied. The weight loss due to fretting wear at RH sub max for each pure metal decreased with increasing heat of oxygen adsorption on the metal, indicating that adhesive wear dominated at RH sub max.

  5. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  6. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  7. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin. PMID:24642975

  8. New Rock Physical Properties Assessments From the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, P. W.; Basso, B.; Kusack, A.; Wilson, J.; Zacny, K.

    2005-12-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) serves as the sample preparation device on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) science payload. The RAT grinds a circular area 45 millimeter in diameter, and on the order of a few millimeters deep, into a rock face. This process removes surface fines and weathered layers in preparation for imaging and spectral observations of the rock. As of September 2005, 15 grinding operations have been performed at Gusev Crater and 26 at Meridiani Planum. Since the RAT performs a mechanical operation on a rock, deductions can be made via the RAT's engineering data about the rock's physical properties. For each grinding operation, the energy consumed while grinding is converted to provide a physically relevant Specific Grind Energy (SGE) in terms of Joules per cubic millimeter of rock removed. The calculation is performed over the last 0.25 millimeter of a grinding operation, where it is possible, by taking measurements from Microscopic Imager images of the abraded area, to make an accurate estimate of the volume of rock removed. Progress is presented on recent refinement of the SGE calculation methods including decoupling of artifacts. Environmental factors and differing parameters used to command the RAT operations are among the key artifacts recently analyzed. Progress is also presented on further characterization of the dynamics and wear mechanics involved in the grinding process, and how they influence SGE. A library of Earth rocks has been assembled and it is being used with the RAT Engineering Model to create a set of similar SGE data products that can be compared to Mars rocks in order to contribute to physical properties assessments of the Mars rocks. Initial results indicate that the Martian rocks are analogous to a range of Earth rocks, from gypsum to low-strength basalt in terms of grindability; however, caution needs to be exercised in making a direct comparison of grinding energies. This is because the grindability of rocks was found to

  9. The Inter-Relationship between Dietary and Environmental Properties and Tooth Wear: Comparisons of Mesowear, Molar Wear Rate, and Hypsodonty Index of Extant Sika Deer Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Mugino Ozaki; Yamada, Eisuke

    2014-01-01

    In reference to the evolutionary trend of increasing cheek tooth height in herbivorous ungulates, the causes of dental abrasion have long been debated. Interspecific comparisons of extant ungulates have revealed that both phytoliths in grass and external abrasive matter may play important roles. Using analysis of extant sika deer living in various environments and showing continuous latitudinal variation in food habits from northern grazing to southern browsing, we quantitatively evaluated the influence of dietary and environmental properties on three dental variables: mesowear score (MS), molar wear rate, and M3 hypsodonty index. We used 547 skulls and 740 mandibles from 16 populations of sika deer to obtain the dental measurements. We found that only graminoid proportion in diet correlated with MS and the molar wear rate, implying that phytoliths in grass abrade dental tissues. In contrast, annual precipitation in habitat was not correlated with any of the dental variables. We also found a significant correlation between the molar wear rate (selective pressure for high-crowned molars) and the M3 hypsodonty index of extant sika deer, implying an evolutionary increment in molar height corresponding to the molar wear rate. Our intraspecific comparative analyses provide further support for use of mesowear analysis as a paleodiet estimation method; it not only reveals staple food types (graminoids or dicots) but also implies regional or seasonal variation in the diet of the species. PMID:24603896

  10. Polyester and epoxy resins: Abrasion resistance. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and materials for enhanced wear and abrasion resistance of polyester and epoxy resins. Topics include test procedures and results, compounds and additives, forming processes, reinforcement effects, and applications. Electrical insulation, linings and coatings for numerous substrates, solar control film glazing material, hoses, material to rebuild worn metal parts, pipes, boats, industrial floor coverings, and ladder rungs are among the applications discussed. Trade name materials and manufacturers are included. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Computational analysis of polyethylene wear in anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; Monteiro, J

    2015-02-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, components has been associated with the failure of joint prostheses in the hip, knee, and shoulder. Considering that in vitro experiments are generally too expensive and time-consuming, computational models are an attractive alternative to study the wear behavior of UHMWPE components. The objective of the present study was to develop a computational wear model to evaluate the wear resistance of anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses. The effects of the wear law and the updating of the UHMWPE surface on the prediction of wear were also considered. Apart from Archard's law, a new wear law, so-called second generation law, which includes the concept of cross-shear and a pressure-independent wear factor, was considered. The wear analyses were performed considering three shoulder joint motions. The muscle and joint reaction forces applied were estimated by an inverse biomechanical model of the upper limb. The results show that abrasive wear is as important for the reverse components as it is for the anatomical. Nevertheless, the volumetric wears estimated over 1 year are within the range considered clinically desirable to reduce the risk of osteolysis. For the anatomical components, the predictions from Archard's law compare better, than those of the second generation law, to the experimental and clinical data available in the literature. Yet, the opposite result is obtained for the reverse components. From the numerical point of view, an updating procedure for the UHMWPE surface is mandatory to improve the numerical predictions. PMID:25362522

  12. Wear-reducing Surface Functionalization of Implant Materials Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldorf, P.; Peters, R.; Reichel, S.; Schulz, A.-P.; Wendlandt, R.

    The aim of the project called "EndoLas" is the development of a reproducible and reliable method for a functionalization of articulating surfaces on hip joint endoprostheses due to a reduction of abrasion and wear by the generation of micro structures using ultrashort laser pulses. On the one hand, the microstructures shall ensure the capture of abraded particles, which cause third-body wear and thereby increase aseptic loosening. On the other hand, the structures shall improve or maintain the tribologically important lubricating film. Thereby, the cavities serve as a reservoir for the body's own synovial fluid. The dry friction, which promotes abrasion and is a part of the mixed friction in the joint, shall therefore be reduced. In experimental setups it was shown, that the abrasive wear can be reduced significantly due to micro-structuring the articulating implant surfaces. To shape the fine and deterministic cavities on the surfaces, an ultra-short pulsed laser, which is integrated in a high-precision, 5-axes micro-machining system, was used. The laser system, based on an Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier, has an average output power of 50 W at the fundamental wavelength of 1030 nm, a maximum repetition rate of 400 kHz and a pulse duration of 6 ps. Due to this, a maximum pulse energy of 125 μJ is achievable. Furthermore external second and third harmonic generation enables the usage of wavelengths in the green and violet spectral range.

  13. Evaluating morphology and mechanical properties of glass-reinforced natural hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Z; Bahrololoom, M E; Hashemi, B

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite has been used in a wide variety of biomedical applications and it can be produced from natural resources such as bovine bone. This material does not have acceptable mechanical properties by itself. In the present work, hydroxyapatite composites with different weight percentages of sodalime glass were made and sintered at different temperatures (800-1200°C). Eventually the properties such as density, micro hardness, compressive strength and wear of specimens were evaluated. Specific percentages of glass additive increased the density and hardness of specimens due to increasing the sintering temperature. The hardness and density of specimens were decreased with higher percentage of glass additive. Moreover, the results of compressive test showed that increasing the glass addition increases the compressive performance. Furthermore, the SEM micrographs on worn specimens showed that the mechanism of wear was abrasive.

  14. Influence of fillers on NR/SBR blends containing ENR-organoclay nanocomposites: morphology and wear.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kaushik; Rajasekar, R; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kim, Jin Kuk; Das, Chapal Kumar

    2010-05-01

    In this study the Epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) and Organoclay (Cloisite 20A) were prepared by solution mixing process. The obtained nanocomposites were incorporated in Natural rubber (NR) and Styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) blends in presence of varying types of carbon black as reinforcing fillers. Morphology, curing characteristics, mechanical and thermal properties were characterized and analyzed. Also, the wear characteristics of the nanocomposites against Du-Pont abrader, DIN abrader and different mining rock surfaces were determined and discussed. The morphology of the organoclay incorporated in ENR shows a highly intercalated structure. ISAF type of carbon black shows a significant effect on curing and mechanical properties by reacting at the interface between SBR and NR matrix. All the samples show only one melting peak at same temperature on the DSC curve. Blends containing ISAF N234 type of carbon black shows high abrasion resistant properties against Du-Pont abrader, DIN abrader and different mining rock. The rubber compound containing 70 wt% of NR, 30 wt% of SBR and 10 wt% of ENR/nanoclay with ISAF N231 are found to be the toughest rubber against all types of rock under the present study. PMID:20358894

  15. The increase in cobalt release in metal-on-polyethylene hip bearings in tests with third body abrasives.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Traynor, Alison; Collins, Simon N; Shelton, Julia C

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving metal-on-metal hip replacements have been attributed to corrosion products as observed by elevated cobalt and chromium ions in the blood. Although the majority of cases are reported in metal-on-metal, incidences of these reactions have been reported in the metal-on-polyethylene patient population. To date, no in vitro study has considered cobalt release for this bearing combination. This study considered four 28 mm and seven 52 mm diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings tested following ISO standard hip simulator conditions as well as under established abrasive conditions. These tests showed measurable cobalt in all bearings under standard conditions. Cobalt release, as well as polyethylene wear, increased with diameter, increasing from 52 to 255 ppb. The introduction of bone cement particles into the articulation doubled polyethylene wear and cobalt release while alumina particles produced significant damage on the heads demonstrated by cobalt levels of 70,700 ppb and an increased polyethylene wear from a mean value of 9-160 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was indicative of head damage and correlated with polyethylene wear at the next gravimetric interval. The removal of third body particles resulted in continued elevated cobalt levels in the 52 mm diameter bearings tested with alumina compared to standard conditions but the bearings tested with bone cement particles returned to standard levels. The polyethylene wear in the bone cement tested bearings also recovered to standard levels, although the alumina tested bearings continued to wear at a higher rate of 475 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was shown to occur in metal-on-polyethylene bearings indicating damage to the metal head resulting in increased polyethylene wear. While large diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings may provide an increased range of motion and a reduced dislocation risk, increased levels of cobalt are likely to be released and this needs to be fully

  16. The increase in cobalt release in metal-on-polyethylene hip bearings in tests with third body abrasives.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Traynor, Alison; Collins, Simon N; Shelton, Julia C

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving metal-on-metal hip replacements have been attributed to corrosion products as observed by elevated cobalt and chromium ions in the blood. Although the majority of cases are reported in metal-on-metal, incidences of these reactions have been reported in the metal-on-polyethylene patient population. To date, no in vitro study has considered cobalt release for this bearing combination. This study considered four 28 mm and seven 52 mm diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings tested following ISO standard hip simulator conditions as well as under established abrasive conditions. These tests showed measurable cobalt in all bearings under standard conditions. Cobalt release, as well as polyethylene wear, increased with diameter, increasing from 52 to 255 ppb. The introduction of bone cement particles into the articulation doubled polyethylene wear and cobalt release while alumina particles produced significant damage on the heads demonstrated by cobalt levels of 70,700 ppb and an increased polyethylene wear from a mean value of 9-160 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was indicative of head damage and correlated with polyethylene wear at the next gravimetric interval. The removal of third body particles resulted in continued elevated cobalt levels in the 52 mm diameter bearings tested with alumina compared to standard conditions but the bearings tested with bone cement particles returned to standard levels. The polyethylene wear in the bone cement tested bearings also recovered to standard levels, although the alumina tested bearings continued to wear at a higher rate of 475 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was shown to occur in metal-on-polyethylene bearings indicating damage to the metal head resulting in increased polyethylene wear. While large diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings may provide an increased range of motion and a reduced dislocation risk, increased levels of cobalt are likely to be released and this needs to be fully

  17. Wear Behavior of Newly Developed Bainitic Wheel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-02-01

    The present work concentrates on the analysis of wear behavior of bainitic steels made by austempering from a microalloyed steel MAS2, meant for making railway wheel, and comparison with that of a conventional railway wheel steel, wheel-R19. Austempering of the MAS2 steel samples has been performed at different times and temperatures to obtain different morphologies of bainite. Linearly reciprocating dry sliding wear tests of these samples have been carried out at laboratory scale using five different loads. The wear behavior of the bainitic steels has been compared with that of the ferritic-pearlitic steel, wheel-R19. Mechanical properties of the bainitic MAS2 steels are found to be more than that of the wheel-R19 steel. Considerable enhancement in wear resistance of the bainitic steels is attributed to high hardness and strength of the steels. The wear mechanism has been critically analyzed by examining wear track morphology. The wear data gathered have been graphically presented in the form of wear mechanism map to understand the material behavior under different sliding conditions and subsequent morphological variations.

  18. Development of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) coatings for multipurpose mechanical pump seals.

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalchenko, A. M.; Elam, J. W.; Erdemir, A.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Libera, J. A.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Hryn, J. N.

    2011-01-01

    The reliability and performance of silicon carbide (SiC) shaft seals on multipurpose mechanical pumps are improved by applying a protective coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). UNCD exhibits extreme hardness (97 GPa), low friction (0.1 in air) and outstanding chemical resistance. Consequently, the application of UNCD coatings to multipurpose mechanical pump seals can reduce frictional energy losses and eliminate the downtime and hazardous emissions from seal failure and leakage. In this study, UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition utilizing an argon/methane gas mixture. Prior to coating, the SiC seals were subjected to mechanical polishing using different grades of micron-sized diamond powder to produce different starting surfaces with well-controlled surface roughnesses. Following this roughening process, the seals were seeded by mechanical abrasion with diamond nanopowder, and subsequently coated with UNCD. The coated seals were subjected to dynamic wear testing performed at 3600 RPM and 100 psi for up to 10 days during which the seals were periodically removed and inspected. The UNCD-coated seals were examined using Raman microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and adhesion testing before and after the wear testing. These analyses revealed that delamination of the UNCD films was prevented when the initial SiC seal surface had an initial roughness >0.1 {micro}m. In addition, the UNCD surfaces showed no measurable wear as compared to approximately 0.2 {micro}m of wear for the untreated SiC surfaces.

  19. 29 CFR 1910.215 - Abrasive wheel machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.215 Abrasive wheel machinery. (a) General requirements—(1) Machine guarding. Abrasive wheels shall be used only on machines provided with... omitted; and (ii) The spindle end, nut, and outer flange may be exposed on machines designed as...

  20. Microwave sintering of sol-gel derived abrasive grain

    DOEpatents

    Plovnick, Ross; Celikkaya, Ahmet; Blake, Rodger D.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for making microwave-sintered, free flowing alpha alumina-based ceramic abrasive grain, under conditions effective to couple microwaves with calcined alpha alumina-based abrasive gain precursor and sinter it at a temperature of at least about 1150.degree. C.