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Sample records for abrf edman sequencing

  1. Multi-platform assessment of transcriptome profiling using RNA-seq in the ABRF next-generation sequencing study.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Tighe, Scott W; Nicolet, Charles M; Grove, Deborah; Levy, Shawn; Farmerie, William; Viale, Agnes; Wright, Chris; Schweitzer, Peter A; Gao, Yuan; Kim, Dewey; Boland, Joe; Hicks, Belynda; Kim, Ryan; Chhangawala, Sagar; Jafari, Nadereh; Raghavachari, Nalini; Gandara, Jorge; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hendrickson, Cynthia; Roberson, David; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Smith, Todd; Underwood, Jason G; Wang, May; Zumbo, Paul; Baldwin, Don A; Grills, George S; Mason, Christopher E

    2014-09-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) greatly expands the potential for genomics discoveries, but the wide variety of platforms, protocols and performance capabilitites has created the need for comprehensive reference data. Here we describe the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities next-generation sequencing (ABRF-NGS) study on RNA-seq. We carried out replicate experiments across 15 laboratory sites using reference RNA standards to test four protocols (poly-A-selected, ribo-depleted, size-selected and degraded) on five sequencing platforms (Illumina HiSeq, Life Technologies PGM and Proton, Pacific Biosciences RS and Roche 454). The results show high intraplatform (Spearman rank R > 0.86) and inter-platform (R > 0.83) concordance for expression measures across the deep-count platforms, but highly variable efficiency and cost for splice junction and variant detection between all platforms. For intact RNA, gene expression profiles from rRNA-depletion and poly-A enrichment are similar. In addition, rRNA depletion enables effective analysis of degraded RNA samples. This study provides a broad foundation for cross-platform standardization, evaluation and improvement of RNA-seq.

  2. Identification of Optimal Protocols for Sequencing Difficult Templates: Results of the 2008 ABRF DNA Sequencing Research Group Difficult Template Study 2008

    PubMed Central

    Kieleczawa, Jan; Adam, Debbie; Bintzler, Doug; Detwiler, Michelle; Needleman, David; Schweitzer, Peter; Singh, Sushmita; Steen, Robert; Zianni, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 ABRF DNA Sequencing Research Group (DSRG) difficult template sequencing study was designed to identify a general set of guidelines that would constitute the best approaches for sequencing difficult templates. This was a continuation of previous DSRG difficult template studies performed in 1996, 1997, and 2003. The distinguishing factors in the present study were the number of DNA templates used, the number of different types of difficult regions tested, and the inclusion of a follow-up phase of the study to identify optimal protocols for each type of difficult template. DNA templates with associated sequencing primers were distributed to participating laboratories and each laboratory returned their sequencing results along with descriptions of the experimental conditions used. The data were analyzed and the best protocols were identified for each difficult template. This information was subsequently distributed to the participating laboratories for a second round of sequencing to evaluate the general applicability of the optimized protocols. The average improvements in sequencing results were 11% overall, with a range of −25% to +43% using the optimized protocols. The full results from this study are presented here and they demonstrate that general experimental protocols and common additives can be used to improve the sequencing success for many difficult templates. PMID:19503623

  3. A photothermally responsive nanoprobe for bioimaging based on Edman degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Zhantong; Zhang, Huimin; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; He, Qianjun; Lu, Nan; Huang, Peng; Liu, Yijing; Song, Jibin; Liu, Zhibo; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new type of photothermally responsive nanoprobe based on Edman degradation has been synthesized and characterized. Under irradiation by an 808 nm laser, the heat generated by the gold nanorod core breaks the thiocarbamide structure and releases the fluorescent dye Cy5.5 with increased near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence under mild acidic conditions. This RGD modified nanoprobe is capable of fluorescence imaging of ανβ3 over-expressing U87MG cells in vitro and in vivo. This Edman degradation-based nanoprobe provides a novel strategy to design activatable probes for biomedical imaging and drug/gene delivery.A new type of photothermally responsive nanoprobe based on Edman degradation has been synthesized and characterized. Under irradiation by an 808 nm laser, the heat generated by the gold nanorod core breaks the thiocarbamide structure and releases the fluorescent dye Cy5.5 with increased near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence under mild acidic conditions. This RGD modified nanoprobe is capable of fluorescence imaging of ανβ3 over-expressing U87MG cells in vitro and in vivo. This Edman degradation-based nanoprobe provides a novel strategy to design activatable probes for biomedical imaging and drug/gene delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HPLC, MS and 1H NMR spectrum. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01400c

  4. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  5. Monitoring of environmental cancer initiators through hemoglobin adducts by a modified Edman degradation method

    SciTech Connect

    Toernqvist, M.M.; Mowrer, J.; Jensen, S.; Ehrenberg, L.

    1986-04-01

    Tissue doses of cancer initiators/mutagens are suitably monitored through hemoglobin adducts formed in vivo, but the use of this method has been hampered by a lack of sufficiently simple and fast procedures. It was previously observed that when the N-terminal amino acid in hemoglobin, valine, is alkylated it is cleaved off by the Edman sequencing reagent, phenyl isothiocyanate, in the neutral-alkaline coupling medium, as opposed to the acidic medium required by normal amino acids. Based on this principle, conditions for a functioning procedure for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) determination of N-terminal alkylvalines in hemoglobin were worked out. Derivatizing the protein in formamide solution with pentafluorophenyl isothiocyanate, using a /sup 2/H-alkylated protein as internal standard, and applying on-column injection during analysis, permit reproducible determination of hydroxyethylvaline and other adducts down into the dose range where cancer risks may be considered acceptably low.

  6. ABRF-PRG07: Advanced Quantitative Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Falick, Arnold M.; Lane, William S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Phinney, Brett S.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Yates, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge for core facilities is determining quantitative protein differences across complex biological samples. Although there are numerous techniques in the literature for relative and absolute protein quantification, the majority is nonroutine and can be challenging to carry out effectively. There are few studies comparing these technologies in terms of their reproducibility, accuracy, and precision, and no studies to date deal with performance across multiple laboratories with varied levels of expertise. Here, we describe an Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Research Group (PRG) study based on samples composed of a complex protein mixture into which 12 known proteins were added at varying but defined ratios. All of the proteins were present at the same concentration in each of three tubes that were provided. The primary goal of this study was to allow each laboratory to evaluate its capabilities and approaches with regard to: detection and identification of proteins spiked into samples that also contain complex mixtures of background proteins and determination of relative quantities of the spiked proteins. The results returned by 43 participants were compiled by the PRG, which also collected information about the strategies used to assess overall performance and as an aid to development of optimized protocols for the methodologies used. The most accurate results were generally reported by the most experienced laboratories. Among laboratories that used the same technique, values that were closer to the expected ratio were obtained by more experienced groups. PMID:21455478

  7. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  8. Interlaboratory Study on Differential Analysis of Protein Glycosylation by Mass Spectrometry: The ABRF Glycoprotein Research Multi-Institutional Study 2012*

    PubMed Central

    Leymarie, Nancy; Griffin, Paula J.; Jonscher, Karen; Kolarich, Daniel; Orlando, Ron; McComb, Mark; Zaia, Joseph; Aguilan, Jennifer; Alley, William R.; Altmann, Friederich; Ball, Lauren E.; Basumallick, Lipika; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R.; Behnken, Henning; Blank, Michael A.; Brown, Kristy J.; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Cairo, Christopher W.; Cipollo, John F.; Daneshfar, Rambod; Desaire, Heather; Drake, Richard R.; Go, Eden P.; Goldman, Radoslav; Gruber, Clemens; Halim, Adnan; Hathout, Yetrib; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Horn, David M.; Hurum, Deanna; Jabs, Wolfgang; Larson, Göran; Ly, Mellisa; Mann, Benjamin F.; Marx, Kristina; Mechref, Yehia; Meyer, Bernd; Möginger, Uwe; Neusüβ, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Novotny, Milos V.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Packer, Nicolle H.; Pompach, Petr; Reiz, Bela; Resemann, Anja; Rohrer, Jeffrey S.; Ruthenbeck, Alexandra; Sanda, Miloslav; Schulz, Jan Mirco; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Sihlbom, Carina; Song, Ehwang; Staples, Gregory O.; Suckau, Detlev; Tang, Haixu; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Viner, Rosa I.; An, Yanming; Valmu, Leena; Wada, Yoshinao; Watson, Megan; Windwarder, Markus; Whittal, Randy; Wuhrer, Manfred; Zhu, Yiying; Zou, Chunxia

    2013-01-01

    One of the principal goals of glycoprotein research is to correlate glycan structure and function. Such correlation is necessary in order for one to understand the mechanisms whereby glycoprotein structure elaborates the functions of myriad proteins. The accurate comparison of glycoforms and quantification of glycosites are essential steps in this direction. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique in the field of glycoprotein characterization. Its sensitivity, high dynamic range, and mass accuracy provide both quantitative and sequence/structural information. As part of the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group study, we explored the use of mass spectrometry and ancillary methodologies to characterize the glycoforms of two sources of human prostate specific antigen (PSA). PSA is used as a tumor marker for prostate cancer, with increasing blood levels used to distinguish between normal and cancer states. The glycans on PSA are believed to be biantennary N-linked, and it has been observed that prostate cancer tissues and cell lines contain more antennae than their benign counterparts. Thus, the ability to quantify differences in glycosylation associated with cancer has the potential to positively impact the use of PSA as a biomarker. We studied standard peptide-based proteomics/glycomics methodologies, including LC-MS/MS for peptide/glycopeptide sequencing and label-free approaches for differential quantification. We performed an interlaboratory study to determine the ability of different laboratories to correctly characterize the differences between glycoforms from two different sources using mass spectrometry methods. We used clustering analysis and ancillary statistical data treatment on the data sets submitted by participating laboratories to obtain a consensus of the glycoforms and abundances. The results demonstrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of top-down glycoproteomics, bottom-up glycoproteomics, and glycomics methods. PMID

  9. Interlaboratory study on differential analysis of protein glycosylation by mass spectrometry: the ABRF glycoprotein research multi-institutional study 2012.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Nancy; Griffin, Paula J; Jonscher, Karen; Kolarich, Daniel; Orlando, Ron; McComb, Mark; Zaia, Joseph; Aguilan, Jennifer; Alley, William R; Altmann, Friederich; Ball, Lauren E; Basumallick, Lipika; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R; Behnken, Henning; Blank, Michael A; Brown, Kristy J; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Cairo, Christopher W; Cipollo, John F; Daneshfar, Rambod; Desaire, Heather; Drake, Richard R; Go, Eden P; Goldman, Radoslav; Gruber, Clemens; Halim, Adnan; Hathout, Yetrib; Hensbergen, Paul J; Horn, David M; Hurum, Deanna; Jabs, Wolfgang; Larson, Göran; Ly, Mellisa; Mann, Benjamin F; Marx, Kristina; Mechref, Yehia; Meyer, Bernd; Möginger, Uwe; Neusüβ, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Novotny, Milos V; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Packer, Nicolle H; Pompach, Petr; Reiz, Bela; Resemann, Anja; Rohrer, Jeffrey S; Ruthenbeck, Alexandra; Sanda, Miloslav; Schulz, Jan Mirco; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Sihlbom, Carina; Song, Ehwang; Staples, Gregory O; Suckau, Detlev; Tang, Haixu; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Viner, Rosa I; An, Yanming; Valmu, Leena; Wada, Yoshinao; Watson, Megan; Windwarder, Markus; Whittal, Randy; Wuhrer, Manfred; Zhu, Yiying; Zou, Chunxia

    2013-10-01

    One of the principal goals of glycoprotein research is to correlate glycan structure and function. Such correlation is necessary in order for one to understand the mechanisms whereby glycoprotein structure elaborates the functions of myriad proteins. The accurate comparison of glycoforms and quantification of glycosites are essential steps in this direction. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique in the field of glycoprotein characterization. Its sensitivity, high dynamic range, and mass accuracy provide both quantitative and sequence/structural information. As part of the 2012 ABRF Glycoprotein Research Group study, we explored the use of mass spectrometry and ancillary methodologies to characterize the glycoforms of two sources of human prostate specific antigen (PSA). PSA is used as a tumor marker for prostate cancer, with increasing blood levels used to distinguish between normal and cancer states. The glycans on PSA are believed to be biantennary N-linked, and it has been observed that prostate cancer tissues and cell lines contain more antennae than their benign counterparts. Thus, the ability to quantify differences in glycosylation associated with cancer has the potential to positively impact the use of PSA as a biomarker. We studied standard peptide-based proteomics/glycomics methodologies, including LC-MS/MS for peptide/glycopeptide sequencing and label-free approaches for differential quantification. We performed an interlaboratory study to determine the ability of different laboratories to correctly characterize the differences between glycoforms from two different sources using mass spectrometry methods. We used clustering analysis and ancillary statistical data treatment on the data sets submitted by participating laboratories to obtain a consensus of the glycoforms and abundances. The results demonstrate the relative strengths and weaknesses of top-down glycoproteomics, bottom-up glycoproteomics, and glycomics methods.

  10. Determination of the covalent structure of an N- and C-terminally blocked glycoprotein from endocuticle of Locusta migratoria. Combined use of plasma desorption mass spectrometry and Edman degradation to study post-translationally modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Talbo, G; Højrup, P; Rahbek-Nielsen, H; Andersen, S O; Roepstorff, P

    1991-01-30

    The complete structure of protein isolated from endocuticle of sexually mature locusts, Locusta migratoria, has been determined by a combination of automatic Edman degradation and plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The protein is extensively post-translationally modified. The N-terminal is 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) and the C-terminal proline residue is amidated. Furthermore, the protein is glycosylated by a single N-acetyl-galactosamine residue at one, two or three threonines. The N-terminal sequence was obtained by analysing the N-acetylated N,O-permethylated derivative using plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The position and type of carbohydrate were determined by combining an HPLC-based carbohydrate analysis with the peak pattern of the phenylthiohydantoin derivative in automatic sequencing and with mass information on peptides. The protein has pronounced similarity to cuticular proteins from larvae of diptera and lepidoptera, but only slight resemblance to the previously sequenced locust exocuticular proteins. This indicates a similarity between soft larval cuticles and locust endocuticle, a similarity which may extend to their mechanical properties. PMID:1997327

  11. The 2012/2013 ABRF Proteomic Research Group Study: Assessing Longitudinal Intralaboratory Variability in Routine Peptide Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analyses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Keiryn L; Wang, Xia; Bystrom, Cory E; Chambers, Matthew C; Andacht, Tracy M; Dangott, Larry J; Elortza, Félix; Leszyk, John; Molina, Henrik; Moritz, Robert L; Phinney, Brett S; Thompson, J Will; Bunger, Maureen K; Tabb, David L

    2015-12-01

    Questions concerning longitudinal data quality and reproducibility of proteomic laboratories spurred the Protein Research Group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF-PRG) to design a study to systematically assess the reproducibility of proteomic laboratories over an extended period of time. Developed as an open study, initially 64 participants were recruited from the broader mass spectrometry community to analyze provided aliquots of a six bovine protein tryptic digest mixture every month for a period of nine months. Data were uploaded to a central repository, and the operators answered an accompanying survey. Ultimately, 45 laboratories submitted a minimum of eight LC-MSMS raw data files collected in data-dependent acquisition (DDA) mode. No standard operating procedures were enforced; rather the participants were encouraged to analyze the samples according to usual practices in the laboratory. Unlike previous studies, this investigation was not designed to compare laboratories or instrument configuration, but rather to assess the temporal intralaboratory reproducibility. The outcome of the study was reassuring with 80% of the participating laboratories performing analyses at a medium to high level of reproducibility and quality over the 9-month period. For the groups that had one or more outlying experiments, the major contributing factor that correlated to the survey data was the performance of preventative maintenance prior to the LC-MSMS analyses. Thus, the Protein Research Group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities recommends that laboratories closely scrutinize the quality control data following such events. Additionally, improved quality control recording is imperative. This longitudinal study provides evidence that mass spectrometry-based proteomics is reproducible. When quality control measures are strictly adhered to, such reproducibility is comparable among many disparate groups. Data from the study are

  12. The amino-acid sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chains of red kangaroo and Virginia opossum.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W W; Terwindt, E C

    1976-08-16

    The amino acid sequence of the A chain of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was completely determined by manual Edman degradation of tryptic, thermolytic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chain from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) was deduced from amino acid analyses and partial Edman degradation of peptides. The 173-residue A chains of kangaroo and opossum differ in six positions, whereas comparison with the bovine alpha-crystallin A chain reveals 17 and 22 substitutions, respectively. Most substitutions occur in the COOH-terminal part of the chain.

  13. Unraveling the sequence and structure of the protein osteocalcin from a 42 ka fossil horse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Gandhi, Hasand; Strahler, John R.; Walker, Angela K.; Andrews, Philip C.; Leykam, Joseph; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kelly, Robert L.; Walker, Danny N.; Buckley, Mike; Humpula, James

    2006-04-01

    We report the first complete amino acid sequence and evidence of secondary structure for osteocalcin from a temperate fossil. The osteocalcin derives from a 42 ka equid bone excavated from Juniper Cave, Wyoming. Results were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and Edman sequencing with independent confirmation of the sequence in two laboratories. The ancient sequence was compared to that of three modern taxa: horse ( Equus caballus), zebra ( Equus grevyi), and donkey ( Equus asinus). Although there was no difference in sequence among modern taxa, MALDI-MS and Edman sequencing show that residues 48 and 49 of our modern horse are Thr, Ala rather than Pro, Val as previously reported (Carstanjen B., Wattiez, R., Armory, H., Lepage, O.M., Remy, B., 2002. Isolation and characterization of equine osteocalcin. Ann. Med. Vet.146(1), 31-38). MALDI-MS and Edman sequencing data indicate that the osteocalcin sequence of the 42 ka fossil is similar to that of modern horse. Previously inaccessible structural attributes for ancient osteocalcin were observed. Glu 39 rather than Gln 39 is consistent with deamidation, a process known to occur during fossilization and aging. Two post-translational modifications were documented: Hyp 9 and a disulfide bridge. The latter suggests at least partial retention of secondary structure. As has been done for ancient DNA research, we recommend standards for preparation and criteria for authenticating results of ancient protein sequencing.

  14. Protein sequence analysis using Hewlett-Packard biphasic sequencing cartridges in an applied biosystems 473A protein sequencer.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Mozdzanowski, J; Anumula, K R

    1999-01-01

    Protein sequence analysis using an adsorptive biphasic sequencing cartridge, a set of two coupled columns introduced by Hewlett-Packard for protein sequencing by Edman degradation, in an Applied Biosystems 473A protein sequencer has been demonstrated. Samples containing salts, detergents, excipients, etc. (e.g., formulated protein drugs) can be easily analyzed using the ABI sequencer. Simple modifications to the ABI sequencer to accommodate the cartridge extend its utility in the analysis of difficult samples. The ABI sequencer solvents and reagents were compatible with the HP cartridge for sequencing. Sequence information up to ten residues can be easily generated by this nonoptimized procedure, and it is sufficient for identifying proteins by database search and for preparing a DNA probe for cloning novel proteins.

  15. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  16. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  17. The amino-acid sequences of sculpin islet somatostatin-28 and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Cutfield, J F

    1987-04-01

    Two pancreatic peptides, somatostatin-28 and peptide YY, have been isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin). Following purification by reverse-phase HPLC, each peptide was sequenced completely through to the carboxyl-terminus by gas-phase Edman degradation. Somatostatin-28 was the major form of somatostatin detected and is similar to the gene II product from anglerfish. Peptide YY (36 amino acids) more closely resembles porcine neuropeptide YY and intestinal peptide YY than it does the pancreatic polypeptides. PMID:2883025

  18. Homology of amino acid sequences of rat liver cathepsins B and H with that of papain.

    PubMed Central

    Takio, K; Towatari, T; Katunuma, N; Teller, D C; Titani, K

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of rat liver lysosomal thiol endopeptidases, cathepsins B and H, are presented and compared with that of the plant thiol protease papain. The 252-residue sequence of cathepsin B and the 220-residue sequence of cathepsin H were determined largely by automated Edman degradation of their intact polypeptide chains and of the two chains of each enzyme generated by limited proteolysis. Subfragments of the chains were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl and tryptophanyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of cathepsins B and H with each other and with that of papain demonstrates a striking homology among their primary structures. Sequence identity is extremely high in regions which, according to the three-dimensional structure of papain, constitute the catalytic site. The results not only reveal the first structural features of mammalian thiol endopeptidases but also provide insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant and mammalian thiol proteases. PMID:6574504

  19. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  20. A new antifungal peptide from the seeds of Phytolacca americana: characterization, amino acid sequence and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Hu, Z; Xiong, Y M; Huang, Q Z; WangCG; Zhu, R H; Wang, D C

    1999-03-19

    An antifungal peptide from seeds of Phytolacca americana, designated PAFP-s, has been isolated. The peptide is highly basic and consists of 38 residues with three disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass of 3929.0 was determined by mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained from automated Edman degradation, and cDNA cloning was successfully performed by 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence of a partial cDNA corresponded to the amino acid sequence from chemical sequencing. PAFP-s exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, and its activities differed among various fungi. PAFP-s displayed no inhibitory activity towards Escherichia coli. PAFP-s shows significant sequence similarities and the same cysteine motif with Mj-AMPs, antimicrobial peptides from seeds of Mirabilis jalapa belonging to the knottin-type antimicrobial peptide.

  1. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  2. Amino acid sequences of neuropeptides in the sinus gland of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex: a novel neuropeptide proteolysis site.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R W

    1987-08-01

    The sinus gland is a major neurosecretory structure in Crustacea. Five peptides, labeled C, D, E, F, and I, isolated from the sinus gland of the land crab have been hypothesized to arise from the incomplete proteolysis at two internal sites on a single biosynthetic intermediate peptide "H", based on amino acid composition additivities and pulse-chase radiolabeling studies. The presence of only a single major precursor for the sinus gland peptides implies that peptide H may be synthesized on a common precursor with crustacean hyperglycemic hormone forms, "J" and "L," and a peptide, "K," similar to peptides with molt inhibiting activity. Here I report amino acid sequences of these peptides. The amino terminal sequence of the parent peptide, H, (and the homologous fragments) proved refractory to Edman degradation. Data from amino acid analysis and carboxypeptidase digestion of the naturally occurring fragments and of fragments produced by endopeptidase digestion were used together with Edman degradation to obtain the sequences. Amino acid analysis of fragments of the naturally occurring "overlap" peptides (those produced by internal cleavage at one site on H) was used to obtain the sequences across the cleavage sites. The amino acid sequence of the land crab peptide H is Arg-Ser-Ala-Asp-Gly-Phe-Gly-Arg-Met-Glu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Thr-Ser-Leu-Arg-Gly- Ser-Ala-Glu- Ser-Pro-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-Ser-Ala-Ala-His-Pro-Leu-Glu. In vivo cleavage at one site involves excision of arginine from the sequence Leu-Arg-Gly, whereas cleavage at the other site involves excision of serine from the sequence Glu-Ser-Leu. Proteolysis at the latter sequence has not been previously reported in intact secretory granules. The aspartate at position 4 is possibly covalently modified.

  3. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  4. Comparison of amino acid sequence of bovine coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) with that of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Katayama, K; Ericsson, L H; Enfield, D L; Walsh, K A; Neurath, H; Davie, E W; Titani, K

    1979-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine blood coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) is presented and compared with the sequences of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins and pancreatic trypsinogen. The 416-residue sequence of Factor IX was determined largely by automated Edman degradation of two large segments, containing 181 and 235 residues, isolated after activating Factor IX with a protease from Russell's viper venom. Subfragments of the two segments were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl, tryptophyl, and asparaginyl-glycyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Factor IX, Factor X, and Protein C demonstrates that they are homologous throughout. Their homology with prothrombin, however, is restricted to the amino-terminal region, which is rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and the carboxyl-terminal region, which represents the catalytic domain of these proteins and corresponds to that of pancreatic serine proteases.

  5. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  6. Purification and amino acid sequence of aminopeptidase P from pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Vergas Romero, C; Neudorfer, I; Mann, K; Schäfer, W

    1995-04-01

    Aminopeptidase P from kidney cortex was purified in high yield (recovery greater than or equal to 20%) by a series of column chromatographic steps after solubilization of the membrane-bound glycoprotein with n-butanol. A coupled enzymic assay, using Gly-Pro-Pro-NH-Nap as substrate and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV as auxilliary enzyme, was used to monitor the purification. The purification procedure yielded two forms of aminopeptidase P differing in their carbohydrate composition (glycoforms). Both enzyme preparations were homogeneous as assessed by SDS/PAGE silver staining, and isoelectric focusing. Both forms possessed the same substrate specificity, catalysed the same reaction, and consisted of identical protein chains. The amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry consisted of 623 amino acids. Six N-glycosylation sites, all contained in the N-terminal half of the protein, were characterized. PMID:7744038

  7. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  8. The adipokinetic neuropeptide of Mantodea. Sequence elucidation and evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1991-03-01

    A neuropeptide with adipokinetic activity in Locusta migratoria and the mantid Empusa pennata, and hypertrehalosaemic activity in Periplaneta americana, was isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography from corpora cardiaca of the mantids E. pennata and Sphodromantis sp. After brief enzymatic digestion by 5-oxoprolylpeptidase the primary structure of the peptide of each species was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman degradation. The C-terminus of both peptides was blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion with carboxypeptidase A. The peptides of both species were identical: a blocked, uncharged octapeptide with the sequence L-Glu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp-NH2. The peptide is now called mantid adipokinetic hormone (Emp-AKH). The synthetic peptide was chromatographically indistinguishable from the natural compound and increased blood lipids in locusts and blood carbohydrates in cockroaches when administered in low doses. The structural features clearly define the peptide as a novel member of the large AKH/RPCH-family of peptides. Seven amino-acid residues are at identical positions in Emp-AKH when compared with the adipokinetic hormone of a dragonfly (Lia-AKH) and the hypertrehalosaemic hormone I from the American cockroach (Pea-CAH-I). Evolutionary relationships to other insect orders are discussed.

  9. Investigation of the protein osteocalcin of Camelops hesternus: Sequence, structure and phylogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpula, James F.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Gandhi, Hasand; Strahler, John R.; Walker, Angela K.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Smith, James J.; Voorhies, Michael R.; George Corner, R.; Andrews, Phillip C.

    2007-12-01

    Ancient DNA sequences offer an extraordinary opportunity to unravel the evolutionary history of ancient organisms. Protein sequences offer another reservoir of genetic information that has recently become tractable through the application of mass spectrometric techniques. The extent to which ancient protein sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships, however, has not been explored. We determined the osteocalcin amino acid sequence from the bone of an extinct Camelid (21 ka, Camelops hesternus) excavated from Isleta Cave, New Mexico and three bones of extant camelids: bactrian camel ( Camelus bactrianus); dromedary camel ( Camelus dromedarius) and guanaco ( Llama guanacoe) for a diagenetic and phylogenetic assessment. There was no difference in sequence among the four taxa. Structural attributes observed in both modern and ancient osteocalcin include a post-translation modification, Hyp 9, deamidation of Gln 35 and Gln 39, and oxidation of Met 36. Carbamylation of the N-terminus in ancient osteocalcin may result in blockage and explain previous difficulties in sequencing ancient proteins via Edman degradation. A phylogenetic analysis using osteocalcin sequences of 25 vertebrate taxa was conducted to explore osteocalcin protein evolution and the utility of osteocalcin sequences for delineating phylogenetic relationships. The maximum likelihood tree closely reflected generally recognized taxonomic relationships. For example, maximum likelihood analysis recovered rodents, birds and, within hominins, the Homo-Pan-Gorilla trichotomy. Within Artiodactyla, character state analysis showed that a substitution of Pro 4 for His 4 defines the Capra-Ovis clade within Artiodactyla. Homoplasy in our analysis indicated that osteocalcin evolution is not a perfect indicator of species evolution. Limited sequence availability prevented assigning functional significance to sequence changes. Our preliminary analysis of osteocalcin evolution represents an initial step towards a

  10. A unique charged tyrosine-containing member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone peptide family isolated and sequenced from two beetle species.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1991-05-01

    An identical neuropeptide was isolated from the corpora cardiaca of two beetle species, Melolontha melolontha and Geotrupes stercorosus. Its primary structure was determined by pulsed-liquid-phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion when the peptide was incubated with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of this peptide, which is designated Mem-CC, is pGlu-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2. It is a new member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides with two unusual structural features: it is charged and contains a tyrosine residue at position 4, where all other family members have a phenylalanine residue. Structure-activity studies in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) and the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) revealed that the peptide was poorly active, owing to its structural uniqueness. PMID:2039445

  11. Amino acid sequence of a new mitochondrially synthesized proteolipid of the ATP synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Velours, J; Esparza, M; Hoppe, J; Sebald, W; Guerin, B

    1984-01-01

    The purification and the amino acid sequence of a proteolipid translated on ribosomes in yeast mitochondria is reported. This protein, which is a subunit of the ATP synthase, was purified by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2/1) and subsequent chromatography on phosphocellulose and reverse phase h.p.l.c. A mol. wt. of 5500 was estimated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-30 in 80% formic acid. The complete amino acid sequence of this protein was determined by automated solid phase Edman degradation of the whole protein and of fragments obtained after cleavage with cyanogen bromide. The sequence analysis indicates a length of 48 amino acid residues. The calculated mol. wt. of 5870 corresponds to the value found by gel chromatography. This polypeptide contains three basic residues and no negatively charged side chain. The three basic residues are clustered at the C terminus. The primary structure of this protein is in full agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative polypeptide encoded by the mitochondrial aap1 gene recently discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, this protein shows 50% homology with the amino acid sequence of a putative polypeptide encoded by an unidentified reading frame also discovered near the mitochondrial ATPase subunit 6 gene in Aspergillus nidulans. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6323165

  12. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  13. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  14. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  15. Sequence characterization of a novel alpha-neurotoxin from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Huang, T Y; Kuo, K W; Chen, S W; Huang, K F; Chiou, S H

    1993-02-26

    Several postsynaptic neurotoxins (alpha-neurotoxins) with distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties were isolated and purified from the King cobra venom (Ophiophagus hannah) by employing sequentially preparative-scale cation-exchange chromatography on SP-Sephadex C-25 coupled with gel filtration and reversed-phase HPLC. The complete sequence of one neurotoxin was determined by N-terminal Edman degradation with the automatic pulsed-liquid phase sequencer on some peptide fragments generated from the endopeptidases, i.e. trypsin, S. aureus V8 protease and lysyl endopeptidase. This novel neurotoxin is a basic polypeptide of pI 9.05, consisting of 72 amino-acid residues with 10 cysteine residues. It is found to share about 60% sequence homology with Toxins a and b isolated from the same venom and the well established alpha-bungarotoxin, a major postsynaptic toxic ligand for acetylcholine receptor isolated from Bungarus multicinctus. The characterized alpha-neurotoxin molecules were also shown to bind specifically with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the electric eel, Torpedo californica.

  16. Some properties and amino acid sequence of plastocyanin from a green alga, Ulva arasakii.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, F; Fukazawa, T; Mishina, Y; Sugimura, Y

    1989-08-01

    Plastocyanin was purified from a multicellular, marine green alga, Ulva arasakii, by conventional methods to homogeneity. The oxidized plastocyanin showed absorption maxima at 252, 276.8, 460, 595.3, and 775 nm, and shoulders at 259, 265, 269, and 282.5 nm; the ratio A276.8/A595.3 was 1.5. The midpoint redox potential was determined to be 0.356 V at pH 7.0 with a ferri- and ferrocyanide system. The molecular weight was estimated to be 10,200 and 11,000 by SDS-PAGE and by gel filtration, respectively. U. arasakii also has a small amount of cytochrome c6, like Enteromorpha prolifera. The amino acid sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin was determined by Edman degradation and by carboxypeptidase digestion of the plastocyanin, six tryptic peptides, and five staphylococcal protease peptides. The plastocyanin contained 98 amino acid residues, giving a molecular weight of 10,236 including one copper atom. The complete sequence is as follows: AQIVKLGGDDGALAFVPSKISVAAGEAIEFVNNAGFPHNIVFDEDAVPAGVDADAISYDDYLNSKGETV VRKLSTPGVY G VYCEPHAGAGMKMTITVQ. The sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin is closet to that of the E. prolifera protein (85% homology). A phylogenetic tree of five algal and two higher plant plastocyanins was constructed by comparing the amino acid differences. The branching order is considered to be as follows: a blue-green alga, unicellular green algae, multicellular green algae, and higher plants. PMID:2509442

  17. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  18. Isolation, characterization and cDNA sequencing of a Kazal family proteinase inhibitor from seminal plasma of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Olczak, Mariusz; Wojtczak, Mariola; Glogowski, Jan; Jankowski, Jan; Watorek, Wiesław; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2008-06-01

    The turkey reproductive tract and seminal plasma contain a serine proteinase inhibitor that seems to be unique for the reproductive tract. Our experimental objective was to isolate, characterize and cDNA sequence the Kazal family proteinase inhibitor from turkey seminal plasma and testis. Seminal plasma contains two forms of a Kazal family inhibitor: virgin (Ia) represented by an inhibitor of moderate electrophoretic migration rate (present also in the testis) and modified (Ib, a split peptide bond) represented by an inhibitor with a fast migration rate. The inhibitor from the seminal plasma was purified by affinity, ion-exchange and reverse phase chromatography. The testis inhibitor was purified by affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. N-terminal Edman sequencing of the two seminal plasma inhibitors and testis inhibitor were identical. This sequence was used to construct primers and obtain a cDNA sequence from the testis. Analysis of a cDNA sequence indicated that turkey proteinase inhibitor belongs to Kazal family inhibitors (pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors, mammalian acrosin inhibitors) and caltrin. The turkey seminal plasma Kazal inhibitor belongs to low molecular mass inhibitors and is characterized by a high value of the equilibrium association constant for inhibitor/trypsin complexes.

  19. Identifying proteins from two-dimensional gels by molecular mass searching of peptide fragments in protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Henzel, W J; Billeci, T M; Stults, J T; Wong, S C; Grimley, C; Watanabe, C

    1993-06-01

    A rapid method for the identification of known proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is described in which molecular masses of peptide fragments are used to search a protein sequence database. The peptides are generated by in situ reduction, alkylation, and tryptic digestion of proteins electroblotted from two-dimensional gels. Masses are determined at the subpicomole level by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of the unfractionated digest. A computer program has been developed that searches the protein sequence database for multiple peptides of individual proteins that match the measured masses. To ensure that the most recent database updates are included, a theoretical digest of the entire database is generated each time the program is executed. This method facilitates simultaneous processing of a large number of two-dimensional gel spots. The method was applied to a two-dimensional gel of a crude Escherichia coli extract that was electroblotted onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane. Ten randomly chosen spots were analyzed. With as few as three peptide masses, each protein was uniquely identified from over 91,000 protein sequences. All identifications were verified by concurrent N-terminal sequencing of identical spots from a second blot. One of the spots contained an N-terminally blocked protein that required enzymatic cleavage, peptide separation, and Edman degradation for confirmation of its identity.

  20. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  1. Dissociation pathways of alkali-cationized peptides: opportunities for C-terminal peptide sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lin, T; Payne, A H; Glish, G L

    2001-05-01

    Dissociation pathways of alkali-cationized peptides have been studied using multiple stages of mass spectrometry (MSx) with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Over 100 peptide ions ranging from 2 to 10 residues in length and containing each of the 20 common amino acids have been examined. The formation of the [b(n-1) + Na + OH]+ product ion is the predominant dissociation pathway for the majority of the common amino acids. This product corresponds to a sodium-cationized peptide one residue shorter in length than the original peptide. In a few cases, product ions such as [b(n-1) + Na - H]+ and those formed by loss, or partial loss, of a sidechain are observed. Both [b(n-1) + Na + OH]+ and [b(n-1) + Na - H]+ product ions can be selected as parent ions for a subsequent stage of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). It is shown that these dissociation patterns provide opportunities for peptide sequencing by successive dissociation from the C-terminus of alkali-cationized peptides. Up to seven stages of MS/MS have been performed on a series of [b + Na + OH]+ ions to provide sequence information from the C-terminus. This method is analogous to Edman degradation except that the cleavage occurs from the C-terminus instead of the N-terminus, making it more attractive for N-terminal blocked peptides. The isomers leucine and isoleucine cannot be differentiated by this method but the isobars lysine and glutamine can.

  2. Isolation and sequence analysis of peptides from the venom of Protonectarina sylveirae (Hymenoptera-Vespidae).

    PubMed

    Dohtsu, K; Okumura, K; Hagiwara, K; Palma, M S; Nakajima, T

    1993-01-01

    Three new venom peptides were isolated from the Brazilian wasp; Protonectarina sylveirae and their complete amino acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation as well as by FAB-mass spectrometry. One (P-8) of them was a new analog of mastoparan family; therefore, we named it Protonectarina mastoparan. Another peptide (P-10) had an amino acid sequence homology with Ves-CP-T, a chemotactic peptide of wasp venom, and bombolitin-V, the venom peptide from bumblebee. The third peptide (P-6) was structurally unique, possessing an intramolecular disulfide bond. Not only Protonectarina mastoparan (P-8) but also P-6 and P-10 caused histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells as potently as mastoparan (EC50s were about 1 x 10(-6) M for P-6 and 2 x 10(-6) M for P-10). In addition, P-10 in a concentration higher than 1 x 10(-5) M induced hemolysis though whose hemolytic activity was about a half potency of that of mastoparan. However, P-6 did not cause hemolysis up to the concentration of 10 microM. We have named them sylverin for the peptide P-6 and protonectin for the peptide P-10.

  3. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  4. Sequences of metanicins, 20-residue peptaibols from the ascomycetous fungus CBS 597.80.

    PubMed

    Kimonyo, Anastase; Brückner, Hans

    2013-05-01

    Four linear 20-residue peptaibols, named metanicins (MTCs) A-D, were isolated from submerged cultures of the ascomycetous fungus CBS 597.80. Structure elucidation was performed by a combination of fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), electrospray ionization MS, Edman degradation of isolated fragments, and amino acid analysis by ion-exchange and gas chromatography, and enantioselective HPLC. The sequences of MTC A(B) are (amino acid exchange in B and C in parentheses): Ac-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Gln-Aib-Val-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib(D-Iva)-Gln-Gln-Pheol and of MTC C(D) Ac-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Gln-Aib-Val-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib(D-Iva)-Gln-Gln-Pheol (Ac, acetyl; Aib, α-aminoisobutyric acid; Iva, isovaline; Pheol, L-phenylalaninol). The peptides are related, and some of the sequences are identical, to other 20-residue peptaibols isolated from Trichoderma species. MTCs show moderate activities against Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus, and very low activities against Bacillus subtilis. The producer has originally been identified and deposited as Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae CBS 597.80. Although this identification has been withdrawn by Centralbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) in the meantime, the accession number will be retained - independently from any taxonomic revisions. PMID:23681727

  5. Cloning, characterization, and DNA sequence of a human cDNA encoding neuropeptide tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Minth, C D; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro translation of the RNA isolated from a human pheochromocytoma demonstrated that this tumor contained a mRNA encoding a 10.5-kDa protein, which was immunoprecipitated with antiserum raised against porcine neuropeptide Y. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from total RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pUC8. Transformants containing the neuropeptide Y cDNA were identified using the mixed hybridization probe d[A-(A,G)-(A,G)-T-T-(A,G,T)-A-T-(A,G)-T-A-(A,G)-T-G]. The probe sequences were based on the known amino acid sequence, His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu, found in porcine neuropeptide Y. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was determined and contained 86 and 174 bases in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. The coding sequence consisted of 291 bases, suggesting a precursor to neuropeptide Y that was 97 amino acids long (10,839 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence of the precursor suggested that there were at least two sites of proteolytic processing, which would generate three peptides having 28 (signal peptide), 36 (human neuropeptide Y), and 30 (COOH-terminal peptide) amino acid residues. A partial NH2-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation of the immunoprecipitated in vitro translation product identified the positions of methionine and leucine in the first 30 residues of the prepropeptide. A highly sensitive single-stranded complementary mRNA hybridization probe specific for neuropeptide Y mRNA was prepared using the bacteriophage SP6 promoter. This probe was used to identify a mRNA corresponding to neuropeptide Y of approximately 800 bases. Images PMID:6589611

  6. Sequence analyses of two neuropeptides of the AKH/RPCH-family from the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G; Hilbich, C; Beyreuther, K; Rinehart, K L

    1988-01-01

    Two neuropeptides with adipokinetic activity in Locusta migratoria and hypertrehalosaemic activity in Periplaneta americana were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography from the corpus cardiacum of the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera. The sequences of both peptides, designated Ro I and Ro II, were determined by gas-phase sequencing employing Edman degradation after the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue was enzymatically deblocked, as well as by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Ro I was found to be a decapeptide with the primary structure: pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp-Gly-Thr-NH2, whereas Ro II is an octapeptide with the structure: pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp-NH2. Ro II is identical with AKH-G isolated from the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Synthetic materials having the assigned structures were found to be chromatographically, mass spectrometrically, and biologically indistinguishable from the natural peptides, confirming the sequences and establishing the Romalea peptides as members of the AKH/RPCH-family of peptides. PMID:3226948

  7. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  8. MSLICE Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Morris, John R.

    2011-01-01

    MSLICE Sequencing is a graphical tool for writing sequences and integrating them into RML files, as well as for producing SCMF files for uplink. When operated in a testbed environment, it also supports uplinking these SCMF files to the testbed via Chill. This software features a free-form textural sequence editor featuring syntax coloring, automatic content assistance (including command and argument completion proposals), complete with types, value ranges, unites, and descriptions from the command dictionary that appear as they are typed. The sequence editor also has a "field mode" that allows tabbing between arguments and displays type/range/units/description for each argument as it is edited. Color-coded error and warning annotations on problematic tokens are included, as well as indications of problems that are not visible in the current scroll range. "Quick Fix" suggestions are made for resolving problems, and all the features afforded by modern source editors are also included such as copy/cut/paste, undo/redo, and a sophisticated find-and-replace system optionally using regular expressions. The software offers a full XML editor for RML files, which features syntax coloring, content assistance and problem annotations as above. There is a form-based, "detail view" that allows structured editing of command arguments and sequence parameters when preferred. The "project view" shows the user s "workspace" as a tree of "resources" (projects, folders, and files) that can subsequently be opened in editors by double-clicking. Files can be added, deleted, dragged-dropped/copied-pasted between folders or projects, and these operations are undoable and redoable. A "problems view" contains a tabular list of all problems in the current workspace. Double-clicking on any row in the table opens an editor for the appropriate sequence, scrolling to the specific line with the problem, and highlighting the problematic characters. From there, one can invoke "quick fix" as described

  9. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  10. A comparison of the N-terminal sequence of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum angiotensin converting-like enzyme with forms of vertebrate angiotensin converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Laurent, V; Salzet, M

    1995-09-22

    This paper reports the purification of an angiotensing-converting like enzyme (ACE) of ca. 120 kDa from extracts of head membranes of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum. After solubilization with Triton X-114, the ACE-like enzyme contained in the detergent-poor fraction was separated using five steps of purification including gel permeation and anion exchange chromatographies followed by reverse-phase HPLC. The first 23 amino acid residues of the N-terminal part (GLDPELSPGCFSADEAGAQLFAE) of the purified S-pyridylethylated leech ACE established by automated Edman degradation revealed ca. 87% sequence identity with the N-terminal sequence of the guinea pig ACE. This enzyme cleaves the hyppuryl-His-Leu substrate with a specific activity of 5600 nmol hyppurate min-1 mg protein-1. Hydrolysis of this substrate by ACE-like enzyme is inhibited at 80% by 10 microM captopril or 10 microM lisinopril (IC50 of 200 nM and 50 nM, respectively). This enzyme is close in sequence and in activity to single domain vertebrate ACE. This is the first N-terminal sequence of an ACE-like enzyme determined in invertebrates.

  11. Complete primary structure of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p III: comparison with known Lol p I and II sequences.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-10-17

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p III, determined by the automated Edman degradation of the protein and its selected fragments, is reported in this paper. Cleavage by enzymatic and chemical techniques established unambiguously the sequence for this 97-residue protein (Mr = 10,909), which lacks cysteine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. The sequence of Lol p III is very similar to that of another L. perenne allergen, Lol p II, which was sequenced recently; of the 97 positions in the two proteins, 57 are occupied by identical amino acids (59% identity). In addition, both allergens share a similar structure with an antibody-binding fragment of a third L. perenne allergen, Lol p I. Since human antibody responsiveness to all these three allergens is associated with HLA-DR3, and since the structure common to the three molecules shows high degrees of amphipathicity in Lol p II and III, we speculate that this common segment in the three molecules might contain or contribute to the respectively Ia/T-cell sites.

  12. Novel proline-hydroxyproline glycopeptides from the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Wigg.) flowers: de novo sequencing and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Astafieva, Alexandra A; Enyenihi, Atim A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Grishin, Eugene V; Odintsova, Tatyana I; Zubarev, Roman A; Egorov, Tsezi A

    2015-09-01

    Two novel homologous peptides named ToHyp1 and ToHyp2 that show no similarity to any known proteins were isolated from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers by multidimensional liquid chromatography. Amino acid and mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that the peptides have unusual structure: they are cysteine-free, proline-hydroxyproline-rich and post-translationally glycosylated by pentoses, with 5 carbohydrates in ToHyp2 and 10 in ToHyp1. The ToHyp2 peptide with a monoisotopic molecular mass of 4350.3Da was completely sequenced by a combination of Edman degradation and de novo sequencing via top down multistage collision induced dissociation (CID) and higher energy dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). ToHyp2 consists of 35 amino acids, contains eighteen proline residues, of which 8 prolines are hydroxylated. The peptide displays antifungal activity and inhibits growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further showed that carbohydrate moieties have no significant impact on the peptide structure, but are important for antifungal activity although not absolutely necessary. The deglycosylated ToHyp2 peptide was less active against the susceptible fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana than the native peptide. Unique structural features of the ToHyp2 peptide place it into a new family of plant defense peptides. The discovery of ToHyp peptides in T. officinale flowers expands the repertoire of molecules of plant origin with practical applications. PMID:26259198

  13. Novel proline-hydroxyproline glycopeptides from the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Wigg.) flowers: de novo sequencing and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Astafieva, Alexandra A; Enyenihi, Atim A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Grishin, Eugene V; Odintsova, Tatyana I; Zubarev, Roman A; Egorov, Tsezi A

    2015-09-01

    Two novel homologous peptides named ToHyp1 and ToHyp2 that show no similarity to any known proteins were isolated from Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers by multidimensional liquid chromatography. Amino acid and mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that the peptides have unusual structure: they are cysteine-free, proline-hydroxyproline-rich and post-translationally glycosylated by pentoses, with 5 carbohydrates in ToHyp2 and 10 in ToHyp1. The ToHyp2 peptide with a monoisotopic molecular mass of 4350.3Da was completely sequenced by a combination of Edman degradation and de novo sequencing via top down multistage collision induced dissociation (CID) and higher energy dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). ToHyp2 consists of 35 amino acids, contains eighteen proline residues, of which 8 prolines are hydroxylated. The peptide displays antifungal activity and inhibits growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further showed that carbohydrate moieties have no significant impact on the peptide structure, but are important for antifungal activity although not absolutely necessary. The deglycosylated ToHyp2 peptide was less active against the susceptible fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana than the native peptide. Unique structural features of the ToHyp2 peptide place it into a new family of plant defense peptides. The discovery of ToHyp peptides in T. officinale flowers expands the repertoire of molecules of plant origin with practical applications.

  14. Purification and amino acid sequence of halystase from snake venom of Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii, a serine protease that cleaves specifically fibrinogen and kininogen.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Sakurai, Y; Fujimura, Y; Hayashi, I; Oh-Ishi, S; Suzuki, M; Hamako, J; Yamamoto, Y; Yamazaki, J; Kinoshita, M; Titani, K

    1998-03-15

    We have isolated a serine protease, halystase, from Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii venom by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose and Q-Sepharose columns, and have determined the complete amino acid sequence by Edman degradation and by mass spectral analysis of peptides generated by enzymatic and chemical cleavage. The 238-residue sequence of halystase, containing N-linked carbohydrates (about 13%) at two sites showed significant similarity to other thrombin-like snake venom serine proteases (66-72%), mammalian tissue kallikrein (42%) and thrombin (26%). Halystase contained the tentative catalytic triad of His43, Asp88 and Ser184 common to all serine proteases and Asp178 in the primary substrate-binding site. Although halystase contained an RGD sequence at residues 181-183, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. It hydrolyzed most efficiently a tissue-kallikrein substrate, prolylphenylalanylarginyl-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide, and released bradykinin from bovine kininogen. Halystase did not coagulate human plasma, but it cleaved the fibrinogen B beta chain at the carboxyl side of Arg42 and cleaved slowly the fibrogen A alpha chain. Fibrinogen thus treated gradually became insensitive to thrombin. The proteolytic activity was inhibited with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride or leupeptin. These results indicate that halystase is a serine protease structurally similar to coagulating thrombin-like snake venom proteases, but it specifically cleaves fibrinogen at sites different from thrombin without inducing fibrin clotting, and hydrolyzes kininogen to produce bradykinin, resulting in the reduction of blood pressure.

  15. Identification and localization of amino acid substitutions between two phenobarbital-inducible rat hepatic microsomal cytochromes P-450 by micro sequence analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, P M; Ryan, D E; Levin, W; Shively, J E

    1983-01-01

    Two isozymes of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450--P-450b and P-450e--were compared by micro sequence analyses of their NH2 termini and tryptic fragments. These two phenobarbital-inducible hemoproteins, which are immunochemically indistinguishable with antibody against cytochrome P-450b, have extensive sequence homology. Automated Edman degradation of the native proteins revealed identical amino acids for the first 35 residues. Sequence determinations of the tryptic peptides, which constitute approximately 75% of each protein molecule, have thus far shown 10 amino acid differences between the two isozymes. Results of our amino acid sequence analyses established that two of the cDNAs, pcP-450pb1 and pcP-450pb4, reported by Fujii-Kuriyama et al. [Fujii-Kuriyama, Y., Mizukami, Y., Kamajiri, K., Sogawa, K. & Muramatsu, M. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 2793-2797] encode cytochrome P-450b whereas pcP-450pb2, a third cDNA whose nucleotide sequence differed slightly from that of the other two (six amino acid substitutions), encodes cytochrome P-450e. In addition to establishing the identity of these cloned cDNAs we provide direct evidence for seven additional amino acid differences between cytochromes P-450b and P-450e that occur beyond the region (Arg358) encoded by the cloned cDNA for cytochrome P-450e. Together, the amino acid sequences determined by micro sequence analysis and recombinant DNA techniques reveal 13 amino acid differences between these two isozymes. This report highlights the complementary nature of two different molecular approaches to elucidation of the amino acid sequences of isozymes with extensive structural homology. PMID:6572377

  16. Sequence homology between the subunits of two immunologically and functionally distinct types of fimbriae of Actinomyces spp.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Cisar, J O

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the type 1 fimbrial subunit gene of Actinomyces viscosus T14V revealed a consensus ribosome-binding site followed by an open reading frame of 1,599 nucleotides. The encoded protein of 533 amino acids (Mr = 56,899) was predominantly hydrophilic except for an amino-terminal signal peptide and a carboxy-terminal region identified as a potential membrane-spanning segment. Edman degradation of the cloned protein expressed in Escherichia coli and the type 1 fimbriae of A. viscosus T14V showed that both began with alanine at position 31 of the deduced amino acid sequence. The amino acid compositions of the cloned protein and fimbriae also were comparable and in close agreement with the composition of the deduced protein. The amino acid sequence of the A. viscosus T14V type 1 fimbrial subunit showed no significant global homology with various other proteins, including the pilins of gram-negative bacteria. However, 34% amino acid sequence identity was noted between the type 1 fimbrial subunit of strain T14V and the type 2 fimbrial subunit of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 (M. K. Yeung and J. O. Cisar, J. Bacteriol. 170:3803-3809, 1988). This homology included several different conserved sequences of up to eight identical amino acids that were distributed in both the amino- and carboxy-terminal thirds of each Actinomyces fimbrial subunit. These findings indicate that the different types of fimbriae on these gram-positive bacteria share a common ancestry. PMID:1970561

  17. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  18. Preserving sequence annotations across reference sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Matching and comparing sequence annotations of different reference sequences is vital to genomics research, yet many annotation formats do not specify the reference sequence types or versions used. This makes the integration of annotations from different sources difficult and error prone. Results As part of our effort to create linked data for interoperable sequence annotations, we present an RDF data model for sequence annotation using the ontological framework established by the OBO Foundry ontologies and the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). We defined reference sequences as the common domain of integration for sequence annotations, and identified three semantic relationships between sequence annotations. In doing so, we created the Reference Sequence Annotation to compensate for gaps in the SO and in its mapping to BFO, particularly for annotations that refer to versions of consensus reference sequences. Moreover, we present three integration models for sequence annotations using different reference assemblies. Conclusions We demonstrated a working example of a sequence annotation instance, and how this instance can be linked to other annotations on different reference sequences. Sequence annotations in this format are semantically rich and can be integrated easily with different assemblies. We also identify other challenges of modeling reference sequences with the BFO. PMID:25093075

  19. Amino acid sequence, S-S bridge arrangement and distribution in plant tissues of thionins from Viscum album.

    PubMed

    Orrù, S; Scaloni, A; Giannattasio, M; Urech, K; Pucci, P; Schaller, G

    1997-09-01

    The complete primary structure of a cytotoxic 5 kDa polypeptide, viscotoxin A1, isolated from Viscum album L., has been determined by combining classical Edman degradation methodology with advanced mass spectrometric procedures. The same integrated approach allowed correction of the sequence of viscotoxin A2 and definition of the pattern of the disulfide bridges. The arrangement of the cysteine pairing was determined as Cys3-Cys40, Cys4-Cys32 and Cys16-Cys26. The primary structure of viscotoxin A1 shares a high degree of similarity with the known viscotoxins and more generally with the plant alpha- and beta-thionins. The pattern of S-S bridges determined for viscotoxin A2 and A1 is similar to that inferred by X-ray and NMR analysis in crambin and related to that present in alpha-purothionin and beta-hordothionin, thus indicating a highly conserved organization of the S-S pairings within the entire family. This arrangement of S-S bridges describes a peculiar structural motif, indicated as 'concentric motif', which is suggested to stabilize a common structure occurring in various small proteins able to interact with cell membranes. The distribution of the new variant toxin in different mistletoe subspecies was investigated. Viscotoxin A1 is abundant in the seeds of the three European subspecies of V. album whereas it represents a minor component in the shoots.

  20. Purification and complete amino acid sequence of a new type of sweet protein taste-modifying activity, curculin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Theerasilp, S; Aiuchi, T; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1990-09-15

    A new taste-modifying protein named curculin was extracted with 0.5 M NaCl from the fruits of Curculigo latifolia and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. Purified curculin thus obtained gave a single band having a Mr of 12,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 8 M urea. The molecular weight determined by low-angle laser light scattering was 27,800. These results suggest that native curculin is a dimer of a 12,000-Da polypeptide. The complete amino acid sequence of curculin was determined by automatic Edman degradation. Curculin consists of 114 residues. Curculin itself elicits a sweet taste. After curculin, water elicits a sweet taste, and sour substances induce a stronger sense of sweetness. No protein with both sweet-tasting and taste-modifying activities has ever been found. There are five sets of tripeptides common to miraculin (a taste-modifying protein), six sets of tripeptides common to thaumatin (a sweet protein), and two sets of tripeptides common to monellin (a sweet protein). Anti-miraculin serum was not immunologically reactive with curculin. The mechanism of the taste-modifying action of curculin is discussed. PMID:2394746

  1. X-ray sequence and crystal structure of luffaculin 1, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomin; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein sequence can be obtained through Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, or cDNA sequencing. High resolution X-ray crystallography can also be used to derive protein sequence information, but faces the difficulty in distinguishing the Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, and Val/Thr pairs. Luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from the seeds of Luffa acutangula. Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, luffaculin 1 also demonstrates activities including inhibiting tumor cells' proliferation and inducing tumor cells' differentiation. Results The crystal structure of luffaculin 1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. Its amino-acid sequence was derived from this high resolution structure using the following criteria: 1) high resolution electron density; 2) comparison of electron density between two molecules that exist in the same crystal; 3) evaluation of the chemical environment of residues to break down the sequence assignment ambiguity in residue pairs Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr; 4) comparison with sequences of the homologous proteins. Using the criteria 1 and 2, 66% of the residues can be assigned. By incorporating with criterion 3, 86% of the residues were assigned, suggesting the effectiveness of chemical environment evaluation in breaking down residue ambiguity. In total, 94% of the luffaculin 1 sequence was assigned with high confidence using this improved X-ray sequencing strategy. Two N-acetylglucosamine moieties, linked respectively to the residues Asn77 and Asn84, can be identified in the structure. Residues Tyr70, Tyr110, Glu159 and Arg162 define the active site of luffaculin 1 as an RNA N-glycosidase. Conclusion X-ray sequencing method can be effective to derive sequence information of proteins. The evaluation of the chemical environment of residues is a useful method to break down the assignment ambiguity in Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr pairs. The sequence and the crystal structure confirm that luffaculin 1 is a new

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  3. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  4. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  5. Amino acid sequence and chemical modification of a novel alpha-neurotoxin (Oh-5) from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Leu, L F; Chang, L S; Chang, C C

    1997-04-01

    A novel alpha-neurotoxin, Oh-5, was isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom and purified by successive SP-Sephadex C-25 column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. The complete sequence of Oh-5 was determined by Edman degradation of peptide fragments generated by endopeptidases, i.e., trypsin, Saccharomyces aureus V8 protease and lysyl endopeptidase. This novel toxin comprises 72 amino acid residues with 10 cysteines. The sequence shows 89% sequence homology with Oh-4, and 60% with Toxins a and b from the same venom. The tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine and arginine residues in Oh-5 were modified with tetranitromethane (TNM), 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl (NPS) chloride, trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS), and p-hydroxyphenylglyoxal (HPG), respectively. Modification of Tyr-4 or Trp-27 did not affect the lethal toxicity at all, while the Tyr-4 and 23 nitrated derivative retained about 50% of the lethality of native toxin. Selective trinitrophenylation of Lys-51 or 69 resulted in a decrease in lethality by 29%, and 50% lethality was retained after modification of Lys-2, 51, and 69. A drastic decrease in lethality to 26% was observed when both Arg-35 and 37 were modified. The neurotoxicity was further decreased when Arg-9 was additionally modified. These results suggest that the aromatic residues, Tyr-4 and Trp-27, are not crucial for the neurotoxicity, whereas the cationic residues are involved in multipoint contact between the toxin molecule and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The residues Tyr-23 and Arg-35 and 37 in the central loop of Oh-5 seem to contribute greatly to the neurotoxicity.

  6. Multimodal sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  7. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  8. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  9. Science sequence design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskela, P. E.; Bollman, W. E.; Freeman, J. E.; Helton, M. R.; Reichert, R. J.; Travers, E. S.; Zawacki, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The activities of the following members of the Navigation Team are recorded: the Science Sequence Design Group, responsible for preparing the final science sequence designs; the Advanced Sequence Planning Group, responsible for sequence planning; and the Science Recommendation Team (SRT) representatives, responsible for conducting the necessary sequence design interfaces with the teams during the mission. The interface task included science support in both advance planning and daily operations. Science sequences designed during the mission are also discussed.

  10. Isolation and sequencing of an active-site peptide from Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase after affinity labeling with 2-((Bromoacetyl)amino)pentitol 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraij, B.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    2-((Bromoacetyl)amino)pentitol 1,5-bisphosphate was reported to be a highly selective affinity label for ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzyme has now been inactivated with a /sup 14/C-labeled reagent in order to identify the target residue at the sequence level. Subsequent to inactivation, the enzyme was carboxymethylated with iodoacetate and then digested with trypsin. The only radioactive peptide in the digest was obtained at a high degree of purity by successive chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, SP-Sephadex, and Sephadex G-25. On the basis of amino acid analysis of the purified peptide, the derivatized residue was a methionyl sulfonium salt. Automated Edman degradation confirmed the purity of the labeled peptide and established its sequence as Leu-Gln-Gly-Ala-Ser-Gly-Ile-His-Thr-Gly-Thr-Met-Gly-Phe-Gly-Lys-Met-Glu-Gly-Glu-Ser-Ser-Asp-Arg. Cleavage of this peptide with cyanogen bromide showed that the reagent moiety was covalently attached to the second methionyl residue. Sequence homology with the carboxylase/oxygenase from spinach indicates that the lysyl residue immediately preceding the alkylated methionine corresponds to Lys-334, a residue previously implicated at the active site. 31 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. The generalized quaternion sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveci, Ömür

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we define the recurrence sequence by using the relation matrix of the generalized quaternion group and then, we obtain miscellaneous properties of this sequence. Also, we obtain the cyclic groups and the semigroups which are produced by generating matrix of the sequence defined when read modulo m. Furthermore, we study this sequence modulo m, and then we derive the relationship among the order the cyclic groups obtained and the periods of the sequence defined.

  12. Sequence analysis of the Alcaligenes eutrophus chromosomally encoded ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large and small subunit genes and their gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, K; Caton, J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chromosomally encoded ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) large (rbcL) and small (rbcS) subunit genes of the hydrogen bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus ATCC 17707 was determined. We found that the two coding regions are separated by a 47-base-pair intergenic region, and both genes are preceded by plausible ribosome-binding sites. Cotranscription of the rbcL and rbcS genes has been demonstrated previously. The rbcL and rbcS genes encode polypeptides of 487 and 135 amino acids, respectively. Both genes exhibited similar codon usage which was highly biased and different from that of other organisms. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of both subunit proteins was determined by Edman degradation. No processing of the rbcS protein was detected, while the rbcL protein underwent a posttranslational loss of formylmethionyl. The A. eutrophus rbcL and rbcS proteins exhibited 56.8 to 58.3% and 35.6 to 38.5% amino acid sequence homology, respectively, with the corresponding proteins from cyanobacteria, eucaryotic algae, and plants. The A. eutrophus and Rhodospirillum rubrum rbcL proteins were only about 32% homologous. The N- and C-terminal sequences of both the rbcL and the rbcS proteins were among the most divergent regions. Known or proposed active site residues in other rbcL proteins, including Lys, His, Arg, and Asp residues, were conserved in the A. eutrophus enzyme. The A. eutrophus rbcS protein, like those of cyanobacteria, lacks a 12-residue internal sequence that is found in plant RuBPCase. Comparison of hydropathy profiles and secondary structure predictions by the method described by Chou and Fasman (P. Y. Chou and G. D. Fasman, Adv. Enzymol. 47:45-148, 1978) revealed striking similarities between A. eutrophus RuBPCase and other hexadecameric enzymes. This suggests that folding of the polypeptide chains is similar. The observed sequence homologies were consistent with the notion that both the rbcL and rbcS genes of the

  13. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  14. Contamination of sequence databases with adaptor sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Sanders, A.R.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1997-02-01

    Because of the exponential increase in the amount of DNA sequences being added to the public databases on a daily basis, it has become imperative to identify sources of contamination rapidly. Previously, contaminations of sequence databases have been reported to alert the scientific community to the problem. These contaminations can be divided into two categories. The first category comprises host sequences that have been difficult for submitters to manage or control. Examples include anomalous sequences derived from Escherichia coli, which are inserted into the chromosomes (and plasmids) of the bacterial hosts. Insertion sequences are highly mobile and are capable of transposing themselves into plasmids during cloning manipulation. Another example of the first category is the infection with yeast genomic DNA or with bacterial DNA of some commercially available cDNA libraries from Clontech. The second category of database contamination is due to the inadvertent inclusion of nonhost sequences. This category includes incorporation of cloning-vector sequences and multicloning sites in the database submission. M13-derived artifacts have been common, since M13-based vectors have been widely used for subcloning DNA fragments. Recognizing this problem, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) started to screen, in April 1994, all sequences directly submitted to GenBank, against a set of vector data retrieved from GenBank by use of key-word searches, such as {open_quotes}vector.{close_quotes} In this report, we present evidence for another sequence artifact that is widespread but that, to our knowledge, has not yet been reported. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  16. Sequence information signal processor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Waterman, Michael S.; Hunkapillar, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit is used to compare two sequences, such as genetic sequences, to determine which alignment of the sequences produces the greatest similarity. The circuit includes a linear array of series-connected processors, each of which stores a single element from one of the sequences and compares that element with each successive element in the other sequence. For each comparison, the processor generates a scoring parameter that indicates which segment ending at those two elements produces the greatest degree of similarity between the sequences. The processor uses the scoring parameter to generate a similar scoring parameter for a comparison between the stored element and the next successive element from the other sequence. The processor also delivers the scoring parameter to the next processor in the array for use in generating a similar scoring parameter for another pair of elements. The electronic circuit determines which processor and alignment of the sequences produce the scoring parameter with the highest value.

  17. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  18. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  19. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  20. Nonparametric Combinatorial Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Fabian L.; Jordan, Michael I.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This paper presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three sequence datasets which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  1. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  2. Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Herter, Brandi N.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) is an important tool for characterizing viral populations. It is culture independent, requires no a priori knowledge of the viruses in the sample, and may provide useful genomic information. However, MSS can lack sensitivity and may yield insufficient data for detailed analysis. We have created a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. A computational approach condensed ∼1 billion bp of viral reference sequence into <200 million bp of unique, representative sequence suitable for targeted sequence capture. We compared the effectiveness of detecting viruses in standard MSS versus MSS following targeted sequence capture. First, we analyzed two sets of samples, one derived from samples submitted to a diagnostic virology laboratory and one derived from samples collected in a study of fever in children. We detected 14 and 18 viruses in the two sets, comprising 19 genera from 10 families, with dramatic enhancement of genome representation following capture enrichment. The median fold-increases in percentage viral reads post-capture were 674 and 296. Median breadth of coverage increased from 2.1% to 83.2% post-capture in the first set and from 2.0% to 75.6% in the second set. Next, we analyzed samples containing a set of diverse anellovirus sequences and demonstrated that ViroCap could be used to detect viral sequences with up to 58% variation from the references used to select capture probes. ViroCap substantially enhances MSS for a comprehensive set of viruses and has utility for research and clinical applications. PMID:26395152

  3. Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Todd N; Wylie, Kristine M; Herter, Brandi N; Storch, Gregory A

    2015-12-01

    Metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) is an important tool for characterizing viral populations. It is culture independent, requires no a priori knowledge of the viruses in the sample, and may provide useful genomic information. However, MSS can lack sensitivity and may yield insufficient data for detailed analysis. We have created a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. A computational approach condensed ∼1 billion bp of viral reference sequence into <200 million bp of unique, representative sequence suitable for targeted sequence capture. We compared the effectiveness of detecting viruses in standard MSS versus MSS following targeted sequence capture. First, we analyzed two sets of samples, one derived from samples submitted to a diagnostic virology laboratory and one derived from samples collected in a study of fever in children. We detected 14 and 18 viruses in the two sets, comprising 19 genera from 10 families, with dramatic enhancement of genome representation following capture enrichment. The median fold-increases in percentage viral reads post-capture were 674 and 296. Median breadth of coverage increased from 2.1% to 83.2% post-capture in the first set and from 2.0% to 75.6% in the second set. Next, we analyzed samples containing a set of diverse anellovirus sequences and demonstrated that ViroCap could be used to detect viral sequences with up to 58% variation from the references used to select capture probes. ViroCap substantially enhances MSS for a comprehensive set of viruses and has utility for research and clinical applications.

  4. Career Academy Course Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Thom; Lenz, Robert

    This career academy course sequence guide is designed to give teachers a quick overview of the course sequences of well-known career academy and career pathway programs from across the country. The guide presents a variety of sample course sequences for the following academy themes: (1) arts and communication; (2) business and finance; (3)…

  5. Uncorrectable sequences and telecommand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekroot, Laura; Mceliece, R.; Dolinar, S.; Swanson, L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of a tail sequence for command link transmission units is to fail to decode, so that the command decoder will begin searching for the start of the next unit. A tail sequence used by several missions and recommended for this purpose by the Consultative Committee on Space Data Standards is analyzed. A single channel error can cause the sequence to decode. An alternative sequence requiring at least two channel errors before it can possibly decode is presented. (No sequence requiring more than two channel errors before it can possibly decode exists for this code.)

  6. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  7. Regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    The web resource Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat) offers a collection of software tools dedicated to the prediction of regulatory sites in non-coding DNA sequences. These tools include sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, pattern matching, genome-scale pattern matching, feature-map drawing, random sequence generation and other utilities. Alternative formats are supported for the representation of regulatory motifs (strings or position-specific scoring matrices) and several algorithms are proposed for pattern discovery. RSAT currently holds >100 fully sequenced genomes and these data are regularly updated from GenBank.

  8. Indexing Similar DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.

    To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an indexing data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to index highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our index requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.

  9. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  10. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  11. Sequences for Student Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  12. Agriculture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in agriculture. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  13. M&m Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Harris S.; Shiflett, Ray C.

    2005-01-01

    Consider a sequence recursively formed as follows: Start with three real numbers, and then when k are known, let the (k +1)st be such that the mean of all k +1 equals the median of the first k. The authors conjecture that every such sequence eventually becomes stable. This article presents results related to their conjecture.

  14. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  15. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  16. Twin Mitochondrial Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Yosr; Martinez, Selena; Gong, Henry; Dumas, Kevin; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-09-01

    When applying genome-wide sequencing technologies to disease investigation, it is increasingly important to resolve sequence variation in regions of the genome that may have homologous sequences. The human mitochondrial genome challenges interpretation given the potential for heteroplasmy, somatic variation, and homologous nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts). Identical twins share the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from early life, but whether the mitochondrial sequence remains similar is unclear. We compared an adult monozygotic twin pair using high throughput-sequencing and evaluated variants with primer extension and mitochondrial pre-enrichment. Thirty-seven variants were shared between the twin individuals, and the variants were verified on the original genomic DNA. These studies support highly identical genetic sequence in this case. Certain low-level variant calls were of high quality and homology to the mitochondrial DNA, and they were further evaluated. When we assessed calls in pre-enriched mitochondrial DNA templates, we found that these may represent numts, which can be differentiated from mtDNA variation. We conclude that twin identity extends to mitochondrial DNA, and it is critical to differentiate between numts and mtDNA in genome sequencing, particularly since significant heteroplasmy could influence genome interpretation. Further studies on mtDNA and numts will aid in understanding how variation occurs and persists. PMID:24040623

  17. The ABRF Metabolomics Research Group 2013 Study: Investigation of Spiked Compound Differences in a Human Plasma Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Asara, John M.; Wang, Yiwen; Neubert, Thomas A.; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Turck, Chris W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging field that involves qualitative and quantitative measurements of small molecule metabolites in a biological system. These measurements can be useful for developing biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, or predicting response to therapy. Currently, a wide variety of metabolomics approaches, including nontargeted and targeted profiling, are used across laboratories on a routine basis. A diverse set of analytical platforms, such as NMR, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Orbitrap mass spectrometry, and time-of-flight-mass spectrometry, which use various chromatographic and ionization techniques, are used for resolution, detection, identification, and quantitation of metabolites from various biological matrices. However, few attempts have been made to standardize experimental methodologies or comparative analyses across different laboratories. The Metabolomics Research Group of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities organized a “round-robin” experiment type of interlaboratory study, wherein human plasma samples were spiked with different amounts of metabolite standards in 2 groups of biologic samples (A and B). The goal was a study that resembles a typical metabolomics analysis. Here, we report our efforts and discuss challenges that create bottlenecks for the field. Finally, we discuss benchmarks that could be used by laboratories to compare their methodologies. PMID:26290656

  18. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  19. A calculation of all possible oligosaccharide isomers both branched and linear yields 1.05 x 10(12) structures for a reducing hexasaccharide: the Isomer Barrier to development of single-method saccharide sequencing or synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Laine, R A

    1994-12-01

    The number of all possible linear and branched isomers of a hexasaccharide was calculated and found to be > 1.05 x 10(12). This large number defines the Isomer Barrier, a persistent technological barrier to the development of a single analytical method for the absolute characterization of carbohydrates, regardless of sample quantity. Because of this isomer barrier, no single method can be employed to determine complete oligosaccharide structure in 100 nmol amounts with the same assurance that can be achieved for 100 pmol amounts with single-procedure Edman peptide or Sanger DNA sequencing methods. Difficulties in the development of facile synthetic schemes for oligosaccharides are also explained by this large number. No current method of chemical or physical analysis has the resolution necessary to distinguish among 10(12) structures having the same mass. Therefore the 'characterization' of a middle-weight oligosaccharide solely by NMR or mass spectrometry necessarily contains a very large margin of error. Greater uncertainty accompanies results performed solely by sequential enzyme degradation followed by gel-permeation chromatography or electrophoresis, as touted by some commercial advertisements. Much of the literature which uses these single methods to 'characterize' complex carbohydrates is, therefore, in question, and journals should beware of publishing structural characterizations unless the authors reveal all alternate possible structures which could result from their analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Synthesis and screening of support-bound combinatorial peptide libraries with free C-termini: determination of the sequence specificity of PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Pei, Dehua

    2008-03-01

    Preparation of support-bound combinatorial peptide libraries with free C-termini has been challenging in the past because solid-phase peptide synthesis usually starts from the C-terminus, which must be covalently attached to the solid support. In this work, we have developed a general methodology to synthesize and screen one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries containing free C-termini. TentaGel microbeads (90 mum) were spatially segregated into outer and inner layers, and peptides were synthesized on the beads in the conventional C --> N manner, with their C-termini attached to the support through an ester linkage on the bead surface but through an amide bond in the bead interior. The surface peptides were cyclized between their N-terminal amine and a carboxyl group installed at a C-terminal linker sequence, while the internal peptides were kept in the linear form. Base hydrolysis of the ester linkage in the cyclic peptides regenerated linear peptides that contained a free alpha-carboxyl group at their C-termini but remained covalently attached to the resin via the N-termini ("inverted" peptides). An inverted peptide library containing five random residues (theoretical diversity of 3.2 x 10 (6)) was synthesized and screened for binding to four postsynaptic density-95/discs large/zona occluden-1 (PDZ) domains of sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1) and channel-interacting PDZ domain protein (CIPP). The identity of the binding peptides was determined by sequencing the linear encoding peptides inside the bead by partial Edman degradation/mass spectrometry. Consensus recognition motifs were identified for the PDZ domains, and representative peptides were resynthesized and confirmed for binding to their cognate PDZ domains. This method should be generally applicable to all PDZ domains as well as other protein domains and enzymes that recognize the C-terminus of their target proteins.

  1. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian Thomas; Leitner, Thomas Kenneth; Apetrei, Cristian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  2. Evolution of DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-03-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted in it. Detection of terminated sequences was done radiographically on Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Improvements that have evolved over time in original Sanger sequencing include replacement of radiography with fluorescence, use of separate fluorescent markers for each nucleotide, use of capillary electrophoresis instead of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then introduction of capillary array electrophoresis. However, this technique suffered from few inherent limitations like decreased sensitivity for low level mutant alleles, complexities in analyzing highly polymorphic regions like Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and high DNA concentrations required. Several Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have been introduced by Roche, Illumina and other commercial manufacturers that tend to overcome Sanger sequencing limitations and have been reviewed. Introduction of NGS in clinical research and medical diagnostics is expected to change entire diagnostic approach. These include study of cancer variants, detection of minimal residual disease, exome sequencing, detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and their disease association, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and sequencing of microorganisms genome.

  3. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  4. Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses scope and sequence plans for curriculum coordination in elementary and secondary education related to school libraries. Highlights include library skills; levels of learning objectives; technology skills; media literacy skills; and information inquiry skills across disciplines by grade level. (LRW)

  5. Pierre Robin sequence

    MedlinePlus

    Pierre Robin syndrome; Pierre Robin complex; Pierre Robin anomaly ... The exact causes of Pierre Robin sequence are unknown. It may be part of many genetic syndromes. The lower jaw develops slowly before birth, but ...

  6. SINGLE CELL GENOME SEQUENCING

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing of single cells has become a powerful approach for studying uncultivated microorganisms that represent 90–99 % of all environmental microbes. Single cell sequencing enables not only the identification of microbes but also linking of functions to species, a feat not achievable by metagenomic techniques. Moreover, it allows the analysis of low abundance species that may be missed in community-based analyses. It has also proved very useful in complementing metagenomics in the assembly and binning of single genomes. With the advent of drastically cheaper and higher throughput sequencing technologies, it is expected that single cell sequencing will become a standard tool in studying the genome and transcriptome of microbial communities. PMID:22154471

  7. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  8. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  9. Authentication of byte sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1991-06-01

    Algorithms for the authentication of byte sequences are described. The algorithms are designed to authenticate data in the Storage, Retrieval, Analysis, and Display (SRAD) Test Data Archive of the Radiation Effects and Testing Directorate (9100) at Sandia National Laboratories, and may be used in similar situations where authentication of stored data is required. The algorithms use a well-known error detection method called the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). When a byte sequence is authenticated and stored, CRC bytes are generated and attached to the end of the sequence. When the authenticated data is retrieved, the authentication check consists of processing the entire sequence, including the CRC bytes, and checking for a remainder of zero. The error detection properties of the CRC are extensive and result in a reliable authentication of SRAD data.

  10. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Leitner, Thomas; Apetrei, Christian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  11. Genome sequencing conference II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Genome Sequencing Conference 2 was held September 30 to October 30, 1990. 26 speaker abstracts and 33 poster presentations were included in the program report. New and improved methods for DNA sequencing and genetic mapping were presented. Many of the papers were concerned with accuracy and speed of acquisition of data with computers and automation playing an increasing role. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  12. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  13. Nanapore Sequencing with MSPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Jens H.

    2011-10-01

    Nanopore sequencing is the simplest concept of converting the sequence of a single DNA molecule directly into an electronic signal. We introduced the protein pore MspA. derived from Mycobacterium smegmatis, to nanpore sequencing [1]. MspA has a single, narrow (-1.2nm) and short (<1nm) constriction, ideal to identify single nucleotides. Compared to solid state devices, MspA is reproducible with sub-nanometer precision and is engineerable using genetic mutations. DNA moves through the pore at rates exceeding 1nt/microsec. too fast to observe the passage of each nucleotide. However, when DNA is held with double stranded DNA sections or an avidin anchor, single nucleotides resident in MspA's constriction can be identified with highly resolved current differences. We have provided proof of principle of a nanopore sequencing method [2] in which we use DNA modified by inserting double stranded DNA-sections between every nucleotide. The double stranded sections are designed to halt translocation for long enough to sequentially read the sequence of the original DNA molecule. Prospects and developments to sequence unmodified native DNA using MspA will be discussed.[4pt] [1] T.Z. Butler, et al, PNAS 105 20647 (2008)[0pt] [2] I.M. Derrington, et al, PNAS 107 16060 (2010).

  14. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  15. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  16. Controlled processing during sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region’s activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations. PMID:26578941

  17. Controlled processing during sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region's activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  18. Generations of sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Erik; Lundeberg, Joakim; Ahmadian, Afshin

    2009-02-01

    Advancements in the field of DNA sequencing are changing the scientific horizon and promising an era of personalized medicine for elevated human health. Although platforms are improving at the rate of Moore's Law, thereby reducing the sequencing costs by a factor of two or three each year, we find ourselves at a point in history where individual genomes are starting to appear but where the cost is still too high for routine sequencing of whole genomes. These needs will be met by miniaturized and parallelized platforms that allow a lower sample and template consumption thereby increasing speed and reducing costs. Current massively parallel, state-of-the-art systems are providing significantly improved throughput over Sanger systems and future single-molecule approaches will continue the exponential improvements in the field.

  19. Definition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, M G; Belisle, J T

    1997-01-01

    A number of the culture filtrate proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis are known to contribute to the immunology of tuberculosis and to possess enzymatic activities associated with pathogenicity. However, a complete analysis of the protein composition of this fraction has been lacking. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detailed maps of the culture filtrate proteins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv were generated. In total, 205 protein spots were observed. The coupling of this electrophoretic technique with Western blot analysis allowed the identification and mapping of 32 proteins. Further molecular characterization of abundant proteins within this fraction was achieved by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eighteen proteins were subjected to N-group analysis; of these, only 10 could be sequenced by Edman degradation. Among the most interesting were a novel 52-kDa protein demonstrating significant homology to an alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708, a 25-kDa protein corresponding to open reading frame 28 of the M. tuberculosis cosmid MTCY1A11, and a 31-kDa protein exhibiting an amino acid sequence identical to that of antigen 85A and 85B. This latter product migrated with an isoelectric point between those of antigen 85A and 85C but did not react with the antibody specific for this complex, suggesting that there is a fourth member of the antigen 85 complex. Novel N-terminal amino acid sequences were obtained for three additional culture filtrate proteins; however, these did not yield significant homology to known protein sequences. A protein cluster of 85 to 88 kDa, recognized by the monoclonal antibodies IT-57 and IT-42 and known to react with sera from a large proportion of tuberculosis patients, was refractory to N-group analysis. Nevertheless, mass spectrometry of peptides obtained from one member of this complex identified it as the M. tuberculosis Kat

  20. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  1. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  2. Microchips for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrangelo, Carlos H.; Palaniappan, S.; Man, Piu Francis; Burns, Mark A.; Burke, David T.

    1999-08-01

    Genetic information is vital for understanding features and response of an organism. In humans, genetic errors are linked to the development of major diseases such as cancer and diabetes. In order to maximally exploit this information it is necessary to develop miniature sequencing assays that are rapid and inexpensive. In this paper we show how this could be attained with microfluidic chips that contain integrated assays. To date simple silicon/glass chips aimed for sequencing purpose have been realized; but these chips are not yet practical. Some of the solutions that are used to bring these devices closer to commercial applications are discussed.

  3. Method to amplify variable sequences without imposing primer sequences

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Zeytun, Ahmet

    2006-11-14

    The present invention provides methods of amplifying target sequences without including regions flanking the target sequence in the amplified product or imposing amplification primer sequences on the amplified product. Also provided are methods of preparing a library from such amplified target sequences.

  4. Sequences close to periodic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnik, Andrei A.; Pritykin, Yurii L.; Semenov, Aleksei L.

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a survey of concepts and results connected with generalizations of the notion of a periodic sequence, both classical and new. The topics discussed relate to almost periodicity in such areas as combinatorics on words, symbolic dynamics, expressibility in logical theories, computability, Kolmogorov complexity, and number theory. Bibliography: 124 titles.

  5. Lining up Arithmetic Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Most future teachers are familiar with number patterns that represent an arithmetic sequence, and most are able to determine the general representation of the "n"th number in the pattern. However, when they are given a visual representation instead of the numbers in the pattern, it is not always easy for them to make the connection between the…

  6. Methods for comparing a DNA sequence with a protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Zhang, J

    1996-12-01

    We describe two methods for constructing an optimal global alignment of, and an optimal local alignment between, a DNA sequence and a protein sequence. The alignment model of the methods addresses the problems of frameshifts and introns in the DNA sequence. The methods require computer memory proportional to the sequence lengths, so they can rigorously process very huge sequences. The simplified versions of the methods were implemented as computer programs named NAP and LAP. The experimental results demonstrate that the programs are sensitive and powerful tools for finding genes by DNA-protein sequence homology.

  7. HIV sequence compendium 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Freed, Eric; Hahn, Beatrice; Marx, Preston; McCutchan, Francine; Mellors, John; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2002-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Traditionally, we present the sequence data themselves in the form of alignments: Section II, an alignment of a selection of HIV-1/SIVcpz full-length genomes (a lot of LAI-like sequences, for example, have been omitted because they are so similar that they bias the alignment); Section III, a combined HIV-1/HIV-2/SIV whole genome alignment; Sections IV–VI, amino acid alignments for HIV-1/SIV-cpz, HIV-2/SIV, and SIVagm. The HIV-2/SIV and SIVagm amino acid alignments are separate because the genetic distances between these groups are so great that presenting them in one alignment would make it very elongated because of the large number of gaps that have to be inserted. As always, tables with extensive background information gathered from the literature accompany the whole genome alignments. The collection of whole-gene sequences in the database is now large enough that we have abundant representation of most subtypes. For many subtypes, and especially for subtype B, a large number of sequences that span entire genes were not included in the printed alignments to conserve space. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov/content/hiv-db/ALIGN_CURRENT/ALIGN-INDEX.html. Importantly, all these alignments have been edited to include only one sequence per person, based on phylogenetic trees that were created for all of them, as well as on the literature. Because of the number of sequences available, we have decided to use a different selection principle this year, based on the epidemiological importance of the subtypes. Subtypes A–D and CRFs 01 and 02 are by far the most widespread variants, and for these (when available) we have included 8–10 representatives in the alignments. The other

  8. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Mathew W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal or transverse direction at the tip, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip. Each measured change in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference signals, with each reference signal identified with a polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component. The tip preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  9. RNA Sequencing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Teng, Shaolei

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a serious psychiatric disorder that affects 1% of general population and places a heavy burden worldwide. The underlying genetic mechanism of SCZ remains unknown, but studies indicate that the disease is associated with a global gene expression disturbance across many genes. Next-generation sequencing, particularly of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), provides a powerful genome-scale technology to investigate the pathological processes of SCZ. RNA-Seq has been used to analyze the gene expressions and identify the novel splice isoforms and rare transcripts associated with SCZ. This paper provides an overview on the genetics of SCZ, the advantages of RNA-Seq for transcriptome analysis, the accomplishments of RNA-Seq in SCZ cohorts, and the applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and RNA-Seq in SCZ research. PMID:27053919

  10. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  11. Rod sequence advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.M. ); Lu, Yi ); Furia, R.V.; Thompson, R.J. ); Lin, Ching-lu )

    1992-01-01

    During startup and power shaping maneuvers of boiling water reactors (BWR's), control rods are sequentially withdrawn from the reactor core. The withdrawal sequences determine the overall reactor power and the local core power density and are based on the knowledge of station engineers. It is important that the control rods are withdrawn in such a manner that the local power level does not become excessive while the desired reactor power is generated. Rules that constrain the relative positions of control rod groups have been developed to do this. While these rules are relatively simple, applying them to all possible movements of the 17 control rod groups in a typical BWR is complex and time consuming. SMARTRODS, is a rule based pilot expert system, was developed in LISP for the determination of the rod sequences.

  12. Multiview image sequence enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanov, Ljubomir; Luong, Hiêp; Ružic, Tijana; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-03-01

    Realistic visualization is crucial for more intuitive representation of complex data, medical imaging, simulation and entertainment systems. Multiview autostereoscopic displays are great step towards achieving complete immersive user experience. However, providing high quality content for this type of displays is still a great challenge. Due to the different characteristics/settings of the cameras in the multivew setup and varying photometric characteristics of the objects in the scene, the same object may have different appearance in the sequences acquired by the different cameras. Images representing views recorded using different cameras in practice have different local noise, color and sharpness characteristics. View synthesis algorithms introduce artefacts due to errors in disparity estimation/bad occlusion handling or due to erroneous warping function estimation. If the input multivew images are not of sufficient quality and have mismatching color and sharpness characteristics, these artifacts may become even more disturbing. The main goal of our method is to simultaneously perform multiview image sequence denoising, color correction and the improvement of sharpness in slightly blurred regions. Results show that the proposed method significantly reduces the amount of the artefacts in multiview video sequences resulting in a better visual experience.

  13. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  14. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  15. Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew J; Cauchi, Laura; Miles, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

  16. A vision for ubiquitous sequencing.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Yaniv

    2015-10-01

    Genomics has recently celebrated reaching the $1000 genome milestone, making affordable DNA sequencing a reality. With this goal successfully completed, the next goal of the sequencing revolution can be sequencing sensors--miniaturized sequencing devices that are manufactured for real-time applications and deployed in large quantities at low costs. The first part of this manuscript envisions applications that will benefit from moving the sequencers to the samples in a range of domains. In the second part, the manuscript outlines the critical barriers that need to be addressed in order to reach the goal of ubiquitous sequencing sensors.

  17. A vision for ubiquitous sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv

    2015-01-01

    Genomics has recently celebrated reaching the $1000 genome milestone, making affordable DNA sequencing a reality. With this goal successfully completed, the next goal of the sequencing revolution can be sequencing sensors—miniaturized sequencing devices that are manufactured for real-time applications and deployed in large quantities at low costs. The first part of this manuscript envisions applications that will benefit from moving the sequencers to the samples in a range of domains. In the second part, the manuscript outlines the critical barriers that need to be addressed in order to reach the goal of ubiquitous sequencing sensors. PMID:26430149

  18. High-Throughput Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The human genome sequence has profoundly altered our understanding of biology, human diversity and disease. The path from the first draft sequence to our nascent era of personal genomes and genomic medicine has been made possible only because of the extraordinary advancements in DNA sequencing technologies over the past ten years. Here, we discuss commonly used high-throughput sequencing platforms, the growing array of sequencing assays developed around them as well as the challenges facing current sequencing platforms and their clinical application. PMID:26000844

  19. Correspondence: Searching sequence space

    SciTech Connect

    Youvan, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    This correspondence debates the efficiency and application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to search protein sequence space. The important experimental point is that such sparse searches utilize physically realistic syntheses. In this regard, all GA-based technologies are very similar; they {open_quotes}learn{close_quotes} from their initial sparse search and then generate interesting new proteins within a few iterations. Which GA-based technology is best? That probably depends on the protein and the specific engineering goal. Given the fact that the field of combinatorial chemistry is still in its infancy, it is probably wise to consider all of the proven mutagenesis methods. 19 refs.

  20. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  1. Sequencing the Unrearranged Human Immunoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Rene

    2010-06-03

    Rene Warren from Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre discusses sequencing and finishing the IgH heavy chain locus on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  2. Marks of Change in Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgensen, H.

    2011-12-01

    Given a sequence of events, how does one recognize that a change has occurred? We explore potential definitions of the concept of change in a sequence and propose that words in relativized solid codes might serve as indicators of change.

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardis, Elaine R.

    2013-06-01

    Automated DNA sequencing instruments embody an elegant interplay among chemistry, engineering, software, and molecular biology and have built upon Sanger's founding discovery of dideoxynucleotide sequencing to perform once-unfathomable tasks. Combined with innovative physical mapping approaches that helped to establish long-range relationships between cloned stretches of genomic DNA, fluorescent DNA sequencers produced reference genome sequences for model organisms and for the reference human genome. New types of sequencing instruments that permit amazing acceleration of data-collection rates for DNA sequencing have been developed. The ability to generate genome-scale data sets is now transforming the nature of biological inquiry. Here, I provide an historical perspective of the field, focusing on the fundamental developments that predated the advent of next-generation sequencing instruments and providing information about how these instruments work, their application to biological research, and the newest types of sequencers that can extract data from single DNA molecules.

  4. Sanger dideoxy sequencing of DNA.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah E; Lorsch, Jon

    2013-01-01

    While the ease and reduced cost of automated DNA sequencing has largely obviated the need for manual dideoxy sequencing for routine purposes, specific applications require manual DNA sequencing. For instance, in studies of enzymes or proteins that bind or modify DNA, a DNA ladder is often used to map the site at which an enzyme is bound or a modification occurs. In these cases, the Sanger method for dideoxy sequencing provides a rapid and facile method for producing a labeled DNA ladder.

  5. Partial amino acid sequence and mRNA analysis of cytosolic pyridoxine-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase from porcine intestinal mucosa: proposed derivation from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Tseung, Chi-Wah; McMahon, Laura G; Vázquez, Jorge; Pohl, Jan; Gregory, Jesse F

    2004-05-15

    We have previously identified and purified a novel beta-glucosidase, designated PNGH (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase), from the cytosolic fraction of pig intestinal mucosal. PNGH catalyses the hydrolysis of PNG (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside), a plant derivative of vitamin B6 that exhibits partial nutritional bioavailability in humans and animals. Preliminary amino acid sequence analysis indicated regions of close similarity of PNGH to the precursor form of LPH (lactase-phlorizin hydrolase), the beta-glucosidase localized to the brush-border membrane. We report in the present study amino acid sequence data for PNGH and results of Northern blot analyses, upon which we propose a common genomic origin of PNGH and LPH. Internal Edman sequencing of the PNGH band isolated by SDS/PAGE yielded data for 16 peptides, averaging 10.8 amino acids in length. These peptides from PNGH (approx. 140 kDa) were highly similar to sequences existing over most of the length of the >200 kDa precursor of rabbit LPH; however, we found no PNGH sequences that corresponded to approx. 350 amino acids between positions 463 and 812 of the LPH precursor, a region encoded by exon 7 of the LPH precursor gene (amino acids 568-784), and no sequences that corresponded to regions near the N-terminus. MS analysis of tryptic peptides yielded 25 peptides, averaging 15 amino acids, with masses that matched segments of the rabbit LPH precursor. Northern blot analysis of pig and human small intestinal polyadenylated mRNA using a non-specific LPH cDNA probe showed an expected approx. 6 kb transcript of the LPH precursor, but also an approx. 4 kb transcript that was consistent with the size predicted from the PNGH protein mass. Using a probe specific to the region encoded by exon 7, hybridization occurred only with the 6 kb transcript. Based on these observations, we propose that both PNGH and LPH enzymes have the same genomic origin, but differ in transcriptional and, possibly, post

  6. Partial amino acid sequence and mRNA analysis of cytosolic pyridoxine-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase from porcine intestinal mucosa: proposed derivation from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Tseung, Chi-Wah; McMahon, Laura G; Vázquez, Jorge; Pohl, Jan; Gregory, Jesse F

    2004-05-15

    We have previously identified and purified a novel beta-glucosidase, designated PNGH (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside hydrolase), from the cytosolic fraction of pig intestinal mucosal. PNGH catalyses the hydrolysis of PNG (pyridoxine-5'-beta-D-glucoside), a plant derivative of vitamin B6 that exhibits partial nutritional bioavailability in humans and animals. Preliminary amino acid sequence analysis indicated regions of close similarity of PNGH to the precursor form of LPH (lactase-phlorizin hydrolase), the beta-glucosidase localized to the brush-border membrane. We report in the present study amino acid sequence data for PNGH and results of Northern blot analyses, upon which we propose a common genomic origin of PNGH and LPH. Internal Edman sequencing of the PNGH band isolated by SDS/PAGE yielded data for 16 peptides, averaging 10.8 amino acids in length. These peptides from PNGH (approx. 140 kDa) were highly similar to sequences existing over most of the length of the >200 kDa precursor of rabbit LPH; however, we found no PNGH sequences that corresponded to approx. 350 amino acids between positions 463 and 812 of the LPH precursor, a region encoded by exon 7 of the LPH precursor gene (amino acids 568-784), and no sequences that corresponded to regions near the N-terminus. MS analysis of tryptic peptides yielded 25 peptides, averaging 15 amino acids, with masses that matched segments of the rabbit LPH precursor. Northern blot analysis of pig and human small intestinal polyadenylated mRNA using a non-specific LPH cDNA probe showed an expected approx. 6 kb transcript of the LPH precursor, but also an approx. 4 kb transcript that was consistent with the size predicted from the PNGH protein mass. Using a probe specific to the region encoded by exon 7, hybridization occurred only with the 6 kb transcript. Based on these observations, we propose that both PNGH and LPH enzymes have the same genomic origin, but differ in transcriptional and, possibly, post

  7. Automated Identification of Nucleotide Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George; Zhu, Dian-Hui

    2007-01-01

    STITCH is a computer program that processes raw nucleotide-sequence data to automatically remove unwanted vector information, perform reverse-complement comparison, stitch shorter sequences together to make longer ones to which the shorter ones presumably belong, and search against the user s choice of private and Internet-accessible public 16S rRNA databases. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] In STITCH, a template 16S rRNA sequence is used to position forward and reverse reads. STITCH then automatically searches known 16S rRNA sequences in the user s chosen database(s) to find the sequence most similar to (the sequence that lies at the smallest edit distance from) each spliced sequence. The result of processing by STITCH is the identification of the most similar well-described bacterium. Whereas previously commercially available software for analyzing genetic sequences operates on one sequence at a time, STITCH can manipulate multiple sequences simultaneously to perform the aforementioned operations. A typical analysis of several dozen sequences (length of the order of 103 base pairs) by use of STITCH is completed in a few minutes, whereas such an analysis performed by use of prior software takes hours or days.

  8. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  9. Novel sequences propel familiar folds.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Zahra; Paoli, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    Recent structure determinations have made new additions to a set of strikingly different sequences that give rise to the same topology. Proteins with a beta propeller fold are characterized by extreme sequence diversity despite the similarity in their three-dimensional structures. Several fold predictions, based in part on sequence repeats thought to match modular beta sheets, have been proved correct.

  10. Sequencing Technologies Panel at SFAF

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Steve; Fiske, Haley; Knight, Jim; Rhodes, Michael; Vander Horn, Peter

    2010-06-02

    From left to right: Steve Turner of Pacific Biosciences, Haley Fiske of Illumina, Jim Knight of Roche, Michael Rhodes of Life Technologies and Peter Vander Horn of Life Technologies' Single Molecule Sequencing group discuss new sequencing technologies and applications on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  11. Sequence Factorial and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we introduce sequence factorial and use this to study generalized M-bonomial coefficients. For the sequence of natural numbers, the twin concepts of sequence factorial and generalized M-bonomial coefficients, respectively, extend the corresponding concepts of factorial of an integer and binomial coefficients. Some latent properties…

  12. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  13. The evolution of nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Qiuping; Wang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The “$1000 Genome” project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the “$1000 Genome” while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards. PMID:25610451

  14. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles; Koster, Hubert

    2010-09-28

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include DNA or RNA in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  15. ISHAN: sequence homology analysis package.

    PubMed

    Shil, Pratip; Dudani, Niraj; Vidyasagar, Pandit B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence based homology studies play an important role in evolutionary tracing and classification of proteins. Various methods are available to analyze biological sequence information. However, with the advent of proteomics era, there is a growing demand for analysis of huge amount of biological sequence information, and it has become necessary to have programs that would provide speedy analysis. ISHAN has been developed as a homology analysis package, built on various sequence analysis tools viz FASTA, ALIGN, CLUSTALW, PHYLIP and CODONW (for DNA sequences). This JAVA application offers the user choice of analysis tools. For testing, ISHAN was applied to perform phylogenetic analysis for sets of Caspase 3 DNA sequences and NF-kappaB p105 amino acid sequences. By integrating several tools it has made analysis much faster and reduced manual intervention. PMID:17274766

  16. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  17. Adversary Sequence Interruption Model

    1985-11-15

    PC EASI is an IBM personal computer or PC-compatible version of an analytical technique for measuring the effectiveness of physical protection systems. PC EASI utilizes a methodology called Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI) which evaluates the probability of interruption (PI) for a given sequence of adversary tasks. Probability of interruption is defined as the probability that the response force will arrive before the adversary force has completed its task. The EASI methodology is amore » probabilistic approach that analytically evaluates basic functions of the physical security system (detection, assessment, communications, and delay) with respect to response time along a single adversary path. It is important that the most critical scenarios for each target be identified to ensure that vulnerabilities have not been overlooked. If the facility is not overly complex, this can be accomplished by examining all paths. If the facility is complex, a global model such as Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) may be used to identify the most vulnerable paths. PC EASI is menu-driven with screen forms for entering and editing the basic scenarios. In addition to evaluating PI for the basic scenario, the sensitivities of many of the parameters chosen in the scenario can be analyzed. These sensitivities provide information to aid the analyst in determining the tradeoffs for reducing the probability of interruption. PC EASI runs under the Micro Data Base Systems'' proprietary database management system Knowledgeman. KMAN provides the user environment and file management for the specified basic scenarios, and KGRAPH the graphical output of the sensitivity calculations. This software is not included. Due to errors in release 2 of KMAN, PC EASI will not execute properly; release 1.07 of KMAN is required.« less

  18. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  19. Advances in nanopore sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Liu, Ruoyu; Xie, Haiqiang; Hui, Yanting; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Yiyu

    2013-07-01

    Much tremendous break through have been obtained in recent years for nanopore sequencing to achieve the goal of $1000 genome. As a method of single molecule sequencing, nanopore sequencing can discriminate the individual molecules of the target DNA strand rapidly due to the current blockages by translocating the nucleotides through a nano-scale pore. Both the protein-pores and solid-state nanopore channels which called single nanopore sequencing have been studied widely for the application of nanopore sequencing technology. This review will give a detail representation to protein nanopore and solid-state nanopore sequencing. For protein nanopore sequencing technology, we will introduce different nanopore types, device assembly and some challenges still exist at present. We will focus on more research fields for solid-state nanopore sequencing in terms of materials, device assembly, fabricated methods, translocation process and some specific challenges. The review also covers some of the technical advances in the union nanopore sequencing, which include nanopore sequencing combine with exonuclease, hybridization, synthesis and design polymer.

  20. Turtle Graphics of Morphic Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zantema, Hans

    2016-02-01

    The simplest infinite sequences that are not ultimately periodic are pure morphic sequences: fixed points of particular morphisms mapping single symbols to strings of symbols. A basic way to visualize a sequence is by a turtle curve: for every alphabet symbol fix an angle, and then consecutively for all sequence elements draw a unit segment and turn the drawing direction by the corresponding angle. This paper investigates turtle curves of pure morphic sequences. In particular, criteria are given for turtle curves being finite (consisting of finitely many segments), and for being fractal or self-similar: it contains an up-scaled copy of itself. Also space-filling turtle curves are considered, and a turtle curve that is dense in the plane. As a particular result we give an exact relationship between the Koch curve and a turtle curve for the Thue-Morse sequence, where until now for such a result only approximations were known.

  1. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Charles R.; Hubert, Koster

    2014-06-24

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Probes may be affixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  2. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  3. Nuclear RNA Isolation and Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Navroop K; Mitchell, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Most transcriptome studies involve sequencing and quantification of steady-state mRNA by isolating and sequencing poly (A) RNA. Although this type of sequencing data is informative to determine steady-state mRNA levels it does not provide information on transcriptional output and thus may not always reflect changes in transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Furthermore, sequencing poly (A) RNA may miss transcribed regions of the genome not usually modified by polyadenylation which includes many long noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe nuclear-RNA sequencing (nucRNA-seq) which investigates the transcriptional landscape through sequencing and quantification of nuclear RNAs which are both unspliced and spliced transcripts for protein-coding genes and nuclear-retained long noncoding RNAs.

  4. Identification of transcribed sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hochgeschwender, U.; Gardiner, K.

    1994-12-31

    The international Human Genome Project is providing three essential ingredients for the efficient identification of diseases genes. One is the high density of polymorphic markers that are critical for the mapping of disease genes to defined chromosomal regions. The second is a physical map in the form of overlapping genomic clones in YACs or cosmids that will allow detailed analysis of the critical region. The third is a transcription map (gene map) that will provide a bank of regionally mapped candidate genes to test for mutations once a disease gene is mapped. In the past 5 years the identification and mapping of several thousand simple-sequence-repeat polymorphisms has provided the first ingredient, and the physical maps of many chromosomes are approaching completion. However, the transcription map is problematic and a long way from being a useful tool. A detailed analysis of the technology involved in building the requisite transcription maps is found in this book, the published proceedings of the third international workshop on the topic, held October 2-4, 1993, in association with the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in New Orleans.

  5. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by patterns in

  6. Nonlinear analysis of biological sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D.C.; Bruno, W.; Detours, V.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objectives of this project involved deriving new capabilities for analyzing biological sequences. The authors focused on tabulating the statistical properties exhibited by Human coding DNA sequences and on techniques of inferring the phylogenetic relationships among protein sequences related by descent.

  7. Sequence factorial and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2012-06-01

    In this note, we introduce sequence factorial and use this to study generalized M-bonomial coefficients. For the sequence of natural numbers, the twin concepts of sequence factorial and generalized M-bonomial coefficients, respectively, extend the corresponding concepts of factorial of an integer and binomial coefficients. Some latent properties of generalized M-bonomial coefficients by which a vast majority of practical problems involving generalized M-bonomial coefficients can be solved are derived.

  8. Quasi-Random Sequence Generators.

    1994-03-01

    Version 00 LPTAU generates quasi-random sequences. The sequences are uniformly distributed sets of L=2**30 points in the N-dimensional unit cube: I**N=[0,1]. The sequences are used as nodes for multidimensional integration, as searching points in global optimization, as trial points in multicriteria decision making, as quasi-random points for quasi Monte Carlo algorithms.

  9. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  10. Venter wins sequencing race - twice

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, R.

    1995-06-02

    This article discusses the end of the race to sequence the first complete genome of a free-living organism. Craig Venter of the Institute for Geonomic Research unveiled the complete sequences of two bacteria: Haemophilus influenzae and Mycoplasma genitalium at the American Society of Microbiology Meeting in May 1995. Because there are many similarities in bacterial and human biochemistry, the sequences will be useful for searching for human genes.

  11. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S.; Brettin, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Martinez, Antonio D.; Miller, R. M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald; Bennett, Joan W.; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steve; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E.

    2008-09-30

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  12. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The British Mycological Society.

  13. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Rizvi, L; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  14. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  15. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  16. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  17. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  18. Multiple sequence alignment with DIALIGN.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    DIALIGN is a software tool for multiple sequence alignment by combining global and local alignment features. It composes multiple alignments from local pairwise sequence similarities. This approach is particularly useful to discover conserved functional regions in sequences that share only local homologies but are otherwise unrelated. An anchoring option allows to use external information and expert knowledge in addition to primary-sequence similarity alone. The latest version of DIALIGN optionally uses matches to the PFAM database to detect weak homologies. Various versions of the program are available through Göttingen Bioinformatics Compute Server (GOBICS) at http://www.gobics.de/department/software.

  19. Automated Sequence Preprocessing in a Large-Scale Sequencing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wendl, Michael C.; Dear, Simon; Hodgson, Dave; Hillier, LaDeana

    1998-01-01

    A software system for transforming fragments from four-color fluorescence-based gel electrophoresis experiments into assembled sequence is described. It has been developed for large-scale processing of all trace data, including shotgun and finishing reads, regardless of clone origin. Design considerations are discussed in detail, as are programming implementation and graphic tools. The importance of input validation, record tracking, and use of base quality values is emphasized. Several quality analysis metrics are proposed and applied to sample results from recently sequenced clones. Such quantities prove to be a valuable aid in evaluating modifications of sequencing protocol. The system is in full production use at both the Genome Sequencing Center and the Sanger Centre, for which combined weekly production is ∼100,000 sequencing reads per week. PMID:9750196

  20. VOE Accounting: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 2-year program in accounting. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  1. Sequence conserved for subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    The more proteins diverged in sequence, the more difficult it becomes for bioinformatics to infer similarities of protein function and structure from sequence. The precise thresholds used in automated genome annotations depend on the particular aspect of protein function transferred by homology. Here, we presented the first large-scale analysis of the relation between sequence similarity and identity in subcellular localization. Three results stood out: (1) The subcellular compartment is generally more conserved than what might have been expected given that short sequence motifs like nuclear localization signals can alter the native compartment; (2) the sequence conservation of localization is similar between different compartments; and (3) it is similar to the conservation of structure and enzymatic activity. In particular, we found the transition between the regions of conserved and nonconserved localization to be very sharp, although the thresholds for conservation were less well defined than for structure and enzymatic activity. We found that a simple measure for sequence similarity accounting for pairwise sequence identity and alignment length, the HSSP distance, distinguished accurately between protein pairs of identical and different localizations. In fact, BLAST expectation values outperformed the HSSP distance only for alignments in the subtwilight zone. We succeeded in slightly improving the accuracy of inferring localization through homology by fine tuning the thresholds. Finally, we applied our results to the entire SWISS-PROT database and five entirely sequenced eukaryotes. PMID:12441382

  2. Auto Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for an auto mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  3. Commercial Photography: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a commercial photography vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents,…

  4. Commercial Art: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a commercial art vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  5. Urban Horticulture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 4-year program in urban horticulture. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  6. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  7. Diesel Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a diesel mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  8. Health Occupations: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in health occupations. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  9. Commercial Foods: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a commercial food service vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents,…

  10. Aircraft Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for an aircraft mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and…

  11. Rapid Diagnostics of Onboard Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starbird, Thomas W.; Morris, John R.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Maimone, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Keeping track of sequences onboard a spacecraft is challenging. When reviewing Event Verification Records (EVRs) of sequence executions on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER), operators often found themselves wondering which version of a named sequence the EVR corresponded to. The lack of this information drastically impacts the operators diagnostic capabilities as well as their situational awareness with respect to the commands the spacecraft has executed, since the EVRs do not provide argument values or explanatory comments. Having this information immediately available can be instrumental in diagnosing critical events and can significantly enhance the overall safety of the spacecraft. This software provides auditing capability that can eliminate that uncertainty while diagnosing critical conditions. Furthermore, the Restful interface provides a simple way for sequencing tools to automatically retrieve binary compiled sequence SCMFs (Space Command Message Files) on demand. It also enables developers to change the underlying database, while maintaining the same interface to the existing applications. The logging capabilities are also beneficial to operators when they are trying to recall how they solved a similar problem many days ago: this software enables automatic recovery of SCMF and RML (Robot Markup Language) sequence files directly from the command EVRs, eliminating the need for people to find and validate the corresponding sequences. To address the lack of auditing capability for sequences onboard a spacecraft during earlier missions, extensive logging support was added on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sequencing server. This server is responsible for generating all MSL binary SCMFs from RML input sequences. The sequencing server logs every SCMF it generates into a MySQL database, as well as the high-level RML file and dictionary name inputs used to create the SCMF. The SCMF is then indexed by a hash value that is automatically included in all command

  12. Recent advances in nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Raj D.; Kim, Jungsuk; Dunbar, William B.

    2013-01-01

    The prospect of nanopores as a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform has been a topic of growing interest and considerable government-sponsored research for more than a decade. Oxford Nanopore Technologies recently announced the first commercial nanopore sequencing devices, to be made available by the end of 2012, while other companies (Life, Roche, IBM) are also pursuing nanopore sequencing approaches. In this paper, the state of the art in nanopore sequencing is reviewed, focusing on the most recent contributions that have or promise to have NGS commercial potential. We consider also the scalability of the circuitry to support multichannel arrays of nanopores in future sequencing devices, which is critical to commercial viability. PMID:23138639

  13. The EMBL nucleotide sequence database.

    PubMed Central

    Stoesser, G; Moseley, M A; Sleep, J; McGowran, M; Garcia-Pastor, M; Sterk, P

    1998-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl. html ) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. DNA and RNA sequences are directly submitted from researchers and genome sequencing groups and collected from the scientific literature and patent applications (Fig. 1). In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute. Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. EBI's network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface, providing database searching and sequence similarity facilities plus access to a large number of additional databases. PMID:9399791

  14. Poisson process approximation for sequence repeats, and sequencing by hybridization.

    PubMed

    Arratia, R; Martin, D; Reinert, G; Waterman, M S

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing by hybridization is a tool to determine a DNA sequence from the unordered list of all l-tuples contained in this sequence; typical numbers for l are l = 8, 10, 12. For theoretical purposes we assume that the multiset of all l-tuples is known. This multiset determines the DNA sequence uniquely if none of the so-called Ukkonen transformations are possible. These transformations require repeats of (l-1)-tuples in the sequence, with these repeats occurring in certain spatial patterns. We model DNA as an i.i.d. sequence. We first prove Poisson process approximations for the process of indicators of all leftmost long repeats allowing self-overlap and for the process of indicators of all left-most long repeats without self-overlap. Using the Chen-Stein method, we get bounds on the error of these approximations. As a corollary, we approximate the distribution of longest repeats. In the second step we analyze the spatial patterns of the repeats. Finally we combine these two steps to prove an approximation for the probability that a random sequence is uniquely recoverable from its list of l-tuples. For all our results we give some numerical examples including error bounds. PMID:8891959

  15. Multilocus sequence typing of total-genome-sequenced bacteria.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mette V; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon; Friis, Carsten; Hasman, Henrik; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jelsbak, Lars; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Ussery, David W; Aarestrup, Frank M; Lund, Ole

    2012-04-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from the MLST databases are downloaded monthly, and the best-matching MLST alleles of the specified MLST scheme are found using a BLAST-based ranking method. The sequence type is then determined by the combination of alleles identified. The method was tested on preassembled genomes from 336 isolates covering 56 MLST schemes, on short sequence reads from 387 isolates covering 10 schemes, and on a small test set of short sequence reads from 29 isolates for which the sequence type had been determined by traditional methods. The method presented here enables investigators to determine the sequence types of their isolates on the basis of WGS data. This method is publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MLST. PMID:22238442

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon; Friis, Carsten; Hasman, Henrik; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jelsbak, Lars; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Ussery, David W.; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the “gold standard” of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from the MLST databases are downloaded monthly, and the best-matching MLST alleles of the specified MLST scheme are found using a BLAST-based ranking method. The sequence type is then determined by the combination of alleles identified. The method was tested on preassembled genomes from 336 isolates covering 56 MLST schemes, on short sequence reads from 387 isolates covering 10 schemes, and on a small test set of short sequence reads from 29 isolates for which the sequence type had been determined by traditional methods. The method presented here enables investigators to determine the sequence types of their isolates on the basis of WGS data. This method is publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MLST. PMID:22238442

  17. Ossification sequence heterochrony among amphibians.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Sean M; Harrison, Luke B; Sheil, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochrony is an important mechanism in the evolution of amphibians. Although studies have centered on the relationship between size and shape and the rates of development, ossification sequence heterochrony also may have been important. Rigorous, phylogenetic methods for assessing sequence heterochrony are relatively new, and a comprehensive study of the relative timing of ossification of skeletal elements has not been used to identify instances of sequence heterochrony across Amphibia. In this study, a new version of the program Parsimov-based genetic inference (PGi) was used to identify shifts in ossification sequences across all extant orders of amphibians, for all major structural units of the skeleton. PGi identified a number of heterochronic sequence shifts in all analyses, the most interesting of which seem to be tied to differences in metamorphic patterns among major clades. Early ossification of the vomer, premaxilla, and dentary is retained by Apateon caducus and members of Gymnophiona and Urodela, which lack the strongly biphasic development seen in anurans. In contrast, bones associated with the jaws and face were identified as shifting late in the ancestor of Anura. The bones that do not shift late, and thereby occupy the earliest positions in the anuran cranial sequence, are those in regions of the skull that undergo the least restructuring throughout anuran metamorphosis. Additionally, within Anura, bones of the hind limb and pelvic girdle were also identified as shifting early in the sequence of ossification, which may be a result of functional constraints imposed by the drastic metamorphosis of most anurans.

  18. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Kannappan; Huang, Thomas S.

    1991-07-01

    There is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information.

  19. From mapping to sequencing, post-sequencing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuji; Matsumoto, Takashi; Antonio, Baltazar A; Nagamura, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The Rice Genome Research Program (RGP) in Japan has been collaborating with the international community in elucidating a complete high-quality sequence of the rice genome. As the pioneer in large-scale analysis of the rice genome, the RGP has successfully established the fundamental tools for genome research such as a genetic map, a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based physical map, a transcript map and a phage P1 artificial chromosome (PAC)/bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequence-ready physical map, which serve as common resources for genome sequencing. Among the 12 rice chromosomes, the RGP is in charge of sequencing six chromosomes covering 52% of the 390 Mb total length of the genome. The contribution of the RGP to the realization of decoding the rice genome sequence with high accuracy and deciphering the genetic information in the genome will have a great impact in understanding the biology of the rice plant that provides a major food source for almost half of the world's population. A high-quality draft sequence (phase 2) was completed in December 2002. Since then, much of the finished quality sequence (phase 3) has become available in public databases. With the completion of sequencing in December 2004, it is expected that the genome sequence would facilitate innovative research in functional and applied genomics. A map-based genome sequence is indispensable for further improvement of current rice varieties and for development of novel varieties carrying agronomically important traits such as high yield potential and tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses. In addition to genome sequencing, various related projects have been initiated to generate valuable resources, which could serve as indispensable tools in clarifying the structure and function of the rice genome. These resources have been made available to the scientific community through the Rice Genome Resource Center (RGRC) of the National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS) to

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Poliovirus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is a major surveillance tool in the Polio Laboratory Network. Due to the rapid evolution of polioviruses (~1 % per year), pathways of virus transmission can be reconstructed from the pathways of genomic evolution. Here, we describe three main phylogenetic methods; estimation of genetic distances, reconstruction of a maximum-likelihood (ML) tree, and estimation of substitution rates using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The data set used consists of complete capsid sequences from a survey of poliovirus sequences available in GenBank. PMID:26983737

  1. Guitars, Violins, and Geometric Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita; Haehl, Martha

    2007-01-01

    This article describes middle school mathematics activities that relate measurement, ratios, and geometric sequences to finger positions or the placement of frets on stringed musical instruments. (Contains 2 figures and 2 tables.)

  2. Paucity of moderately repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    We examined clones of renatured repetitive human DNA to find novel repetitive DNAs. After eliminating known repeats, the remaining clones were subjected to sequence analysis. These clones also corresponded to known repeats, but with greater sequence diversity. This indicates that either these libraries were depleted of short interspersed repeats in construction, or these repeats are much less prevalent in the human genome than is indicated by data from {und Xenopus} or sea urchin studies. We directly investigated the sequence composition of human DNA through traditional renaturation techniques with the goal of estimating the limits of abundance of repetitive sequence classes in human DNA. Our results sharply limit the maximum possible abundance to 1--2% of the human genome. Our estimate, minus the known repeats in this fraction, leaves about 1% (3 {times} 10{sup 7} nucleotides) of the human genome for novel repetitive elements. 2 refs. (MHB)

  3. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  4. The Dynamics of DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morvillo, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a paper-and-pencil activity that helps students understand DNA sequencing and expands student understanding of DNA structure, replication, and gel electrophoresis. Appropriate for advanced biology students who are familiar with the Sanger method. (DDR)

  5. Polymorphix: a sequence polymorphism database.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Eric; Duret, Laurent; Penel, Simon; Galtier, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    Within-species sequence variation data are of special interest since they contain information about recent population/species history, and the molecular evolutionary forces currently in action in natural populations. These data, however, are presently dispersed within generalist databases, and are difficult to access. To solve this problem, we have developed Polymorphix, a database dedicated to sequence polymorphism. It contains within-species homologous sequence families built using EMBL/GenBank under suitable similarity and bibliographic criteria. Polymorphix is an ACNUC structured database allowing both simple and complex queries for population genomic studies. Alignments within families as well as phylogenetic trees can be download. When available, outgroups are included in the alignment. Polymorphix contains sequences from the nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplastic genomes of every eukaryote species represented in EMBL. It can be accessed by a web interface (http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/polymorphix/query.php).

  6. Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Brian; Hartman, Frank; Maxwell, Scott; Yen, Jeng; Wright, John; Balacuit, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP) is the software tool for use in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission for planning rover operations and generating command sequences for accomplishing those operations. RSVP combines three-dimensional (3D) visualization for immersive exploration of the operations area, stereoscopic image display for high-resolution examination of the downlinked imagery, and a sophisticated command-sequence editing tool for analysis and completion of the sequences. RSVP is linked with actual flight-code modules for operations rehearsal to provide feedback on the expected behavior of the rover prior to committing to a particular sequence. Playback tools allow for review of both rehearsed rover behavior and downlinked results of actual rover operations. These can be displayed simultaneously for comparison of rehearsed and actual activities for verification. The primary inputs to RSVP are downlink data products from the Operations Storage Server (OSS) and activity plans generated by the science team. The activity plans are high-level goals for the next day s activities. The downlink data products include imagery, terrain models, and telemetered engineering data on rover activities and state. The Rover Sequence Editor (RoSE) component of RSVP performs activity expansion to command sequences, command creation and editing with setting of command parameters, and viewing and management of rover resources. The HyperDrive component of RSVP performs 2D and 3D visualization of the rover s environment, graphical and animated review of rover-predicted and telemetered state, and creation and editing of command sequences related to mobility and Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) operations. Additionally, RoSE and HyperDrive together evaluate command sequences for potential violations of flight and safety rules. The products of RSVP include command sequences for uplink that are stored in the Distributed Object Manager (DOM) and predicted rover

  7. DNA sequences at a glance.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Armando J; Garcia, Sara P; Pratas, Diogo; Ferreira, Paulo J S G

    2013-01-01

    Data summarization and triage is one of the current top challenges in visual analytics. The goal is to let users visually inspect large data sets and examine or request data with particular characteristics. The need for summarization and visual analytics is also felt when dealing with digital representations of DNA sequences. Genomic data sets are growing rapidly, making their analysis increasingly more difficult, and raising the need for new, scalable tools. For example, being able to look at very large DNA sequences while immediately identifying potentially interesting regions would provide the biologist with a flexible exploratory and analytical tool. In this paper we present a new concept, the "information profile", which provides a quantitative measure of the local complexity of a DNA sequence, independently of the direction of processing. The computation of the information profiles is computationally tractable: we show that it can be done in time proportional to the length of the sequence. We also describe a tool to compute the information profiles of a given DNA sequence, and use the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain 972 h(-) and five human chromosomes 22 for illustration. We show that information profiles are useful for detecting large-scale genomic regularities by visual inspection. Several discovery strategies are possible, including the standalone analysis of single sequences, the comparative analysis of sequences from individuals from the same species, and the comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms. The comparison scale can be varied, allowing the users to zoom-in on specific details, or obtain a broad overview of a long segment. Software applications have been made available for non-commercial use at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/dna-at-glance.

  8. Sequencing Centers Panel at SFAF

    SciTech Connect

    Schilkey, Faye; Ali, Johar; Grafham, Darren; Muzny, Donna; Fulton, Bob; Fitzgerald, Mike; Hostetler, Jessica; Daum, Chris

    2010-06-02

    From left to right: Faye Schilkey of NCGR, Johar Ali of OICR, Darren Grafham of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Donna Muzny of the Baylor College of Medicine, Bob Fulton of Washington University, Mike Fitzgerald of the Broad Institute, Jessica Hostetler of the J. Craig Venter Institute and Chris Daum of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discuss sequencing technologies, applications and pipelines on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  9. Structural complexity of DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Tseng, Shen-Han; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  10. DNA Sequences at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Armando J.; Garcia, Sara P.; Pratas, Diogo; Ferreira, Paulo J. S. G.

    2013-01-01

    Data summarization and triage is one of the current top challenges in visual analytics. The goal is to let users visually inspect large data sets and examine or request data with particular characteristics. The need for summarization and visual analytics is also felt when dealing with digital representations of DNA sequences. Genomic data sets are growing rapidly, making their analysis increasingly more difficult, and raising the need for new, scalable tools. For example, being able to look at very large DNA sequences while immediately identifying potentially interesting regions would provide the biologist with a flexible exploratory and analytical tool. In this paper we present a new concept, the “information profile”, which provides a quantitative measure of the local complexity of a DNA sequence, independently of the direction of processing. The computation of the information profiles is computationally tractable: we show that it can be done in time proportional to the length of the sequence. We also describe a tool to compute the information profiles of a given DNA sequence, and use the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain 972 h− and five human chromosomes 22 for illustration. We show that information profiles are useful for detecting large-scale genomic regularities by visual inspection. Several discovery strategies are possible, including the standalone analysis of single sequences, the comparative analysis of sequences from individuals from the same species, and the comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms. The comparison scale can be varied, allowing the users to zoom-in on specific details, or obtain a broad overview of a long segment. Software applications have been made available for non-commercial use at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/dna-at-glance. PMID:24278218

  11. Sequenced drive for rotary valves

    DOEpatents

    Mittell, Larry C.

    1981-01-01

    A sequenced drive for rotary valves which provides the benefits of applying rotary and linear motions to the movable sealing element of the valve. The sequenced drive provides a close approximation of linear motion while engaging or disengaging the movable element with the seat minimizing wear and damage due to scrubbing action. The rotary motion of the drive swings the movable element out of the flowpath thus eliminating obstruction to flow through the valve.

  12. Mycobacterium abscessus multispacer sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus group includes antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic mycobacteria that are responsible for sporadic cases and outbreaks of cutaneous, pulmonary and disseminated infections. However, because of their close genetic relationships, accurate discrimination between the various strains of these mycobacteria remains difficult. In this report, we describe the development of a multispacer sequence typing (MST) analysis for the simultaneous identification and typing of M. abscessus mycobacteria. We also compared MST with the reference multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) typing method. Results Based on the M. abscessus CIP104536T genome, eight intergenic spacers were selected, PCR amplified and sequenced in 21 M. abscessus isolates and analysed in 48 available M. abscessus genomes. MST and MLSA grouped 37 M. abscessus organisms into 12 and nine types, respectively; four formerly “M. bolletii” organisms and M. abscessus M139 into three and four types, respectively; and 27 formerly “M. massiliense” organisms grouped into nine and five types, respectively. The Hunter-Gaston index was off 0.912 for MST and of 0.903 for MLSA. The MST-derived tree was similar to that based on MLSA and rpoB gene sequencing and yielded three main clusters comprising each the type strain of the respective M. abscessus sub-species. Two isolates exhibited discordant MLSA- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position, one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position and one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and MLSA-derived position. MST spacer n°2 sequencing alone allowed for the accurate identification of the different isolates at the sub-species level. Conclusions MST is a new sequencing-based approach for both identifying and genotyping M. abscessus mycobacteria that clearly differentiates formerly “M. massiliense” organisms from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii organisms. PMID:23294800

  13. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  14. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  15. Long-range barcode labeling-sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Singh, Kanwar K.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Froula, Jeff L.; Eng, Kevin S.

    2016-10-18

    Methods for sequencing single large DNA molecules by clonal multiple displacement amplification using barcoded primers. Sequences are binned based on barcode sequences and sequenced using a microdroplet-based method for sequencing large polynucleotide templates to enable assembly of haplotype-resolved complex genomes and metagenomes.

  16. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  17. Sequence change and phylogenetic signal in muscoid COII DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Szalanski, Allen L; Owens, Carrie B

    2003-08-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase II gene from house fly, Musca domestica, face fly, Musca autumnalis, stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, horn fly, Haematobia irritans, and black garbage fly, Hydrotaea aenescens, are reported. The nucleotide sequence codes for a 229 amino acid peptide. The COII sequence is A + T rich (74.1%), with up to 12.3% nucleotide and 8.4% amino acid divergence among the five taxa. Of the 688 nucleotides encoding for the gene, 135 nucleotide sites (19.6%) are variable, and 55 (8.0%) are phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic analysis using three calliphorids as the outgroup taxa, indicates that the two haematophagus species, horn fly and stable fly, form a sister group.

  18. A Demonstration of Automated DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latourelle, Sandra; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Details a simulation that employs a paper-and-pencil model to demonstrate the principles behind automated DNA sequencing. Discusses the advantages of automated sequencing as well as the chemistry of automated DNA sequencing. (DDR)

  19. Analysis of Pteridium ribosomal RNA sequences by rapid direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, M K

    1991-08-01

    A total of 864 bases from 5 regions interspersed in the 18S and 26S rRNA molecules from various clones of Pteridium covering the general geographical distribution of the genus was analysed using a rapid rRNA sequencing technique. No base difference has been detected amongst the three major lineages, two of which apparently separated before the breakup of the ancient supercontinent, Pangaea. These regions of the rRNA sequences have thus been conserved for at least 160 million years and are here compared with other eukaryotic, especially plant rRNAs.

  20. Predicting the molecular complexity of sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D

    2013-04-01

    Predicting the molecular complexity of a genomic sequencing library is a critical but difficult problem in modern sequencing applications. Methods to determine how deeply to sequence to achieve complete coverage or to predict the benefits of additional sequencing are lacking. We introduce an empirical bayesian method to accurately characterize the molecular complexity of a DNA sample for almost any sequencing application on the basis of limited preliminary sequencing. PMID:23435259

  1. Statistical properties of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing non-coding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, nucleotides thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationarity" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and non-coding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to every DNA sequence (33301 coding and 29453 non-coding) in the entire GenBank database. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the non-coding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural and artificial languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts. These statistical properties of non-coding sequences support the possibility that non-coding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  2. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  3. Twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Loman, Nicholas J; Pallen, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the publication of the first bacterial genome sequence, from Haemophilus influenzae, shook the world of bacteriology. In this Timeline, we review the first two decades of bacterial genome sequencing, which have been marked by three revolutions: whole-genome shotgun sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and single-molecule long-read sequencing. We summarize the social history of sequencing and its impact on our understanding of the biology, diversity and evolution of bacteria, while also highlighting spin-offs and translational impact in the clinic. We look forward to a 'sequencing singularity', where sequencing becomes the method of choice for as-yet unthinkable applications in bacteriology and beyond.

  4. Graph Partitioning and Sequencing Software

    1995-09-19

    Graph partitioning is a fundemental problem in many scientific contexts. CHACO2.0 is a software package designed to partition and sequence graphs. CHACO2.0 allows for recursive application of several methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these approaches can be used to partition the graph into two, four, or eight pieces at each level of recursion.more » In addition, the Kernighan Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other algorithms. CHACO2.0 can also be used to address various graph sequencing problems, with applications to scientific computing, database design, gene sequencing and other problems.« less

  5. The Extrapolation of Elementary Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip; Saul, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    We study sequence extrapolation as a stream-learning problem. Input examples are a stream of data elements of the same type (integers, strings, etc.), and the problem is to construct a hypothesis that both explains the observed sequence of examples and extrapolates the rest of the stream. A primary objective -- and one that distinguishes this work from previous extrapolation algorithms -- is that the same algorithm be able to extrapolate sequences over a variety of different types, including integers, strings, and trees. We define a generous family of constructive data types, and define as our learning bias a stream language called elementary stream descriptions. We then give an algorithm that extrapolates elementary descriptions over constructive datatypes and prove that it learns correctly. For freely-generated types, we prove a polynomial time bound on descriptions of bounded complexity. An especially interesting feature of this work is the ability to provide quantitative measures of confidence in competing hypotheses, using a Bayesian model of prediction.

  6. Multilocus sequence typing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Martin C J

    2006-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was proposed in 1998 as a portable, universal, and definitive method for characterizing bacteria, using the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as an example. In addition to providing a standardized approach to data collection, by examining the nucleotide sequences of multiple loci encoding housekeeping genes, or fragments of them, MLST data are made freely available over the Internet to ensure that a uniform nomenclature is readily available to all those interested in categorizing bacteria. At the time of writing, over thirty MLST schemes have been published and made available on the Internet, mostly for pathogenic bacteria, although there are schemes for pathogenic fungi and some nonpathogenic bacteria. MLST data have been employed in epidemiological investigations of various scales and in studies of the population biology, pathogenicity, and evolution of bacteria. The increasing speed and reduced cost of nucleotide sequence determination, together with improved web-based databases and analysis tools, present the prospect of increasingly wide application of MLST.

  7. Numerical classification of coding sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. W.; Liu, C. C.; Jukes, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    DNA sequences coding for protein may be represented by counts of nucleotides or codons. A complete reading frame may be abbreviated by its base count, e.g. A76C158G121T74, or with the corresponding codon table, e.g. (AAA)0(AAC)1(AAG)9 ... (TTT)0. We propose that these numerical designations be used to augment current methods of sequence annotation. Because base counts and codon tables do not require revision as knowledge of function evolves, they are well-suited to act as cross-references, for example to identify redundant GenBank entries. These descriptors may be compared, in place of DNA sequences, to extract homologous genes from large databases. This approach permits rapid searching with good selectivity.

  8. Analysis of DNA Sequence Variants Detected by High Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David R; Sincan, Murat; Fajardo, Karin Fuentes; Mullikin, James C; Pierson, Tyler M; Toro, Camilo; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Tifft, Cynthia J; Gahl, William A; Markello, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    The Undiagnosed Diseases Program at the National Institutes of Health uses High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) to diagnose rare and novel diseases. HTS techniques generate large numbers of DNA sequence variants, which must be analyzed and filtered to find candidates for disease causation. Despite the publication of an increasing number of successful exome-based projects, there has been little formal discussion of the analytic steps applied to HTS variant lists. We present the results of our experience with over 30 families for whom HTS sequencing was used in an attempt to find clinical diagnoses. For each family, exome sequence was augmented with high-density SNP-array data. We present a discussion of the theory and practical application of each analytic step and provide example data to illustrate our approach. The paper is designed to provide an analytic roadmap for variant analysis, thereby enabling a wide range of researchers and clinical genetics practitioners to perform direct analysis of HTS data for their patients and projects. PMID:22290882

  9. A repetitive sequence assembler based on next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lian, S; Tu, Y; Wang, Y; Chen, X; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive sequences of variable length are common in almost all eukaryotic genomes, and most of them are presumed to have important biomedical functions and can cause genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provide the possibility of identifying capturing these repetitive sequences directly from the NGS data. In this study, we assessed the performances in identifying capturing repeats of leading assemblers, such as Velvet, SOAPdenovo, SGA, MSR-CA, Bambus2, ALLPATHS-LG, and AByss using three real NGS datasets. Our results indicated that most of them performed poorly in capturing the repeats. Consequently, we proposed a repetitive sequence assembler, named NGSReper, for capturing repeats from NGS data. Simulated datasets were used to validate the feasibility of NGSReper. The results indicate that the completeness of capturing repeat is up to 99%. Cross validation was performed in three real NGS datasets, and extensive comparisons indicate that NGSReper performed best in terms of completeness and accuracy in capturing repeats. In conclusion, NGSReper is an appropriate and suitable tool for capturing repeats directly from NGS data. PMID:27525861

  10. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. BFC: correcting Illumina sequencing errors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary: BFC is a free, fast and easy-to-use sequencing error corrector designed for Illumina short reads. It uses a non-greedy algorithm but still maintains a speed comparable to implementations based on greedy methods. In evaluations on real data, BFC appears to correct more errors with fewer overcorrections in comparison to existing tools. It particularly does well in suppressing systematic sequencing errors, which helps to improve the base accuracy of de novo assemblies. Availability and implementation: https://github.com/lh3/bfc Contact: hengli@broadinstitute.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25953801

  12. Data compression for sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Post-Sanger sequencing methods produce tons of data, and there is a general agreement that the challenge to store and process them must be addressed with data compression. In this review we first answer the question “why compression” in a quantitative manner. Then we also answer the questions “what” and “how”, by sketching the fundamental compression ideas, describing the main sequencing data types and formats, and comparing the specialized compression algorithms and tools. Finally, we go back to the question “why compression” and give other, perhaps surprising answers, demonstrating the pervasiveness of data compression techniques in computational biology. PMID:24252160

  13. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  14. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  15. Single-Cell Semiconductor Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Andrea B.; Moroz, Tatiana P.; Barnes, Jeffrey P.; Netherton, Mandy; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq or transcriptome analysis of individual cells and small-cell populations is essential for virtually any biomedical field. It is especially critical for developmental, aging, and cancer biology as well as neuroscience where the enormous heterogeneity of cells present a significant methodological and conceptual challenge. Here we present two methods that allow for fast and cost-efficient transcriptome sequencing from ultra-small amounts of tissue or even from individual cells using semiconductor sequencing technology (Ion Torrent, Life Technologies). The first method is a reduced representation sequencing which maximizes capture of RNAs and preserves transcripts’ directionality. The second, a template-switch protocol, is designed for small mammalian neurons. Both protocols, from cell/tissue isolation to final sequence data, take up to 4 days. The efficiency of these protocols has been validated with single hippocampal neurons and various invertebrate tissues including individually identified neurons within a simpler memory-forming circuit of Aplysia californica and early (1-, 2-, 4-, 8-cells) embryonic and developmental stages from basal metazoans. PMID:23929110

  16. [Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis].

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasufumi

    2013-12-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis has been emerging as a powerful tool for genotyping specific bacterial species. MLST utilizes internal fragments of multiple housekeeping genes and the combination of each allele defines the sequence type for each isolate. MLST databases contain reference data and are freely accessible via internet websites. The standard method for investigating short-term hospital outbreaks is still pulse-field gel-electrophoresis and MLST analysis is not a substitute. However, analysis of sequence types and clonal complexes (closely related sequence types) enables identification and understanding of a specific clone that is widely spreading among drug-resistant organisms, or a key clone that is important for evolution of the organism. In the case of Escherichia coli, CTX-M-15 or CTX-M-14 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing ST131 clone has emerged and spread globally in the last 10 years. MLST analysis is an unambiguous procedure and is becoming a common typing method to characterize isolates. PMID:24605545

  17. Genome Sequence of Spizellomyces punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Carsten; Lang, B. Franz; Chen, Zehua; Gujja, Sharvari; Shea, Terrance; Zeng, Qiandong; Young, Sarah; Nusbaum, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Spizellomyces punctatus is a basally branching chytrid fungus that is found in the Chytridiomycota phylum. Spizellomyces species are common in soil and of importance in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we report the genome sequence of S. punctatus, which will facilitate the study of this group of early diverging fungi. PMID:27540072

  18. Ideal statistically quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Ekrem; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    An ideal I is a family of subsets of N, the set of positive integers which is closed under taking finite unions and subsets of its elements. A sequence (xk) of real numbers is said to be S(I)-statistically convergent to a real number L, if for each ɛ > 0 and for each δ > 0 the set { n ∈N :1/n | { k ≤n :| xk-L | ≥ɛ } | ≥δ } belongs to I. We introduce S(I)-statistically ward compactness of a subset of R, the set of real numbers, and S(I)-statistically ward continuity of a real function in the senses that a subset E of R is S(I)-statistically ward compact if any sequence of points in E has an S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy subsequence, and a real function is S(I)-statistically ward continuous if it preserves S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy sequences where a sequence (xk) is called to be S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy when (Δxk) is S(I)-statistically convergent to 0. We obtain results related to S(I)-statistically ward continuity, S(I)-statistically ward compactness, Nθ-ward continuity, and slowly oscillating continuity.

  19. Why Visual Sequences Come First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Steven D.

    Visual sequences should be the first visual literacy exercises for reasons that are physio-psychological, semantic, and curricular. In infancy, vision is undifferentiated and undetailed. The number of details a child sees increases with age. Therefore, a series of pictures, rather than one photograph which tells a whole story, is more appropriate…

  20. Genome Sequence of Spizellomyces punctatus.

    PubMed

    Russ, Carsten; Lang, B Franz; Chen, Zehua; Gujja, Sharvari; Shea, Terrance; Zeng, Qiandong; Young, Sarah; Cuomo, Christina A; Nusbaum, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Spizellomyces punctatus is a basally branching chytrid fungus that is found in the Chytridiomycota phylum. Spizellomyces species are common in soil and of importance in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we report the genome sequence of S. punctatus, which will facilitate the study of this group of early diverging fungi. PMID:27540072

  1. Image Sequence Coding by Octrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Riccardo

    1989-11-01

    This work addresses the problem of representing an image sequence as a set of octrees. The purpose is to generate a flexible data structure to model video signals, for applications such as motion estimation, video coding and/or analysis. An image sequence can be represented as a 3-dimensional causal signal, which becomes a 3 dimensional array of data when the signal has been digitized. If it is desirable to track long-term spatio-temporal correlation, a series of octree structures may be embedded on this 3D array. Each octree looks at a subset of data in the spatio-temporal space. At the lowest level (leaves of the octree), adjacent pixels of neighboring frames are captured. A combination of these is represented at the parent level of each group of 8 children. This combination may result in a more compact representation of the information of these pixels (coding application) or in a local estimate of some feature of interest (e.g., velocity, classification, object boundary). This combination can be iterated bottom-up to get a hierarchical description of the image sequence characteristics. A coding strategy using such data structure involves the description of the octree shape using one bit per node except for leaves of the tree located at the lowest level, and the value (or parametric model) assigned to each one of these leaves. Experiments have been performed to represent Common Image Format (CIF) sequences.

  2. Foreign Language Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Patrick T.; And Others

    The scope and sequence format for foreign language instruction in Waukesha, Wisconsin's public schools is presented. It charts the specific concepts, skills, and objectives to be included in foreign language exploration (FLEX) courses and courses in French, German, Latin, and Spanish at each of five levels. Each concept, skill, and objective is…

  3. Single-cell semiconductor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Tatiana P; Barnes, Jeffrey P; Netherton, Mandy; Moroz, Leonid L

    2013-01-01

    RNA-seq or transcriptome analysis of individual cells and small-cell populations is essential for virtually any biomedical field. It is especially critical for developmental, aging, and cancer biology as well as neuroscience where the enormous heterogeneity of cells present a significant methodological and conceptual challenge. Here we present two methods that allow for fast and cost-efficient transcriptome sequencing from ultra-small amounts of tissue or even from individual cells using semiconductor sequencing technology (Ion Torrent, Life Technologies). The first method is a reduced representation sequencing which maximizes capture of RNAs and preserves transcripts' directionality. The second, a template-switch protocol, is designed for small mammalian neurons. Both protocols, from cell/tissue isolation to final sequence data, take up to 4 days. The efficiency of these protocols has been validated with single hippocampal neurons and various invertebrate tissues including individually identified neurons within a simpler memory-forming circuit of Aplysia californica and early (1-, 2-, 4-, 8-cells) embryonic and developmental stages from basal metazoans.

  4. RSAT: regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Sand, Olivier; Turatsinze, Jean-Valéry; Janky, Rekin's; Defrance, Matthieu; Vervisch, Eric; Brohée, Sylvain; van Helden, Jacques

    2008-07-01

    The regulatory sequence analysis tools (RSAT, http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat/) is a software suite that integrates a wide collection of modular tools for the detection of cis-regulatory elements in genome sequences. The suite includes programs for sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, phylogenetic footprint detection, pattern matching, genome scanning and feature map drawing. Random controls can be performed with random gene selections or by generating random sequences according to a variety of background models (Bernoulli, Markov). Beyond the original word-based pattern-discovery tools (oligo-analysis and dyad-analysis), we recently added a battery of tools for matrix-based detection of cis-acting elements, with some original features (adaptive background models, Markov-chain estimation of P-values) that do not exist in other matrix-based scanning tools. The web server offers an intuitive interface, where each program can be accessed either separately or connected to the other tools. In addition, the tools are now available as web services, enabling their integration in programmatic workflows. Genomes are regularly updated from various genome repositories (NCBI and EnsEMBL) and 682 organisms are currently supported. Since 1998, the tools have been used by several hundreds of researchers from all over the world. Several predictions made with RSAT were validated experimentally and published.

  5. Recent Scope-and-Sequence Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Presents scope-and-sequence models from the National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools, the Bradley Commission on History in Schools, and three from the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Ad Hoc Committee on Scope and Sequence. Provides NCSS's criteria on scope and sequence and notes that sequence of the five models varies…

  6. Multiple Strand Sequencing Using the Elaboration Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beissner, Katherine; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    This study examined the sequencing of instruction in a course in physical therapy. In the first phase, a procedural elaboration sequence was designed using the Simplifying Assumptions Method. In the second phase, a prescriptive-theoretical elaboration sequence independent of the procedural sequence was designed. A descriptive-theoretical…

  7. Performance comparison of Next Generation sequencing platforms.

    PubMed

    Erguner, Bekir; Ustek, Duran; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation DNA Sequencing technologies offer ultra high sequencing throughput for very low prices. The increase in throughput and diminished costs open up new research areas. Moreover, number of clinicians utilizing DNA sequencing keeps growing. One of the main concern for researchers and clinicians who are adopting these platforms is their sequencing accuracy. We compared three of the most commonly used Next Generation Sequencing platforms; Ion Torrent from Life Technologies, GS FLX+ from Roche and HiSeq 2000 from Illumina.

  8. Program for Editing Spacecraft Command Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy; Waggoner, Bruce; Kordon, Mark; Hashemi, Mahnaz; Hanks, David; Salcedo, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Sequence Translator, Editor, and Expander Resource (STEER) is a computer program that facilitates construction of sequences and blocks of sequences (hereafter denoted generally as sequence products) for commanding a spacecraft. STEER also provides mechanisms for translating among various sequence product types and quickly expanding activities of a given sequence in chronological order for review and analysis of the sequence. To date, construction of sequence products has generally been done by use of such clumsy mechanisms as text-editor programs, translating among sequence product types has been challenging, and expanding sequences to time-ordered lists has involved arduous processes of converting sequence products to "real" sequences and running them through Class-A software (defined, loosely, as flight and ground software critical to a spacecraft mission). Also, heretofore, generating sequence products in standard formats has been troublesome because precise formatting and syntax are required. STEER alleviates these issues by providing a graphical user interface containing intuitive fields in which the user can enter the necessary information. The STEER expansion function provides a "quick and dirty" means of seeing how a sequence and sequence block would expand into a chronological list, without need to use of Class-A software.

  9. Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alland, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes my work with the Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS) team during the summer of 2011. It gives some background on the motivation for this project and describes the expected benefit to the Cassini program. It then introduces the two tasks that I worked on - an automatic system auditing tool and a series of corrections to the Cassini Sequence Generator (SEQ_GEN) - and the specific objectives these tasks were to accomplish. Next, it details the approach I took to meet these objectives and the results of this approach, followed by a discussion of how the outcome of the project compares with my initial expectations. The paper concludes with a summary of my experience working on this project, lists what the next steps are, and acknowledges the help of my Cassini colleagues.

  10. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Smith, L.M.; Tong, X.E.

    1995-03-28

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis. 4 figures.

  11. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Renfeng; Smith, Lloyd M.; Tong, Xinchun E.

    1995-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis.

  12. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection.

  13. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1996-05-07

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection. 18 figs.

  14. Visual mislocalization during saccade sequences

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, Maria Concetta; Burr, David

    2016-01-01

    Visual objects briefly presented around the time of saccadic eye movements are perceived compressed towards the saccade target. Here, we investigated perisaccadic mislocalization with a double-step saccade paradigm, measuring localization of small probe dots briefly flashed at various times around the sequence of the two saccades. At onset of the first saccade, probe dots were mislocalized towards the first and, to a lesser extent, also towards the second saccade target. However, there was very little mislocalization at the onset of the second saccade. When we increased the presentation duration of the saccade targets prior to onset of the saccade sequence, perisaccadic mislocalization did occur at the onset of the second saccade. PMID:25370348

  15. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  16. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  17. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  18. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages.

  19. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo

    PubMed Central

    Bina, Elizabeth A.; Brahme, Indraneel S.; Hill, Amy B.; Himmelstein, Philip H.; Hunsicker, Sara M.; Ish, Amanda R.; Le, Tinh S.; Martin, Mary M.; Moscinski, Catherine N.; Shetty, Sameer A.; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B.; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Bowman, Charles A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages. PMID:26089415

  20. Robot navigation using image sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, C.; Hager, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    We describe a framework for robot navigation that exploits the continuity of image sequences. Tracked visual features both guide the robot and provide predictive information about subsequent features to track. Our hypothesis is that image-based techniques will allow accurate motion without a precise geometric model of the world, while using predictive information will add speed and robustness. A basic component of our framework is called a scene, which is the set of image features stable over some segment of motion. When the scene changes, it is appended to a stored sequence. As the robot moves, correspondences and dissimilarities between current, remembered, and expected scenes provide cues to join and split scene sequences, forming a map-like directed graph. Visual servoing on features in successive scenes is used to traverse a path between robot and goal map locations. In our framework, a human guide serves as a scene recognition oracle during a map-learning phase; thereafter, assuming a known starting position, the robot can independently determine its location without general scene recognition ability. A prototype implementation of this framework uses as features color patches, sum-of-squared differences (SSD) subimages, or image projections of rectangles.

  1. Incidental sequence learning across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weiermann, Brigitte; Meier, Beat

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incidental sequence learning across the lifespan. We tested 50 children (aged 7-16), 50 young adults (aged 20-30), and 50 older adults (aged >65) with a sequence learning paradigm that involved both a task and a response sequence. After several blocks of practice, all age groups slowed down when the training sequences were removed, providing indirect evidence for sequence learning. This performance slowing was comparable between groups, indicating no age-related differences. However, when explicit sequence knowledge was considered, age effects were found. For both children and older adults with no or only little explicit knowledge, incidental sequence learning was largely reduced and statistically not significant. In contrast, young adults showed sequence learning irrespective of the amount of explicit knowledge. These results indicate that different learning processes are involved in incidental sequence learning depending on age.

  2. Shaping Action Sequences in Basal Ganglia Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Costa, Rui M

    2015-01-01

    Many behaviors necessary for organism survival are learned anew and become organized as complex sequences of actions. Recent studies suggest that cortico-basal ganglia circuits are important for chunking isolated movements into precise and robust action sequences that permit the achievement of particular goals. During sequence learning many neurons in the basal ganglia develop sequence-related activity - related to the initiation, execution, and termination of sequences - suggesting that action sequences are processed as action units. Corticostriatal plasticity is critical for the crystallization of action sequences, and for the development of sequence-related neural activity. Furthermore, this sequence-related activity is differentially expressed in direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways. These findings have implications for understanding the symptoms associated with movement and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26189204

  3. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, Thomas G.; Chang, William I-Wei

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence.

  4. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, T.G.; Chang, W.I.

    1997-12-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence. 5 figs.

  5. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Arielle S.; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed. PMID:26575193

  6. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arielle S; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed. PMID:26575193

  7. The transvaal sequence: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Schweitzer, J. K.; Bosch, P. J. A.; Schereiber, U. M.; Van Deventer, J. L.; Hatton, C. J.

    1993-02-01

    The 15 000 m of relatively unmetamorphosed clastic and chemical sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the 2550-2050 Ma Transvaal Sequence as preserved within the Transvaal and correlated Griqualand West basins of South Africa, and in the Kanye basin of Botswana are described. Immature clastic sedimentary and largely andesitic volcanic rocks of the Wolkberg, Godwan and Buffelsfontein Groups and the Bloempoort and Wachteenbeetje Formations probably represent rift-related sequences of Ventersdorp age. The thin sandstones of the Black Reef Formation, developed at the base of both the Kanye and Transvaal basin successions and correlated with the basal Vryburg siltstones of the Griqualand West Sequence, are considered here to be the basal unit of the Transvaal Sequence. The Black Reef fluvial deposits grade up into the epeiric marine carbonates of the Malmani Subgroup. These stromatolitic dolomites and interdbedded cherts were laid down within a steepened carbonate ramp setting; transgressions from an initial Griqualand West compartment towards the northeast covered both the Kanye and Transvaal basins. Iron formations of the succeeding Penge Formation and Griqualand West correlates are envisaged as relatively shallow water shelf deposits within the carbonate platform model; siliceous breccias of the Kanye basin are interpreted as reflecting subaerial brecciation of exposed silica gels. The Duitschland Formation overlying the Penge iron formations is seen as a final, regressive clastic and chemical sedimentary deposits as the Malmani-Penge sea retreated from the Transvaal basin. The interbedded sandstones and mudstones of the uncomformity-bounded Pretoria Group probably represent a combination of alluvial fan and fluviodeltaic complexes debouching into the largely lacustrine Transvaal and Kanye basins. A strong glacial influence in the lower Pretoria Group is reflected in the correlated Makganyene diamicities of the Griqualand West Sequence. Sedimentation across all three

  8. Sequencing Voyager II for the Uranus encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    The process of developing the programmed sequence of events necessary for the Voyager 2 spacecraft to return desired data from its Uranus encounter is discussed. The major steps in the sequence process are reviewed, and the elements of the Mission Sequence Software are described. The design phase and the implementation phase of the sequence process are discussed, and the Computer Command Subsystem architecture is examined in detail. The software's role in constructing the sequences and converting them into onboard programs is elucidated, and the problems unique to the Uranus encounter sequences are considered.

  9. Biomolecule Sequencer: Nanopore Sequencing Technology for In-Situ Environmental Monitoring and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, K. K.; Botkin, D. J.; Burton, A. S.; Castro-Wallace, S. L.; Chaput, J. D.; Dworkin, J. P.; Lupisella, M. L.; Mason, C. E.; Rubins, K. H.; Smith, D. J.; Stahl, S.; Switzer, C.

    2016-10-01

    Biomolecule Sequencer will demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA sequencing is feasible as a tool for in-situ environmental monitoring and astrobiology. A space-based sequencer could identify microbes, diseases, and help detect DNA-based life.

  10. Proline-rich Sequence Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schlundt, Andreas; Sticht, Jana; Piotukh, Kirill; Kosslick, Daniela; Jahnke, Nadin; Keller, Sandro; Schuemann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Freund, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor maintenance protein Tsg101 has recently gained much attention because of its involvement in endosomal sorting, virus release, cytokinesis, and cancerogenesis. The ubiquitin-E2-like variant (UEV) domain of the protein interacts with proline-rich sequences of target proteins that contain P(S/T)AP amino acid motifs and weakly binds to the ubiquitin moiety of proteins committed to sorting or degradation. Here we performed peptide spot analysis and phage display to refine the peptide binding specificity of the Tsg101 UEV domain. A mass spectrometric proteomics approach that combines domain-based pulldown experiments, binding site inactivation, and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was then used to delineate the relative importance of the peptide and ubiquitin binding sites. Clearly “PTAP” interactions dominate target recognition, and we identified several novel binders as for example the poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), Sec24b, NFκB2, and eIF4b. For PABP1 and eIF4b the interactions were confirmed in the context of the corresponding full-length proteins in cellular lysates. Therefore, our results strongly suggest additional roles of Tsg101 in cellular regulation of mRNA translation. Regulation of Tsg101 itself by the ubiquitin ligase TAL (Tsg101-associated ligase) is most likely conferred by a single PSAP binding motif that enables the interaction with Tsg101 UEV. Together with the results from the accompanying article (Kofler, M., Schuemann, M., Merz, C., Kosslick, D., Schlundt, A., Tannert, A., Schaefer, M., Lührmann, R., Krause, E., and Freund, C. (2009) Proline-rich sequence recognition: I. Marking GYF and WW domain assembly sites in early spliceosomal complexes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 8, 2461–2473) on GYF and WW domain pathways our work defines major proline-rich sequence-mediated interaction networks that contribute to the modular assembly of physiologically relevant protein complexes. PMID:19542561

  11. Benchmarking short sequence mapping tools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of next-generation sequencing instruments has led to the generation of millions of short sequences in a single run. The process of aligning these reads to a reference genome is time consuming and demands the development of fast and accurate alignment tools. However, the current proposed tools make different compromises between the accuracy and the speed of mapping. Moreover, many important aspects are overlooked while comparing the performance of a newly developed tool to the state of the art. Therefore, there is a need for an objective evaluation method that covers all the aspects. In this work, we introduce a benchmarking suite to extensively analyze sequencing tools with respect to various aspects and provide an objective comparison. Results We applied our benchmarking tests on 9 well known mapping tools, namely, Bowtie, Bowtie2, BWA, SOAP2, MAQ, RMAP, GSNAP, Novoalign, and mrsFAST (mrFAST) using synthetic data and real RNA-Seq data. MAQ and RMAP are based on building hash tables for the reads, whereas the remaining tools are based on indexing the reference genome. The benchmarking tests reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each tool. The results show that no single tool outperforms all others in all metrics. However, Bowtie maintained the best throughput for most of the tests while BWA performed better for longer read lengths. The benchmarking tests are not restricted to the mentioned tools and can be further applied to others. Conclusion The mapping process is still a hard problem that is affected by many factors. In this work, we provided a benchmarking suite that reveals and evaluates the different factors affecting the mapping process. Still, there is no tool that outperforms all of the others in all the tests. Therefore, the end user should clearly specify his needs in order to choose the tool that provides the best results. PMID:23758764

  12. Integration of retinal image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  13. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  14. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-09-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria comprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium. PMID:21705585

  15. The Genome Sequencing Center at NCGR

    SciTech Connect

    Schilkey, Faye

    2010-06-02

    Faye Schilkey from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses NCGR's research, sequencing and analysis experience on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  16. Data structures for DNA sequence manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, C B

    1986-01-01

    Two data structures designated Fragment and Construct are described. The Fragment data structure defines a continuous nucleic acid sequence from a unique genetic origin. The Construct defines a continuous sequence composed of sequences from multiple genetic origins. These data structures are manipulated by a set of software tools to simulate the construction of mosaic recombinant DNA molecules. They are also used as an interface between sequence data banks and analytical programs. PMID:3753765

  17. Sequencing crop genomes: approaches and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genome sequencing methodology parrallels the sequencing of the human genome. The first projects were slow and very expensive. BAC by BAC approaches were utilized first and whole-genome shotgun sequencing rapidly replaced that approach. So called 'next generation' technologies such as short rea...

  18. PacBio Sequencing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Anthony; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule, real-time sequencing developed by Pacific BioSciences offers longer read lengths than the second-generation sequencing (SGS) technologies, making it well-suited for unsolved problems in genome, transcriptome, and epigenetics research. The highly-contiguous de novo assemblies using PacBio sequencing can close gaps in current reference assemblies and characterize structural variation (SV) in personal genomes. With longer reads, we can sequence through extended repetitive regions and detect mutations, many of which are associated with diseases. Moreover, PacBio transcriptome sequencing is advantageous for the identification of gene isoforms and facilitates reliable discoveries of novel genes and novel isoforms of annotated genes, due to its ability to sequence full-length transcripts or fragments with significant lengths. Additionally, PacBio’s sequencing technique provides information that is useful for the direct detection of base modifications, such as methylation. In addition to using PacBio sequencing alone, many hybrid sequencing strategies have been developed to make use of more accurate short reads in conjunction with PacBio long reads. In general, hybrid sequencing strategies are more affordable and scalable especially for small-size laboratories than using PacBio Sequencing alone. The advent of PacBio sequencing has made available much information that could not be obtained via SGS alone. PMID:26542840

  19. Incidental Sequence Learning across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiermann, Brigitte; Meier, Beat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incidental sequence learning across the lifespan. We tested 50 children (aged 7-16), 50 young adults (aged 20-30), and 50 older adults (aged >65) with a sequence learning paradigm that involved both a task and a response sequence. After several blocks of practice, all age groups slowed down…

  20. Automated Sequence Generation Process and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy

    2007-01-01

    "Automated sequence generation" (autogen) signifies both a process and software used to automatically generate sequences of commands to operate various spacecraft. The autogen software comprises the autogen script plus the Activity Plan Generator (APGEN) program. APGEN can be used for planning missions and command sequences.

  1. The recurrence sequence via the Fibonacci groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aküzüm, Yeşim; Deveci, Ömür

    2016-04-01

    This work develops properties of the recurrence sequence defined by the aid of the relation matrix of the Fibonacci groups. The study of this sequence modulo m yields cyclic groups and semigroups from generating matrix. Finally, we extend the sequence defined to groups and then, we obtain its period in the Fibonacci groups.

  2. SP8 Sequencing Extinct Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Poinar, H.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, which hold clues to the evolution of various animal and hominid taxa, are comparatively weak molecules from other cellular debris, and thus evolutionary biologists are in essence time trapped. Fortunately, DNA and protein fragments do exist in fossil remains beyond what theoretical experimentation would suggest. Sequestering of DNA molecules in humic or Maillard-like complexes likely represents a rich source of DNA molecules from the past, which have yet to be tapped. These molecules were impossible to acquire due to the selective nature of the polymerase chain reaction. Recently, however, rapid parallel pyrosequencing techniques, such as those used in metagenomics-based research, which, in theory, allow for the identification of all short nucleotide sequences in a sample in a non-selective approach, have the potential to allow the identification of all nucleic acids in a sample, and thus represent the way forward for ancient DNA. In theory, this new technology will allow the completion of genomes of extinct animals, plants, and microbes. I will discuss the benefits and pitfalls of this metagenomics approach to ancient DNA, highlighting our recent efforts underway to sequence the wooly mammoth genome as well as other fossil remains.

  3. Estimating evolution of temporal sequence changes: a practical approach to inferring ancestral developmental sequences and sequence heterochrony.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Luke B; Larsson, Hans C E

    2008-06-01

    Developmental biology often yields data in a temporal context. Temporal data in phylogenetic systematics has important uses in the field of evolutionary developmental biology and, in general, comparative biology. The evolution of temporal sequences, specifically developmental sequences, has proven difficult to examine due to the highly variable temporal progression of development. Issues concerning the analysis of temporal sequences and problems with current methods of analysis are discussed. We present here an algorithm to infer ancestral temporal sequences, quantify sequence heterochronies, and estimate pseudoreplicate consensus support for sequence changes using Parsimov-based genetic inference [PGi]. Real temporal developmental sequence data sets are used to compare PGi with currently used approaches, and PGi is shown to be the most efficient, accurate, and practical method to examine biological data and infer ancestral states on a phylogeny. The method is also expandable to address further issues in developmental evolution, namely modularity. PMID:18570033

  4. Nucleotide Sequence-Based Multitarget Identification

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagamoorthy, T.; Mulatz, Kirk; Hodkinson, Roger

    2003-01-01

    MULTIGEN technology (T. Vinayagamoorthy, U.S. patent 6,197,510, March 2001) is a modification of conventional sequencing technology that generates a single electropherogram consisting of short nucleotide sequences from a mixture of known DNA targets. The target sequences may be present on the same or different nucleic acid molecules. For example, when two DNA targets are sequenced, the first and second sequencing primers are annealed to their respective target sequences, and then a polymerase causes chain extension by the addition of new deoxyribose nucleotides. Since the electrophoretic separation depends on the relative molecular weights of the truncated molecules, the molecular weight of the second sequencing primer was specifically designed to be higher than the combined molecular weight of the first sequencing primer plus the molecular weight of the largest truncated molecule generated from the first target sequence. Thus, the series of truncated molecules produced by the second sequencing primer will have higher molecular weights than those produced by the first sequencing primer. Hence, the truncated molecules produced by these two sequencing primers can be effectively separated in a single lane by standard gel electrophoresis in a single electropherogram without any overlapping of the nucleotide sequences. By using sequencing primers with progressively higher molecular weights, multiple short DNA sequences from a variety of targets can be determined simultaneously. We describe here the basic concept of MULTIGEN technology and three applications: detection of sexually transmitted pathogens (Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum), detection of contaminants in meat samples (coliforms, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human N-acetyltransferase (NAT1) gene (S. Fronhoffs et al., Carcinogenesis 22:1405-1412, 2001). PMID:12843076

  5. Dispersed repetitive DNA sequence of Mucor racemosus.

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, R; Katayama, C; Sypherd, P S; Cihlar, R L

    1985-01-01

    A dispersed repetitive DNA sequence has been identified within the genome of the fungus Mucor racemosus. Recombinant phage clones, as well as a plasmid harboring the sequence, have been isolated. Examination of cloned fragments comprising part of the repetitive sequence has led to a partial characterization of the element. The sequence has been detected in other Mucor species, and although the apparent number and chromosomal position of the repetitive sequence vary from strain to strain, it is clear that at least portions of the element have been conserved. Images PMID:3980442

  6. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  7. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  8. [DNA sequencing technology and automatization of it].

    PubMed

    Kraev, A S

    1991-01-01

    Precise manipulations with genetic material, typical for modern experiments in molecular biology and in new biotechnology, require a capability to determine DNA base sequence. This capability enables today to exploit specific genetic knowledge for the dissection of complex cell processes and for modulation of cell metabolism in transgenic organisms. The review focuses on such DNA sequencing technologies that are widespread in general laboratory practice. They can safely be called, with the availability of commercial reagents, industrial techniques. Modern DNA sequencing requires recurrent breakdown of large genomic DNA into smaller pieces, that are then amplified, sequenced and the initial long stretch reconstructed via overlap of small pieces. The DNA sequencing process has several steps: a DNA fragment is obtained in sufficient quantity and purity, it is converted to a form suitable for a particular sequencing method, a sequencing reaction is performed and its products fractionated; and finally the resultant data are interpreted (i.e. an autoradiograph is read into a computer memory) and a long sequence in reconstructed via overlap of short stretches. These steps are considered in separate parts; an accent is made on sequencing strategies with respect to their biological task. In the last part, possibilities for automation of sequencing experiment are considered, followed by a discussion of domestic problems in DNA sequencing.

  9. Experimental investigation of an RNA sequence space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Youn-Hyung; Dsouza, Lisa; Fox, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Modern rRNAs are the historic consequence of an ongoing evolutionary exploration of a sequence space. These extant sequences belong to a special subset of the sequence space that is comprised only of those primary sequences that can validly perform the biological function(s) required of the particular RNA. If it were possible to readily identify all such valid sequences, stochastic predictions could be made about the relative likelihood of various evolutionary pathways available to an RNA. Herein an experimental system which can assess whether a particular sequence is likely to have validity as a eubacterial 5S rRNA is described. A total of ten naturally occurring, and hence known to be valid, sequences and two point mutants of unknown validity were used to test the usefulness of the approach. Nine of the ten valid sequences tested positive whereas both mutants tested as clearly defective. The tenth valid sequence gave results that would be interpreted as reflecting a borderline status were the answer not known. These results demonstrate that it is possible to experimentally determine which sequences in local regions of the sequence space are potentially valid 5S rRNAs.

  10. Accurate and comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Subramanian S; Parker, Stephen C J; Abaan, Hatice Ozel; Fajardo, Karin V Fuentes; Margulies, Elliott H

    2011-09-01

    As whole-genome sequencing becomes commoditized and we begin to sequence and analyze personal genomes for clinical and diagnostic purposes, it is necessary to understand what constitutes a complete sequencing experiment for determining genotypes and detecting single-nucleotide variants. Here, we show that the current recommendation of ∼30× coverage is not adequate to produce genotype calls across a large fraction of the genome with acceptably low error rates. Our results are based on analyses of a clinical sample sequenced on two related Illumina platforms, GAII(x) and HiSeq 2000, to a very high depth (126×). We used these data to establish genotype-calling filters that dramatically increase accuracy. We also empirically determined how the callable portion of the genome varies as a function of the amount of sequence data used. These results help provide a "sequencing guide" for future whole-genome sequencing decisions and metrics by which coverage statistics should be reported.

  11. Atypical regions in large genomic DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S. |; McPeek, M.S.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-07-19

    Large genomic DNA sequences contain regions with distinctive patterns of sequence organization. The authors describe a method using logarithms of probabilities based on seventh-order Markov chains to rapidly identify genomic sequences that do not resemble models of genome organization built from compilations of octanucleotide usage. Data bases have been constructed from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA sequences of >1000 nt and human sequences of >10,000 nt. Atypical genes and clusters of genes have been located in bacteriophage, yeast, and primate DNA sequences. The authors consider criteria for statistical significance of the results, offer possible explanations for the observed variation in genome organization, and give additional applications of these methods in DNA sequence analysis.

  12. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-09-01

    Standard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specific method to determine the expression of small and large RNAs from ribosomal RNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserves all RNA classes. This characteristic allows comparisons between RNA classes, thereby facilitating relationships between different RNA classes. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedure associated with RNAome sequencing published by Derks and colleagues in RNA Biology (2015) [1]. We also provide the R code for the developed Total Rna Analysis Pipeline (TRAP), an algorithm to analyze RNAome sequencing datasets (deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus data repository, accession number GSE48084). PMID:26484291

  13. From sequence mapping to genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The development of "next-generation" high-throughput sequencing technologies has made it possible for many labs to undertake sequencing-based research projects that were unthinkable just a few years ago. Although the scientific applications are diverse, e.g., new genome projects, gene expression analysis, genome-wide functional screens, or epigenetics-the sequence data are usually processed in one of two ways: sequence reads are either mapped to an existing reference sequence, or they are built into a new sequence ("de novo assembly"). In this chapter, we first discuss some limitations of the mapping process and how these may be overcome through local sequence assembly. We then introduce the concept of de novo assembly and describe essential assembly improvement procedures such as scaffolding, contig ordering, gap closure, error evaluation, gene annotation transfer and ab initio gene annotation. The results are high-quality draft assemblies that will facilitate informative downstream analyses.

  14. Replacement Sequence of Events Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Daniel Wenkert Roy; Khanampompan, Teerpat

    2008-01-01

    The soeWINDOW program automates the generation of an ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations)-compliant sub-RSOE (Replacement Sequence of Events) by extracting a specified temporal window from an RSOE while maintaining page header information. RSOEs contain a significant amount of information that is not ITAR-compliant, yet that foreign partners need to see for command details to their instrument, as well as the surrounding commands that provide context for validation. soeWINDOW can serve as an example of how command support products can be made ITAR-compliant for future missions. This software is a Perl script intended for use in the mission operations UNIX environment. It is designed for use to support the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) instrument team. The tool also provides automated DOM (Distributed Object Manager) storage into the special ITAR-okay DOM collection, and can be used for creating focused RSOEs for product review by any of the MRO teams.

  15. Particle sizer and DNA sequencer

    DOEpatents

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.

    2005-09-13

    An electrophoretic device separates and detects particles such as DNA fragments, proteins, and the like. The device has a capillary which is coated with a coating with a low refractive index such as Teflon.RTM. AF. A sample of particles is fluorescently labeled and injected into the capillary. The capillary is filled with an electrolyte buffer solution. An electrical field is applied across the capillary causing the particles to migrate from a first end of the capillary to a second end of the capillary. A detector light beam is then scanned along the length of the capillary to detect the location of the separated particles. The device is amenable to a high throughput system by providing additional capillaries. The device can also be used to determine the actual size of the particles and for DNA sequencing.

  16. Effect of sequence length on the execution of familiar keying sequences: lasting segmentation and preparation?

    PubMed

    Verwey, Willem B

    2003-12-01

    The author assessed the mechanisms underlying skilled production of keying sequences in the discrete sequence-production task by examining the effect of sequence length on mean element execution rate (i.e., the rate effect). To that end, participants (N = 9) practiced fixed movement sequences consisting of 2, 4, and 6 key presses for a total of 588 trials per sequence. In the subsequent test phase, the sequences were executed with and without a verbal short-term memory task in both simple and choice reaction time (RT) paradigms. The rate effect was obtained in the discrete sequence-production task-including the typical quadratic increase in sequence execution time (SET, which excludes RT) with sequence length. The rate effect resulted primarily from 6-key sequences that included 1 or 2 relatively slow elements at individually different serial positions. Slowing of the depression of the 2nd response key (R2) in the 2-key sequence reduced the rate effect in the memory task condition, and faster execution of the 1st few elements in each sequence amplified the rate effect in simple RT. Last, the time to respond to random cues increased with position, suggesting that the mechanisms that underlie the rate effect in new sequences and in familiar sequences are different. The data were in line with the notion that coding of longer keying sequences involves motor chunks for the individual sequence segments and information on how those motor chunks are to be concatenated.

  17. Feedback shift register sequences versus uniformly distributed random sequences for correlation chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljurand, M.; Valentin, J. R.; Shao, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two alternative input sequences are commonly employed in correlation chromatography (CC). They are sequences derived according to the algorithm of the feedback shift register (i.e., pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS)) and sequences derived by using the uniform random binary sequences (URBS). These two sequences are compared. By applying the "cleaning" data processing technique to the correlograms that result from these sequences, we show that when the PRBS is used the S/N of the correlogram is much higher than the one resulting from using URBS.

  18. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  19. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  20. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; Kockx, Christel E M; Gomez, Cesar Payan; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  1. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Kasper WJ; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam CGN; Kockx, Christel EM; Payan Gomez, Cesar; Brouwer, Rutger WW; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan HJ; van IJcken, Wilfred FJ; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  2. The PIR-International Protein Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    Barker, W C; Garavelli, J S; McGarvey, P B; Marzec, C R; Orcutt, B C; Srinivasarao, G Y; Yeh, L S; Ledley, R S; Mewes, H W; Pfeiffer, F; Tsugita, A; Wu, C

    1999-01-01

    The Protein Information Resource (PIR; http://www-nbrf.georgetown. edu/pir/) supports research on molecular evolution, functional genomics, and computational biology by maintaining a comprehensive, non-redundant, well-organized and freely available protein sequence database. Since 1988 the database has been maintained collaboratively by PIR-International, an international association of data collection centers cooperating to develop this resource during a period of explosive growth in new sequence data and new computer technologies. The PIR Protein Sequence Database entries are classified into superfamilies, families and homology domains, for which sequence alignments are available. Full-scale family classification supports comparative genomics research, aids sequence annotation, assists database organization and improves database integrity. The PIR WWW server supports direct on-line sequence similarity searches, information retrieval, and knowledge discovery by providing the Protein Sequence Database and other supplementary databases. Sequence entries are extensively cross-referenced and hypertext-linked to major nucleic acid, literature, genome, structure, sequence alignment and family databases. The weekly release of the Protein Sequence Database can be accessed through the PIR Web site. The quarterly release of the database is freely available from our anonymous FTP server and is also available on CD-ROM with the accompanying ATLAS database search program.

  3. DNA sequence analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, F; Nordhoff, E; Larsen, L K; Kristiansen, K; Roepstorff, P; Hillenkamp, F

    1998-01-01

    Conventional DNA sequencing is based on gel electrophoretic separation of the sequencing products. Gel casting and electrophoresis are the time limiting steps, and the gel separation is occasionally imperfect due to aberrant mobility of certain fragments, leading to erroneous sequence determination. Furthermore, illegitimately terminated products frequently cannot be distinguished from correctly terminated ones, a phenomenon that also obscures data interpretation. In the present work the use of MALDI mass spectrometry for sequencing of DNA amplified from clinical samples is implemented. The unambiguous and fast identification of deletions and substitutions in DNA amplified from heterozygous carriers realistically suggest MALDI mass spectrometry as a future alternative to conventional sequencing procedures for high throughput screening for mutations. Unique features of the method are demonstrated by sequencing a DNA fragment that could not be sequenced conventionally because of gel electrophoretic band compression and the presence of multiple non-specific termination products. Taking advantage of the accurate mass information provided by MALDI mass spectrometry, the sequence was deduced, and the nature of the non-specific termination could be determined. The method described here increases the fidelity in DNA sequencing, is fast, compatible with standard DNA sequencing procedures, and amenable to automation. PMID:9592136

  4. On the activation of bovine plasma factor XIII. Amino acid sequence of the peptide released by thrombin and the terminal residues of the subunit polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Iwanaga, S; Suzuki, T

    1975-12-01

    A blood coagulation factor, Factor XIII, was highly purified from bovine fresh plasma by a method similar to those used for human plasma Factor XIII. The isolated Factor XIII consisted of two subunit polypeptides, a and b chains, with molecular weights of 79,000 +/- 2,000 and 75,000 +/- 2,000, respectively. In the conversion of Factor XIII to the active enzyme, Factor XIIIa, by bovine thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5], a peptide was liberated. This peptide, designated tentatively as "activation peptide," was isolated by gel-filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column. It contained a total of 37 amino acid residues with a masked N-terminal residue and C-terminal arginine. The whole amino acid sequence of "Activation peptide" was established by the dansyl-Edman method and standard enzymatic techniques, and the masked N-terminal residue was identified as N-acetylserine by using a rat liver acylamino acid-releasing enzyme. This enzyme specifically cleaved the N-acetylserylglutamyl peptide bond serine and the remaining peptide, which was now reactive to 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride. A comparison of the sequences of human and bovine "Activation peptide" revealed five amino acids replacements, Ser-3 to Thr; Gly-5 to Arg; Ile-14 to Val; Thr-18 to Asn, and Pro-26 to Leu. Another difference was the deletion of Leu-34 in the human peptide. Adsorption chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate was developed as a preparative procedure for the resolution of the two subunit polypeptides, a or a' chain and b chain, constituting the protein molecule of Factor XIII or Factor XIIIa. End group analyses on the isolated pure chains revealed that the structural change of Factor XIII during activation with thrombin occurs only in the N-terminal portion of the a chain, not in the N-terminal end of the b chain or in the C-terminal ends of the a and b chains. From these results, it was concluded that the activation of bovine plasma Factor XIII

  5. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-03-01

    DNA SEQUENCES have been analysed using models, such as an it-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations1. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  6. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    DNA sequences have been analysed using models, such as an n-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  7. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  8. Simulation of realistic synthetic reflection sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, A.T. )

    1993-04-01

    It is useful to be able to calculate synthetic primary reflection sequences from which to generate synthetic seismic sections which can be used for testing new processing algorithms. However, these synthetic reflection sequences should closely match real properties found in recent studies. Using the ARMA(1,1) model resulting from such studies to describe the correlation (or spectral) structure of the sequences, and by matching moments up to fourth order (since the sequences are non-Gaussian in practice), realistic sequences can be generated. A simple scheme is provided which also eliminate the necessity of throwing away large numbers of simulated values at start-up. The procedure is illustrated on three real sequences and is seen to reproduce all the important features.

  9. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  10. The genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Tizard, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Although several new avian bornaviruses have recently been described, information on their evolution, virulence, and sequence are often limited. Here we report the complete genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) isolated from a case of proventricular dilatation disease in a Palm cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus). The complete genome consists of 8842 nucleotides with distinct 5' and 3' end sequences. This virus shares nucleotide sequence identities of 69-74 % with other bornaviruses in the genomic regions excluding the 5' and 3' terminal sequences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic regions demonstrated this new isolate is an isolated branch within the clade that includes the aquatic bird bornaviruses and the passerine bornaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analyses and its low nucleotide sequence identities with other bornavirus, we support the proposal that PaBV-5 be assigned to a new bornavirus species:- Psittaciform 2 bornavirus.

  11. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  12. The expanding scope of DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shendure, Jay; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2014-01-01

    In just seven years, next-generation technologies have reduced the cost and increased the speed of DNA sequencing by four orders of magnitude, and experiments requiring many millions of sequencing reads are now routine. In research, sequencing is being applied not only to assemble genomes and to investigate the genetic basis of human disease, but also to explore myriad phenomena in organismic and cellular biology. In the clinic, the utility of sequence data is being intensively evaluated in diverse contexts, including reproductive medicine, oncology and infectious disease. A recurrent theme in the development of new sequencing applications is the creative ‘recombination’ of existing experimental building blocks. However, there remain many potentially high-impact applications of next-generation DNA sequencing that are not yet fully realized. PMID:23138308

  13. Comparison of next-generation sequencing systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Li, Yinhu; Li, Siliang; Hu, Ni; He, Yimin; Pong, Ray; Lin, Danni; Lu, Lihua; Law, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world's biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized.

  14. The genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Tizard, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Although several new avian bornaviruses have recently been described, information on their evolution, virulence, and sequence are often limited. Here we report the complete genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) isolated from a case of proventricular dilatation disease in a Palm cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus). The complete genome consists of 8842 nucleotides with distinct 5' and 3' end sequences. This virus shares nucleotide sequence identities of 69-74 % with other bornaviruses in the genomic regions excluding the 5' and 3' terminal sequences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic regions demonstrated this new isolate is an isolated branch within the clade that includes the aquatic bird bornaviruses and the passerine bornaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analyses and its low nucleotide sequence identities with other bornavirus, we support the proposal that PaBV-5 be assigned to a new bornavirus species:- Psittaciform 2 bornavirus. PMID:26403158

  15. On the Origin of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gulik, Peter T S van der

    2015-01-01

    Three aspects which make planet Earth special, and which must be taken in consideration with respect to the emergence of peptides, are the mineralogical composition, the Moon which is in the same size class, and the triple environment consisting of ocean, atmosphere, and continent. GlyGly is a remarkable peptide because it stimulates peptide bond formation in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation reaction. The role glycine and aspartic acid play in the active site of RNA polymerase is remarkable too. GlyGly might have been the original product of coded peptide synthesis because of its importance in stimulating the production of oligopeptides with a high aspartic acid content, which protected small RNA molecules by binding Mg2+ ions. The feedback loop, which is closed by having RNA molecules producing GlyGly, is proposed as the essential element fundamental to life. Having this system running, longer sequences could evolve, gradually solving the problem of error catastrophe. The basic structure of the standard genetic code (8 fourfold degenerate codon boxes and 8 split codon boxes) is an example of the way information concerning the emergence of life is frozen in the biological constitution of organisms: the structure of the code contains historical information. PMID:26580656

  16. On the Origin of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gulik, Peter T S van der

    2015-01-01

    Three aspects which make planet Earth special, and which must be taken in consideration with respect to the emergence of peptides, are the mineralogical composition, the Moon which is in the same size class, and the triple environment consisting of ocean, atmosphere, and continent. GlyGly is a remarkable peptide because it stimulates peptide bond formation in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation reaction. The role glycine and aspartic acid play in the active site of RNA polymerase is remarkable too. GlyGly might have been the original product of coded peptide synthesis because of its importance in stimulating the production of oligopeptides with a high aspartic acid content, which protected small RNA molecules by binding Mg2+ ions. The feedback loop, which is closed by having RNA molecules producing GlyGly, is proposed as the essential element fundamental to life. Having this system running, longer sequences could evolve, gradually solving the problem of error catastrophe. The basic structure of the standard genetic code (8 fourfold degenerate codon boxes and 8 split codon boxes) is an example of the way information concerning the emergence of life is frozen in the biological constitution of organisms: the structure of the code contains historical information.

  17. Analysis of human collagen sequences.

    PubMed

    Nassa, Manisha; Anand, Pracheta; Jain, Aditi; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Rani, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is fast emerging as important component mediating cell-cell interactions, along with its established role as a scaffold for cell support. Collagen, being the principal component of extracellular matrix, has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions. However, collagens are complex protein structures belonging to a large family consisting of 28 members in humans; hence, there exists a lack of in depth information about their structural features. Annotating and appreciating the functions of these proteins is possible with the help of the numerous biocomputational tools that are currently available. This study reports a comparative analysis and characterization of the alpha-1 chain of human collagen sequences. Physico-chemical, secondary structural, functional and phylogenetic classification was carried out, based on which, collagens 12, 14 and 20, which belong to the FACIT collagen family, have been identified as potential players in diseased conditions, owing to certain atypical properties such as very high aliphatic index, low percentage of glycine and proline residues and their proximity in evolutionary history. These collagen molecules might be important candidates to be investigated further for their role in skeletal disorders. PMID:22359431

  18. Pareto optimal pairwise sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    DeRonne, Kevin W; Karypis, George

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignment using evolutionary profiles is a commonly employed tool when investigating a protein. Many profile-profile scoring functions have been developed for use in such alignments, but there has not yet been a comprehensive study of Pareto optimal pairwise alignments for combining multiple such functions. We show that the problem of generating Pareto optimal pairwise alignments has an optimal substructure property, and develop an efficient algorithm for generating Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments. All possible sets of two, three, and four profile scoring functions are used from a pool of 11 functions and applied to 588 pairs of proteins in the ce_ref data set. The performance of the best objective combinations on ce_ref is also evaluated on an independent set of 913 protein pairs extracted from the BAliBASE RV11 data set. Our dynamic-programming-based heuristic approach produces approximated Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments that contain comparable alignments to those on the exact frontier, but on average in less than 1/58th the time in the case of four objectives. Our results show that the Pareto frontiers contain alignments whose quality is better than the alignments obtained by single objectives. However, the task of identifying a single high-quality alignment among those in the Pareto frontier remains challenging.

  19. On the Origin of Sequence

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Three aspects which make planet Earth special, and which must be taken in consideration with respect to the emergence of peptides, are the mineralogical composition, the Moon which is in the same size class, and the triple environment consisting of ocean, atmosphere, and continent. GlyGly is a remarkable peptide because it stimulates peptide bond formation in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation reaction. The role glycine and aspartic acid play in the active site of RNA polymerase is remarkable too. GlyGly might have been the original product of coded peptide synthesis because of its importance in stimulating the production of oligopeptides with a high aspartic acid content, which protected small RNA molecules by binding Mg2+ ions. The feedback loop, which is closed by having RNA molecules producing GlyGly, is proposed as the essential element fundamental to life. Having this system running, longer sequences could evolve, gradually solving the problem of error catastrophe. The basic structure of the standard genetic code (8 fourfold degenerate codon boxes and 8 split codon boxes) is an example of the way information concerning the emergence of life is frozen in the biological constitution of organisms: the structure of the code contains historical information. PMID:26580656

  20. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Costa, Fernando F.; Nagai, Maria Aparecida; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Zago, Marco A.; Andrade, Luis Eduardo C.; Carrer, Helaine; El-Dorry, Hamza F. A.; Espreafico, Enilza M.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Gruber, Arthur; Hackel, Christine; Kimura, Edna T.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Marie, Suely K. N.; Martins, Elizabeth A. L.; Nóbrega, Marina P.; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Pardini, Maria Inês M. C.; Pereira, Gonçalo G.; Pesquero, João Bosco; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Rogatto, Silvia R.; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Sogayar, Mari C.; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Acencio, Marcio; Alberto, Fernando L.; Amaral, Maria Elisabete J.; Aneas, Ivy; Bengtson, Mário Henrique; Carraro, Dirce M.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Carvalho, Lúcia Helena; Cerutti, Janete M.; Corrêa, Maria Lucia C.; Costa, Maria Cristina R.; Curcio, Cyntia; Gushiken, Tsieko; Ho, Paulo L.; Kimura, Elza; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Maia, Gustavo; Majumder, Paromita; Marins, Mozart; Matsukuma, Adriana; Melo, Analy S. A.; Mestriner, Carlos Alberto; Miracca, Elisabete C.; Miranda, Daniela C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Nóbrega, Francisco G.; Ojopi, Élida P. B.; Pandolfi, José Rodrigo C.; Pessoa, Luciana Gilbert; Rahal, Paula; Rainho, Claudia A.; da Ro's, Nancy; de Sá, Renata G.; Sales, Magaly M.; da Silva, Neusa P.; Silva, Tereza C.; da Silva, Wilson; Simão, Daniel F.; Sousa, Josane F.; Stecconi, Daniella; Tsukumo, Fernando; Valente, Valéria; Zalcberg, Heloisa; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Reis, Luis F. L.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1,181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes, for 67 (44.6%) of the 150 related genes, and for 45 of the 148 (30.4%) EST-predicted genes on this chromosome. Using a set of stringent criteria to validate our sequences, we identified a further 219 previously unannotated transcribed sequences on chromosome 22. Of these, 171 were in fact also defined by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48 transcribed sequences on chromosome 22 not defined by other sequences. All of the transcribed sequences defined by ORESTES coincided with DNA regions predicted as encoding exons by genscan. (http://genes.mit.edu/GENSCAN.html). PMID:11070084

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  2. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  3. REvolver: modeling sequence evolution under domain constraints.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Tina; von Haeseler, Arndt; Ebersberger, Ingo

    2012-09-01

    Simulating the change of protein sequences over time in a biologically realistic way is fundamental for a broad range of studies with a focus on evolution. It is, thus, problematic that typically simulators evolve individual sites of a sequence identically and independently. More realistic simulations are possible; however, they are often prohibited by limited knowledge concerning site-specific evolutionary constraints or functional dependencies between amino acids. As a consequence, a protein's functional and structural characteristics are rapidly lost in the course of simulated evolution. Here, we present REvolver (www.cibiv.at/software/revolver), a program that simulates protein sequence alteration such that evolutionarily stable sequence characteristics, like functional domains, are maintained. For this purpose, REvolver recruits profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs) for parameterizing site-specific models of sequence evolution in an automated fashion. pHMMs derived from alignments of homologous proteins or protein domains capture information regarding which sequence sites remained conserved over time and where in a sequence insertions or deletions are more likely to occur. Thus, they describe constraints on the evolutionary process acting on these sequences. To demonstrate the performance of REvolver as well as its applicability in large-scale simulation studies, we evolved the entire human proteome up to 1.5 expected substitutions per site. Simultaneously, we analyzed the preservation of Pfam and SMART domains in the simulated sequences over time. REvolver preserved 92% of the Pfam domains originally present in the human sequences. This value drops to 15% when traditional models of amino acid sequence evolution are used. Thus, REvolver represents a significant advance toward a realistic simulation of protein sequence evolution on a proteome-wide scale. Further, REvolver facilitates the simulation of a protein family with a user-defined domain architecture at

  4. Discrete sequence prediction and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Learning from experience to predict sequences of discrete symbols is a fundamental problem in machine learning with many applications. We apply sequence prediction using a simple and practical sequence-prediction algorithm, called TDAG. The TDAG algorithm is first tested by comparing its performance with some common data compression algorithms. Then it is adapted to the detailed requirements of dynamic program optimization, with excellent results.

  5. Unlocking Short Read Sequencing for Metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Rodrigue, Sébastien; Materna, Arne C.; Timberlake, Sonia C.; Blackburn, Matthew C.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Alm, Eric J.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Gilbert, Jack Anthony

    2010-07-28

    We describe an experimental and computational pipeline yielding millions of reads that can exceed 200 bp with quality scores approaching that of traditional Sanger sequencing. The method combines an automatable gel-less library construction step with paired-end sequencing on a short-read instrument. With appropriately sized library inserts, mate-pair sequences can overlap, and we describe the SHERA software package that joins them to form a longer composite read.

  6. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  7. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.

    1995-07-25

    A DNA sequencing method is described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in the lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radioisotope labels. 5 figs.

  8. Multiple tag labeling method for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Huang, Xiaohua C.; Quesada, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A DNA sequencing method described which uses single lane or channel electrophoresis. Sequencing fragments are separated in said lane and detected using a laser-excited, confocal fluorescence scanner. Each set of DNA sequencing fragments is separated in the same lane and then distinguished using a binary coding scheme employing only two different fluorescent labels. Also described is a method of using radio-isotope labels.

  9. Complete DNA sequence of yeast chromosome XI.

    PubMed

    Dujon, B; Alexandraki, D; André, B; Ansorge, W; Baladron, V; Ballesta, J P; Banrevi, A; Bolle, P A; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M; Bossier, P; Bou, G; Boyer, J; Bultrago, M J; Cheret, G; Colleaux, L; Dalgnan-Fornler, B; del Rey, F; Dlon, C; Domdey, H; Düsterhoft, A; Düsterhus, S; Entlan, K D; Erfle, H; Esteban, P F; Feldmann, H; Fernandes, L; Robo, G M; Fritz, C; Fukuhara, H; Gabel, C; Gaillon, L; Carcia-Cantalejo, J M; Garcia-Ramirez, J J; Gent, N E; Ghazvini, M; Goffeau, A; Gonzaléz, A; Grothues, D; Guerreiro, P; Hegemann, J; Hewitt, N; Hilger, F; Hollenberg, C P; Horaitis, O; Indge, K J; Jacquier, A; James, C M; Jauniaux, C; Jimenez, A; Keuchel, H; Kirchrath, L; Kleine, K; Kötter, P; Legrain, P; Liebl, S; Louis, E J; Maia e Silva, A; Marck, C; Monnier, A L; Möstl, D; Müller, S; Obermaier, B; Oliver, S G; Pallier, C; Pascolo, S; Pfeiffer, F; Philippsen, P; Planta, R J; Pohl, F M; Pohl, T M; Pöhlmann, R; Portetelle, D; Purnelle, B; Puzos, V; Ramezani Rad, M; Rasmussen, S W; Remacha, M; Revuelta, J L; Richard, G F; Rieger, M; Rodrigues-Pousada, C; Rose, M; Rupp, T; Santos, M A; Schwager, C; Sensen, C; Skala, J; Soares, H; Sor, F; Stegemann, J; Tettelin, H; Thierry, A; Tzermia, M; Urrestarazu, L A; van Dyck, L; Van Vliet-Reedijk, J C; Valens, M; Vandenbo, M; Vilela, C; Vissers, S; von Wettstein, D; Voss, H; Wiemann, S; Xu, G; Zimmermann, J; Haasemann, M; Becker, I; Mewes, H W

    1994-06-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XI has been determined. In addition to a compact arrangement of potential protein coding sequences, the 666,448-base-pair sequence has revealed general chromosome patterns; in particular, alternating regional variations in average base composition correlate with variations in local gene density along the chromosome. Significant discrepancies with the previously published genetic map demonstrate the need for using independent physical mapping criteria.

  10. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  11. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  12. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  13. Fractal Analysis of DNA Sequence Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelsen, Cheryl Lynn

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the "sandbox method." Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base -content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than do invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  14. Some properties of generalized Fibonacci sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Chin-Yoon; Ho, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    For all non-negative integer n and real constants a, b, p and q, the generalized Fibonacci sequence {U n } is defined by Un+2 = pUn+1 + qUn with the initial values U0 = a and U1 = b. Throughout the paper, we study some properties of the generalized Fibonacci sequence. Our results will motivate some new research problems concerning the contribution of the generalized sequence.

  15. Towards modeling DNA sequences as automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Christian; Farmer, Doyne

    1984-01-01

    We seek to describe a starting point for modeling the evolution and role of DNA sequences within the framework of cellular automata by discussing the current understanding of genetic information storage in DNA sequences. This includes alternately viewing the role of DNA in living organisms as a simple scheme and as a complex scheme; a brief review of strategies for identifying and classifying patterns in DNA sequences; and finally, notes towards establishing DNA-like automata models, including a discussion of the extent of experimentally determined DNA sequence data present in the database at Los Alamos.

  16. Using SEQUEST with Theoretically Complete Sequence Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G.

    2015-11-01

    SEQUEST has long been used to identify peptides/proteins from their tandem mass spectra and protein sequence databases. The algorithm has proven to be hugely successful for its sensitivity and specificity in identifying peptides/proteins, the sequences of which are present in the protein sequence databases. In this work, we report on work that attempts a new use for the algorithm by applying it to search a complete list of theoretically possible peptides, a de novo-like sequencing. We used freely available mass spectral data and determined a number of unique peptides as identified by SEQUEST. Using masses of these peptides and the mass accuracy of 0.001 Da, we have created a database of all theoretically possible peptide sequences corresponding to the precursor masses. We used our recently developed algorithm for determining all amino acid compositions corresponding to a mass interval, and used a lexicographic ordering to generate theoretical sequences from the compositions. The newly generated theoretical database was many-fold more complex than the original protein sequence database. We used SEQUEST to search and identify the best matches to the spectra from all theoretically possible peptide sequences. We found that SEQUEST cross-correlation score ranked the correct peptide match among the top sequence matches. The results testify to the high specificity of SEQUEST when combined with the high mass accuracy for intact peptides.

  17. The Shannon information entropy of protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Strait, B J; Dewey, T G

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive data base is analyzed to determine the Shannon information content of a protein sequence. This information entropy is estimated by three methods: a k-tuplet analysis, a generalized Zipf analysis, and a "Chou-Fasman gambler." The k-tuplet analysis is a "letter" analysis, based on conditional sequence probabilities. The generalized Zipf analysis demonstrates the statistical linguistic qualities of protein sequences and uses the "word" frequency to determine the Shannon entropy. The Zipf analysis and k-tuplet analysis give Shannon entropies of approximately 2.5 bits/amino acid. This entropy is much smaller than the value of 4.18 bits/amino acid obtained from the nonuniform composition of amino acids in proteins. The "Chou-Fasman" gambler is an algorithm based on the Chou-Fasman rules for protein structure. It uses both sequence and secondary structure information to guess at the number of possible amino acids that could appropriately substitute into a sequence. As in the case for the English language, the gambler algorithm gives significantly lower entropies than the k-tuplet analysis. Using these entropies, the number of most probable protein sequences can be calculated. The number of most probable protein sequences is much less than the number of possible sequences but is still much larger than the number of sequences thought to have existed throughout evolution. Implications of these results for mutagenesis experiments are discussed. PMID:8804598

  18. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  19. Sequence comparisons via algorithmic mutual information.

    PubMed

    Milosavljević, A

    1994-01-01

    One of the main problems in DNA and protein sequence comparisons is to decide whether observed similarity of two sequences should be explained by their relatedness or by mere presence of some shared internal structure, e.g., shared internal tandem repeats. The standard methods that are based on statistics or classical information theory can be used to discover either internal structure or mutual sequence similarity, but cannot take into account both. Consequently, currently used methods for sequence comparison employ "masking" techniques that simply eliminate sequences that exhibit internal repetitive structure prior to sequence comparisons. The "masking" approach precludes discovery of homologous sequences of moderate or low complexity, which abound at both DNA and protein levels. As a solution to this problem, we propose a general method that is based on algorithmic information theory and minimal length encoding. We show that algorithmic mutual information factors out the sequence similarity that is due to shared internal structure and thus enables discovery of truly related sequences. We extend that recently developed algorithmic significance method (Milosavljević & Jurka 1993) to show that significance depends exponentially on algorithmic mutual information.

  20. 32 CFR 179.7 - Sequencing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and social factors. (3) Economic factors, including economic considerations pertaining to..., information documenting the reasons for the sequencing change will be provided for inclusion in the...

  1. 32 CFR 179.7 - Sequencing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and social factors. (3) Economic factors, including economic considerations pertaining to..., information documenting the reasons for the sequencing change will be provided for inclusion in the...

  2. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  3. DNA sequence from Cretaceous period bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S R; Weyand, N J; Bunnell, M

    1994-11-18

    DNA was extracted from 80-million-year-old bone fragments found in strata of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the roof of an underground coal mine in eastern Utah. This DNA was used as the template in a polymerase chain reaction that amplified and sequenced a portion of the gene encoding mitochondrial cytochrome b. These sequences differ from all other cytochrome b sequences investigated, including those in the GenBank and European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases. DNA isolated from these bone fragments and the resulting gene sequences demonstrate that small fragments of DNA may survive in bone for millions of years.

  4. Illuminating the future of DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Watson, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Human (clinical) genome sequencing is the biggest potential market in DNA sequencing, and it is this market that all of the sequencing companies are striving to capture. In another article in this issue of Genome Biology, Neil Hall expresses some concern over the limitation of Illumina's newly announced Hiseq X Ten platform to human indeed, at face value this does appear strange. The fact that Illumina have presented PhiX data from the X Ten confirms that there is no limitation inherent to the technology. The limitation is one of licensing. However, those involved in human genome sequencing will not be surprised by the move.

  5. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  6. Recursive sequences in first-year calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainer, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article provides ready-to-use supplementary material on recursive sequences for a second-semester calculus class. It equips first-year calculus students with a basic methodical procedure based on which they can conduct a rigorous convergence or divergence analysis of many simple recursive sequences on their own without the need to invoke inductive arguments as is typically required in calculus textbooks. The sequences that are accessible to this kind of analysis are predominantly (eventually) monotonic, but also certain recursive sequences that alternate around their limit point as they converge can be considered.

  7. Corruption of genomic databases with anomalous sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Lamperti, E D; Kittelberger, J M; Smith, T F; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1992-01-01

    We describe evidence that DNA sequences from vectors used for cloning and sequencing have been incorporated accidentally into eukaryotic entries in the GenBank database. These incorporations were not restricted to one type of vector or to a single mechanism. Many minor instances may have been the result of simple editing errors, but some entries contained large blocks of vector sequence that had been incorporated by contamination or other accidents during cloning. Some cases involved unusual rearrangements and areas of vector distant from the normal insertion sites. Matches to vector were found in 0.23% of 20,000 sequences analyzed in GenBank Release 63. Although the possibility of anomalous sequence incorporation has been recognized since the inception of GenBank and should be easy to avoid, recent evidence suggests that this problem is increasing more quickly than the database itself. The presence of anomalous sequence may have serious consequences for the interpretation and use of database entries, and will have an impact on issues of database management. The incorporated vector fragments described here may also be useful for a crude estimate of the fidelity of sequence information in the database. In alignments with well-defined ends, the matching sequences showed 96.8% identity to vector; when poorer matches with arbitrary limits were included, the aggregate identity to vector sequence was 94.8%. PMID:1614861

  8. Exome sequencing: new insights into lipoprotein disorders.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Several next generation sequencing platforms allow for a DNA-to-diagnosis protocol to identify the molecular basis of monogenic dyslipidemias. However, recent reports of the application of whole genome or whole exome sequencing in families with severe dyslipidemias have largely identified genetic variants in known lipid genes. To date, high-throughput DNA sequencing in families with previously uncharacterized monogenic dyslipidemias, have failed to reveal new genes for regulation of plasma lipids. This suggests that rather than sequencing whole genomes or exomes, most patients with monogenic dyslipidemias could be diagnosed using a more dedicated approach that focuses primarily on genes already known to act within lipoprotein metabolic pathways.

  9. Detecting Emotions from Connected Action Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Daniel; Robinson, Peter

    In this paper we deal with the problem of detecting emotions from the body movements produced by naturally connected action sequences. Although action sequences are one of the most common forms of body motions in everyday scenarios their potential for emotion recognition has not been explored in the past. We show that there are fundamental differences between actions recorded in isolation and in natural sequences and demonstrate a number of techniques which allow us to correctly label action sequences with one of four emotions up to 86% of the time. Our results bring us an important step closer to recognizing emotions from body movements in natural scenarios.

  10. Corruption of genomic databases with anomalous sequence.

    PubMed

    Lamperti, E D; Kittelberger, J M; Smith, T F; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1992-06-11

    We describe evidence that DNA sequences from vectors used for cloning and sequencing have been incorporated accidentally into eukaryotic entries in the GenBank database. These incorporations were not restricted to one type of vector or to a single mechanism. Many minor instances may have been the result of simple editing errors, but some entries contained large blocks of vector sequence that had been incorporated by contamination or other accidents during cloning. Some cases involved unusual rearrangements and areas of vector distant from the normal insertion sites. Matches to vector were found in 0.23% of 20,000 sequences analyzed in GenBank Release 63. Although the possibility of anomalous sequence incorporation has been recognized since the inception of GenBank and should be easy to avoid, recent evidence suggests that this problem is increasing more quickly than the database itself. The presence of anomalous sequence may have serious consequences for the interpretation and use of database entries, and will have an impact on issues of database management. The incorporated vector fragments described here may also be useful for a crude estimate of the fidelity of sequence information in the database. In alignments with well-defined ends, the matching sequences showed 96.8% identity to vector; when poorer matches with arbitrary limits were included, the aggregate identity to vector sequence was 94.8%.

  11. A measurement of disorder in binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Longyan; Wang, Haihong; Cheng, Weiwen; Zhao, Shengmei

    2015-03-01

    We propose a complex quantity, AL, to characterize the degree of disorder of L-length binary symbolic sequences. As examples, we respectively apply it to typical random and deterministic sequences. One kind of random sequences is generated from a periodic binary sequence and the other is generated from the logistic map. The deterministic sequences are the Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences. In these analyzed sequences, we find that the modulus of AL, denoted by |AL | , is a (statistically) equivalent quantity to the Boltzmann entropy, the metric entropy, the conditional block entropy and/or other quantities, so it is a useful quantitative measure of disorder. It can be as a fruitful index to discern which sequence is more disordered. Moreover, there is one and only one value of |AL | for the overall disorder characteristics. It needs extremely low computational costs. It can be easily experimentally realized. From all these mentioned, we believe that the proposed measure of disorder is a valuable complement to existing ones in symbolic sequences.

  12. Representing objects, relations, and sequences.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Stephen I; Okaywe, T Wendy

    2013-08-01

    Vector symbolic architectures (VSAs) are high-dimensional vector representations of objects (e.g., words, image parts), relations (e.g., sentence structures), and sequences for use with machine learning algorithms. They consist of a vector addition operator for representing a collection of unordered objects, a binding operator for associating groups of objects, and a methodology for encoding complex structures. We first develop constraints that machine learning imposes on VSAs; for example, similar structures must be represented by similar vectors. The constraints suggest that current VSAs should represent phrases ("The smart Brazilian girl") by binding sums of terms, in addition to simply binding the terms directly. We show that matrix multiplication can be used as the binding operator for a VSA, and that matrix elements can be chosen at random. A consequence for living systems is that binding is mathematically possible without the need to specify, in advance, precise neuron-to-neuron connection properties for large numbers of synapses. A VSA that incorporates these ideas, Matrix Binding of Additive Terms (MBAT), is described that satisfies all constraints. With respect to machine learning, for some types of problems appropriate VSA representations permit us to prove learnability rather than relying on simulations. We also propose dividing machine (and neural) learning and representation into three stages, with differing roles for learning in each stage. For neural modeling, we give representational reasons for nervous systems to have many recurrent connections, as well as for the importance of phrases in language processing. Sizing simulations and analyses suggest that VSAs in general, and MBAT in particular, are ready for real-world applications. PMID:23607563

  13. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis. PMID:25329378

  14. Transfer in Motor Sequence Learning: Effects of Practice Schedule and Sequence Context

    PubMed Central

    Müssgens, Diana M.; Ullén, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Transfer (i.e., the application of a learned skill in a novel context) is an important and desirable outcome of motor skill learning. While much research has been devoted to understanding transfer of explicit skills the mechanisms of skill transfer after incidental learning remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to (1) examine the effect of practice schedule on transfer and (2) investigate whether sequence-specific knowledge can transfer to an unfamiliar sequence context. We trained two groups of participants on an implicit serial response time task under a Constant (one sequence for 10 blocks) or Variable (alternating between two sequences for a total of 10 blocks) practice schedule. We evaluated response times for three types of transfer: task-general transfer to a structurally non-overlapping sequence, inter-manual transfer to a perceptually identical sequence, and sequence-specific transfer to a partially overlapping (three shared triplets) sequence. Results showed partial skill transfer to all three sequences and an advantage of Variable practice only for task-general transfer. Further, we found expression of sequence-specific knowledge for familiar sub-sequences in the overlapping sequence. These findings suggest that (1) constant practice may create interference for task-general transfer and (2) sequence-specific knowledge can transfer to a new sequential context. PMID:26635591

  15. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  16. SPIDER: software for protein identification from sequence tags with de novo sequencing error.

    PubMed

    Han, Yonghua; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Kaizhong

    2005-06-01

    For the identification of novel proteins using MS/MS, de novo sequencing software computes one or several possible amino acid sequences (called sequence tags) for each MS/MS spectrum. Those tags are then used to match, accounting amino acid mutations, the sequences in a protein database. If the de novo sequencing gives correct tags, the homologs of the proteins can be identified by this approach and software such as MS-BLAST is available for the matching. However, de novo sequencing very often gives only partially correct tags. The most common error is that a segment of amino acids is replaced by another segment with approximately the same masses. We developed a new efficient algorithm to match sequence tags with errors to database sequences for the purpose of protein and peptide identification. A software package, SPIDER, was developed and made available on Internet for free public use. This paper describes the algorithms and features of the SPIDER software. PMID:16108090

  17. SPIDER: software for protein identification from sequence tags with de novo sequencing error.

    PubMed

    Han, Yonghua; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Kaizhong

    2004-01-01

    For the identification of novel proteins using MS/MS, de novo sequencing software computes one or several possible amino acid sequences (called sequence tags) for each MS/MS spectrum. Those tags are then used to match, accounting amino acid mutations, the sequences in a protein database. If the de novo sequencing gives correct tags, the homologs of the proteins can be identified by this approach and software such as MS-BLAST is available for the matching. However, de novo sequencing very often gives only partially correct tags. The most common error is that a segment of amino acids is replaced by another segment with approximately the same masses. We developed a new efficient algorithm to match sequence tags with errors to database sequences for the purpose of protein and peptide identification. A software package, SPIDER, was developed and made available on Internet for free public use. This paper describes the algorithms and features of the SPIDER software. PMID:16448014

  18. Program Helps To Optimize Assembly Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, Chester S.; Werntz, David G.; Loyola, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    FAST project-management software tool designed to optimize sequence of assembly of Space Station Freedom. Assesses effects of detailed changes upon system and produces output metrics identifying preferred assembly sequences. Incorporates Space-Shuttle integration, Space-Station hardware, on-orbit operations, and governing programmatic considerations as either precedence relations or numerical data. Written in C language.

  19. Concept For Generation Of Long Pseudorandom Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) digital circuit performs exponentiation in finite field. Algorithm that generates unusually long sequences of pseudorandom numbers executed by digital processor that includes such circuits. Concepts particularly advantageous for such applications as spread-spectrum communications, cryptography, and generation of ranging codes, synthetic noise, and test data, where usually desirable to make pseudorandom sequences as long as possible.

  20. Multilocus Sequence Typing Tool for Cyclospora cayetanensis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yaqiong; Roellig, Dawn M.; Li, Na; Tang, Kevin; Frace, Michael; Ortega, Ynes; Arrowood, Michael J.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Wang, Lin; Moss, Delynn M.; Zhang, Longxian; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Because the lack of typing tools for Cyclospora cayetanensis has hampered outbreak investigations, we sequenced its genome and developed a genotyping tool. We observed 2 to 10 geographically segregated sequence types at each of 5 selected loci. This new tool could be useful for case linkage and infection/contamination source tracking. PMID:27433881

  1. Marketing and Distributive Education: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 2-year program in marketing and distributive education. The guide consists of a course description;…

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1.

    PubMed

    Greninger, Alexander L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense

    PubMed Central

    Raiol, Tainá; Ribeiro, Guilherme Menegói; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense is a rapidly growing bacterium associated with opportunistic infections. The genome of a representative isolate (strain GO 06) recovered from wound samples from patients who underwent arthroscopic or laparoscopic surgery was sequenced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first announcement of the complete genome sequence of an M. massiliense strain. PMID:22965084

  5. Measuring the functional sequence complexity of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Durston, Kirk K; Chiu, David KY; Abel, David L; Trevors, Jack T

    2007-01-01

    Background Abel and Trevors have delineated three aspects of sequence complexity, Random Sequence Complexity (RSC), Ordered Sequence Complexity (OSC) and Functional Sequence Complexity (FSC) observed in biosequences such as proteins. In this paper, we provide a method to measure functional sequence complexity. Methods and Results We have extended Shannon uncertainty by incorporating the data variable with a functionality variable. The resulting measured unit, which we call Functional bit (Fit), is calculated from the sequence data jointly with the defined functionality variable. To demonstrate the relevance to functional bioinformatics, a method to measure functional sequence complexity was developed and applied to 35 protein families. Considerations were made in determining how the measure can be used to correlate functionality when relating to the whole molecule and sub-molecule. In the experiment, we show that when the proposed measure is applied to the aligned protein sequences of ubiquitin, 6 of the 7 highest value sites correlate with the binding domain. Conclusion For future extensions, measures of functional bioinformatics may provide a means to evaluate potential evolving pathways from effects such as mutations, as well as analyzing the internal structural and functional relationships within the 3-D structure of proteins. PMID:18062814

  6. Molecular selection in a unified evolutionary sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    With guidance from experiments and observations that indicate internally limited phenomena, an outline of unified evolutionary sequence is inferred. Such unification is not visible for a context of random matrix and random mutation. The sequence proceeds from Big Bang through prebiotic matter, protocells, through the evolving cell via molecular and natural selection, to mind, behavior, and society.

  7. Regular Pentagons and the Fibonacci Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doug

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how to draw a regular pentagon. Shows the sequence of a succession of regular pentagons formed by extending the sides. Calculates the general formula of the Lucas and Fibonacci sequences. Presents a regular icosahedron as an example of the golden ratio. (YP)

  8. VOE Computer Programming: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in computer programming. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Goose Dicistrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of goose dicistrovirus assembled from the filtered feces of a Canadian goose from South Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. The 9.1-kb dicistronic RNA virus falls within the family Dicistroviridae; however, it shares <33% translated amino acid sequence within the nonstructural open reading frame (ORF) from aparavirus or cripavirus. PMID:26941149

  10. Genome Sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Stone, Joshua K.; Gelhaus, H. Carl; Warren, Richard L.; Cruttwell, Caroline J.; Funnell, Simon G.; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392. This isolate has been distributed as K96243, but distinct genomic differences have been identified. The genomic sequence of this isolate will provide the genomic context for previously conducted functional studies. PMID:23704173

  11. Bonobos Extract Meaning from Call Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Zanna; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Studies on language-trained bonobos have revealed their remarkable abilities in representational and communication tasks. Surprisingly, however, corresponding research into their natural communication has largely been neglected. We address this issue with a first playback study on the natural vocal behaviour of bonobos. Bonobos produce five acoustically distinct call types when finding food, which they regularly mix together into longer call sequences. We found that individual call types were relatively poor indicators of food quality, while context specificity was much greater at the call sequence level. We therefore investigated whether receivers could extract meaning about the quality of food encountered by the caller by integrating across different call sequences. We first trained four captive individuals to find two types of foods, kiwi (preferred) and apples (less preferred) at two different locations. We then conducted naturalistic playback experiments during which we broadcasted sequences of four calls, originally produced by a familiar individual responding to either kiwi or apples. All sequences contained the same number of calls but varied in the composition of call types. Following playbacks, we found that subjects devoted significantly more search effort to the field indicated by the call sequence. Rather than attending to individual calls, bonobos attended to the entire sequences to make inferences about the food encountered by a caller. These results provide the first empirical evidence that bonobos are able to extract information about external events by attending to vocal sequences of other individuals and highlight the importance of call combinations in their natural communication system. PMID:21556149

  12. Towards a reference pecan genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost of generating DNA sequence data has declined dramatically over the previous 15 years as a result of the Human Genome Project and the potential applications of genome sequencing for human medicine. This cost reduction has generated renewed interest among crop breeding scientists in applying...

  13. Sequence Factorial of "g"-Gonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2013-01-01

    The gamma function, which has the property to interpolate the factorial whenever the argument is an integer, is a special case (the case "g"?=?2) of the general term of the sequence factorial of "g"-gonal numbers. In relation to this special case, a formula for calculating the general term of the sequence factorial of any…

  14. From Arithmetic Sequences to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuura, Ryota; Harless, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The first part of the article focuses on deriving the essential properties of arithmetic sequences by appealing to students' sense making and reasoning. The second part describes how to guide students to translate their knowledge of arithmetic sequences into an understanding of linear equations. Ryota Matsuura originally wrote these lessons for…

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Daniel A.; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos A.; Garlena, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612, also known by the strain designations ATCC 25594, NRRL B-16283, and NBRC 100016. The genome sequence reveals it to be free of prophage and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), and it is an effective host for the isolation and characterization of Gordonia bacteriophages. PMID:27688316

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of 63 Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. The current collection of sequenced mycobacteriophages—all isolated on a single host strain, Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155, reveals substantial genetic diversity. The complete genome sequences of 63 newly isolated mycobacteriophages expand the resolution of our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:24285655

  17. Global Alignment System for Large Genomic Sequencing

    2002-03-01

    AVID is a global alignment system tailored for the alignment of large genomic sequences up to megabases in length. Features include the possibility of one sequence being in draft form, fast alignment, robustness and accuracy. The method is an anchor based alignment using maximal matches derived from suffix trees.

  18. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. PMID:27340063

  19. Optimizing cancer genome sequencing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Malachi; Miller, Christopher A.; Griffith, Obi L.; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L.; Ramu, Avinash; Walker, Jason R.; Dang, Ha X.; Trani, Lee; Larson, David E.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Austin, Rachel E.; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean D.; Ly, Amy; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cordes, Matthew G.; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Ding, Li; Klco, Jeffery M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumors are typically sequenced to depths of 75–100× (exome) or 30–50× (whole genome). We demonstrate that current sequencing paradigms are inadequate for tumors that are impure, aneuploid or clonally heterogeneous. To reassess optimal sequencing strategies, we performed ultra-deep (up to ~312×) whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exome capture (up to ~433×) of a primary acute myeloid leukemia, its subsequent relapse, and a matched normal skin sample. We tested multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms and validated ~200,000 putative SNVs by sequencing them to depths of ~1,000×. Additional targeted sequencing provided over 10,000× coverage and ddPCR assays provided up to ~250,000× sampling of selected sites. We evaluated the effects of different library generation approaches, depth of sequencing, and analysis strategies on the ability to effectively characterize a complex tumor. This dataset, representing the most comprehensively sequenced tumor described to date, will serve as an invaluable community resource (dbGaP accession id phs000159). PMID:26645048

  20. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  1. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612.

    PubMed

    Russell, Daniel A; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos A; Garlena, Rebecca A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612, also known by the strain designations ATCC 25594, NRRL B-16283, and NBRC 100016. The genome sequence reveals it to be free of prophage and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), and it is an effective host for the isolation and characterization of Gordonia bacteriophages. PMID:27688316

  3. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  4. Project Report: Automatic Sequence Processor Software Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) element of Multi-Mission Ground System and Services (MGSS) provides space missions with multi-purpose software to plan spacecraft activities, sequence spacecraft commands, and then integrate these products and execute them on spacecraft. Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently is flying many missions. The processes for building, integrating, and testing the multi-mission uplink software need to be improved to meet the needs of the missions and the operations teams that command the spacecraft. The Multi-Mission Sequencing Team is responsible for collecting and processing the observations, experiments and engineering activities that are to be performed on a selected spacecraft. The collection of these activities is called a sequence and ultimately a sequence becomes a sequence of spacecraft commands. The operations teams check the sequence to make sure that no constraints are violated. The workflow process involves sending a program start command, which activates the Automatic Sequence Processor (ASP). The ASP is currently a file-based system that is comprised of scripts written in perl, c-shell and awk. Once this start process is complete, the system checks for errors and aborts if there are any; otherwise the system converts the commands to binary, and then sends the resultant information to be radiated to the spacecraft.

  5. What's Next? Judging Sequences of Binary Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oskarsson, An T.; Van Boven, Leaf; McClelland, Gary H.; Hastie, Reid

    2009-01-01

    The authors review research on judgments of random and nonrandom sequences involving binary events with a focus on studies documenting gambler's fallacy and hot hand beliefs. The domains of judgment include random devices, births, lotteries, sports performances, stock prices, and others. After discussing existing theories of sequence judgments,…

  6. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Yvonnetastic

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anshika; Carlton, Meghan L.; Kane, Meghan T.; Panchal, Niyati J.; Pham, Yvonne C.; Reynolds, Zachary J.; Sapienza, Michael S.; German, Brian A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Schafer, Claire E.; Yu, Victor J.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia bacteriophage Yvonnetastic was isolated from soil in Pittsburgh, PA, using Gordonia terrae 3612 as a host. Yvonnetastic has siphoviral morphology and a genome of 98,136 bp, with 198 predicted protein-coding genes and five tRNA genes. Yvonnetastic does not share substantial sequence similarity with other sequenced bacteriophage genomes. PMID:27389265

  7. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  8. Sequencing error correction without a reference genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Next (second) generation sequencing is an increasingly important tool for many areas of molecular biology, however, care must be taken when interpreting its output. Even a low error rate can cause a large number of errors due to the high number of nucleotides being sequenced. Identifying sequencing errors from true biological variants is a challenging task. For organisms without a reference genome this difficulty is even more challenging. Results We have developed a method for the correction of sequencing errors in data from the Illumina Solexa sequencing platforms. It does not require a reference genome and is of relevance for microRNA studies, unsequenced genomes, variant detection in ultra-deep sequencing and even for RNA-Seq studies of organisms with sequenced genomes where RNA editing is being considered. Conclusions The derived error model is novel in that it allows different error probabilities for each position along the read, in conjunction with different error rates depending on the particular nucleotides involved in the substitution, and does not force these effects to behave in a multiplicative manner. The model provides error rates which capture the complex effects and interactions of the three main known causes of sequencing error associated with the Illumina platforms. PMID:24350580

  9. Acoustic Packaging of Action Sequences by Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Rebecca J.; Tapscott, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether acoustic input, in the form of infant-directed speech, influenced infants' segmenting of action sequences. Thirty-two 7.5- to 11.5-month-old infants were familiarized with video sequences made up of short action clips. Narration coincided with portions of the action stream to package certain pairs of clips together.…

  10. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Yvonnetastic.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Bandyopadhyay, Anshika; Carlton, Meghan L; Kane, Meghan T; Panchal, Niyati J; Pham, Yvonne C; Reynolds, Zachary J; Sapienza, Michael S; German, Brian A; McDonnell, Jill E; Schafer, Claire E; Yu, Victor J; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia bacteriophage Yvonnetastic was isolated from soil in Pittsburgh, PA, using Gordonia terrae 3612 as a host. Yvonnetastic has siphoviral morphology and a genome of 98,136 bp, with 198 predicted protein-coding genes and five tRNA genes. Yvonnetastic does not share substantial sequence similarity with other sequenced bacteriophage genomes. PMID:27389265

  11. Auto Body Repair: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for an auto body repair vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and…

  12. Nonspatial Sequence Coding in CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Timothy A.; Salz, Daniel M.; McKenzie, Sam

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical to the memory for sequences of events, a defining feature of episodic memory. However, the fundamental neuronal mechanisms underlying this capacity remain elusive. While considerable research indicates hippocampal neurons can represent sequences of locations, direct evidence of coding for the memory of sequential relationships among nonspatial events remains lacking. To address this important issue, we recorded neural activity in CA1 as rats performed a hippocampus-dependent sequence-memory task. Briefly, the task involves the presentation of repeated sequences of odors at a single port and requires rats to identify each item as “in sequence” or “out of sequence”. We report that, while the animals' location and behavior remained constant, hippocampal activity differed depending on the temporal context of items—in this case, whether they were presented in or out of sequence. Some neurons showed this effect across items or sequence positions (general sequence cells), while others exhibited selectivity for specific conjunctions of item and sequence position information (conjunctive sequence cells) or for specific probe types (probe-specific sequence cells). We also found that the temporal context of individual trials could be accurately decoded from the activity of neuronal ensembles, that sequence coding at the single-cell and ensemble level was linked to sequence memory performance, and that slow-gamma oscillations (20–40 Hz) were more strongly modulated by temporal context and performance than theta oscillations (4–12 Hz). These findings provide compelling evidence that sequence coding extends beyond the domain of spatial trajectories and is thus a fundamental function of the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to remember the order of life events depends on the hippocampus, but the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by recording neural activity in hippocampal

  13. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis. PMID:24515370

  14. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  15. Qualifying high-throughput immune repertoire sequencing.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Norbert; Pröll, Johannes; Weinberger, Johannes; Zopf, Agnes; Wiesinger, Karin; Krismer, Konstantin; Bettelheim, Peter; Gabriel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diversity of B and T cell receptors, achieved by gene recombination and somatic hypermutation, allows the immune system for recognition and targeted reaction against various threats. Next-generation sequencing for assessment of a cell's gene composition and variation makes deep analysis of one individual's immune spectrum feasible. An easy to apply but detailed analysis and visualization strategy is necessary to process all sequences generated. We performed sequencing utilizing the 454 system for CLL and control samples, utilized the IMGT database and applied the presented analysis tools. With the applied protocol, malignant clones are found and characterized, mutational status compared to germline identity is elaborated in detail showing that the CLL mutation status is not as monoclonal as generally thought. On the other hand, this strategy is not solely applicable to the 454 sequencing system but can easily be transferred to any other next-generation sequencing platform. PMID:24607567

  16. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  17. NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suman; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing protocol for the DNA methylation analysis of genomes. This approach allows the rapid and efficient construction of NGS-ready libraries with a large number of PCR products that have been individually amplified from bisulfite-converted DNA. This approach also employs a bioinformatics strategy to sort the raw sequence reads generated from NGS platforms and subsequently to derive DNA methylation levels for individual loci. The results demonstrated that this NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing approach provide not only DNA methylation levels but also informative DNA methylation patterns that have not been seen through other existing methods.•This protocol provides an efficient method generating NGS-ready libraries from individually amplified PCR products.•This protocol provides a bioinformatics strategy sorting NGS-derived raw sequence reads.•This protocol provides deep bisulfite sequencing results that can measure DNA methylation levels and patterns of individual loci.

  18. Next generation sequencing technology: Advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Buermans, H P J; den Dunnen, J T

    2014-10-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Through advancements in the fields of molecular biology and technical engineering, parallelization of the sequencing reaction has profoundly increased the total number of produced sequence reads per run. Current sequencing platforms allow for a previously unprecedented view into complex mixtures of RNA and DNA samples. NGS is currently evolving into a molecular microscope finding its way into virtually every fields of biomedical research. In this chapter we review the technical background of the different commercially available NGS platforms with respect to template generation and the sequencing reaction and take a small step towards what the upcoming NGS technologies will bring. We close with an overview of different implementations of NGS into biomedical research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.

  19. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  20. SVC: structured visualization of evolutionary sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Roepcke, S; Fiziev, P; Seeburg, P H; Vingron, M

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a web application for the detailed analysis and visualization of evolutionary sequence conservation in complex vertebrate genes. Given a pair of orthologous genes, the protein-coding sequences are aligned. When these sequences are mapped back onto their encoding exons in the genomes, a scaffold of the conserved gene structure naturally emerges. Sequence similarity between exons and introns is analysed and embedded into the gene structure scaffold. The visualization on the SVC server provides detailed information about evolutionarily conserved features of these genes. It further allows concise representation of complex splice patterns in the context of evolutionary conservation. A particular application of our tool arises from the fact that around mRNA editing sites both exonic and intronic sequences are highly conserved. This aids in delineation of these sites. SVC is available at http://svc.molgen.mpg.de.

  1. Reading biological processes from nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Anand

    Cellular processes have traditionally been investigated by techniques of imaging and biochemical analysis of the molecules involved. The recent rapid progress in our ability to manipulate and read nucleic acid sequences gives us direct access to the genetic information that directs and constrains biological processes. While sequence data is being used widely to investigate genotype-phenotype relationships and population structure, here we use sequencing to understand biophysical mechanisms. We present work on two different systems. First, in chapter 2, we characterize the stochastic genetic editing mechanism that produces diverse T-cell receptors in the human immune system. We do this by inferring statistical distributions of the underlying biochemical events that generate T-cell receptor coding sequences from the statistics of the observed sequences. This inferred model quantitatively describes the potential repertoire of T-cell receptors that can be produced by an individual, providing insight into its potential diversity and the probability of generation of any specific T-cell receptor. Then in chapter 3, we present work on understanding the functioning of regulatory DNA sequences in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we use experiments that measure the transcriptional activity of large libraries of mutagenized promoters and enhancers and infer models of the sequence-function relationship from this data. For the bacterial promoter, we infer a physically motivated 'thermodynamic' model of the interaction of DNA-binding proteins and RNA polymerase determining the transcription rate of the downstream gene. For the eukaryotic enhancers, we infer heuristic models of the sequence-function relationship and use these models to find synthetic enhancer sequences that optimize inducibility of expression. Both projects demonstrate the utility of sequence information in conjunction with sophisticated statistical inference techniques for dissecting underlying biophysical

  2. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Alexis L.; Workman, Rachael E.; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R.; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26787508

  3. Complete genome sequence of southern tomato virus identified from China using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, southern tomato virus (STV), on tomatoes in China, was elucidated using small RNAs deep sequencing. The identified STV_CN12 shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and U.S. This is the first report ...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sequence Type 1407, a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, A.; Ciammaruconi, A.; Carannante, A.; Neri, A.; Fazio, C.; Fortunato, A.; Palozzi, A. M.; Vacca, P.; Fillo, S.; Lista, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable due to the spread of resistant or multidrug-resistant strains. Cefixime-resistant gonococci belonging to sequence type 1407 have been described worldwide. We report the genome sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain G2891, a multidrug-resistant isolate of sequence type 1407, collected in Italy in 2013. PMID:26272575

  5. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing has a promise to discover the protein post-translation modifications; however, such approach is still in their infancy and not widely applied for proteomics practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for discovery of protein modifications through identification of the UStags (Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry for peptides and polypeptides in a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were filtered to define a more limited set of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags’ prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer the possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances of yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. Random matching of the de novo sequences to the predicted sequences were examined with use of two random (false) databases, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity are described. The de novo-UStag complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling discovery of new protein modifications.

  6. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-03-19

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data.

  7. Coding sequences of functioning human genes derived entirely from mobile element sequences.

    PubMed

    Britten, Roy J

    2004-11-30

    Among all of the many examples of mobile elements or "parasitic sequences" that affect the function of the human genome, this paper describes several examples of functioning genes whose sequences have been almost completely derived from mobile elements. There are many examples where the synthetic coding sequences of observed mRNA sequences are made up of mobile element sequences, to an extent of 80% or more of the length of the coding sequences. In the examples described here, the genes have named functions, and some of these functions have been studied. It appears that each of the functioning genes was originally formed from mobile elements and that in some process of molecular evolution a coding sequence was derived that could be translated into a protein that is of some importance to human biology. In one case (AD7C), the coding sequence is 99% made up of a cluster of Alu sequences. In another example, the gene BNIP3 coding sequence is 97% made up of sequences from an apparent human endogenous retrovirus. The Syncytin gene coding sequence appears to be made from an endogenous retrovirus envelope gene. PMID:15546984

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Southern tomato virus Identified in China Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Sun, Shu-E; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Southern tomato virus (STV), a double-stranded RNA virus that affects tomato in China, was determined using small RNA deep sequencing. This Chinese isolate shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and the United States. This is the first report of STV infecting tomatoes in Asia. PMID:26494671

  9. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data. PMID:25792042

  10. Comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sequence signatures, as defined by the frequencies of k-tuples (or k-mers, k-grams), have been used extensively to compare genomic sequences of individual organisms, to identify cis-regulatory modules, and to study the evolution of regulatory sequences. Recently many next-generation sequencing (NGS) read data sets of metagenomic samples from a variety of different environments have been generated. The assembly of these reads can be difficult and analysis methods based on mapping reads to genes or pathways are also restricted by the availability and completeness of existing databases. Sequence-signature-based methods, however, do not need the complete genomes or existing databases and thus, can potentially be very useful for the comparison of metagenomic samples using NGS read data. Still, the applications of sequence signature methods for the comparison of metagenomic samples have not been well studied. Results We studied several dissimilarity measures, including d2, d2* and d2S recently developed from our group, a measure (hereinafter noted as Hao) used in CVTree developed from Hao’s group (Qi et al., 2004), measures based on relative di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide frequencies as in Willner et al. (2009), as well as standard lp measures between the frequency vectors, for the comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures. We compared their performance using a series of extensive simulations and three real next-generation sequencing (NGS) metagenomic datasets: 39 fecal samples from 33 mammalian host species, 56 marine samples across the world, and 13 fecal samples from human individuals. Results showed that the dissimilarity measure d2S can achieve superior performance when comparing metagenomic samples by clustering them into different groups as well as recovering environmental gradients affecting microbial samples. New insights into the environmental factors affecting microbial compositions in metagenomic samples are obtained through

  11. Sequence Bundles: a novel method for visualising, discovering and exploring sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We introduce Sequence Bundles--a novel data visualisation method for representing multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). We identify and address key limitations of the existing bioinformatics data visualisation methods (i.e. the Sequence Logo) by enabling Sequence Bundles to give salient visual expression to sequence motifs and other data features, which would otherwise remain hidden. Methods For the development of Sequence Bundles we employed research-led information design methodologies. Sequences are encoded as uninterrupted, semi-opaque lines plotted on a 2-dimensional reconfigurable grid. Each line represents a single sequence. The thickness and opacity of the stack at each residue in each position indicates the level of conservation and the lines' curved paths expose patterns in correlation and functionality. Several MSAs can be visualised in a composite image. The Sequence Bundles method is designed to favour a tangible, continuous and intuitive display of information. Results We have developed a software demonstration application for generating a Sequence Bundles visualisation of MSAs provided for the BioVis 2013 redesign contest. A subsequent exploration of the visualised line patterns allowed for the discovery of a number of interesting features in the dataset. Reported features include the extreme conservation of sequences displaying a specific residue and bifurcations of the consensus sequence. Conclusions Sequence Bundles is a novel method for visualisation of MSAs and the discovery of sequence motifs. It can aid in generating new insight and hypothesis making. Sequence Bundles is well disposed for future implementation as an interactive visual analytics software, which can complement existing visualisation tools. PMID:25237395

  12. CATEGORIZATION OF EVENT SEQUENCES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    G.E. Ragan; P. Mecheret; D. Dexheimer

    2005-04-14

    The purposes of this analysis are: (1) Categorize (as Category 1, Category 2, or Beyond Category 2) internal event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. (2) Categorize external event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. This includes examining DBGM-1 seismic classifications and upgrading to DBGM-2, if appropriate, to ensure Beyond Category 2 categorization. (3) State the design and operational requirements that are invoked to make the categorization assignments valid. (4) Indicate the amount of material put at risk by Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences. (5) Estimate frequencies of Category 1 event sequences at the maximum capacity and receipt rate of the repository. (6) Distinguish occurrences associated with normal operations from event sequences. It is beyond the scope of the analysis to propose design requirements that may be required to control radiological exposure associated with normal operations. (7) Provide a convenient compilation of the results of the analysis in tabular form. The results of this analysis are used as inputs to the consequence analyses in an iterative design process that is depicted in Figure 1. Categorization of event sequences for permanent retrieval of waste from the repository is beyond the scope of this analysis. Cleanup activities that take place after an event sequence and other responses to abnormal events are also beyond the scope of the analysis.

  13. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Tobar-Tosse, Fabián; Rodríguez, Adrián C; Vélez, Patricia E; Zambrano, María M; Moreno, Pedro A

    2013-01-01

    Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C) content, Codon Usage (Cd), Trinucleotide Usage (Tn), and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS) in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment. PMID:23536879

  14. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  15. Microfluidic droplet enrichment for targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Eastburn, Dennis J.; Huang, Yong; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Sciambi, Adam; Ptáček, Louis J.; Abate, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted sequence enrichment enables better identification of genetic variation by providing increased sequencing coverage for genomic regions of interest. Here, we report the development of a new target enrichment technology that is highly differentiated from other approaches currently in use. Our method, MESA (Microfluidic droplet Enrichment for Sequence Analysis), isolates genomic DNA fragments in microfluidic droplets and performs TaqMan PCR reactions to identify droplets containing a desired target sequence. The TaqMan positive droplets are subsequently recovered via dielectrophoretic sorting, and the TaqMan amplicons are removed enzymatically prior to sequencing. We demonstrated the utility of this approach by generating an average 31.6-fold sequence enrichment across 250 kb of targeted genomic DNA from five unique genomic loci. Significantly, this enrichment enabled a more comprehensive identification of genetic polymorphisms within the targeted loci. MESA requires low amounts of input DNA, minimal prior locus sequence information and enriches the target region without PCR bias or artifacts. These features make it well suited for the study of genetic variation in a number of research and diagnostic applications. PMID:25873629

  16. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eudes GV; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel TJ; Carneiro, Adriana R; Le Loir, Yves; Baumbach, Jan; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the “scientific value” of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information. PMID:24921006

  17. Gelada vocal sequences follow Menzerath's linguistic law.

    PubMed

    Gustison, Morgan L; Semple, Stuart; Ferrer-I-Cancho, Ramon; Bergman, Thore J

    2016-05-10

    Identifying universal principles underpinning diverse natural systems is a key goal of the life sciences. A powerful approach in addressing this goal has been to test whether patterns consistent with linguistic laws are found in nonhuman animals. Menzerath's law is a linguistic law that states that, the larger the construct, the smaller the size of its constituents. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first evidence that Menzerath's law holds in the vocal communication of a nonhuman species. We show that, in vocal sequences of wild male geladas (Theropithecus gelada), construct size (sequence size in number of calls) is negatively correlated with constituent size (duration of calls). Call duration does not vary significantly with position in the sequence, but call sequence composition does change with sequence size and most call types are abbreviated in larger sequences. We also find that intercall intervals follow the same relationship with sequence size as do calls. Finally, we provide formal mathematical support for the idea that Menzerath's law reflects compression-the principle of minimizing the expected length of a code. Our findings suggest that a common principle underpins human and gelada vocal communication, highlighting the value of exploring the applicability of linguistic laws in vocal systems outside the realm of language.

  18. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Pääbo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library are of Neanderthal origin, the strongest being the ascertainment of sequence identities between Neanderthal and chimpanzee at sites where the human genomic sequence is different. These results enabled us to calculate the human-Neanderthal divergence time based on multiple randomly distributed autosomal loci. Our analyses suggest that on average the Neanderthal genomic sequence we obtained and the reference human genome sequence share a most recent common ancestor ~706,000 years ago, and that the human and Neanderthal ancestral populations split ~370,000 years ago, before the emergence of anatomically modern humans. Our finding that the Neanderthal and human genomes are at least 99.5% identical led us to develop and successfully implement a targeted method for recovering specific ancient DNA sequences from metagenomic libraries. This initial analysis of the Neanderthal genome advances our understanding of the evolutionary relationship of Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis and signifies the dawn of Neanderthal genomics. PMID:17110569

  19. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Tobar-Tosse, Fabián; Rodríguez, Adrián C; Vélez, Patricia E; Zambrano, María M; Moreno, Pedro A

    2013-01-01

    Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C) content, Codon Usage (Cd), Trinucleotide Usage (Tn), and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS) in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  20. Oligonucleotide Sequence Motifs as Nucleosome Positioning Signals

    PubMed Central

    Collings, Clayton K.; Fernandez, Alfonso G.; Pitschka, Chad G.; Hawkins, Troy B.; Anderson, John N.

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the sequence patterns that characterize positioned nucleosomes, we first performed an analysis of the periodicities of the 256 tetranucleotides in a yeast genome-wide library of nucleosomal DNA sequences that was prepared by in vitro reconstitution. The approach entailed the identification and analysis of 24 unique tetranucleotides that were defined by 8 consensus sequences. These consensus sequences were shown to be responsible for most if not all of the tetranucleotide and dinucleotide periodicities displayed by the entire library, demonstrating that the periodicities of dinucleotides that characterize the yeast genome are, in actuality, due primarily to the 8 consensus sequences. A novel combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches was then used to show that these tetranucleotides are important for preferred formation of nucleosomes at specific sites along DNA in vitro. These results were then compared to tetranucleotide patterns in genome-wide in vivo libraries from yeast and C. elegans in order to assess the contributions of DNA sequence in the control of nucleosome residency in the cell. These comparisons revealed striking similarities in the tetranucleotide occurrence profiles that are likely to be involved in nucleosome positioning in both in vitro and in vivo libraries, suggesting that DNA sequence is an important factor in the control of nucleosome placement in vivo. However, the strengths of the tetranucleotide periodicities were 3–4 fold higher in the in vitro as compared to the in vivo libraries, which implies that DNA sequence plays less of a role in dictating nucleosome positions in vivo. The results of this study have important implications for models of sequence-dependent positioning since they suggest that a defined subset of tetranucleotides is involved in preferred nucleosome occupancy and that these tetranucleotides are the major source of the dinucleotide periodicities that are characteristic of

  1. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  2. Stem kernels for RNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Popendorf, Kris; Ogawa, Nana; Asai, Kiyoshi; Sato, Kengo

    2007-10-01

    Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars have been developed for modeling and analyzing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNA, and are used for structural alignment of RNA sequences. However, such stochastic models cannot sufficiently discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from nonmembers and hence detect noncoding RNA regions from genome sequences. A novel kernel function, stem kernel, for the discrimination and detection of functional RNA sequences using support vector machines (SVMs) is proposed. The stem kernel is a natural extension of the string kernel, specifically the all-subsequences kernel, and is tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures. The stem kernel examines all possible common base pairs and stem structures of arbitrary lengths, including pseudoknots between two RNA sequences, and calculates the inner product of common stem structure counts. An efficient algorithm is developed to calculate the stem kernels based on dynamic programming. The stem kernels are then applied to discriminate members of an RNA family from nonmembers using SVMs. The study indicates that the discrimination ability of the stem kernel is strong compared with conventional methods. Furthermore, the potential application of the stem kernel is demonstrated by the detection of remotely homologous RNA families in terms of secondary structures. This is because the string kernel is proven to work for the remote homology detection of protein sequences. These experimental results have convinced us to apply the stem kernel in order to find novel RNA families from genome sequences. PMID:17933013

  3. Robot Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Brian K.; Maxwell,Scott A.; Hartman, Frank R.; Wright, John R.; Yen, Jeng; Toole, Nicholas T.; Gorjian, Zareh; Morrison, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The Robot Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP) is being used in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission for downlink data visualization and command sequence generation. RSVP reads and writes downlink data products from the operations data server (ODS) and writes uplink data products to the ODS. The primary users of RSVP are members of the Rover Planner team (part of the Integrated Planning and Execution Team (IPE)), who use it to perform traversability/articulation analyses, take activity plan input from the Science and Mission Planning teams, and create a set of rover sequences to be sent to the rover every sol. The primary inputs to RSVP are downlink data products and activity plans in the ODS database. The primary outputs are command sequences to be placed in the ODS for further processing prior to uplink to each rover. RSVP is composed of two main subsystems. The first, called the Robot Sequence Editor (RoSE), understands the MSL activity and command dictionaries and takes care of converting incoming activity level inputs into command sequences. The Rover Planners use the RoSE component of RSVP to put together command sequences and to view and manage command level resources like time, power, temperature, etc. (via a transparent realtime connection to SEQGEN). The second component of RSVP is called HyperDrive, a set of high-fidelity computer graphics displays of the Martian surface in 3D and in stereo. The Rover Planners can explore the environment around the rover, create commands related to motion of all kinds, and see the simulated result of those commands via its underlying tight coupling with flight navigation, motor, and arm software. This software is the evolutionary replacement for the Rover Sequencing and Visualization software used to create command sequences (and visualize the Martian surface) for the Mars Exploration Rover mission.

  4. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and solexa sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Feng; Ramchiary, Nirala; Choi, Su Ryun; Lim, Yong Pyo; Wang, Xiao-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of the chloroplast (cp) genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb) and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the cp genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassicarapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246, 362, and 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16, and FT, respectively. Micro-reads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7-99.8 or 95.5-99.7% of the B. rapa cp genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of cp genome.

  5. Effects of the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ sequencing chemistry on sequence data quality.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers substantial improvements over current forensic DNA typing methodologies such as increased resolution, scalability, and throughput. The Ion PGM™ is a promising MPS platform for analysis of forensic biological evidence. The system employs a sequencing-by-synthesis chemistry on a semiconductor chip that measures a pH change due to the release of hydrogen ions as nucleotides are incorporated into the growing DNA strands. However, implementation of MPS into forensic laboratories requires a robust chemistry. Ion Torrent's Hi-Q™ Sequencing Chemistry was evaluated to determine if it could improve on the quality of the generated sequence data in association with selected genetic marker targets. The whole mitochondrial genome and the HID-Ion STR 10-plex panel were sequenced on the Ion PGM™ system with the Ion PGM™ Sequencing 400 Kit and the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ Sequencing Kit. Concordance, coverage, strand balance, noise, and deletion ratios were assessed in evaluating the performance of the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ Sequencing Kit. The results indicate that reliable, accurate data are generated and that sequencing through homopolymeric regions can be improved with the use of Ion Torrent's Hi-Q™ Sequencing Chemistry. Overall, the quality of the generated sequencing data supports the potential for use of the Ion PGM™ in forensic genetic laboratories.

  6. Sequencing, Analysis, and Annotation of Expressed Sequence Tags for Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M.; Shehata, Maher M.; Abu-Duhier, Faisel M.; Al-Yamani, Essam J.; Al-Busadah, Khalid A.; Al-Arawi, Mohammed S.; Al-Khider, Ali Y.; Al-Muhaimeed, Abdullah N.; Al-Qahtani, Fahad H.; Manee, Manee M.; Al-Shomrani, Badr M.; Al-Qhtani, Saad M.; Al-Harthi, Amer S.; Akdemir, Kadir C.; Otu, Hasan H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite its economical, cultural, and biological importance, there has not been a large scale sequencing project to date for Camelus dromedarius. With the goal of sequencing complete DNA of the organism, we first established and sequenced camel EST libraries, generating 70,272 reads. Following trimming, chimera check, repeat masking, cluster and assembly, we obtained 23,602 putative gene sequences, out of which over 4,500 potentially novel or fast evolving gene sequences do not carry any homology to other available genomes. Functional annotation of sequences with similarities in nucleotide and protein databases has been obtained using Gene Ontology classification. Comparison to available full length cDNA sequences and Open Reading Frame (ORF) analysis of camel sequences that exhibit homology to known genes show more than 80% of the contigs with an ORF>300 bp and ∼40% hits extending to the start codons of full length cDNAs suggesting successful characterization of camel genes. Similarity analyses are done separately for different organisms including human, mouse, bovine, and rat. Accompanying web portal, CAGBASE (http://camel.kacst.edu.sa/), hosts a relational database containing annotated EST sequences and analysis tools with possibility to add sequences from public domain. We anticipate our results to provide a home base for genomic studies of camel and other comparative studies enabling a starting point for whole genome sequencing of the organism. PMID:20502665

  7. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  8. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  9. Pittosporum cryptic virus 1: genome sequence completion using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Kubaa, Raied Abou; Tuzlali, Hasan Tuna; Digiaro, Michele

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to dsRNAs extracted from an Italian pittosporum plant infected with pittosporum cryptic virus 1 (PiCV1). NGS allowed assembly of the full genome sequence of PiCV1, comprising dsRNA1 (1.9 kbp) and dsRNA2 (1.5 kbp), which encode the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid protein genes, respectively. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses confirmed that PiCV1 is a new member of the genus Deltapartitivirus, family Partiviridae. From the same plant, NSG also permitted assembly of the complete genome sequence of eggplant mottled dwarf virus (EMDV), which shared 86 % to 98 % nucleotide sequence identity with complete and partial sequences (ca 6750 nt) of other known EMDV isolates with sequences available in the GenBank database. PMID:27087112

  10. Clinical sequencing: is WGS the better WES?

    PubMed

    Meienberg, Janine; Bruggmann, Rémy; Oexle, Konrad; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Current clinical next-generation sequencing is done by using gene panels and exome analysis, both of which involve selective capturing of target regions. However, capturing has limitations in sufficiently covering coding exons, especially GC-rich regions. We compared whole exome sequencing (WES) with the most recent PCR-free whole genome sequencing (WGS), showing that only the latter is able to provide hitherto unprecedented complete coverage of the coding region of the genome. Thus, from a clinical/technical point of view, WGS is the better WES so that capturing is no longer necessary for the most comprehensive genomic testing of Mendelian disorders. PMID:26742503

  11. Next-generation sequencing discoveries in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Slack, Graham W; Gascoyne, Randy D

    2013-03-01

    Since the mapping of the human genome and the advent of next-generation sequencing technology thorough examination of the cancer genome has become a reality. Over the last few years several studies have used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the genetic landscape of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, identifying novel genetic mutations and gene rearrangements that have shed new light on the underlying tumor biology in these diseases as well as identifying possible targets for directed therapy. This review covers the major discoveries in lymphoma using next-generation sequencing technology.

  12. Update on Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Brian; Hartman, Frank; Maxwell, Scott; Yen, Jeng; Wright, John; Balacuit, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP) has been updated. RSVP was reported in Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program (NPO-30845), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 38. To recapitulate: The Rover Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP) is the software tool to be used in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission for planning rover operations and generating command sequences for accomplishing those operations. RSVP combines three-dimensional (3D) visualization for immersive exploration of the operations area, stereoscopic image display for high-resolution examination of the downlinked imagery, and a sophisticated command-sequence editing tool for analysis and completion of the sequences. RSVP is linked with actual flight code modules for operations rehearsal to provide feedback on the expected behavior of the rover prior to committing to a particular sequence. Playback tools allow for review of both rehearsed rover behavior and downlinked results of actual rover operations. These can be displayed simultaneously for comparison of rehearsed and actual activities for verification. The primary inputs to RSVP are downlink data products from the Operations Storage Server (OSS) and activity plans generated by the science team. The activity plans are high-level goals for the next day s activities. The downlink data products include imagery, terrain models, and telemetered engineering data on rover activities and state. The Rover Sequence Editor (RoSE) component of RSVP performs activity expansion to command sequences, command creation and editing with setting of command parameters, and viewing and management of rover resources. The HyperDrive component of RSVP performs 2D and 3D visualization of the rover s environment, graphical and animated review of rover predicted and telemetered state, and creation and editing of command sequences related to mobility and Instrument Deployment Device (robotic arm) operations. Additionally, RoSE and

  13. New Stopping Criteria for Segmenting DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentian

    2001-06-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian information criterion in the model selection framework. When this criterion is applied to telomere of S. cerevisiae and the complete sequence of E. coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified, and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  14. New Stopping Criteria for Segmenting DNA Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wentian

    2001-06-18

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian information criterion in the model selection framework. When this criterion is applied to telomere of S.cerevisiae and the complete sequence of E.coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified, and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  15. Mariner 9 mapping science sequence design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The primary mission of Mariner 9 was to map the Martian surface. This paper discusses in detail the design of the mapping science sequences which were executed by the spacecraft in sixty days and during which over eighty percent of the surface was photographed. The sequence design was influenced by many factors: experimenter scientific objectives, instrument capabilities, spacecraft capabilities, orbit characteristics, and data return rates, which are illustrated graphically. Typical orbits are depicted for each of the three different mapping phases lasting twenty days. Examples of typical orbital sequence plans prepared daily during mission operations are given.

  16. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  17. Networks of motifs from sequences of symbols.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Roberta; Condorelli, Daniele; Latora, Vito

    2010-10-22

    We introduce a method to convert an ensemble of sequences of symbols into a weighted directed network whose nodes are motifs, while the directed links and their weights are defined from statistically significant co-occurences of two motifs in the same sequence. The analysis of communities of networks of motifs is shown to be able to correlate sequences with functions in the human proteome database, to detect hot topics from online social dialogs, to characterize trajectories of dynamical systems, and it might find other useful applications to process large amounts of data in various fields.

  18. Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis of FAD Synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Luisa; Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2006-08-01

    An evolutionary analysis of the sequences available till now for FAD synthetases has been carried out. Several identical conserved residues have been observed along the sequences of all the FAD synthetases analyzed, which might correlate with role for these residues in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis shows that FAD synthetase sequences can be organized in two main clusters. One of them mainly contains temperature, pressure or pH resistant organisms, whereas in the other one organisms with pathogenic character can be found.

  19. Stabilization of echo amplitudes in FSE sequences.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, P; Hinks, R S

    1993-08-01

    The classical CPMG sequence and its extension as an imaging sequence, fast spin echo (FSE, based on RARE), suffer from signal magnitude variations in the early echoes when the refocusing pulses are not set exactly to 180 degrees. It has been suggested that by varying the value of the nutation angle of each refocusing pulse the signal magnitude could be made constant. This article describes an algorithm permitting the generation of sequences of nutation angles yielding series of echoes with constant signal magnitudes. This result is then used to design selective pulses for the FSE imaging technique.

  20. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  1. Iterative method for generating correlated binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usatenko, O. V.; Melnik, S. S.; Apostolov, S. S.; Makarov, N. M.; Krokhin, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an efficient iterative method for generating random correlated binary sequences with a prescribed correlation function. The method is based on consecutive linear modulations of an initially uncorrelated sequence into a correlated one. Each step of modulation increases the correlations until the desired level has been reached. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are tested by generating sequences with inverse power-law correlations. The substantial increase in the strength of correlation in the iterative method with respect to single-step filtering generation is shown for all studied correlation functions. Our results can be used for design of disordered superlattices, waveguides, and surfaces with selective transport properties.

  2. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Tn10

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Ronald; Sewitz, Sven; Lipkow, Karen; Crellin, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Tn10 has been determined. The dinucleotide signature and percent G+C of the sequence had no discontinuities, indicating that Tn10 constitutes a homogeneous unit. The new sequence contained three new open reading frames corresponding to a glutamate permease, repressors of heavy metal resistance operons, and a hypothetical protein in Bacillus subtilis. The glutamate permease was fully functional when expressed, but Tn10 did not protect Escherichia coli from the toxic effects of various metals. PMID:10781570

  3. Networks of Motifs from Sequences of Symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinatra, Roberta; Condorelli, Daniele; Latora, Vito

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a method to convert an ensemble of sequences of symbols into a weighted directed network whose nodes are motifs, while the directed links and their weights are defined from statistically significant co-occurences of two motifs in the same sequence. The analysis of communities of networks of motifs is shown to be able to correlate sequences with functions in the human proteome database, to detect hot topics from online social dialogs, to characterize trajectories of dynamical systems, and it might find other useful applications to process large amounts of data in various fields.

  4. Deep sequencing increases hepatitis C virus phylogenetic cluster detection compared to Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Vincent; Olmstead, Andrea; Tang, Patrick; Cook, Darrel; Janjua, Naveed; Grebely, Jason; Jacka, Brendan; Poon, Art F Y; Krajden, Mel

    2016-09-01

    Effective surveillance and treatment strategies are required to control the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic. Phylogenetic analyses are powerful tools for reconstructing the evolutionary history of viral outbreaks and identifying transmission clusters. These studies often rely on Sanger sequencing which typically generates a single consensus sequence for each infected individual. For rapidly mutating viruses such as HCV, consensus sequencing underestimates the complexity of the viral quasispecies population and could therefore generate different phylogenetic tree topologies. Although deep sequencing provides a more detailed quasispecies characterization, in-depth phylogenetic analyses are challenging due to dataset complexity and computational limitations. Here, we apply deep sequencing to a characterized population to assess its ability to identify phylogenetic clusters compared with consensus Sanger sequencing. For deep sequencing, a sample specific threshold determined by the 50th percentile of the patristic distance distribution for all variants within each individual was used to identify clusters. Among seven patristic distance thresholds tested for the Sanger sequence phylogeny ranging from 0.005-0.06, a threshold of 0.03 was found to provide the maximum balance between positive agreement (samples in a cluster) and negative agreement (samples not in a cluster) relative to the deep sequencing dataset. From 77 HCV seroconverters, 10 individuals were identified in phylogenetic clusters using both methods. Deep sequencing analysis identified an additional 4 individuals and excluded 8 other individuals relative to Sanger sequencing. The application of this deep sequencing approach could be a more effective tool to understand onward HCV transmission dynamics compared with Sanger sequencing, since the incorporation of minority sequence variants improves the discrimination of phylogenetically linked clusters.

  5. Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence.

    PubMed

    Du, Yue; Prashad, Shikha; Schoenbrun, Ilana; Clark, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that motor sequences can be learned quickly through online learning. Subsequently, the initial acquisition of a motor sequence is boosted or consolidated by offline learning. However, little is known whether offline learning can drive the fast learning of motor sequences (i.e., initial sequence learning in the first training session). To examine offline learning in the fast learning stage, we asked four groups of young adults to perform the serial reaction time (SRT) task with either a fixed or probabilistic sequence and with or without preliminary knowledge (PK) of the presence of a sequence. The sequence and PK were manipulated to emphasize either procedural (probabilistic sequence; no preliminary knowledge (NPK)) or declarative (fixed sequence; with PK) memory that were found to either facilitate or inhibit offline learning. In the SRT task, there were six learning blocks with a 2 min break between each consecutive block. Throughout the session, stimuli followed the same fixed or probabilistic pattern except in Block 5, in which stimuli appeared in a random order. We found that PK facilitated the learning of a fixed sequence, but not a probabilistic sequence. In addition to overall learning measured by the mean reaction time (RT), we examined the progressive changes in RT within and between blocks (i.e., online and offline learning, respectively). It was found that the two groups who performed the fixed sequence, regardless of PK, showed greater online learning than the other two groups who performed the probabilistic sequence. The groups who performed the probabilistic sequence, regardless of PK, did not display online learning, as indicated by a decline in performance within the learning blocks. However, they did demonstrate remarkably greater offline improvement in RT, which suggests that they are learning the probabilistic sequence offline. These results suggest that in the SRT task, the fast acquisition of a motor sequence is driven

  6. Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yue; Prashad, Shikha; Schoenbrun, Ilana; Clark, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that motor sequences can be learned quickly through online learning. Subsequently, the initial acquisition of a motor sequence is boosted or consolidated by offline learning. However, little is known whether offline learning can drive the fast learning of motor sequences (i.e., initial sequence learning in the first training session). To examine offline learning in the fast learning stage, we asked four groups of young adults to perform the serial reaction time (SRT) task with either a fixed or probabilistic sequence and with or without preliminary knowledge (PK) of the presence of a sequence. The sequence and PK were manipulated to emphasize either procedural (probabilistic sequence; no preliminary knowledge (NPK)) or declarative (fixed sequence; with PK) memory that were found to either facilitate or inhibit offline learning. In the SRT task, there were six learning blocks with a 2 min break between each consecutive block. Throughout the session, stimuli followed the same fixed or probabilistic pattern except in Block 5, in which stimuli appeared in a random order. We found that PK facilitated the learning of a fixed sequence, but not a probabilistic sequence. In addition to overall learning measured by the mean reaction time (RT), we examined the progressive changes in RT within and between blocks (i.e., online and offline learning, respectively). It was found that the two groups who performed the fixed sequence, regardless of PK, showed greater online learning than the other two groups who performed the probabilistic sequence. The groups who performed the probabilistic sequence, regardless of PK, did not display online learning, as indicated by a decline in performance within the learning blocks. However, they did demonstrate remarkably greater offline improvement in RT, which suggests that they are learning the probabilistic sequence offline. These results suggest that in the SRT task, the fast acquisition of a motor sequence is driven

  7. Hippocampal theta sequences reflect current goals.

    PubMed

    Wikenheiser, Andrew M; Redish, A David

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal information processing is discretized by oscillations, and the ensemble activity of place cells is organized into temporal sequences bounded by theta cycles. Theta sequences represent time-compressed trajectories through space. Their forward-directed nature makes them an intuitive candidate mechanism for planning future trajectories, but their connection to goal-directed behavior remains unclear. As rats performed a value-guided decision-making task, the extent to which theta sequences projected ahead of the animal's current location varied on a moment-by-moment basis depending on the rat's goals. Look-ahead extended farther on journeys to distant goals than on journeys to more proximal goals and was predictive of the animal's destination. On arrival at goals, however, look-ahead was similar regardless of where the animal began its journey from. Together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal theta sequences contain information related to goals or intentions, pointing toward a potential spatial basis for planning.

  8. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  9. Using mobile sequencers in an academic classroom

    PubMed Central

    Zaaijer, Sophie; Erlich, Yaniv

    2016-01-01

    The advent of mobile DNA sequencers has made it possible to generate DNA sequencing data outside of laboratories and genome centers. Here, we report our experience of using the MinION, a mobile sequencer, in a 13-week academic course for undergraduate and graduate students. The course consisted of theoretical sessions that presented fundamental topics in genomics and several applied hackathon sessions. In these hackathons, the students used MinION sequencers to generate and analyze their own data and gain hands-on experience in the topics discussed in the theoretical classes. The manuscript describes the structure of our class, the educational material, and the lessons we learned in the process. We hope that the knowledge and material presented here will provide the community with useful tools to help educate future generations of genome scientists. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14258.001 PMID:27054412

  10. The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-24

    The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the {approximately}120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes {approximately}13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.

  11. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals. PMID:25287501

  12. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    PubMed

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  13. Algebraic structures of sequences of numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, I.-Chiau

    2012-09-01

    For certain sequences of numbers, commutative rings with a module structure over a non-commutative ring are constructed. Identities of these numbers are considered as realizations of algebraic relations.

  14. The Value of DNA Sequencing - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    DNA sequencing: what it tells us about DNA changes in cancer, how looking across many tumors will help to identify meaningful changes and potential drug targets, and how genomics is changing the way we think about cancer.

  15. CLaMS: Classifier for Metagenomic Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita

    2010-12-01

    CLaMS-"Classifer for Metagenonic Sequences" is a Java application for binning assembled metagenomes wings user-specified training sequence sets and other user-specified initial parameters. Since ClAmS analyzes and matches sequence composition-based genomic signatures, it is much faster than binning tools that rely on alignments to homologs; CLaMS can bin ~20,000 sequences in 3 minutes on a laptop with a 2.4 Ghz. Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2 GB Ram. CLaMS is meant to be desktop application for biologist and can be run on any machine under any operating system on which the Java Runtime Environment is enabled. CLaMS is freely available in both GVI-based and command-line based forms.

  16. Viral detection by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Nakaya, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We applied a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion PGM, for viral detection in fecal samples from adult cows collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.25 ml of fecal specimens (N = 8), and more than 5 μg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing using the 318 v2 semiconductor chip of these eight samples yielded 57-580 K (average: 270 K, after data analysis) reads in a single run. As a result, viral genome sequences were detected in each specimen. In addition to bacteriophage, mammal- and insect-derived viruses, partial genome sequences of plant, algal, and protozoal viruses were detected. Thus, this metagenomic analysis of fecal specimens could be useful to comprehensively understand viral populations of the intestine and food sources in animals.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: isolated lissencephaly sequence

    MedlinePlus

    ... lissencephaly sequence (ILS) is a condition that affects brain development before birth. Normally, the cells that make up ... the brain do not form. This impairment of brain development leads to the smooth brain appearance and the ...

  18. CLaMS: Classifier for Metagenomic Sequences

    2010-12-01

    CLaMS-"Classifer for Metagenonic Sequences" is a Java application for binning assembled metagenomes wings user-specified training sequence sets and other user-specified initial parameters. Since ClAmS analyzes and matches sequence composition-based genomic signatures, it is much faster than binning tools that rely on alignments to homologs; CLaMS can bin ~20,000 sequences in 3 minutes on a laptop with a 2.4 Ghz. Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2 GB Ram. CLaMS is meant to be desktop applicationmore » for biologist and can be run on any machine under any operating system on which the Java Runtime Environment is enabled. CLaMS is freely available in both GVI-based and command-line based forms.« less

  19. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  20. "X"-tending the Fibonacci Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Glenn T.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a lesson on the Fibonacci and Lucas sequences that captures student interest by presenting the opportunity for computation practice, mental mathematics, and proof for algebra students. Discusses an extension for solving simultaneous equations. (YDS)

  1. Genetics Home Reference: isolated Pierre Robin sequence

    MedlinePlus

    ... of isolated Pierre Robin sequence: Boston Children's Hospital: Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Treatment and Care Genetic Testing ... 7 links) Centers for Disease Control: Facts About Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Children's Craniofacial Association: A Guide ...

  2. The DWPF Melter proposed heat up sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.

    1989-08-11

    Per the request of DWPT supervision, a proposed heatup sequence for the DWPF Melter has been documented in this report. DWPF personnel will use this report as a guide to write the detailed DWPF Melter startup plan. 6 refs.

  3. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    PubMed

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences. PMID:27265133

  4. Using mobile sequencers in an academic classroom.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, Sophie; Erlich, Yaniv

    2016-01-01

    The advent of mobile DNA sequencers has made it possible to generate DNA sequencing data outside of laboratories and genome centers. Here, we report our experience of using the MinION, a mobile sequencer, in a 13-week academic course for undergraduate and graduate students. The course consisted of theoretical sessions that presented fundamental topics in genomics and several applied hackathon sessions. In these hackathons, the students used MinION sequencers to generate and analyze their own data and gain hands-on experience in the topics discussed in the theoretical classes. The manuscript describes the structure of our class, the educational material, and the lessons we learned in the process. We hope that the knowledge and material presented here will provide the community with useful tools to help educate future generations of genome scientists.

  5. Genome Sequence of Serratia plymuthica V4

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, S.; Van der Auwera, G.; Almeida, C.; Vieira, M. J.; Vlamakis, H.

    2014-01-01

    Serratia spp. are gammaproteobacteria and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain V4, which produces the siderophore serratiochelin and antimicrobial compounds. PMID:24831138

  6. Graphic Sequences of Spanish Nominals and Reflexives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of graphics for clarifying paradigmatic and syntagmatic relationships of nominals is described. This approach improves student understanding of reflexive, pseudo-reflexive, and nonreflexive sequences. (Contains seven references.) (Author/LB)

  7. The retrieval of ancient human DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Handt, O.; Krings, M.; Ward, R. H.; Pääbo, S.

    1996-01-01

    DNA was extracted from approximately 600-year-old human remains found at an archaeological site in the southwestern United States, and mtDNA fragments were amplified by PCR. When these fragments were sequenced directly, multiple sequences seemed to be present. From three representative individuals, DNA fragments of different lengths were quantified and short overlapping amplification products cloned. When amplifications started from <40 molecules, clones contained several different sequences. In contrast, when they were initiated by a few thousand molecules, unambiguous and reproducible results were achieved. These results show that more experimental work than is often applied is necessary to ensure that DNA sequences amplified from ancient human remains are authentic. In particular, quantitation of the numbers of amplifiable molecules is a useful tool to determine the role of contaminating contemporary molecules and PCR errors in amplifications from ancient DNA. Images Figure 1 PMID:8755923

  8. A disruptive sequencer meets disruptive publishing

    PubMed Central

    Loman, Nick; Goodwin, Sarah; Jansen, Hans; Loose, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing was recently made available to users in the form of the Oxford Nanopore MinION. Released to users through an early access programme, the MinION is made unique by its tiny form factor and ability to generate very long sequences from single DNA molecules. The platform is undergoing rapid evolution with three distinct nanopore types and five updates to library preparation chemistry in the last 18 months. To keep pace with the rapid evolution of this sequencing platform, and to provide a space where new analysis methods can be openly discussed, we present a new F1000Research channel devoted to updates to and analysis of nanopore sequence data. PMID:26998227

  9. The complete DNA sequence of vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Goebel, S J; Johnson, G P; Perkus, M E; Davis, S W; Winslow, J P; Paoletti, E

    1990-11-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the genome of vaccinia virus has been determined. The genome consisted of 191,636 bp with a base composition of 66.6% A + T. We have identified 198 "major" protein-coding regions and 65 overlapping "minor" regions, for a total of 263 potential genes. Genes encoded by the virus were located by examination of DNA sequence characteristics and compared with existing vaccinia virus mapping analyses, sequence data, and transcription data. These genes were found to be compactly organized along the genome with relatively few regions of noncoding sequences. Whereas several similarities to proteins of known function were discerned, the function of the majority of proteins encoded by these open reading frames is as yet undetermined.

  10. Temporal and kinematic consistency predict sequence awareness.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, Molly J; Schieber, Marc H; Mink, Jonathan W

    2016-10-01

    Many human motor skills can be represented as a hierarchical series of movement patterns. Awareness of underlying patterns can improve performance and decrease cognitive load. Subjects (n = 30) tapped a finger sequence with changing stimulus-to-response mapping and a common movement sequence. Thirteen subjects (43 %) became aware that they were tapping a familiar movement sequence during the experiment. Subjects who became aware of the underlying motor pattern tapped with greater kinematic and temporal consistency from task onset, but consistency was not sufficient for awareness. We found no effect of age, musical experience, tapping evenness, or inter-key-interval on awareness of the pattern in the motor response. We propose that temporal or kinematic consistency reinforces a pattern representation, but cognitive engagement with the contents of the sequence is necessary to bring the pattern to conscious awareness. These findings predict benefit for movement strategies that limit temporal and kinematic variability during motor learning. PMID:27324192

  11. Ideal shrinking and expansion of discrete sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Ideal methods are described for shrinking or expanding a discrete sequence, image, or image sequence. The methods are ideal in the sense that they preserve the frequency spectrum of the input up to the Nyquist limit of the input or output, whichever is smaller. Fast implementations that make use of the discrete Fourier transform or the discrete Hartley transform are described. The techniques lead to a new multiresolution image pyramid.

  12. Exome Sequencing in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Jose M; Singleton, Andrew B

    2011-01-01

    Exome Sequencing is rapidly becoming a fundamental tool for genetics and functional genomics laboratories. This methodology has enabled the discovery of novel pathogenic mutations causing mendelian diseases that had, until now, remained elusive. In this review we discuss not only how we envisage exome sequencing being applied to a complex disease, such as Parkinson’s disease, but also what are the known caveats of this approach. PMID:21651510

  13. Transcriptional profiling of Dictyostelium with RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Edward Roshan; Rot, Gregor; Toplak, Marko; Santhanam, Balaji; Curk, Tomaz; Shaulsky, Gad; Zupan, Blaz

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional profiling methods have been utilized in the analysis of various biological processes in Dictyostelium. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have increased the resolution and the dynamic range of transcriptional profiling. Here we describe the utility of RNA-sequencing with the Illumina technology for production of transcriptional profiles. We also describe methods for data mapping and storage as well as common and specialized tools for data analysis, both online and offline. PMID:23494306

  14. The Accuracy, Feasibility and Challenges of Sequencing Short Tandem Repeats Using Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Zavodna, Monika; Bagshaw, Andrew; Brauning, Rudiger; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    To date we have little knowledge of how accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are in sequencing repetitive sequences beyond known limitations to accurately sequence homopolymers. Only a handful of previous reports have evaluated the potential of NGS for sequencing short tandem repeats (microsatellites) and no empirical study has compared and evaluated the performance of more than one NGS platform with the same dataset. Here we examined yeast microsatellite variants from both long-read (454-sequencing) and short-read (Illumina) NGS platforms and compared these to data derived through Sanger sequencing. In addition, we investigated any locus-specific biases and differences that might have resulted from variability in microsatellite repeat number, repeat motif or type of mutation. Out of 112 insertion/deletion variants identified among 45 microsatellite amplicons in our study, we found 87.5% agreement between the 454-platform and Sanger sequencing in frequency of variant detection after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests. For a subset of 21 microsatellite amplicons derived from Illumina sequencing, the results of short-read platform were highly consistent with the other two platforms, with 100% agreement with 454-sequencing and 93.6% agreement with the Sanger method after Benjamini-Hochberg correction. We found that the microsatellite attributes copy number, repeat motif and type of mutation did not have a significant effect on differences seen between the sequencing platforms. We show that both long-read and short-read NGS platforms can be used to sequence short tandem repeats accurately, which makes it feasible to consider the use of these platforms in high-throughput genotyping. It appears the major requirement for achieving both high accuracy and rare variant detection in microsatellite genotyping is sufficient read depth coverage. This might be a challenge because each platform generates a consistent pattern of non-uniform sequence

  15. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Paul; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    De novo protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that composes a given protein one can determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through protein structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. Mass spectrometry is the current technique of choice for de novo sequencing, but because some amino acids have the same mass the sequence cannot be completely determined in many cases. In this paper we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting perpendicular nanochannel, similar to that proposed in for DNA sequencing. Indeed, we find that the distribution of ionic currents for each of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids encoded by eukaryotic genes is statistically distinct, showing this technique's potential for de novo protein sequencing.

  16. Estimating the entropy of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, A O; Herzel, H

    1997-10-01

    The Shannon entropy is a standard measure for the order state of symbol sequences, such as, for example, DNA sequences. In order to incorporate correlations between symbols, the entropy of n-mers (consecutive strands of n symbols) has to be determined. Here, an assay is presented to estimate such higher order entropies (block entropies) for DNA sequences when the actual number of observations is small compared with the number of possible outcomes. The n-mer probability distribution underlying the dynamical process is reconstructed using elementary statistical principles: The theorem of asymptotic equi-distribution and the Maximum Entropy Principle. Constraints are set to force the constructed distributions to adopt features which are characteristic for the real probability distribution. From the many solutions compatible with these constraints the one with the highest entropy is the most likely one according to the Maximum Entropy Principle. An algorithm performing this procedure is expounded. It is tested by applying it to various DNA model sequences whose exact entropies are known. Finally, results for a real DNA sequence, the complete genome of the Epstein Barr virus, are presented and compared with those of other information carriers (texts, computer source code, music). It seems as if DNA sequences possess much more freedom in the combination of the symbols of their alphabet than written language or computer source codes. PMID:9344742

  17. Recoupling pulse sequences with constant phase increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies a family of recoupling pulse sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, that are characterized by constant phase increments at regular intervals. These pulse sequences can be employed for both homonuclear and heteronuclear recoupling experiments and are robust to dispersion in chemical shifts and rf-inhomogeneity. The homonuclear pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕp , where ϕp =p (n - 1) π/n, where n is number of blocks in a rotor period and p = 0, 1, 2, … . The pulse sequence repeats itself every rotor period when n is odd and every two rotor period when n is even. The heteronuclear recoupling pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕ1p and (2 π) ϕ2p on channel I and S, where ϕ1p = p (2 n - 3) π/2 n, ϕ2p = p (2 n - 1) π/2 n and n is number of blocks in a rotor period. The recoupling pulse sequences mix the z magnetization. Experimental quantification of this method is shown for 13Cα -13CO , homonuclear recoupling in a sample of Glycine and 15N -13Cα , heteronuclear recoupling in Alanine. Application of this method is demonstrated on a sample of tripeptide N-formyl-[U-13C ,15N ]- Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF).

  18. Ordinality and novel sequence learning in jackdaws.

    PubMed

    Pfuhl, G; Biegler, R

    2012-09-01

    A hallmark of higher cognition is the flexible use of information. This requires an abstract representation of the information. In sequence learning, ordinal position knowledge is seen as a more versatile representation when compared to chaining. Here, we assessed which of these mental representations is the most natural and most dominant in jackdaws. Two jackdaws (Corvus monedula) were trained on 14 separate three-item sequences (triplets), made up of abstract images. On each trial, the three items of one triplet were presented in fixed order. The images represented either the first, second or third ordinal position. Test stimuli consisted of the three images and a distractor image that was chosen randomly from the remaining sequences. We rewarded pecking in the correct order to the images belonging to the same sequence. The most common error the birds made was to peck at a distractor item from the same ordinal position. To look at how versatile the jackdaws' ordinal knowledge was, we replaced a familiar item with a novel item in some sequences. We then created novel sequences with these items, which the birds completed correctly. It appears, then, that jackdaws have a concept of ordinal position.

  19. Reporting Differences Between Spacecraft Sequence Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy E.; Fisher, Forest W.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of computer programs, called seq diff suite, reports differences between the products of other computer programs involved in the generation of sequences of commands for spacecraft. These products consist of files of several types: replacement sequence of events (RSOE), DSN keyword file [DKF (wherein DSN signifies Deep Space Network)], spacecraft activities sequence file (SASF), spacecraft sequence file (SSF), and station allocation file (SAF). These products can include line numbers, request identifications, and other pieces of information that are not relevant when generating command sequence products, though these fields can result in the appearance of many changes to the files, particularly when using the UNIX diff command to inspect file differences. The outputs of prior software tools for reporting differences between such products include differences in these non-relevant pieces of information. In contrast, seq diff suite removes the fields containing the irrelevant pieces of information before processing to extract differences, so that only relevant differences are reported. Thus, seq diff suite is especially useful for reporting changes between successive versions of the various products and in particular flagging difference in fields relevant to the sequence command generation and review process.

  20. Palaeoclimate from magnetic proxies in loess sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    For the terrestrial environment, sequences of loess sediments provide key aeolian archives on every continent. High-resolution loess/palaeosol sequences can provide both quantitative information on the soil-forming palaeoclimate, and mineralogical, physical and chemical information on dust and dust fluxes. The sensitivity of iron minerals in these sequences to sediment source, and to changes in ambient environmental conditions makes them particularly valuable for paleoclimatic reconstruction. Iron oxide concentrations can be very low (e.g. below the detection limits of x ray diffraction) but produce almost disproportionately large and distinctive effects - for instance, on soil/sediment colour and soil/sediment magnetic properties. Magnetic analyses of loess/palaeosol sequences can differentiate between stratigraphic units robustly and rapidly. Sediment provenance can be constrained where unweathered loess displays distinctive magnetic signatures. Further, understanding of the links between soil-forming processes and soil magnetic properties has enabled quantification of palaeo-rainfall in the classic Quaternary sequences of the Chinese Loess Plateau, and for the Holocene sequences of the Russian steppe. However, loess/palaeosol magnetic properties must always be considered carefully, on a site-specific basis, since they may reflect changes in sediment source and/or the influences of the full range of pedogenic factors (parent material, climate, topography, organic activity and time). Thus, no generic ‘model' of loess/palaeosol climofunction exists; rather, the (potentially local) impacts of source and soil-forming environment must be evaluated appropriately.

  1. Polynomials Generated by the Fibonacci Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, David; Mills, Donald; Mitchell, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    The Fibonacci sequence's initial terms are F_0=0 and F_1=1, with F_n=F_{n-1}+F_{n-2} for n>=2. We define the polynomial sequence p by setting p_0(x)=1 and p_{n}(x)=x*p_{n-1}(x)+F_{n+1} for n>=1, with p_{n}(x)= sum_{k=0}^{n} F_{k+1}x^{n-k}. We call p_n(x) the Fibonacci-coefficient polynomial (FCP) of order n. The FCP sequence is distinct from the well-known Fibonacci polynomial sequence. We answer several questions regarding these polynomials. Specifically, we show that each even-degree FCP has no real zeros, while each odd-degree FCP has a unique, and (for degree at least 3) irrational, real zero. Further, we show that this sequence of unique real zeros converges monotonically to the negative of the golden ratio. Using Rouche's theorem, we prove that the zeros of the FCP's approach the golden ratio in modulus. We also prove a general result that gives the Mahler measures of an infinite subsequence of the FCP sequence whose coefficients are reduced modulo an integer m>=2. We then apply this to the case that m=L_n, the nth Lucas number, showing that the Mahler measure of the subsequence is phi^{n-1}, where phi=(1+sqrt 5)/2.

  2. Recoupling pulse sequences with constant phase increments.

    PubMed

    Khaneja, Navin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies a family of recoupling pulse sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, that are characterized by constant phase increments at regular intervals. These pulse sequences can be employed for both homonuclear and heteronuclear recoupling experiments and are robust to dispersion in chemical shifts and rf-inhomogeneity. The homonuclear pulse sequence consists of a building block [Formula: see text] , where ϕ(p)=p(n-1)πn, where n is number of blocks in a rotor period and p=0,1,2,…. The pulse sequence repeats itself every rotor period when n is odd and every two rotor period when n is even. The heteronuclear recoupling pulse sequence consists of a building block [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] on channel I and S, where ϕ1(p)=p(2n-3)π2n,ϕ2(p)=p(2n-1)π2n and n is number of blocks in a rotor period. The recoupling pulse sequences mix the z magnetization. Experimental quantification of this method is shown for (13)Cα-(13)CO, homonuclear recoupling in a sample of Glycine and (15)N-(13)Cα, heteronuclear recoupling in Alanine. Application of this method is demonstrated on a sample of tripeptide N-formyl-[U-(13)C,(15)N]- Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF). PMID:27569693

  3. Dynamic proximity of spatio-temporal sequences.

    PubMed

    Horn, David; Dror, Gideon; Quenet, Brigitte

    2004-09-01

    Recurrent networks can generate spatio-temporal neural sequences of very large cycles, having an apparent random behavior. Nonetheless a proximity measure between these sequences may be defined through comparison of the synaptic weight matrices that generate them. Following the dynamic neural filter (DNF) formalism we demonstrate this concept by comparing teacher and student recurrent networks of binary neurons. We show that large sequences, providing a training set well exceeding the Cover limit, allow for good determination of the synaptic matrices. Alternatively, assuming the matrices to be known, very fast determination of the biases can be achieved. Thus, a spatio-temporal sequence may be regarded as spatio-temporal encoding of the bias vector. We introduce a linear support vector machine (SVM) variant of the DNF in order to specify an optimal weight matrix. This approach allows us to deal with noise. Spatio-temporal sequences generated by different DNFs with the same number of neurons may be compared by calculating correlations of the synaptic matrices of the reconstructed DNFs. Other types of spatio-temporal sequences need the introduction of hidden neurons, and/or the use of a kernel variant of the SVM approach. The latter is being defined as a recurrent support vector network (RSVN).

  4. Variations on strongly lacunary quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Huseyin; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new function space, namely the space of Nθ (p)-ward continuous functions, which turns out to be a closed subspace of the space of continuous functions for each positive integer p. Nθα(p ) -ward continuity is also introduced and investigated for any fixed 0 < α ≤ 1, and for any fixed positive integer p. A real valued function f defined on a subset A of R, the set of real numbers is Nθα(p ) -ward continuous if it preserves Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequences, i.e. (f (xn)) is an Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequence whenever (xn) is Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy sequence of points in A, where a sequence (xk) of points in R is called Nθα(p ) -quasi-Cauchy if lim r →∞ 1/hrα ∑k ∈Ir |Δ xk | p =0 , where Δxk = xk+1-xk for each positive integer k, p is a fixed positive integer, α is fixed in ]0, 1], Ir = (kr-1, kr], and θ = (kr) is a lacunary sequence, i.e. an increasing sequence of positive integers such that k0 ≠ 0, and hr: kr-kr-1 →∞.

  5. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  6. Repetitive sequence families in Alces alces americana.

    PubMed

    Blake, R D; Wang, J Z; Beauregard, L

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution derivative melting was used to obtain detailed distributions of local (G + C) contents in a number of ruminant DNAs. Profiles over low (G + C) regions [20-36% (G + C)] are congruent for all ruminants. This region represents 45-50% of the nuclear DNA content and primarily contains intergenic and intron sequences. The high (G + C) region, where most coding sequences are found [38-68% (G + C)], is marked by satellite bands denoting the presence of transcriptionally inert, tandemly repetitive sequence families. These bands can be analyzed for the abundance, base composition, and sequence divergence of satellite families with relatively high precision. Band patterns are unique to each species; even closely related species can be readily distinguished by their base distribution profiles. Variations in nuclear DNA contents in ruminants, determined by flow cytometry, are primarily due to variations in abundances of these repetitive sequence families. Thus, A. alces (moose) is found to have 8.85 +/- 0.2 pg DNA/cell, 25% more than the average in ruminants, while the base distribution curve indicates the presence of an unusually abundant satellite of 52.6% (G + C). The size (1 kb) and sequence of this satellite corresponds to satellite-I of other cervids, and in consequence it is designated Alces-I. The sequence of a cloned repeat of Alces-I has a length of 968 bp, a (G + C) content of 52.6%, and contributes 35%, or almost 3 million copies to the nuclear DNA, exceeding by approximately 300% the average array size of this repeat family in related cervids. In situ hybridization indicates the repeat is distributed throughout centromeric regions of all 62 acrocentric autosomes. Alces-I has much greater-than-expected numbers of GG, GA, and AG and far fewer numbers of TA and CG duplets, characteristics of all tandem repeats. The sequence is judged to be orthologous with satellite-I sequences from Rangifer tarandus (caribou), Capreolus capreolus (roe deer), Muntiacus

  7. Processing Aftershock Sequences Using Waveform Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, M. E.; Procopio, M. J.; Young, C. J.; Carr, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    For most event monitoring systems, the objective is to keep up with the flow of incoming data, producing a bulletin with some modest, relatively constant, time delay after present time, often a period of a few hours or less. Because the association problem scales exponentially and not linearly with the number of detections, a dramatic increase in seismicity due to an aftershock sequence can easily cause the bulletin delay time to increase dramatically. In some cases, the production of a bulletin may cease altogether, until the automatic system can catch up. For a nuclear monitoring system, the implications of such a delay could be dire. Given the expected similarity between a mainshock and aftershocks, it has been proposed that waveform correlation may provide a powerful means to simultaneously increase the efficiency of processing aftershock sequences, while also lowering the detection threshold and improving the quality of the event solutions. However, many questions remain unanswered. What are the key parameters for achieving the best correlations between waveforms (window length, filtering, etc.), and are they sequence-dependent? What is the overall percentage of similar events in an aftershock sequence, i.e. what is the maximum level of efficiency that a waveform correlation could be expected to achieve? Finally, how does this percentage of events vary among sequences? Using data from the aftershock sequence for the December 26, 2004 Mw 9.1 Sumatra event, we investigate these issues by building and testing a prototype waveform correlation event detection system that automatically expands its library of known events as new signatures are indentified in the aftershock sequence (by traditional signal detection and event processing). Our system tests all incoming data against this dynamic library, thereby identify any similar events before traditional processing takes place. In the region surrounding the Sumatra event, the NEIC EDR contains 4997 events in the 9

  8. Standards for Sequencing Viral Genomes in the Era of High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Beitzel, Brett; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Davenport, Matthew G.; Donaldson, Eric; Frieman, Matthew; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kuhn, Jens H.; O’Rear, Jules; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wentworth, David E.; Wiley, Michael R.; Yu, Guo-Yun; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Bradburne, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thanks to high-throughput sequencing technologies, genome sequencing has become a common component in nearly all aspects of viral research; thus, we are experiencing an explosion in both the number of available genome sequences and the number of institutions producing such data. However, there are currently no common standards used to convey the quality, and therefore utility, of these various genome sequences. Here, we propose five “standard” categories that encompass all stages of viral genome finishing, and we define them using simple criteria that are agnostic to the technology used for sequencing. We also provide genome finishing recommendations for various downstream applications, keeping in mind the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with different levels of finishing. Our goal is to define a common vocabulary that will allow comparison of genome quality across different research groups, sequencing platforms, and assembly techniques. PMID:24939889

  9. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the 'CCCGCC' motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  10. Standards for sequencing viral genomes in the era of high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Jason T; Beitzel, Brett; Chain, Patrick S G; Davenport, Matthew G; Donaldson, Eric F; Frieman, Matthew; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Kuhn, Jens H; O'Rear, Jules; Sabeti, Pardis C; Wentworth, David E; Wiley, Michael R; Yu, Guo-Yun; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Bradburne, Christopher; Palacios, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to high-throughput sequencing technologies, genome sequencing has become a common component in nearly all aspects of viral research; thus, we are experiencing an explosion in both the number of available genome sequences and the number of institutions producing such data. However, there are currently no common standards used to convey the quality, and therefore utility, of these various genome sequences. Here, we propose five "standard" categories that encompass all stages of viral genome finishing, and we define them using simple criteria that are agnostic to the technology used for sequencing. We also provide genome finishing recommendations for various downstream applications, keeping in mind the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with different levels of finishing. Our goal is to define a common vocabulary that will allow comparison of genome quality across different research groups, sequencing platforms, and assembly techniques.

  11. Wavelet Analysis on Symbolic Sequences and Two-Fold de Bruijn Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. Al.

    2016-07-01

    The concept of symbolic sequences play important role in study of complex systems. In the work we are interested in ultrametric structure of the set of cyclic sequences naturally arising in theory of dynamical systems. Aimed at construction of analytic and numerical methods for investigation of clusters we introduce operator language on the space of symbolic sequences and propose an approach based on wavelet analysis for study of the cluster hierarchy. The analytic power of the approach is demonstrated by derivation of a formula for counting of two-fold de Bruijn sequences, the extension of the notion of de Bruijn sequences. Possible advantages of the developed description is also discussed in context of applied problem of construction of efficient DNA sequence assembly algorithms.

  12. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the ‘CCCGCC’ motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  13. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  14. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  15. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L.; Lau, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  16. Two Hybrid Algorithms for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naznin, Farhana; Sarker, Ruhul; Essam, Daryl

    2010-01-01

    In order to design life saving drugs, such as cancer drugs, the design of Protein or DNA structures has to be accurate. These structures depend on Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA). MSA is used to find the accurate structure of Protein and DNA sequences from existing approximately correct sequences. To overcome the overly greedy nature of the well known global progressive alignment method for multiple sequence alignment, we have proposed two different algorithms in this paper; one is using an iterative approach with a progressive alignment method (PAMIM) and the second one is using a genetic algorithm with a progressive alignment method (PAMGA). Both of our methods started with a "kmer" distance table to generate single guide-tree. In the iterative approach, we have introduced two new techniques: the first technique is to generate Guide-trees with randomly selected sequences and the second is of shuffling the sequences inside that tree. The output of the tree is a multiple sequence alignment which has been evaluated by the Sum of Pairs Method (SPM) considering the real value data from PAM250. In our second GA approach, these two techniques are used to generate an initial population and also two different approaches of genetic operators are implemented in crossovers and mutation. To test the performance of our two algorithms, we have compared these with the existing well known methods: T-Coffee, MUSCEL, MAFFT and Probcon, using BAliBase benchmarks. The experimental results show that the first algorithm works well for some situations, where other existing methods face difficulties in obtaining better solutions. The proposed second method works well compared to the existing methods for all situations and it shows better performance over the first one.

  17. Anomaly Detection for Discrete Sequences: A Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Banerjee, Arindam; Kumar, Vipin

    2012-01-01

    This survey attempts to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of the existing research for the problem of detecting anomalies in discrete/symbolic sequences. The objective is to provide a global understanding of the sequence anomaly detection problem and how existing techniques relate to each other. The key contribution of this survey is the classification of the existing research into three distinct categories, based on the problem formulation that they are trying to solve. These problem formulations are: 1) identifying anomalous sequences with respect to a database of normal sequences; 2) identifying an anomalous subsequence within a long sequence; and 3) identifying a pattern in a sequence whose frequency of occurrence is anomalous. We show how each of these problem formulations is characteristically distinct from each other and discuss their relevance in various application domains. We review techniques from many disparate and disconnected application domains that address each of these formulations. Within each problem formulation, we group techniques into categories based on the nature of the underlying algorithm. For each category, we provide a basic anomaly detection technique, and show how the existing techniques are variants of the basic technique. This approach shows how different techniques within a category are related or different from each other. Our categorization reveals new variants and combinations that have not been investigated before for anomaly detection. We also provide a discussion of relative strengths and weaknesses of different techniques. We show how techniques developed for one problem formulation can be adapted to solve a different formulation, thereby providing several novel adaptations to solve the different problem formulations. We also highlight the applicability of the techniques that handle discrete sequences to other related areas such as online anomaly detection and time series anomaly detection.

  18. Compilation of tRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sprinzl, M; Grueter, F; Spelzhaus, A; Gauss, D H

    1980-01-11

    This compilation presents in a small space the tRNA sequences so far published. The numbering of tRNAPhe from yeast is used following the rules proposed by the participants of the Cold Spring Harbor Meeting on tRNA 1978 (1,2;Fig. 1). This numbering allows comparisons with the three dimensional structure of tRNAPhe. The secondary structure of tRNAs is indicated by specific underlining. In the primary structure a nucleoside followed by a nucleoside in brackets or a modification in brackets denotes that both types of nucleosides can occupy this position. Part of a sequence in brackets designates a piece of sequence not unambiguosly analyzed. Rare nucleosides are named according to the IUPACIUB rules (for complicated rare nucleosides and their identification see Table 1); those with lengthy names are given with the prefix x and specified in the footnotes. Footnotes are numbered according to the coordinates of the corresponding nucleoside and are indicated in the sequence by an asterisk. The references are restricted to the citation of the latest publication in those cases where several papers deal with one sequence. For additional information the reader is referred either to the original literature or to other tRNA sequence compilations (3-7). Mutant tRNAs are dealt with in a compilation by J. Celis (8). The compilers would welcome any information by the readers regarding missing material or erroneous presentation. On the basis of this numbering system computer printed compilations of tRNA sequences in a linear form and in cloverleaf form are in preparation. PMID:6986608

  19. Compilation of tRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gauss, D H; Grüter, F; Sprinzl, M

    1979-01-01

    This compilation presents in a small space the tRNA sequences so far published in order to enable rapid orientation and comparison. The numbering of tRNAPhe from yeast is used as has been done earlier (1) but following the rules proposed by the participants of the Cold Spring Harbor Meeting on tRNA 1978 (2) (Fig. 1). This numbering allows comparisons with the three dimensional structure of tRNAPhe, the only structure known from X-ray analysis. The secondary structure of tRNAs is indicated by specific underlining. In the primary structure a nucleoside followed by a nucleoside in brackets or a modification in brackets denotes that both types of nucleosides can occupy this position. Part of a sequence in brackets designates a piece of sequence not unambiguously analyzed. Rare nucleosides are named according to the IUPAC-IUB rules (for some more complicated rare nucleosides and their identification see Table 1); those with lengthy names are given with the prefix x and specified in the footnotes. Footnotes are numbered according to the coordinates of the corresponding nucleoside and are indicated in the sequence by an asterisk. The references are restricted to the citation of the latest publication in those cases where several papers deal with one sequence. For additional information the reader is referred either to the original literature or to other tRNA sequence compilations (3--7). Mutant tRNAs are dealt with in a separate compilation prepared by J. Celis (see below). The compilers would welcome any information by the readers regarding missing material or erroneous presentation. On the basis of this numbering system computer printed compilations of tRNA sequences in a linear form and in cloverleaf form are in preparation. PMID:424282

  20. Software for pre-processing Illumina next-generation sequencing short read sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When compared to Sanger sequencing technology, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are hindered by shorter sequence read length, higher base-call error rate, non-uniform coverage, and platform-specific sequencing artifacts. These characteristics lower the quality of their downstream analyses, e.g. de novo and reference-based assembly, by introducing sequencing artifacts and errors that may contribute to incorrect interpretation of data. Although many tools have been developed for quality control and pre-processing of NGS data, none of them provide flexible and comprehensive trimming options in conjunction with parallel processing to expedite pre-processing of large NGS datasets. Methods We developed ngsShoRT (next-generation sequencing Short Reads Trimmer), a flexible and comprehensive open-source software package written in Perl that provides a set of algorithms commonly used for pre-processing NGS short read sequences. We compared the features and performance of ngsShoRT with existing tools: CutAdapt, NGS QC Toolkit and Trimmomatic. We also compared the effects of using pre-processed short read sequences generated by different algorithms on de novo and reference-based assembly for three different genomes: Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c, and Escherichia coli O157 H7. Results Several combinations of ngsShoRT algorithms were tested on publicly available Illumina GA II, HiSeq 2000, and MiSeq eukaryotic and bacteria genomic short read sequences with the focus on removing sequencing artifacts and low-quality reads and/or bases. Our results show that across three organisms and three sequencing platforms, trimming improved the mean quality scores of trimmed sequences. Using trimmed sequences for de novo and reference-based assembly improved assembly quality as well as assembler performance. In general, ngsShoRT outperformed comparable trimming tools in terms of trimming speed and improvement of de novo and reference